Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×

227 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Spot Rifts, Sport Sift, Fort Spits, First Post! (-1)

FirstPostRobot1 (631217) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881869)

Though I have pledged to be civil, I must take this opportunity to say...
All your First Post are belong to us!
Take that, Mr. Hidden Goatse Link.

Generated by FirstPost! version 1.2.2

Re:Spot Rifts, Sport Sift, Fort Spits, First Post! (-1)

trolling4fun+profit (627630) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882073)

Wow, FirstPostRobot actually got a first post?

How did this happen, where's the soul in that.

YOU FAIL IT fails it...

You can tune a piano (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4881876)

but you can't tuna Taco.

Maybe you can, now, after the wedding?

FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4881880)

diex0r

Doobies (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4881893)

Doobies

Shoot (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4881894)

When can the nerds at slashdot come up with a filter for the words SOVIET, fp, RUSSIA, and 'first post'?

Re:Shoot (-1)

trolling4fun+profit (627630) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882097)

When the words SOVIET RUSSIA come up with a filter for the nerds at Slashdot.

PS. not fp

Piano in the amazon? (3, Funny)

itallushrt (148885) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881899)

Who in their right mind needs a piano in the amazon? I'd be concerned with bug repellant than hearing Mozarts 5th.

Re:Piano in the amazon? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4881921)

amazingly, the people who LIVE THERE, seem to be able to deal with the mosquitos, and can move on to things to occupy their time.

Go figure.

Re:Piano in the amazon? (1)

itallushrt (148885) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881933)

That is odd. You mean these people actually are interested in music, the piano specifically, and not in shrinking heads. Who would have thunk it?

Not a hard choice (1, Redundant)

Nevermore-Spoon (610798) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881944)

I disagree whole heartedly! I think there is great beauty in this story.

And the choice between an incredible music instrument or the "luxary" of bug repellent?

I desire more out of life than a little reprieve from insects

Re:Not a hard choice (5, Insightful)

Greedo (304385) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882191)

I was expecting an interesting read about how this tribe had taught themselves to play a piano, improvising melodies and chord progressions based on their indigenous musical heritage. Coming up with unorthodox techniques, etc..

Instead, it's the story of a bunch of British folks playing Beatles songs with the villagers, who have been Catholicized and are wearing American t-shirts and plastic flip-flops.

How sad. And mildly offensive.

(Oh ... taking a piano into the jungle is interesting. Taking a Korg is dumb. IMHO.)

I SOVIET RUSSIA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882347)

Our culture infects YOU!

Re:Piano in the amazon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882028)

what the hell is "Mozart's Fifth"? His favorite harmonic interval?

Re:Piano in the amazon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882121)

Mozart: Piano Concerto No.5/Choral Fantasia [yahoo.com]

Of course, he was probably referring to the more famous Beethovens 5th.

phew (4, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881907)


I almost didn't get to read this story on old technology, one of the tubes in my computer died.

Re:phew (1)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882036)

hmmph you damn new tech lovers... new tech is useless. My babbage engine is going strong and I can read the story...... this is what happens when you migrate to new tech

Re:phew (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882329)

Houston, we have a problem - another one who thinks that exaggeration = funny. But we have a solution as well, and that is shut the fuck up.

God I loved the smell of the tubes warming up. . . (3, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882302)

in the morning! And in the "old days" we didn't have to waste time and money *adding* lights to our computer cases.

You want "eerie glow?" I got yer eerie glow right here buddy.

Plus you could use them to keep your bagel warm and nicely soft.

Of course you couldn't use them to mill grain like you could with a Babbage machine. There are always downsides to new technology.

KFG

Re:God I loved the smell of the tubes warming up. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882354)


Boy, does it ever stop? I'm afraid that you are going into the weekend bearing the burden of shut the fuck up.

Re:phew (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882314)


I was almost going to not to tell you to shut the fuck up, but I changed my mind. Shut the fuck up.

What needs tuning... (5, Funny)

craenor (623901) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881909)

The piano? Or the guy who delivers a baby grand piano into the Amazon...

Re:What needs tuning... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882376)


Should you shut up? Or shut the fuck up? I think shut the fuck up.

Not exactly apples to apples.. (5, Informative)

Anonvmous Coward (589068) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881928)

"More impressive is the old wooden piano seems to survive better than the new synth but that is horse of a different colour."

