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Fast CD-R Drives Make For Twice the Piracy

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the double-your-pleasure dept.

Music 524

Bowie J. Poag notes this Register story about an RIAA copyright infringement bust in New York. The RIAA claims the operation had the equivalent of 421 CD-burners, which, translated from RIAA-speak, means "156 CD-burners but some of them were fast". How they expect anyone to take their statistics seriously is beyond me.

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go register (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893195)

raaaaaaa two days old!

Re:go register (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893224)

theres people moderating, but noone speaking.... echo

My CDR is really slow... (5, Funny)

nother_nix_hacker (596961) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893197)

...does that mean I have half a cd burner?

Re:My CDR is really slow... (5, Interesting)

roseblood (631824) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893268)

So, a 40x cd-r is far faster than average? What the hell are they using as a baseline? I can write at 40x myself. To me that is avreage. I went to the store, I saw 50something, 40, and 32 available. That makes 40x about average (average really would be something between 40x and 42x...seeing that the 50somethings were probably 52x)

Funny math. Next thing you'll see is that your PC is a few thousand times faster than the average computer! (ENIAC as basline? Maybe a 8mhz 286?)

This is the equivilant of 40 first posts, isn't it (5, Funny)

miguel_at_menino.com (89271) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893198)

This is the equivilant of 40 first posts, isn't it?

Re:This is the equivilant of 40 first posts, isn't (3, Funny)

questforme (542772) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893374)

I have a Ferrari F40 so really I have 4 Ford Sedans.

interesting (0)

ksuMacGyver (562019) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893199)

So now we finally find out the problem---the RIAA can't count! :)

Does this mean... (5, Funny)

Have Blue (616) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893200)

If we pirate 1,000 songs but all of them were crap, we're innocent?

Re:Does this mean... (2)

403Forbidden (610018) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893241)

Good point, that could be a serious argument to try to show the RIAA being a hipocryte, and not trustwrothy.

Re:Does this mean... (1)

CommieOverlord (234015) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893305)

Good point, that could be a serious argument

No it can't.

Re:Does this mean... (5, Interesting)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893385)

Worse still, if you have a script that generates an arbitrary number of 4:33 .mp3s of nothing, you can violate John Cages [mindspring.com] copyright in truly efficient fashion.
Now, if the product is a copyright violation, is the script itself a violation as well? What does the I-ANAL crowd think?

Re:Does this mean... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893426)

I like anal.

Was Equivalent to 420 but they didn't want to seem (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893203)

HIGH

Moderation tip: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893417)

Parent post is FUNNY, you jackasses.

perhaps they used the same math.. (5, Funny)

spazimodo (97579) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893205)

that gave us 2002-1900 = 100th Anniversary of Quantum Physics

Wow (-1, Troll)

andyrut (300890) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893207)

A BUST?!

First post?

Doublemint Cd Burners? (0, Troll)

puto (533470) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893208)

Double the Speed, Double Your Burn?

Jesus Harold Christ on a Rubber crutch. This is getting outta control.

This is as bad when they catch some poor kid with a ound of weed and it becomes a major bust worth over "2,000,000" dollars.

156=421 due to speed times?

Anyway, I hope some of these were professional duplicators. They are cheap and fast. I cant imagine having to handload 156 burners.

Puto

EAT MY FUCK (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893210)

FP FOR ALL YOU SOVIETS

Where in Soviet Russia, YOU bust the RIAA

Yes you, becuase all of you are pirates!

NIGGA!

POAG!??! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893213)

Bowie J. Poag? That flaming faggot??

Is it just me... (2)

craenor (623901) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893214)

Or does this seem like a story about the RIAA acknowledging that people can copy cd's...with a cd-r?

My god the humanity! They'll be able to make their own cd's! Why wasn't this reported before.

15 first posts (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893215)

This first post is being sent over a cable modem and is like 15 regular first posts!

Re:15 first posts (2, Funny)

jayratch (568850) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893333)

You mean, this 1st post is being sent over the cablemodem and becomes equivalent to a 15th post...

Wow, it really works!

Re:15 first posts (3, Insightful)

WCMI92 (592436) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893391)

"This first post is being sent over a cable modem and is like 15 regular first posts!"

So if I download something with the T1 at work it's like stealing 1,000 songs? And if I burn them with my 24x burner, it's like burning 6 CD's?

Methinks we have discovered the formula that the RIAA/MPAA/BSA uses to come up with their "piracy" statistics...

Calculate what could have been copied on PC equipment circa 1987 and multiply by Moore's Law...

RIAA Math: Add more examples here... (5, Funny)

dagg (153577) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893220)

Example #1:
One library of congress = 29 trillion (in british units) copyright violations.

