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Professional Apache Tomcat

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the yowl dept.

Apache 136

Liam writes "Tomcat is a subproject of the Apache Software Foundation's Jakarta project, its purpose being to serve Java Servlets and JavaServer Pages. It's a complex piece of software and though the documentation is very comprehensive, it helps to have a good reference work to hand. There aren't many books on the subject to choose from, so a publisher could make a fast buck putting out an incomplete work lacking in depth. Fortunately Wrox Press has done a great job with its new publication Professional Apache Tomcat." Read on for the rest of Liam's review.

The book covers every aspect of installing and configuring Tomcat in a great deal of depth, detailing its every aspect. From standalone use (where Tomcat is used as a general web server as well as for serving Java content), to integration with the leading web servers Apache (both Unix and Windows versions) and Microsoft's Internet Information Services, nothing appears to have been left out (however, integration with Netscape's Enterprise Server is mentioned in passing early on, but doesn't appear again).

Being only a month old, it's pretty much bang up to date, covering Tomcat 3.x, 4.0.x and 4.1.x with Apache 1.3.x and 2.0.x and IIS 4 and 5.

The book starts with an introduction to the Apache project, and Tomcat's place in the wider scheme of things. The historical progression in serving dynamic web content from CGI to Servlets and JSP is charted, and there's an overview of JSP tags and general web application architecture. This is interesting enough and useful as background, but as this book is intended for administrators, it's covered quickly in the first two chapters, and the main business of installing Tomcat gets underway in chapter 3.

Installation is discussed with both Windows and Linux users in mind, from both binary and source distributions. As the Tomcat source is usually built with Ant, build and installation of this tool is also discussed (Ant and Log4j, both also part of Jakarta, get chapters of their own later in the book). From there, basic configuration of the standalone server followed by detailed examinations of the components that make up Tomcat's architecture fills the next 200 or so pages.

Serious users of Tomcat will wish to employ Tomcat with an existing web server, and four chapters concentrate on this job. There is more emphasis on Apache than IIS, though given Apache's dominance of the web server field, this is understandable. There is inevitably a certain amount of detail aimed at Apache and IIS configuration, and a basic knowledge of both is assumed throughout. However, any necessary information is included in detail; for example the (Apache) connector modules mod_webapp and mod_jk/jk2 are given a thorough treatment, describing their use from source installation to configuration, together with the pros and cons of the various connectors available. Beyond that, we learn how to design larger-scale setups, with an explanation of load balancing techniques and scaling of the system, and performance testing with JMeter, yet another Jakarta project component.

As ever, security is a major concern and gets a lot of emphasis. Before client authentication and the use of SSL are discussed, there's an overview of basic system security with Unix and Windows. This should be teaching granny to suck eggs for a book aimed at administrators, but it's only a few pages and completes the subject. More interesting are the sections on security realms and user/client authentication. We are presented with examples of authenticating against a MySQL database with JDBC (database connectivity with JDBC is a big enough subject in its own right, and so gets a separate chapter too), and digest authentication. We then move on to encryption with SSL: using Tomcat itself with the JSSE and PureTLS Java SSL implementations, then later with Apache and SSL (setting up mod_ssl with Apache gets a very useful appendix of its own, taken from Professional Apache 2.0, another Wrox book). Again, there's lots of detail, right down to how to get hold of signed certificates for your server. Here the book's general emphasis on Apache over IIS is most apparent, as SSL with IIS is not discussed at all. However, I have no experience with IIS, so I can't say for sure how serious this omission might be.

There's a very brief appendix on setting up Apache's Axis SOAP toolkit, but without any mention of SOAP appearing elsewhere in the book. As other concepts are introduced so well, it's a curious addition.

With nine co-authors (though only four got onto the cover photograph - I wonder if they drew straws?), one might expect wildly different styles throughout the book, but each chapter is consistently and clearly laid out with diagrams and relevant configuration file fragments where necessary. There's little levity and it's all written in a very business-like manner, but then this is hardly a subject you'd choose for holiday reading.

Professional Apache Tomcat is surely the definitive book on the subject. I recently used it to integrate Tomcat 4 with an existing Apache 2 installation, and everything went very smoothly. More than just a set of tutorials, it offers a thorough description of the whole architecture, and makes an excellent companion to either of Wrox's Professional Apache books.

There's no CD with the book, but Wrox's website provides some support code, and there are lively forums for readers at p2p.wrox.com.


You can purchase Professional Apache Tomcat from bn.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.

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Review: (-1, Troll)

l33t j03 (222209) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706843)

Here is my review:

Apache and Professional should not be in the same sentence.

Neither should Red Hat.

Re:Review: (-1)

cyborg_monkey (150790) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706908)

Neither should Slashdot reader and heterosexual.

Re:Review: (-1)

Fecal Troll Matter (445929) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706974)

Wigger.

Re:Review: (-1)

macksav (602217) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706946)

why are french people like l33t j03 so fucking gay? i mean is it the air, the water, the suppositories they constantly insert in their assholes? i can see a few, or a small percentage being gay as fucking hell, but ALL of them? and a finer example than l33t j03 could not be found. i've heard he sometimes takes three huge wart-covered cocks up his ass while sucking the scab-encrusted dick of a 50 yr old male crack whore. now, that's dedicated sodomy! but still for all his faggoty expertise, shouldn't a cum-swilling, dick eating, ass-fisting piece of homosexual trash like l33t j03 be hunted down and killed like the freak that he is?

w00t (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706846)

The is an attempt at fp.
w00t.
w00t

Tomcat??? (-1, Offtopic)

Pig Hogger (10379) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706865)

Will this be the proper IIS neutering tool???

Re:Tomcat??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706899)

Eh? It's just an interpretter for jsp pages.

Re:Tomcat??? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706910)

What, in the hell, are you talking about?
IIS is for serving ASP (and .NET) pages. Tomcat is a servlet engine. Maybe you want to compare a J2EE webapp to a .NET webapp, then you are talking IIS vs. Apache/Tomcat/JBoss. But that's still apples and oranges.

If you want an IIS neutering tool, I'd mess with getting mono and apache into a superior product.

Re:Tomcat??? (3, Informative)

sisukapalli1 (471175) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707005)

You should probably see the documentaion of Tomcat project (jakarta.apache.org). Tomcat is a Servlet and JSP engine. The jakarta project itself has several other sub-projects with various Java tools (even things like ant -- java/xml based make, templating engines, logging and testing frameworks, etc., so it is fairly broad in scope, and most are relevant to Tomcat).