I found this statement a little lacking in depth. The 'synth' isn't there to replace the piano specifically, it's there to provide a wide range of sounds. The keyboard interface is a very practical one for a classically trained musician to pick up and play. If it were here to replace the piano, it would have to not only faithfully recreate the sound, but it'd also have to provide the same feedback a piano does. When you play a piano, you can feel the hammers hitting the strings. This kind of feedback make it more natural to play. That's why it still has it's place.

Sorry for the rant, I just found the comparison a little silly. Kind of like comparing an alarm clock to the clock in Windows.

My comment about the 'keyboard interface that any musician can pick up' reminded me of something kind of interesting. Have any of you seen how the sound for the Simpsons is mastered? The sound guy has a guitar hooked up to a computer. He uses it to time when sounds take place. I thought that was a very unusual use for a guitar, but that's what he could play! I thought that was pretty cool.

Re:Not exactly apples to apples.. (3, Informative)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882077)

The sound guy has a guitar hooked up to a computer. He uses it to time when sounds take place. I thought that was a very unusual use for a guitar...

Not at all. I have a guitar synth myself, a Roland GR-50. It has a special pickup that you can attach to pretty much any steel-string guitar; it figures out what string and note is being play and uses that to control the synth and to generate MIDI events.

I've also seen a MIDI "wind controller" that played like a saxaphone, and MIDI "drums" - both standard kit and hand-drums. Each of these input methods has different nuances - for example. with the guitar synth you can only play 6 notes at a time, as opposed to 10 for a keyboard, but bending notes is much easier.

Re:Not exactly apples to apples.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882144)

MIDI "wind controller" that played like a saxaphone

I remember when I was in High School that was really popular. I am trying to remember who use to play it all the time. Very rarely see anybody with it nowadays though.

Re:Not exactly apples to apples.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882419)

Not at all. I have a guitar synth myself, a Roland GR-50.

Do you know how to play the song "Shut the Fuck Up?" Well, you'd better learn pretty quick. Shut the fuck up.

Oranges to tangerines, then? (5, Interesting)

fireboy1919 (257783) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882110)

People want PIANOs that can produce a wide range of sounds. That's why synths exist. Here are some features on modern day keyboard that prove my point:
weighted keys: so that it feels the same as a piano. You can't feel the hammers hitting the strings, you can only feel how hard it is to press the keys. Modern synths have this.
touch sensitivity:Harder hit means more sound...like a piano.
88 keys:There's no reason that a synth should have so many keys, since it is usually portable, and thre isn't a lot of synth-only music (meaning that the range could be dictated by the instrument). Unless, of course, its a replacement for the piano.

This doesn't apply to all keyboards because all of these features are rather expensive. But most good keyboard players get their keyboards with all of these features. Saying they're not the same is like saying that a piano wasn't a replacement for the harpsichord (which could only play one volume).

Interesting how we name our keyed instruments - based upon whatever feature they have that the previous instrument didn't. Pianos where originally called "forte-pianos," and synths...

Re:Oranges to tangerines, then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882223)

No, pianos were orignally called "pianofortes," not "forte-pianos." An otherwise excellent comment though.

feedback (5, Interesting)

carlcmc (322350) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882140)

I'm sorry, but you are mistaken in saying that the feedback of hammers hitting the strings cannot be reproduced. While I might be healthcare, i also play classical music on the piano, and for 2500 you can get a digital piano that has as good if not better feedback as your standard uprights in the same price range. Granted a grand piano is better, but what percentage of people are able to afford a 15k to 20k grand piano?. A digital piano such as a korg for instance never requires tuning, has excellent feed back and record and play back. I suppose you may have been talking just about synths that have keys but no feed back, but i wanted to respond to the misconeption that you can't get great feed back with digital.

Re:feedback (4, Informative)

Gsus411 (544087) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882274)

I would love to see some of these digital pianos you speak of. I have played on just about every piano possible, from Steinway grands to no-name uprights from 100 years ago to the most elaborate digital pianos available. A good digital piano may have a better response than a cheap $700 dollar throwaway. But for the $2,500 you mention, you can get a decent upright with better response than any digital piano you can find for any price.

My $0.02.....

Re:Not exactly apples to apples.. (1)

RazzleFrog (537054) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882175)

Actually, the electronic keyboard is more a replacement for the organ. Old time pipe organs can produce many different sounds in many different ranges using stops. The only thing missing is foot pedals (not the sustain and damper pedals but the full octave that Organists play with their feet. Hey that sounds like one of those old bumper stickers - "Organists do it with their feet."