Re:RIAA Math: Add more examples here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893304)

One MP3 on a P2P file sharing system = Infinite copyright violations

THESE are the people they should be going after (5, Insightful)

utexaspunk (527541) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893221)

not the individual consumers. Not that individual consumers are pirating cd's any less, but these are the guys you can catch outright without creating new laws that restrict our rights.

Statistics? (5, Funny)

pi radians (170660) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893222)

How they expect anyone to take their statistics seriously is beyond me.

Who, the RIAA's or The Register's?

(ba-dum-bum-cha!)

Yeah.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893223)

and 21% percent of people buy less music now they download.

RIAA always forget to tell us that the other 79% buy more ;)

Re:Yeah.. (2)

WCMI92 (592436) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893416)

"nd 21% percent of people buy less music now they download.
RIAA always forget to tell us that the other 79% buy more;)"

And I'm one of them. I'd have never bought Avril Lavigne, Michelle Branch, and Vanessa Carlton's album if I hadn't been able to use Kazzaa Lite to sample them in advance.

Glad I did, they are awesome.

DVD+R/+RW (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893225)

That's what I'm using now, 4.7 gigs.... 20 minutes :-))))

Yap, bit off topic, just too enthousiastic about my recent toy I guess ;-)

RIAA in a spin over CD copying bust (3, Informative)

ath0mic (519762) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893226)

By Andrew Orlowski in San Francisco Posted: 14/12/2002 at 00:31 GMT

"Perhaps the truth is less interesting than the facts?" asked Amy Weiss, the RIAA's Senior Vice President of Communications recently in this email to The Register.

It's a question which has baffled many of our readers, and us too. Perhaps it's a kind of Zen koan, which needs to be repeated many times before making sense. If so, we can't report any success.

But the RIAA seems to be having a few problems with the facts itself.

Yesterday it issued a press release announcing a piracy bust in New York which unearthed 421 CD-R burners.

Only there weren't 421 burners, but "the equivalent of 421 burners."

In fact, there were just 156. How did the RIAA account for this discrepancy?

"There were only 156 actual burners, but some run at very high speeds: some as high as 40x. This is well above the average speed," was the official line yesterday.

Apparently another example of the Association's difficulty grappling with new technology. After the RIAA's website was hacked, with large sections rendered inaccessible, spokespersons explained the difficulties were due to a sudden upsurge in popularity.

Well, that's one way of putting it.

The other curious aspect of yesterday's release is the use of Secret Service agents in the bust. The Secret Service, we naively presumed, was employed to protect high-ranking elected officials.

And RIAA's Press Release... (1, Informative)

ath0mic (519762) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893242)



Largest CD-R Manufacturing Operation In U.S. History, Major Blow To Piracy In Area

WASHINGTON (Dec. 11th) -- In what is the largest seizure ever of equipment used to pirate music onto blank CDs in the United States, the U.S. Secret Service, assisted by a team of investigators from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), on Monday morning raided a major music piracy operation in New York City, leading to the capture of 35,000 finished CD-Rs, 10,000 DVDs, the equivalent of 421 CD-R burners and the arrest of three individuals. This operation alone had the potential to cost the industry an estimated $90 million annually.

The raid, executed by a team of several Secret Service agents and RIAA investigators, was the culmination of a two-month joint investigation of a well-organized music piracy operation in Queens, located on 47-28 37th Street. This particular operation was the largest supplier of pirated music to individual vendors, retail locations, and distribution centers on Canal Street in Manhattan, churning out illegal product around the clock with an estimated capacity of at least six million pirated discs each year. Among the three individuals arrested was the leader of the operation. They now face charges of trafficking in counterfeit labels, criminal copyright infringement, and trademark counterfeiting.

"This is a major blow to the music pirates who were robbing record companies, artists, legitimate retailers and countless others in the industry of millions of hard-earned dollars," said Frank Creighton, Executive Vice President and Director of the RIAA's Anti-Piracy Unit. "This operation should pay further dividends because we have successfully struck at one of the major choke points for music piracy in the New York City area. I especially want to thank the work of the U.S. Secret Service who were invaluable partners in this effort."

Officials also seized eight Rimage Imprinters, one high-end color copier valued at $75,000, and other equipment and raw materials used in the manufacturing process. Approximately 25 percent of the product seized was Latin music.

Re:And RIAA's Press Release... (2, Informative)

Dajur (168872) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893296)

If you were trying to karma whore this was a bad idea. We all WANT the RIAA web site slashdotted. And btw you don't need to "mirror" the register, it never goes down from SD linking.

Re:And RIAA's Press Release... (2)

whereiswaldo (459052) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893331)

the equivalent of 421 CD-R burners

If they had said "the equivalent of 421 12x CD-R burners", that would have been a bit more accurate.

What I find funniest about this story is the link to the RIAA:

http://riaa.org/PR_Story.cfm?id=592

"PR STORY?"

Not good PR, but PR nonetheless I suppose.