Apache and Tomcat complement each other, so they should be considered as partners. As such Apache + CGI/Modperl/ModPHP leads IIS... Add Tomcat to the mix and as they say, "The best gets better".

S

Apache Tomcat? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706869)

Yup, beat it in 2 days. Fun game, not much replay value though. Always good to have a tips book if you're not as skilled as me, though. Look out for level 7.

I'd stay away from this one (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706884)

Looks like another marketing ploy from the Apache people, trying to fit the problems to the solution. Nothing in there to get excited about.

Book is really unneeded (1, Informative)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706886)

Tomcat's documentation is superior and it is so very simple to use. I don't think a book on the subject is really necessary. Perhaps if you are doing something extremely out-of-the-ordinary when you plug tomcat into JBoss, but it would be more of a JBoss issue than a tomcat issue.

Re:Book is really unneeded (4, Insightful)

dubious9 (580994) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706965)

Yes, tomcat is simple enough to begin using for yourself, but this book aims at the industrial uses of it.

Documentation mostly tells you what a system does. Books (wrox, oreilly) mostly tell you how to set up a system to do what you want it to do, and explain uses that you might not have thought of.

I like and respect the writers for wrox, and they wouldn't write about it if they didn't think it was useful.

If you are thinking about intergrating JSPs or applets into your already existing complex web architechure, then I would probably buy a book that has professtionals outline exactly what to do, and what best practices there are.

Re:Book is really unneeded (1)

broody (171983) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707242)

Okay Mister fancy pants. Try this one

Where in the docs does it explain how to pass user_dir or ServletDir to Tomcat when it is integrated with Apache? I've seen writeups for the combersome process of setting up virtual servers for each user on a system but not much else.

Re:Book is really unneeded (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707291)

first post

Re:Book is really unneeded (1)

aled (228417) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707983)

It's very simple to use "as is". If you want to do SSL, client side certificates, or just understand the syntax of the workers2.properties file you are going to pass a lot of time searching with google.
BTW, most of jk2 is not documented or poorly documented.

Not judging by the User Mailing List (2, Insightful)

jfsather (310648) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708136)

Actually, if you subscribe to the user mailing list I don't think you'd say this. I managed to get by with just the online documentation and google, but is seems like there are quite a few people who can't. Every day we get asked about Apache/Tomcat binding and help with various server.xml and web.xml problems.

I never understand how some people can't use the resources available. Hell, the mailing list archive is online and people can't figure out that they should search there before asking the list. The list is running at about 50+ messages a day. Obviously someone needs this book.

Re:Book is really unneeded (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4708715)

Information present in the net is most useful, always. But I like books, as a scholarly presentation of information I am looking for.

Let's buy it. Net can not replace books, or else O'Reilly or Wrox would never have published books on Perl and PHP.

Re:Book is really unneeded (1)

version5 (540999) | more than 11 years ago | (#4709130)

> Tomcat's documentation is superior...

I don't know which alternate universe you are living, but in my world, Tomcat's documentation is awful - in fact, my frustrations with the docs led me to buy this very book. Server.xml is a very complicated configuration document and web.xml can be, so this book is great to have a handy reference for that part alone. Unlike a lot of people, I don't consider HOWTOs to be all that useful. The scope tends to be extremely limited and they often don't bother to reference other documents that you are expected to be familiar with in order to follow the instructions.

I agree with some posts on the lack of quality of Wrox books - but in this case, its definitely worth it. Good technical writing is worth its weight in gold. The only book I would prefer would be O'Reilly's Tomcat: The Definitive Guide [amazon.com] , although according to Amazon.com, its not due out until March 2003.

Isn't this a bit overspecialised? (2, Funny)

91degrees (207121) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706887)

A bit like "Advanced use of .htaccess" or "Windows Start Menu volume 1"?

Re:Isn't this a bit overspecialised? (2, Funny)

Cap'n Canuck (622106) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707012)

A bit like "Advanced use of .htaccess" or "Windows Start Menu volume 1"?

Where can I get volume 2? I lost mine, and my set is now incomplete.

Tomcat? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706893)

I'd like to see it marking its territory over IIS's front yard ;)

Tomcat (1)

ivanandre (265129) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706903)

Definitively Tomcat is THE SERVER, in servlet and jsp field. Maybe is slow in static content, but is the reference implementation.

Re:Tomcat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707108)

Maybe is slow in static content

Now you know why we plug tomcat into apache? Tomcat ALONE is slow at producing static content, but by tying apache to tomcat, we have apache serving static pages, and tomcat doing the servlet work.

Re:Tomcat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707312)

This is the case for things in the default web-app as it generally is mapped to the default apache html folder, however other web-apps generally have resources only available to directories accessible to the tomcat engine.

Not sure how much of an issue this is in real world environments as most of the content I've used it for was dynamic (even dynamic javascript source files), minus a few small navigation gifs and stylesheets.

When static content is requested in a web-app it still has to pass through the security manager in the tomcat engine, and can possibly be slower than apache.

I'm not knocking the tomcat project in any way, but I've been more happy using JRUN/apache for my app server.

tomcat? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706915)

LA CORUNA, Spain -- One of the world's worst environmental disasters was feared to be under way as the crippled oil tanker Prestige split in two and began sinking off Spain's north-west coast.

CNN's Al Goodman reported that all that was showing was the battered bow section of the Prestige about 200 kilometres (130 miles) off the coastline in Atlantic waters 3,600 metres (11,880 feet) deep.

The rear section of the Prestige earlier went down taking much of the 24,000 tonnes of oil in its tanks with it, a spokesman for the Dutch salvage company Smit Salvage said.

Environmental group WWF had previously warned that if all the fuel oil leaked, it would be one of the largest oil leaks in the world -- about twice as big as the Exxon Valdez spill off Alaska in 1989.

The Bahamian-flagged tanker, carrying 70,000 tonnes of heavy fuel oil, ran into trouble off the northwest coast of Spain during a violent storm last Wednesday when one of its tanks was punctured due to unknown causes and around 5,000 tonnes of oil flowed out.

Spanish officials -- who have been trying to clean up oil that has already spilled from the tanker over the last six days -- scrambled to protect the coast of northwestern Spain where fishing is the primary industry.

The clean-up effort, they speculated, might take as long as four years.