Re:Not exactly apples to apples.. (5, Informative)

pogen (303331) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882257)

When you play a piano, you can feel the hammers hitting the strings.

Actually, you can't. The hammer loses contact with the rest of the action before it hits the strings so that it can bounce back and allow the strings to resonate. Otherwise, by holding the key down, you would also be holding the hammer against the strings, giving you a nice "thud" sound.

But I'm just being pedantic. Yes, the action has a certain feel that is lacking in most synthesizers. There are a few, though, that have come reasonably close.

Re:Not exactly apples to apples.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882396)

Have any of you seen how the sound for the Simpsons is mastered?

Have you ever seen an episode of Shut The Fuck Up? Too bad, because then you'd have a preview of the life you're living. Shut the fuck up.

In other news... (3, Flamebait)

EvilAlien (133134) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881929)

... cameras steal your soul.

Anyways, I might as well try to say something half-ways intelligent...

We often take technology for granted, assuming that lack of understanding is some sort of mental or cultural deficiency, whereas our general and almost complete in ability to survive if left in the middle of a rain forest without help is somehow a noble mark of civilization. Those who hunt and provide for their own food are somehow throwbacks in a technological society.

To ensure that this ties into News for Nerds, I'd like to point out that the juxtaposition of high and low technology is one of the central concepts to Firefly [fox.com] . I find it funny when people complain about the rediculousness of low-tech firearms on a spaceship... on the frontiers of civilization.

Re:In other news... (1)

dirvish (574948) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882008)

complete in ability to survive if left in the middle of a rain forest without help is somehow a noble mark of civilization.

True enough. People should venture out of civilization every once in a while. They need to be reminded that they are animals and that the world outside of our paved-over cities is a beautiful place.

Hi tech/Lo tech (3, Funny)

swm (171547) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882255)

I find it funny when people complain about the rediculousness of low-tech firearms on a spaceship

OK, I'll bite.

I used to watch Lost In Space when I was a kid. I knew it was hokey, but as long as I accepted it on its own terms, it was good enought for TV.

Then one year I came home from college, and I was channel surfing, and I stumbled across an old episode. The Robinsons were trapped on some alien space craft, and they were shooting their way out, firing those laser pistols they always carried, and then one of them starts lobbing grenades...and I'm just sitting there thinking...
...yeah, that's the ticket. Whenever
I'm on board a strange spacecraft, I always lob a few fragmentation grenades around. If their containment vessel can't handle the shock, that's their problem.

Hissing noise? What hissing noise? Hey...does the air in here seem little thin?

Re:In other news... (0, Offtopic)

silas_moeckel (234313) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882292)

Not being able to survive in the middle of a rain forest has les to do with our tech as with our reluctance to learn anything about how to survive. Most of the engineers I know would be pretty lost in a rain forest now there are a few of them myself included that would be able to survive barring random act of large agressive animal. Its all about what you decided to learn and our society does not value learing how to survive particularly much. Now persoanly I think everybody that wants to eat (think everybody is included in that one) should go out and kill there dinner at least once. Now I think the big question is would we be happy in the middle of the rain forests persoanly I would say not particularly it's a subsistance lifestyle for the most part.

Re:In other news... (5, Funny)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882330)

<quote>I find it funny when people complain about the rediculousness of low-tech firearms on a spaceship</quote>

Low-tech or not, it'll kill ya, and dead is dead.

Lets face it, we're still dependent upon the 7 "low-tech" discoveries/inventions of the Neanderthals:

  1. Fire
  2. Farming
  3. Art
  4. Weaponry
  5. Animal Husbandry
  6. Clothing
  7. vi and unix (well, religion, and holy wars in general)

pianos and technology? (0, Interesting)

nogoodmonkey (614350) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881934)

If that article had a point, I never got to it. I was too bored and stopped reading at "Do you have any idea how much those things weigh?".

It must be a slow news day.

Re:pianos and technology?-Helicopters. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882153)

The more interesting question is why didn't they deliver the piano via helicopter? A much more efficient way to have done it.

This makes no sense (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4881936)

A bunch of half-naked savages have no interest in tickling the ivories. What the heck maybe there will be a Wolfgang von Bushman?

Re:This makes no sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882148)

A bunch of half-naked savages have no interest in tickling the ivories. What the heck maybe there will be a Wolfgang von Bushman?

Damn straight. Just like a bunch of half-naked morons have no interest in tickling the keyboard. Ooops. My bad, that'd make up most of /.'s anonymous posters.

Re:This makes no sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882375)

First of all, the "savages" are not half-naked, but in fact prefer shorts, tshirts, and flip flops. Second of all, the tribe itself asked for a piano for their christian services on sunday, so yes, they are interested in "tickling the ivories."

read the article, you insensitive clod

Amazon's hiring piano tuners? (1, Funny)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881941)

What, Amazon needs piano tuners? I know they've got a big line of products, but shipping on pianos has goto to be expensive!

Oh, we're not talking about Amazon.com?

Re:Amazon's hiring piano tuners? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4881981)

No we're not talking about amazon.com you swamp donkey. Read the full story before posting.

Eww... (5, Funny)

Wampus Aurelius (627669) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881968)

The case was full of insect eggs; she thought that perhaps cockroaches had done the damage and spent a few minutes chasing one adult through the innards.

Can you imagine when someone plays Beethoven's 5th?

DONG DONG DONG (squish)

Re:Eww... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882025)

Uh, I'll stick to the programmer's way of de-bugging things, thank you.

Re:Eww... (2)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882361)

That WAS the original way of "debugging" a computer ... taking the moth out that had gotten fried and shorted out a vacuum tube.

Re:Eww... (3, Funny)

JJAnon (180699) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882078)

I can see you do not have a classical education :P. The accepted transliteration of Beethoven's Fifth is

Da Da Da DUM

So that should read:
Da Da Da (SQUISH)

Note the careful use of CAPITALS to emphasize changes in volume.

Re:Eww... (1)

Wampus Aurelius (627669) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882152)

I bow before your superior knowlege of music transcription. :-P

Engineering is NOT high-tech (5, Insightful)

Pig Hogger (10379) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881977)

Engineering DOESN'T HAVE TO BE high-tech.

It only has to WORK WELL, with whatever is at hand.

Inuktitut writing [halfmoon.org] looks cryptic. Yet it was devised by whites, and designed to work well with the writing implements available to the inuit: bones and stones. They weren't forced to use the roman alphabet which they could not transcribe properly.

Good design and engineering works by using what's available, not shoving down foreign and/or scarce technologies.

Re:Engineering is NOT high-tech (1)

Dexter's Laboratory (608003) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882113)

Exactly. Whatever works best for the people and the environment is the best. That is why they build houses differently in Africa than we do in Europe and especially in cold areas like Scandinavia. The climate makes it important to come up with better heating system and such. Same thing with many other things.

I suspect that the technology and the course its taking and how far depends much on the culture, as well. Our technology fits well for a wealthcreating, timesaving society of producers and consumers. Techology has a place and a reason, and it is not its own reason.

Re:Engineering is NOT high-tech (2)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882202)

I tried to write something in Inuktitut on that page you linked, but I couldn't write "Hello World!" because there is no h!

in SOVIET RUSSIA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4881984)

piano tunes you!

Old News (1, Funny)

TheEnglishPatient (173496) | more than 11 years ago | (#4881987)

BBC radio reported this in November. Read it here http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/2477663. stm

The depressing part of the story (5, Insightful)

gosand (234100) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882012)

An interesting read I guess, but I never really got the point of the story except that it was a heck of a challenge to get that piano delivered. I found this part of the story to be particularly sad though:

But if any of us had been expecting half-naked, blowpipe-wielding savages, we were disappointed. The American missionaries who converted the tribe in the 1950s taught them Christian modesty, and they now favour shorts and T-shirts, largely supplied by visitors and aid agencies. The footwear of choice is the plastic flip-flop.

A tribe that small, in that remote of a location, and Christians still feel the need to impose their religion on them. Quite sad.

Re:The depressing part of the story (2, Informative)

sxltrex (198448) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882105)

Did you miss the part about how the piano was requested by the tribe for their Sunday church services?

Re:The depressing part of the story (2)

dubiousmike (558126) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882125)

Though I am more specifically Catholic than Christian and I have barely been to church in years and thus non practicing, I feel I should mention that no one MADE them accept a religious doctrine. Also, no one made them accept flip flops, t-shirts, ect. They have survived for hundreds of years without Christianity, flip flops and the Simpsons. Though I hear they can't understand why they get to only see the Simpsons once a day and not 4.