Spain said it would push to bring forward the date to ban from European waters single-hulled tankers like the Prestige and insist on double-hulled vessels.

Meanwhile EU Transport Commissioner Loyola de Palacio sent a letter to the 15 EU capitals on Tuesday urging that they move faster to enforce new inspection rules that could prevent such catastrophes. The measures should be written into national law and implemented as quickly as possible, she said.

Goodman said that authorities were "bracing for the worst" with threats to the fishing industry, birdlife and beaches.

He said the regional economy was starting to "shiver and shudder" and economic damage could reach 100 million euros ($100m).

The slick is threatening a stretch of the coast from Cape Finisterre to La Coruna

An oil slick 70 miles long and five miles wide was reported even before the ship split in two, Goodman said.

CNN's Juliet Bremner reported from the scene that barrages, which have been laid to try to contain the spill, were considered to be useless because of the volume of fuel involved.

She described how an anguished local fisherman had crossed himself, pointed to the coastline and repeated: "A disaster, a disaster."

Dr Ian White, managing director of the International Tanker Owners' Pollution Federation, said that heavy fuel oil was "one of the most difficult oils to deal with."

It was thick, heavy, persistent and sticky and would not be dispersed even by heavy seas, he said.

The tanker leaked fuel into the rich fishing grounds off Spain's northwest coast and the government warned that the oil could seep into some of the many inlets that penetrate the Galicia coast like crooked fingers.

The ship is roughly on the border of areas for which Spain and Portugal have responsibility for maritime rescue operations, the ministry added.

Portugal and Spain had both barred salvagers from towing the ship to any of their ports to protect their fishing and tourism industries from further damage.

The shoreline is known as the "coast of death" because of many shipwrecks there.

Regional authorities have temporarily banned fishing in an area famous for its shellfish, octopus and crabs.

"We've had accidents before but nothing like this. If many fish die, will they ever come back?" Federico Martinez Vidal, a fisherman in the town of Camelle, told The Associated Press.

On Monday two Spanish tugboats had tried to pull the tanker as far away from the coast as possible. When it split it was listing about 130 kilometres (70 nautical miles) from the Galician coast.

The Spanish Government's decision to tow the Prestige further out to sea and set up barriers, coupled with a change in wind direction, had first raised hopes a disaster could be averted.

Spain says the vessel was bound for Gibraltar when the spill happened, a charge Britain denies.

Spain and the European Union have criticised Latvia, where the boat was loaded with much of its fuel, and Britain, which has jurisdiction over Gibraltar.

Both have accused Britain and Gibraltar of failing to comply with shipping safety regulations -- a charge they both deny.

The tanker's Greek captain was being held in custody after five hours of questioning by a judge in La Coruna on Sunday. (Full story)

Maritime authorities allege he failed to cooperate with rescue crews after issuing a distress call.

For hours as the Prestige drifted perilously close to shore, he refused to let tugboats secure cables to his stricken ship, officials said.

The tanker is owned by the Greek company Mare Shipping Incorporated.

Spain's north-west coast has suffered several tanker accidents in recent years, the worst in December 1992 when the Greek tanker Aegean Sea lost 21.5 million gallons of crude oil when it ran aground near La Coruna.

Dr. White said the investigation into the ship's breaking up would be sure to look at whether it would have been avoided if the move to compulsory double-hulled tankers from single-hulled had gone ahead sooner.

Comdex is dying (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706921)

There is no justice, I never went to comdex.

Now it's a shell filled with tired hippies and corporate suits.

Oh, what is Apache? Some kind of jab at the American Indians?

Do you also have Little Black Sambo software?

How about ChinkWare?

you racist bastards

burn in hell racist pigs

Re:Comdex is dying (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707026)

mod parent up immediately

Bill Clinton shooting jizz on fat female interns disgusting

The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (3, Funny)

the cobaltsixty (210695) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706923)

Every latest wrox book is a common recipe:
- Take a red cover;
- Fast time-to-market, by any means;
- By any means, i mean: "-Oh, we need a book about Tomcat, sure... Hey, call India. How much chapters we need? Fifteen? Yeah right, ill pay each Indian R$ 10 per chapter... But i want fifteen authors involved".
- Takes either the most handsome or the most weird, depending on their looks. Makes a professional quality-looking photo. Merge with the cover.

Whats next? Shipments from New Delhi and Bombay?

Re:The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (4, Informative)

Neon Spiral Injector (21234) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707196)

Yes, I'm glad someone else noticed this.

I got the Professional Apache 2.0 book reviewed on /. also published by Wrox.

I've read about 1/4 of the book. So far half of that has been on Apache 1.3. I can understand documenting differences between 1.3 and 2.0 in a 2.0 book. But don't go into depth on building and configuring 1.3. There are also numerous typos that are so obvious.

It seems that this book was started as a 1.3 book, but 2.0 shipped so they tacked extra onto it and called it 2.0. Also to get to press first they only did a once over on the new information.

I'll not buy another Wrox book.

Re:The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4708776)

I found Apache 2.0 far best book on the subject. The author's style boring sometimes, but it has loads of information on both 1.3 and 2.0.

Re:The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (1)

lizzybarham (588992) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707208)

I have a copy of Goodwill's Apache Jakarta-Tomcat next to me and it came out about six or seven months ago and, although it is a decent book, it appears to be a rush skim-over of Tomcat and not a thorough, in-depth reference work and not worth the $34.95 price (but, since it was the only one on the market IIRC, I had nothing to compare it with).

Wrox's XML Schema book was one of the first Schema books on the market, but it was thorough.

Re:The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (1)

vofka (572268) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707334)

Yes, it is a great pity that Wrox have started to go down this route...

I remember the first Wrox book I purchased - "Professional Assembly Language" or something like that - this was back in '93 or '94, and was centered around '386 Asm, with a chunk of '486 stuffed in an appendix - The book was fantastic, for years, I would buy little but Wrox and O'Reilly, but Wrox have recently lost the professionalism which they used to have.

Re:The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (2)

bwt (68845) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708208)


Why is that a reason to think twice? Fast time-to-market is good. Multiple authors working in parallel is one among several reasonable strategies to achieve it. The fact that many are Indian is completely irrelevant -- so what? Do you have some weird hangup where you only want to look at white anglo saxon males?

Re:The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4708840)

Do you have some weird hangup where you only want to look at white anglo saxon males?

I have a weird hangup where I only want to look at naked asian females.

Hmm, now THAT would get me to buy a Wrox Press book.

Re:The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (0)

logen (157761) | more than 11 years ago | (#4709202)

I bought Beginning JSP Web Development [wrox.com] from Wrox and it has eight authors and is 852 pages. That's about 106 pages per author. Sure having that many people working on it can speed up the process but in this case it made the book terrible imho. Each chapter used a slightly different writing style and in some of the chapters even the sample code was in a different style. Most of the chapters didn't really build upon the previous chapter, they all could have been their own little books. It seemed like the authors decided who would cover what and then didn't talk to one another until the book was done. There were a couple of instances where the sample code would use the @page directive and the chapter had never explained what it was. And it wasn't explained for several chapters.

Anyways I wouldn't recommend this book to others and I would be weary of other books from Wrox and other publishers that had a ton of Authors (Wrox's Professional JSP [wrox.com] has 22 authors and is only 936 pages!).

-Sam

Re:The reason why i think twice before buying Wrox (2)

bwt (68845) | more than 11 years ago | (#4709463)


Well, if that bothers you then why did you buy the book in the first place? It's not like they are hiding the fact that each chapter has a different author.

I actually like that kind of book better. I find reading 50 to 100 pages on a topic at a time to be a palatable amount of information. Nobody really sits down and reads 936 pages on an IT topic cover to cover anyway. I think it is good to get a variety of explanitory styles.

If you move towards the cutting edge of any field, it ALWAYS happens that books and journals have more authors writing in smaller doses. If that bothers you, stay away from the innovation horizon.

my opinion -- buy this book! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706935)

Tomcat is a subproject of the Apache Software Foundation's Jakarta project, its purpose being to serve Java Servlets and JavaServer Pages. It's a complex piece of software and though the documentation is very comprehensive, it helps to have a good reference work to hand. There aren't many books on the subject to choose from, so a publisher could make a fast buck putting out an incomplete work lacking in depth. Fortunately Wrox Press has excelled itself with its new publication Professional Apache Tomcat.

The book covers every aspect of installing and configuring Tomcat in a great deal of detail, detailing its every aspect. From standalone use (where Tomcat is used as a general web server as well as for serving Java content), to integration with the leading web servers Apache (both Unix and Windows versions) and Microsoft's Internet Information Services, nothing appears to have been left out (however, integration with Netscape's Enterprise Server is mentioned in passing early on, but doesn't appear again).

Being only a month old, it's pretty much bang up to date, covering Tomcat 3.x, 4.0.x and 4.1.x with Apache 1.3.x and 2.0.x and IIS 4 and 5.

The book starts with an introduction to the Apache project, and Tomcat's place in the wider scheme of things. The historical progression in serving dynamic web content from CGI to Servlets and JSP is charted, and there's an overview of JSP tags and general web application architecture. This is interesting enough and useful as background, but as this book is intended for administrators, it's covered quickly in the first two chapters, and the main business of installing Tomcat gets underway in chapter 3.

Installation is discussed with both Windows and Linux users in mind, from both binary and source distributions. As the Tomcat source is usually built with Ant, build and installation of this tool is also discussed (Ant and Log4j, both also part of Jakarta, get chapters of their own later in the book). From there, basic configuration of the standalone server followed by detailed examinations of the components that make up Tomcat's architecture fill the next 200 or so pages.

Serious users of Tomcat will wish to employ Tomcat with an existing web server, and four chapters concentrate on this job. Though there is inevitably a certain amount of detail aimed at Apache and IIS configuration, and a basic knowledge of both is assumed throughout. However, any necessary information is included in detail; for example the (Apache) connector modules mod_webapp and mod_jk/jk2 are given a thorough treatment, describing their use from source installation to configuration, together with the pros and cons of the various connectors available. Beyond that, we learn how to design larger-scale setups, with an explanation of load balancing techniques and scaling of the system, and performance testing with JMeter, yet another Jakarta project component.

As ever, security is a major concern and gets a lot of emphasis. Before client authentication and the use of SSL are discussed, there's an overview of basic system security with Unix and Windows..... More interesting are the sections on security realms and user/client authentication. We are presented with examples of authenticating against a MySQL database with JDBC (database connectivity with JDBC is a big enough subject in its own right, and so gets a separate chapter too), and digest authentication. We then move on to encryption with SSL: using Tomcat itself with the JSSE and PureTLS Java SSL implementations, then later with Apache and SSL (setting up mod_ssl with Apache gets a very useful appendix of its own, taken from Professional Apache 2.0, another Wrox book). Again, there's lots of detail, right down to how to get hold of signed certificates for your server. Here the book's general emphasis on Apache over IIS is most apparent, as SSL with IIS is not discussed at all. However, I have no experience with IIS, so I can't say for sure how important this omission might be.

With nine co-authors (though only four got onto the cover photograph - ...one might expect wildly different styles throughout the book, but each chapter is consistently and clearly laid out with diagrams and relevant configuration file fragments where necessary. At each stage, variations between different versions of each component are made clear.

Professional Apache Tomcat is surely the definitive book on the subject. I recently used it to integrate Tomcat 4 with an existing Apache 2 installation, and everything went very smoothly. More than just a set of tutorials it offers a thorough description of the whole architecture, and makes an excellent companion to Wrox's Professional Apache.

Tomcat is easy! (5, Informative)

dougmc (70836) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706937)

It's a complex piece of software and though the documentation is very comprehensive, it helps to have a good reference work to hand.
Are you kidding? A sysadmin with some experience can successfully configure Tomcat without even really going through the documentation for the very first time in like an hour.

Compared to Weblogic and especially Websphere, it's so incredibly simple it's silly. (Websphere especially is a *nightmare* to install and configure.)

Re:Tomcat is easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706976)

Tomcat can't really be compared to Weblogic and Websphere (though, I agree with the nightmarish configuration on WebSphere). Maybe comparing JBoss to weblogic and websphere, but not tomcat.
Remember, tomcat isn't a full J2EE server. It doesn't deal with EJBs, only with Servlets.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706977)

Of course, weblogic and websphere _do_ a whole lot more than Tomcat...

Re:Tomcat is easy! (1)

einer (459199) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707001)

Second that! It's like 3 lines in 2 xml files to get Tomcat going (granted the older versions were MUCH more difficult to set up). Setting up Websphere was like pulling barbed wire through my urethra.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (2, Informative)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707048)

In Windows, its even easier. Install the installshield script, and place your jsps and servlets into the default directory. Voila.