:P

Re:The depressing part of the story (5, Insightful)

Greedo (304385) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882298)

I don't mean this confrontationally, but how do you know no one "made" them accept Christianity?

The fact that someone even attempted to convert them, let alone that they succeeded, is bad enough. What was wrong with their belief system before that some missionary felt it their duty to "save" these "savages"? The history of missionary work is rife with "forced" conversions (Inquisition, anyone?). I realize this probably wasn't the case in the 1950's, but who knows.

Those American missionaries also taught them "Christian modesty", which could be a thin disguise (in my tin-foil hat world) for "American hegemonic consumerism". Why else would they favour shorts and T-shirts, or ask for an electric keyboard.

Again, missionary work isn't always about spreading the Good Word. In fact, it is based on the assumption that the indigenous Good Word wasn't Good Enough to start with.

Re:The depressing part of the story (2)

Latent IT (121513) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882348)

What was wrong with their belief system before that some missionary felt it their duty to "save" these "savages"? The history of missionary work is rife with "forced" conversions (Inquisition, anyone?).

Mmmm. Hmmm....

I realize this probably wasn't the case in the 1950's, but who knows.

Ah, right. So you knew your statement was misleading, and inflammatory, but you provided it anyway. And nice use of 'who knows'! After all, perhaps the inquisition *was* in the 1950's! Or, maybe they were whipped with noodles!

Those American missionaries also taught them "Christian modesty", which could be a thin disguise (in my tin-foil hat world) for "American hegemonic consumerism". Why else would they favour shorts and T-shirts[...?]

Too right! Why else indeed. Only Americans wear shorts and T-shirts!

In fact, it is based on the assumption that the indigenous Good Word[...]

Er. What? The indigenous... oh, forget it.

Re:The depressing part of the story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882146)

A tribe that small, in that remote of a location, and Christians still feel the need to impose their religion on them. Quite sad.

Christians feel that no soul is too small to save. You may disagree with their beliefs, but wanting to share what you think has merit with the distant or marginal people of the world isn't terribly 'sad'.

Re:The depressing part of the story (1)

The Bungi (221687) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882243)

Share != Force Down Your Throat (Take It Nicely Or Face Eternal Perdition), eh.

A very tempting choice, but that's all (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882284)

Take It Nicely Or Face Eternal Perdition

So in other words, "Take It Nicely Or Face Nothing At All". Perdition (ie, eternal damnation) requires you believe in Christian ideas of hell, the soul, and the ability to be forever 'damned'. As the previous poster said, Christian missionaries do not hold guns to people's heads. If you accept their beliefs (or appear to), they -will- give you gifts. But that's your choice.

Re:The depressing part of the story (2)

fmaxwell (249001) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882283)

You may disagree with their beliefs, but wanting to share what you think has merit with the distant or marginal people of the world isn't terribly 'sad'.

It is when the "marginal people" are a primitive, easily-influenced people who accept the beliefs because they hold the people teaching them in such high regard. It's like a satanist converting a young child to satan worship. It is not an affirmation of the belief system nor is it an example of free will on the part of the new convert.

As an advanced (relatively speaking) people, we have a moral duty to not impose religious beliefs on people who lack the sophistication to understand the difference between science and beliefs in the occult (e.g., people rising from the dead, ceremonies in which wine and wafers symbolise cannabalism, people being turned into pillars of salt, etc.)

Re:The depressing part of the story (1)

L-Train8 (70991) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882409)

Yeah, the stupid, primative natives are obviously incapable of thinking for themselves. If they can't tell the difference between a flashlight and magic, then they are going to be easily duped into Christianity </sarcasm>. Maybe someone should go in and teach them critical thinking skills and the scientific method, so they can more objectively evaluate the prosthyletizing of the missionaries.

Another option would be to just leave them alone. However, whether it's missionaries in the '50's or ranchers and eco-tourists in the '00's, the world is getting smaller and they are going to have contact with some outsiders sooner or later. Maybe it's unfortunate, but it is the way the world is.

Re:The depressing part of the story (1)

Dexter's Laboratory (608003) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882287)

Wanna save my soul? Then don't butt into my life and try to convert me.
Instead give me religious freedom, which, ofcourse includes freedom from religion.

Re:The depressing part of the story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882165)

We feel a need to offer our religion to everyone. It's not imposing at all. If we did impose, you wouldn't see missionaries getting killed all over the world, you'd see missionaries . And how does a pacifist (most missionaries are) impose on anybody anyways?

I can't wait till the Wai Wai guitarists get Wah Wah. The guitars will be crying wai wah wai wah!

Re:The depressing part of the story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882296)

And how does a pacifist (most missionaries are) impose on anybody anyways?

Simple.
"Here have some life saving supplies and some Christian propoganda. And remember, if it wasn't for Jesus's love for you, you'd be dead right now."

You goofy Christians seem to think that as long as you aren't doing it with guns and bullets that it isn't 'imposing'. You also seem to think that you have to 'save' everyone who isn't a Christian. It just baffles me how anyone can think a diety is good, fair, and equitable when in order for you to qualify to the good afterlife, you have to believe in the diety and accept him as your lord and master, rather than, say, accept anyone who is a good, fair, and equitable person, regardless of what they believe. The former makes the Christian god sound more like Bill Gates than some sort of righteous dude that I'd like to hang with.

Re:The depressing part of the story (5, Insightful)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882215)

A tribe that small, in that remote of a location, and Christians still feel the need to impose their religion on them. Quite sad.

Hardly.

Let's assume, for the sake of understanding the Christian missionaries, that they ARE right, and that life now and hereafter DOES get better if you're a Christian.

Given _just that_, it makes sense to want to expose as many people as possible to their religion.

Now, if we discard the "the Christians are right" assumption and simply look at it from a general standpoint, it STILL isn't "sad." It's not like they're requiring them to make pilgrimages to Rome (Muslim tradition) or give up temporal desires (Bhuddism).

It's a form of charity, which, seeing as most of humanity thinks that clothing is a good thing, can be concluded as more than cultural self-interest and being real honest charity.

Please, drop your anti-Christian/anti-religion bias. If everyone in the world had computers, you wouldn't call Linux (over BSD or the existing-and-never-upgraded-DOS) advocates "sad" now, would you?

Re:The depressing part of the story (3, Insightful)

fmaxwell (249001) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882389)

Let's assume, for the sake of understanding the Christian missionaries, that they ARE right, and that life now and hereafter DOES get better if you're a Christian.

Let's assume that the missionaries are wrong. Let's assume that the local beliefs are right. Let's further assume that the locals' conversion to Christianity angers their gods and causes those gods to put a curse on the village and the crops. Let's assume that the villagers then starve to death.

You are going on the assumption that there is some reason to believe that Christianity is "right" and that local belief systems are "wrong." That's simply not the case.

Now, if we discard the "the Christians are right" assumption and simply look at it from a general standpoint, it STILL isn't "sad."

Yes, it is. These people probably had a rich cultural heritage and religious views that were passed down from generation to generation in stories. Losing that so that they can be added to the Catholic Church's list of conquests is very sad.

Re:The depressing part of the story (2)

zephc (225327) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882400)

When did Muslims start making pilgramages to Rome? I thought it was Mecca. Silly me...

The point is that an otherwise prospering culture has been given the shiny beads treatment. A couple simple rules to life: Diversity = good, Homogenity = death.

Re:The depressing part of the story (2)

timeOday (582209) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882268)

Sad why?

Re:The depressing part of the story (2)

fmaxwell (249001) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882309)

Sad why?

Because it supplants the tribe's own belief systems, losing that part of their culture and making the world poorer for the loss. You may feel that teaching primitive, innocent people to feel shame about their own bodies is good. I, and others, do not.

And I bet those "primitives" take good care of it? (3, Insightful)

saskboy (600063) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882014)

I wonder about people when they consider a people who care for music, and treat an instrument properly "savages", yet the piano in my college residence is ruined with misuse and ugly graphiti carving.

Who are the savages? Do people in the Amazon write on public pianos too? "For a good time call Zanthia." --- "Hey Zanthia, wanna have a good time!"

--"NO. And stop calling for me!"

Re:And I bet those "primitives" take good care of (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882225)

Maybe we, living in what we call "civilization" already have everything. We have all the basics like a safe and warm home, food everyday etc. We only have to work to get richer. We're not so much hunters as we are frantic gatherers and traders, scooping up everything we can, even lots of stuff we don't need. Maybe we haven't had many challenges yet. Life is boring. We destroy pianos, subways, walls, cause we can and cause "someone else will clean it up anyway". Maybe we're spoiled, we have everything and don't really have to work for it.