You can even get struts [apache.org] installed by plopping the struts jar file into the deploy directory, and it'll autodeploy struts instantly.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (4, Insightful)

monkeyserver.com (311067) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707045)

That might be true, but there are countless companies that have NO sysadmin. You have, instead, an overworked project manager who has been forced to work on IIS w/ some piece of crap Servlet Container for the last umpteen years. Now that he's convinced management to let him run linux and tomcat w/ apache he has very little time to set it up, and not a ton of experience. He would benifit greatly from this.

And don't, for a second, believe that most ppl know as much as your average slashdot posting geek. This book can be very helpful to those who would like a little hand holding. It also might give even you some insight into things you haven't done or haven't even thought of...

Re:Tomcat is easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707069)

Now that he's convinced management to let him run linux and tomcat w/ apache he has very little time to set it up, and not a ton of experience. He would benifit greatly from this.

Not as much as he would benefit from going to the Tomcat site and reading their doc, first.

And most Java developers and all Java architects know how to configure tomcat and other webapp servers.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707365)

And don't, for a second, believe that most ppl know as much as your average slashdot posting geek.

Considering that your average slashdot posting geek usually doesn't know his/her left hand from their right nostril, this is a very scary thought!

Re:Tomcat is easy! (2)

swb (14022) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707413)

That might be true, but there are countless companies that have NO sysadmin. You have, instead, an overworked project manager who has been forced to work on IIS w/ some piece of crap Servlet Container for the last umpteen years. Now that he's convinced management to let him run linux and tomcat w/ apache he has very little time to set it up, and not a ton of experience.

He's not a sysadmin, but knows enough to convince management to let him run linux and tomcat and apache.

Is management that gullible that they can be hoodwinked by someone who isn't a sysadmin, but wants to ride on the linux train?

Re:Tomcat is easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707930)

"He's not a sysadmin, but knows enough to convince management to let him run linux and tomcat and apache.

Is management that gullible that they can be hoodwinked by someone who isn't a sysadmin, but wants to ride on the linux train?"

You must obviously work a medium to gargantuan size company. Either that or you're an out of work college student. Either way, your elitism does not become you.

People do not come out of the womb with coding skills and Linux hacking prowess. I work for a small company as the prepress department. That's right, I'm the whole department. The company has 10 employees. I'm also the CTO, the Sysadmin, and the Development guy. I'm now having to deploy a Linux web server for a new project, including creating the MySQL database, the Java Middleware, the JSP's and the front end HTML. My company could have hired a outside consultant, but chose to try me out because they know me. Don't think that most companies are "hoodwinked" by people who want to ride the "Linux Train". What does that mean, anyway? I thought Open Source was about comminunity, not elitism.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (2, Insightful)

seanb (27295) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708471)

Tomcat doesn't require (or imply) linux. It works well under Windows, OS X, or anything with a viable J2SE runtime.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4708948)

Absolutely. There is always a point where books do help u out. And this is an excellent book.



I do not refer those shell scripting books on day to day basis, still I have them. Sometimes, books do make job easier.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (5, Insightful)

deppe (27130) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707427)

For the casual developer or admin, I think the new Sun-endorsed XML formats for webtrees and other configuration data is worthless. It's simply too verbose for me.

I recently played with Cocoon (which is a lovely publishing framework) but finally gave up with writing my own "mini-framework" with it because of the awkward XML configuration files.

Don't get me wrong, I love XML for what it is good at, data exchange and such applications, but the idea that _everything_ has to be in XML isn't a useful one (IMHO).

Re:Tomcat is easy! (1)

aled (228417) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708064)

It could be easier to unpack and run, and still be lacking in documentation or when you have to tweak the setup.
BTW, weblogic and websphere are full transactional EJB containers and Web containers. Tomcat is just a Web container (JSP/Serlvet). Let's not compare apples and oranges.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (3, Informative)

Black Perl (12686) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708794)

Compared to Weblogic and especially Websphere, it's so incredibly simple it's silly. (Websphere especially is a *nightmare* to install and configure.)

If all you need is a servlet container, you shouldn't even consider Weblogic or Websphere--overkill. You would have been better off using JRun as a comparison point, although the latest versions of JRun bring it closer to the J2EE servers than Tomcat.

Re:Tomcat is easy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4708837)

What a mess. A good piece of application like Tomcat is finding place in mainstream. If a good book makes the task of laying hands on it easier, why not?

Apache Tomcat (-1, Troll)

wolvenwraith (627118) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706941)

Well we all know we are safe from IIs, no more of those exploits!

Tomcat (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706947)

What amuses/amazes me is that Tomcat is so complex and bloaty. Java really sucks!

Why not just pipe stuff to a Lisp process, or use Zope???

Java and web security papers (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706954)



www.cgisecurity.com/lib [cgisecurity.com]

great book. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4706958)

I am a professor at a large technical college. I use Tomcat in my Distributed Java class and I have to say this is one of the finest books on Tomcat I have seen. I have recommended this book to all of my students.

The book is well-laid out (moreso than most of the GNU/Hippy students!). It offers a good overview of all of the major pieces of functionality in Tomcat and does a particularly good job of describing the different manners which you can integrate Tomcat and Apache.

My only complaint might be that the section on Axis was extremly light-weight. I would have loved to see more detail in this chapter, even though the information in the chapter was a good starter.

Yeah, right... (1)

Cap'n Canuck (622106) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707073)

How come I see so many - "This is a great book, buy it!" posts by Anonymous Coward in here. If Mr. - sorry - "Professor" Coward is willing to testify, why do it anonymously?

I have no opinion on whether this is a good book or not, but I get the feeling that the authors/publishers are hyping this book. Which makes me think that it won't be purchased on its own merits, which means that this book is a piece of crap.

But that's just my outlook. Please feel free to form your own opinion.

Troll troll troll! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707076)

This is a troll. Moderators are taking the information to be truth with the extreme lack of detail. This guy doesn't know what he's talking about.

Re:great book. (2, Interesting)

AndyDeck (29830) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707818)

>> I am a professor at a large technical college....

Hello, mr. anonymous coward. I certainly hope that you are actually John Carnell, as your comment is cut&pasted from his Oct 31 review of this book on Amazon.com. If not, this message is a copyright violation.