How sad... (5, Insightful)

tswinzig (210999) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882021)

The American missionaries who converted the tribe in the 1950s taught them Christian modesty, and they now favour shorts and T-shirts, largely supplied by visitors and aid agencies. The footwear of choice is the plastic flip-flop.

No comment necessary?

Not sad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882173)

Unless the Christian missionaries put guns to their heads, I don't see what's sad about it. They opened their minds to a crazy new religion, which the Wai Wai seem to have adopted. They gave them durable clothing. Big deal.

Re:Not sad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882327)

You just don't get it. If you can't find half-naked, blowpipe-wielding savages in a remote corner of the Amazon, where will you go to find half-naked, blowpipe-wielding savages???

Jersey? (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882337)

n/t

KFG

all wrong, all wrong! (2, Interesting)

frotty (586379) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882067)

You're supposed to put a STARBUCKS in a neighborhood when you want to increase the TIF funding attractiveness, not a piano!

Why does this remind me of some sort of
"Catholocism spreading to the brutes" scenario of a few centuries ago? Oh, wait, because it is that.

I guess them savage folks needed to understand the Word of God, I mean, it's our duty to inform them that they're going about living all wrong.

Re:all wrong, all wrong! (1)

frotty (586379) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882120)

A second thought - wouldn't that be grand? All of the yuppies would actually get use out of their City Tanks out there in the "new frontier" ... we should demand a starbucks be placed there, all of a sudden there'll be a condo development that's perpetually 90% sold and a [insert Health Food MegaConGlom Chain here]

Mmm Mmm! 6 grain wheat, incoming. Hey who wouldn't promote healthy living, leaves you a little more energy after the vampiric economic ramifications of supporting massive health food chain stores!

I think we could cut the Wai Wai in on the deal, too, they could be the health club attendants

Pianos and humidity (4, Interesting)

ThinkingGuy (551764) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882083)

I remember reading an article years ago about people in Japan donating old pianos, mostly to southeast Asia (There had been a boom in piano sales in Japan a while back, when many parents were signing their kids up for piano lessons, but with the boom over, most of these pianos sat unused in Japanese homes).
The problem was that pianos made for sale in Japan didn't handle the humid climate of southeast Asia and often became warped, as the one in the Amazon did.
I think it also mentioned some kind of treatment that can be done to the pianos at the manufacture time, to help strengthen them in humid climates.

What? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882132)

"News for Nerds. Stuff that matters."

Yeah, right...

Missionaries suck (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882149)

Isn't it horrible how missionaries have managed to destroy so many cultures?

Re:Missionaries suck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882245)

Isn't it horrible how people think cultures that integrate changes have been destroyed?

New sport: Extreme Philanthropy (5, Funny)

Ooblek (544753) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882158)

A set of hearty do-gooders get this warm, tingly feeling when a bunch of savages want a grand piano of their very own in the middle of the Amazon. These heros set out with visions of a next renaissance in music as these villagers are left with a musical instrument and a desire to learn. Documenting their great struggle in taking this behemoth from the civilzed world to the uncivilized world. Overcoming obstacles like raging rivers and dense tropical jungles, they finally deliver this prize. They leave, intending to come back a few years later. In this time, they expect the musical capabilities of these primitives to mature beyond belief - much like leaving a batch of wine to ferment to perfection in an old oak barrel.

So our intrepid travelers return and are greeted be the villagers that have apparently just been shopping at Target. Flip-flops, shorts, and even the occasional T-Shirt that has the phrase, "I'm a lion hunter. If you see me running, try to keep up," on the back.

The cheap-clothing aside, the veteran piano-tuning-commando-squad makes the exhausting 8-mile trek through the jungle to finally visit the prize instrument and to taste the sweetness of the evolved musical talent that should have developed over these past years.

What they found is that the piano that was donated has almost cracked in half due to the fact the generous donation turned out to be little more than someone deciding not to sell the thing for $5 at a garage sale. (They must have decided they didn't want to move the thing out the front door every Saturday for a month while trying to get rid of it.) The instrument itself was infested with insects and their eggs, probably due to the fact that they generally kept the piano in a storage shed until visitors with cameras decided to show up. This explains all the Target type clothes since it appears that they are really cannibals that would eat visitors without cameras and take their clothes.