Re:great book. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707985)

Who owns the copyright on comments like that? is it the site, or the individual?

Just like The Terminator... (-1, Offtopic)

einer (459199) | more than 11 years ago | (#4706971)

I for one WELCOME our new computer overlords...

Tomcat docs are good, but always need improvement (4, Interesting)

f00zbll (526151) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707092)

Having used Tomcat quite a bit, some things aren't as easy as they should be. Doing a simple stand alone installation takes only a few minutes on a clean system, but frequently the system has weird configurations. There are certain things Tomcat documentation could use improvement, so the book is a nice addition. Often I find documentation is written for those with experience and isn't written in plain english for newbies. Looking at the number of posts on tomcat-user mailing list, more than half the questions are due to user error and documentation. More documentation is always a good thing. well most of the time.

Re:Tomcat docs are good, but always need improveme (1)

realkiwi (23584) | more than 11 years ago | (#4709528)

I second this!

They need improving a lot. Everything is in there but it is not clearly laid out. The logic is often wrong.

My HOWTO integrate Tomcat/postgresql/Dreamweaver Ultradev was an attempt at helping the lower end of application programmers like myself to get a quick start. The latest MX version [tgds.net] points to a HOWTO at Sun for Tomcat setup. It is much easier to follow than the docs.

Nice to see (4, Informative)

Kandel (624601) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707132)

Just remember "Professional Apache Tomcat" is aimed purely at Sys-admins, not programmers. Programmers will learn everything they need to know about configuring Tomcat from the de-facto standard text of "Java Servlet Programming 2nd Edition" [oreilly.com] , which every Servlet programmer will or should have in their reference collection. The documentation of Tomcat is good, but for Sys-admins, being able to just flick to a page and copy down an example is much quicker and easier than hunting around the online documentation. Not to mention the benefits of printed text over online text...especially if your notebook battery runs out when your trying to have a read in a secluded place. Tomcat is a complicated application, and the need for a good printed text is much needed. A lot of functionality of Tomcat can be long and tedious to setup (e.g. Authentication), and it's great to see a text addressing these issues.

All in all, good work Wrox!

Re:Nice to see (1, Troll)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707213)

Its nice to see either a.) An author of the book or b.) a wrox employee create a /. user to make post about this book.

...is aimed purely at Sys-admins, not programmers. Programmers will learn everything they need to know about configuring Tomcat...

OK, so we have a system that needs tomcat, complete with sysadmins and java developers. Why would you let the sysadmins configure tomcat, when you have developers to do it?

Ok, if you already have a product, the developers were consultants that already left, and the sysadmin is switching to tomcat, peruse the tomcat website, cause the doc is extremely easy to read and simple to understand.

Honestly, any sysadmin worth his salt should be able to understand how to configure tomcat in under an hour, and not need any book when the online doc is sufficient.

Besides, tomcat is mainly used for prototyping pages and making small internal sites. Anything larger goes into a full scale J2EE server like JBoss, Weblogic, or WebSphere. Any other type of tomcat site is a small majority that isn't enough for wrox to make money off this book, and is specialized enough to contact the tomcat mailing list and get your answers from the developers.

Re:Nice to see (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707305)

You can't prototype a JBoss application in Tomcat! Tomcat is a servlet container, JBoss is an EJB container. They work together.

There are plenty of configuration gotchas with Tomcat to make a book or two worthwhile. Apress has a good older book on Tomcat as well.

Your last paragraph is just plain dopey.

Re:Nice to see (1)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707384)

Wow, you make EJBs in your prototypes? No? JMS? No? Then you make your prototypes simple enough for tomcat to run.

Re:Nice to see (1)

KenSeymour (81018) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707546)

I think you underestimate the proprotion of production websites that do not use the EJB portion of J2EE.

A web app based on Servlets or JSP but not EJB can handle plenty of traffic.
And you avoid the large architecture, large programming staff and long schedules of J2EE
based web apps.
Not everyone is a yahoo or an amazon.

Also, the J2EE environments are much harder to configure.
Unless you have a crew of developers with lots of J2EE experience on your platform,
you are going to have developers trying to figure
out why there EJB code doesn't work
instead of implementing business logic.Your mileage may vary, but I have yet to hear of
a J2EE environment that was easy to configure
and didn't fight you every step of the way.

Tomcat is a breath of fresh air by comparison.

Re:Nice to see (1)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707752)

Its all about businesses and how they work.
Primarily, when they choose a webapp server, they are looking for reliability, maintainability, and (here's the big one) support.
Price is on the lower end of the chart, withp olitics, like partnerships with IBM/BEA, being well above 'price'.

Now, you have tomcat and apache. Very reliable, easy to maintain, no support (unless you have an inhouse expert).
You have the commercial product (I'll use Weblogic) that is just as reliable, a little more difficult to configure but easy to maintain, full support (and more efficient of a server, for companies with high bandwidth sites). Oh, btw, the commercial product costs about ten grand more.

The company then forks over the ten grand. Why? Mostly for the support. Open Source has a great advantage of price, but a HUGE disadvantage of support. It'd be nice to see a national-wide company that does nothing more but install, configure, maintain, and support open source products.

Re:Nice to see (1)

KenSeymour (81018) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708495)

Unfortunately, my experience with the commercial J2EE product was from within the company that owned and sold the product.

So even though there was "support", we couldn't get it (the cobler's children has no shoes).
We could not use one of the more popular commercial J2EE environments, because they were a competitor.

We would not have needed to get support for Tomcat because we could figure it out for ourselves.
Internal politics, however, made it very difficult to build a web app without EJBs.

Other projects that started earlier were finding that they had performance problems with our J2EE plaform and they had to
use bigger hardware than what was planned.

A project that implemented using Servlet technology and got into production before J2EE became the "one true way" is stable in production under Tomcat.
It is in use world wide.
Of course, your mileage may vary. Your choice of J2EE platform may have better support and work better than the one we used.

Re:Nice to see (4, Insightful)

GOD_ALMIGHTY (17678) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707296)

I don't think any of the generic Servlet/JSP books are much more helpful than explaining the spec's from Sun. They introduce basic patterns and such, but don't do much to help with taking advantage of the architecture while maintaining portability. Tomcat 4.1.x has caching features that will break 'loosely' written code that would work using Jasper on Jetty. The spec doesn't say you can't do these things, but developers need better guidence on what to keep in mind while writing code that needs to be portable, versus just writing for a specific container.

My experience has been that Tomcat does things the 'right way' where others gloss over ambiguities in the spec. Having a detailed explination, with examples on how to write code 'the right way' so that Tomcat will be happy, makes the job of porting to other containers easier.

The 4.1.x stuff seems to be a refactoring of previous versions that continues to enforce best practices to insure data integrity and scalability. The problem is, I need to be able to figure this out without having to read through the source. I don't mind it when I run up against issues and need to understand what's happening internally (I've read a ton of the jakarta-commons and struts taglib source), but to have a 'developer's guide' that does more than cover the basics of JSP/servlet development would be very helpful.

"This should be teaching granny to suck eggs" (-1, Offtopic)

Get Behind the Mule (61986) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707133)

Huh?

Re:"This should be teaching granny to suck eggs" (1)

Get Behind the Mule (61986) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707204)

Offtopic? It's a quotation from the review! And I happen to find it thoroughly incomprehensible. (That's the meaning of "huh?".)

If you understood it, Mr. Moderator, you could have replied with an explanation. Ya know?

Re:"This should be teaching granny to suck eggs" (1)

Shimbo (100005) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707527)

It's easy enough to find on the web but he means -if your sysadmin doesn't grok basic security then you have bigger problems than trying to get Tomcat running.

Granny's are traditionally assumed to be inherently able to suck eggs, so attempting to teach them is pointless (and somewhat insulting).

Tomcat works very well in my opinion (5, Informative)

municio (465355) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707138)

We have been using Tomcat for almost 3 years now and we haven't had any unscheduled downtime yet.

We first started to use it as a development platform. The idea was, "let's develop a Servlet/JSP based application and we will choose later the production server". We wanted to test the application/web servers on our specific application. We though we will end up buying some commercial application. But when the time came to go to production Tomcat had proved itself. It was more than good enough.

We know we can get some extra performance by switching to other web servers, but we don't really need to, Tomcat is more than fast enough. Considering in the global performance of the application, the impact of Tomcat is minimal, as opposed to the database or the LDAP. Our time is better spend improving the database side of the app. Besides Tomcat is very easy to use the source code is very easy to read (as opposed to other open source projects).

At this point, if we switch platform it will be to base our application on JBoss (maybe hooking Tomcat to it). We are not yet convinced that EJBs will benefit our application, but we are seriously considering using JMS.

Re:Tomcat works very well in my opinion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707230)

JBoss (maybe hooking Tomcat to it)

JBoss uses tomcat as its servlet engine.

Re:Tomcat works very well in my opinion (2)

spatrick_123 (459796) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707923)

The default implementation of JBoss uses Jetty [mortbay.org] as its servlet engine, although there is also a download available with Tomcat.

Tomcat and linux reduces dev cost & time (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707162)

We are building our application in Java with Netbeans and deploying our apps in Tomcat and Linux. Our dev cost is very low or is 10% to .Net workshop. Our site is internal and it has very few issues and the apps are very stable and can take a lot of beating. We are looking at TogetherJ for our IDE to do some modelling for our future projects

I think Java and Linux is the future

We see that more and more

Re:Tomcat and linux reduces dev cost & time (1)

mark_lybarger (199098) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708097)

Our dev cost is very low or is 10% to .Net workshop.

whooo there... take it easy on the FUD will ya?.. generally, the bulk of development cost is labor hours, not the tools. the tools help to reduce the labor hours. Sure java and linux may be the future, but.. microsoft software isn't that much cheaper to develop than java/open source software. the biggest development costs are in the hours spent doing analysis, designing, building, and testing. your 800$ pc with 3000$ of software on it is chump change in comparison to the 6 man months put into the project. also, considering the biggest risk in a project (what can fsck it up), is also those 6 man months.

oh wait, you said internal project. sorry. didn't catch that. most companies are ok using MS Access for internal projects. you'll be hard pressed to find anyone willing to invest a dime on software tools for an internal project. and if full time people are assigned work to an interenal project in this day and age, i would be slightly curious when the pink slip might come my way.

Bookpool (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707188)

Pick one up for $33: http://www.bookpool.com/.x/hjjcwf9yt6/ss/1?qs=Prof essional+Apache+Tomcat&Go.x=14&Go.y=9&Go=G o

Compared to Mastering Tomcat Development? (3, Interesting)

GOD_ALMIGHTY (17678) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707206)

Picked up that one yesterday. I bought it cause Rick Hightower (Java Tools for Extreme Programming) wrote the chapter on struts and ant/xdoclet. I haven't been able to go through the whole thing yet, but I need good reference info and insight into how the new Jasper2 engine handles caching of tag libs and some of the quirks that come up in JSP/Servlet development WRT insuring clean separation of data in the various scopes. I'm also very interested in seeing how struts and the JSTL should behave in the container.

I don't think this info is very well covered in the Tomcat docs, dealing with Tomcat development is not the same as the '.htaccess' file as one poster suggested. If your trying to work out why the other guy's JSP/custom taglib stuff isn't as portable as it should be between containers, you really need this type of info.

I'm dissapointed the reviewer sort of glossed over this book, he mentioned the architectural info in the last paragraph, and highlighted all the crap that's already talked about in the Tomcat docs.

I already read most of the open source J2EE/dev mailing lists and visit numerous authors blogs. Trying to tie all this stuff together, while figuring out where it's all headed and discerning the best practices is a bit of a daunting task. The differences between the Jasper and Jasper2 engines is a lot of info, combine with the state of Jakarta-Commons, the rise of Jelly and Maven, and AOP + XRAI coming down the pipe in XDoclet2 and you've got a lot of material to pour through that isn't well documented yet. (ok that's a little out of scope for these 2 books)

I need good books that really help me to formulate development methodologies that scale up and promote efficiency when doing full J2EE app development.

So does anyone have any reading recommendations that will help sort all this out? Should I get this book too, or stick with Mastering Tomcat Development?

I would love to use Tomcat (2, Offtopic)

DeadSea (69598) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707233)

The problem is I'm using JServ (an early precursor to Tomcat that handles servlets.) Having JServ installed seems to prevent Tomcat from installing itself properly. Does anybody have any links that show how to migrate from JServ to Tomcat?

Specifically, an overview of the JServ unistall, Tomcat install on RedHat Linux, and a document that describes config file changes that will be needed.