In the end, the savages did learn how to belt out a few Bach and Beetles tunes, but then just wanted a fricking Korg keyboard, "Like we asked for in the first place." I don't see why they didn't just ask for a PC and a net connection so they could just use Kazaa and download all the Bach and Beetles MP3s they wanted!

Re:New sport: Extreme Philanthropy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882372)

Man I love the Beetles! John Lemon and Paul McCarthy were great.

Bach was good, too. BTO had some kick-ass songs.

Amazon Jungle (1)

rednaxel (532554) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882178)

It may be not enough to say just Amazon, once it's a jungle, not a country. The facts depicted in the story took place in Guyana. Amazon jungle spreads along several countries, including Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Ecuador.

whadya mean 'surprising' (1)

Traicovn (226034) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882182)

My family owns a baby grand and we love it. On the subject of it surviving better, of course it does. I play the violin and have a fairly old insturment (over 200 years old) and it works great. Not one of those new cheap insturments they make in sweatshops in asia. Very nicely made insturment. Just proves, that something that is made well will last a long time...

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882219)

What a STUPID article. Can you waste more electrons? Remember, conserving electricity still wastes electrons.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882242)

They send you to the Amazon for tuning!

The Piano ][ (1)

coloth (630330) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882254)

I can't tell whether the strange tone of this piece is characteristic of British writing, or just this author.

Anyway, the story really should have been about getting the piano to the tribe. If I was writing a short story, the piano would have been the main character--

An aged instrument is torn against its will from a diginfied, but meaningless twilight in luxury, portaged by sweaty, cursing soldiers through the steaming jungle mud, and deposited amongst a people at whose foreign touch it cringed.

But, over the course of two years, even as its cladding peeled away in the humidity, and insects came to violate its works, the instrument found a new purpose, straining against its own years to learn a new repertoire, and inspire its new people, as it had long ago inspired its own.

Ok, bidding for movie rights starts at $20,000. All proceeds to benefit the Indigenous Peoples' Keyboardists' Club.

Electronics don't last.... (2, Informative)

freejung (624389) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882303)

in the jungle. I can tell you that. I live in the jungle and I work with electronics, and the humidity is hell on them, it's no surprise the new synth didn't work out very well.

Trying to use computers here is a joke, they break amazingly fast. The trick is to use it all the time, so the circuits stay warm.

I have a piano and live in amazon, but im lucky.. (5, Interesting)

the cobaltsixty (210695) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882321)

I live in Belem, the largest city within the Amazon Rainforest, with two million inhabitants. For about nine years, i also played piano and almost became a classical pianist. But then i left in order to have more time to spend at the computer.

There are two piano tuners in my city. One has serious hearing problems, which is weird. The other one looks weird, because hes not brazilian, but russian. But i heard hes a good tuner.

Keeping a piano is a challenging task. The climate has much air humidity, the wood helps changing its sounds. Also, we have problems with the extreme heat... But anyway, thats not impossible.

There were two piano factories in brazil, and the most popular, Essenfelder, got bankrupt. The remaing, Fritz Dobbert, still exists. There are in my city two music schools, Carlos Gomes and the Federal University of Para Music School (EMUFPA) [www.ufpa.br] . I used to study at the later one. They still have a really beautiful Yamaha piano there. When they were about to buy, i've heart they had to make a poll to choose whether to buy a white or a wooden one. Thank god, the wooden is there.

Disclaimer: I have nothing against people who think theyre trendy about white pianos, but sure Def Leppard making a Video with a white piano is a shame

POOP! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882322)

poop

Open Source virtual piano tuner (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882334)

openDK() [fazigu.org] lets you use your *NIX system to takedown out-of-tune piano's.

thankn you

12:00 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882338)

A whole nation of people like my Mom. Hmmmm.

Juju magic seems more effective than modern tech (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4882342)

"But I could never track down the fault, let alone fix it. I wrestled with the Korg on and off for more than a fortnight, right until the eve of the fundraising concert, when one of the Wai Wai somehow got it working."

Hmm, all these uber-geeks and no one else found it curious that an unknowledgable aboriginal fixes an electronic device that they couldn't possible understand? Anyone care to explain? Btw, no, I don't buy the "gave it a good whack" excuse.

yet another x-file ...

Obligatory Simpson's Reference (2)

zephc (225327) | more than 11 years ago | (#4882432)

Ah hell, I'll just link to it: "Missionary: Impossible" [snpp.com]
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>