Re:I would love to use Tomcat (1)

sisukapalli1 (471175) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707325)

I believe Tomcat can be used as a drop in replacement for JServ (so, the requests that would have gone to JServ would now go to Tomcat). You could try Catalina (Tomcat 4.0) and start it up to listen to the port JServ was listening to.

The documentation talks about how to set up Tomcat as an adapter. I wish I had more specific info. However, I am pretty sure that the steps are straight-forward.

S

Are you using Tomcat on Solaris 8? (1)

kurokaze (221063) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707247)

If so, then maybe I need to get you in touch
with our sys-admins.

we (they) have had a horrid time getting Tomcat
stable on development servers. Something about
not releasing memory or something.

Re:Are you using Tomcat on Solaris 8? (4, Insightful)

j3110 (193209) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707443)

Try a different JVM if at all possible.. If not, you can configure the JVM to compile useing jikes. The problem you probably have is that the toy compiler that comes with the JDK that's written partially in java, turns out to leek memory (just enough to be annoying if you have a lot of JSPs). There are how-to's online for setting up jikes and tomcat. This issue has been known for a while, but SUN nor Tomcat feel like it's a big enough issue to get upset about. You could also have a look at Jetty which is faster than Tomcat and more stable and yet easier to set up.

Re:Are you using Tomcat on Solaris 8? (1)

problemchild (143094) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708356)

yes I've been using Tomcat on Sol 8 for a while now.
Works fine once you've broke the back of it but
I agree that it's a real bitch to start off.
Those who use it on a Linux platform have it easy as
it works straight out the packet. With Solaris
you need to put the brain in gear.
By the way I'm free for consultancy at any time!!!
http://www.apex.is.co.uk

100% Java (1)

dubbayu_d_40 (622643) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708990)

For tomcat to do this would require a bug that would show up on all platforms (ie maintaining strong refs to unneeded objects). Perhaps it is the Solaris VM? Hmmm, I doubt it... Perhaps it is your developers ;-)

Something good from Wrox?? (2)

JThaddeus (531998) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707306)

I have not been impressed with Wrox books in the past. Too many of them have so many authors that the book's focus is poor. Even one Wrox book I have with two authors has examples so mired in their own utility library that I lost track of what the example were trying to accomplish and how. Plus about 1/4th of the book was incomplete reprints of Javadocs and specs that I can get over net (why enclose CDs any longer?).

That said, I will definately check this book out. We use Tomcat a great deal (with Apache and IIS) and the more info, the better.

Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4707326)

Speaking from personal experience, Tomcat is a great piece of software, and the project has come a long way. The one issue that needs to be worked on, though, is speed. Tomcat is not very fast at most tasks, but I am sure with time they will optimize and fix this.

review license infringement? (5, Interesting)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707403)

Liam (the reviewer) also posted his review on amazon.com [amazon.com]


Now, aside from the irony of the slashdot review pimping the book for barnes & noble [bn.com] , under the Amazon.com terms of service, all reviews become exclusive property of Amazon.com.


Like it or not, this is just as serious of a licensing breach as if Microsoft Word included emacs code.

Re:review license infringement? (2)

glenstar (569572) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708415)

if Microsoft Word included emacs code. ?????

Now that explains why Word is such a pig!

Re:review license infringement? Sorry-bullshit (5, Informative)

Software (179033) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708819)

This is pure bullshit. If you read the Amazon TOS [amazon.com] , you would see this part,
If you do post content or submit material, and unless we indicate otherwise, you grant Amazon.com and its affiliates a nonexclusive, royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable, and fully sublicensable right to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, and display such content throughout the world in any media.
Nowhere in here does it say that "all reviews become the exclusive property of Amazon." All this item, and the rest of the TOS, says is that Amazon can publish the review, and that you have the right to grant Amazon the right. This is perfectly fair, IMHO. If you're submitting a review to Amazon, OF COURSE they should have the right to publish it - why else would you submit it.

Tomcat Speed (2, Insightful)

markv242 (622209) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707622)

Does the book have a chapter on optimizing Tomcat's threads to provide better performance than the out-of-the-box installation? If not, then don't bother buying the book.

Instead, use the money to license a copy of Resin [caucho.com] which is, for lack of a better description, Tomcat on Nitro. It follows the reference implementation of JSP and Servlets just as well as Tomcat does, and even the default configuration, which is tuned for development, outperforms Tomcat.

The configuration of Resin is almost exactly like the config of Tomcat, so I honestly don't see why you'd pick Tomcat over Resin (unless you were having trouble getting the 1.2 or 1.3 JDK installed on your FreeBSD box, something that is historically difficult to do).

Shameless Plug (3, Interesting)

CmdrWass (570427) | more than 11 years ago | (#4707720)

A while back, I wrote and published a straightforward how-to for integrating Jakarta into Apache (getting Jakarta to share port 80 with Apache as opposed to using 8080).

So... if anyone is interested:

http://wass.homelinux.net/howtos/Jakarta_How-To.sh tml [homelinux.net]

really a decent book (0)

suedehed (21718) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708068)

I got my copy last week, and have been flipping through it for a few days now. My company recently launched their new web presence (shameless plug: iGames.com [igames.com] ) on Tomcat (with SQL 2000 Enterprise on the backend). I have been using tomcat for quite a long time, but mostly in the "out of the box" mode. Now that I needed to delve into it a bit further (like trying to figure out how to get it to log to one damn log file, instead of doing Daily logs! ). I was also under the impression that this book would help me with the "finer" tuning and tweaking of the JVM for Tomcat. It has helped somewhat, but I still get occasional hanging, which is easily remidied by restarting tomcat (not the solution I need, next step, connection pooling!). Overall, I think the book is a good reference, it covers some topics that I have searched far and wide to find on the newsgroups, and couldnt.

Need tomcat docs help (1)

u-235-sentinel (594077) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708074)

I've been looking for more information regarding Tomcat. The docs which come with the product don't provide all the information I need. Also their web site is basically a mirror of the docs in the product.

Any direction would be appreciated.

those covers (5, Funny)

avandesande (143899) | more than 11 years ago | (#4708324)

I know someone that covers their wrox books so they don't see the glazed stares of the authors. I just scratch their eyes out with a pocketknife. The covers of my Oreilly books never weird me out....

Favorite quote from article (1)

kvandivo (207171) | more than 11 years ago | (#4709346)

My favorite quote in the review:

"This should be teaching granny to suck eggs for a book aimed at administrators, but it's only a few pages and completes the subject."

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