Re:RIAA in a spin over CD copying bust (5, Insightful)

Apreche (239272) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893308)

Actually the Secret Service has 3 very specific jobs. One of those jobs is to bodyguard and protect important people. That is the most commonly seen job. Their second job is cathing people who counterfeit money. Their third job is catching h4x0rz and pirates.
If you are a computer criminal, depending on the exact circumstances of your offense you will either be visited by customs, secret service, FBI, or local police.

As for this whole 156=421 thing. Does this mean I can sell my burner on ebay? It's pretty fast can I say 2 CD burners! only takes up one drive bay!

There's nothing wrong with burning CDs for personal/fair use. However, despite the number of burner discrepancy, this was an actualy piracy operation. It's not only illegal but not right. People like that should get busted.

Re:RIAA in a spin over CD copying bust (1)

KevinIsOwn (618900) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893315)

The secret service has a hand in counterfeiting and copyright infringement. It isn't a surprise to see them involved in this bust as it is what they are supposed to do.

Re:RIAA in a spin over CD copying bust (2, Informative)

ToteAdler (631239) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893321)

"The other curious aspect of yesterday's release is the use of Secret Service agents in the bust. The Secret Service, we naively presumed, was employed to protect high-ranking elected officials. " Actually thats just part of the Secret Service's [ustreas.gov] job. They are officialy under the treasury department and are also in charge of counterfeiting investigations and some other things... I'm not sure how ileagle CD copying falls under this, but they don't just protect politicians and civil leaders.

KARMA WHORE ALERT! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893322)

BEEP BEEP BEEP!

Re:RIAA in a spin over CD copying bust (2, Insightful)

catbutt (469582) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893334)

The Secret Service, we naively presumed, was employed to protect high-ranking elected officials.

The Secret Service's original purpose was to catch conterfeiters. That's why they are part of the Treasury dept (although this will change with Bush's re-org)

Re:RIAA in a spin over CD copying bust (2, Informative)

Durundal (555941) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893390)

Actually, the Secret Service is a part of the Department of the Treasury... it's two primary missions are protection as mentioned, and enforcement of laws regarding financial crimes, which this most certainly was. From http://www.ustreas.gov/usss/mission.shtml The United States Secret Service is mandated by the U.S. Congress to carry out two distinct and significant missions: protection and criminal investigations. The Secret Service is responsible for: the protection of the President, the Vice President, and their families, heads of state, and other designated individuals; the investigation of threats against these protectees; protection of the White House, Vice President's Residence, Foreign Missions, and other buildings within Washington, D.C.; and security design, planning, and implementation at designated National Special Security Events. The Secret Service is also responsible for the enforcement of laws relating to counterfeiting of obligations and securities of the United States, investigation of financial crimes including, but not limited to access device fraud, financial institution fraud, identity theft, computer fraud, telecommunications fraud, and computer based attacks on our nation's financial, banking, and telecommunications infrastructure.

Actually this is a good thing right ? (3, Insightful)

Archfeld (6757) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893230)

Wholesale pirating and distribution is BAD. This is the kind of thing the RIAA SHOULD be pursuing and is the reason for them actually exsiting.

Re:Actually this is a good thing right ? (1)

Mr. Grimm (599800) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893278)

It's a good thing this kind of operation is stopped. It's a bad thing when they try to exaggerate how big this was in the first place.

Re:Actually this is a good thing right ? (5, Insightful)

SpookyFish (195418) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893347)

Sure it is, and I agree 100% -- but when they try to pull this kind of crap with the numbers, they are losing even *more* credibility among the tech-savvy crowd (if that's possible).

If they keep this stuff up, eventually everything they do will be dismissed as wrong -- no one will even bother to look for the merits.

Re:Actually this is a good thing right ? (3, Informative)

vidnet (580068) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893352)

Agreed.

I'm all for freedom of speech and lebensraum to use what I legally buy, but "35,000 finished CD-Rs, 10,000 DVDs" can hardly be concidered fair use. No matter how fast the drives used to make them were.

I don't appreciate the creative math of course, but 35k pirate cds is not something to stand up for (assuming no twiddling was done in that figure)

Re:Actually this is a good thing right ? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893405)

he has a way to produce their product cheaper. isn't capitalism supposed to reward this kind of thing?

Equivalent (2, Funny)

rela (531062) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893232)

the equivalent of 421 CD-R burners

Is that like 'the equivalent of being pregnant'?

Either they're capable of writing CD-Rs, or they're not, sheesh.

You see... (5, Funny)

WickedClean (230550) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893235)

It is mathematics like this that allow companies such as Worldcom and Enron to cook their books.

I hope you're right (3, Funny)

Alethes (533985) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893343)

Maybe the same thing will happen to the RIAA that happened to WorldCom and Enron.

So does this mean... (5, Funny)

badasscat (563442) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893237)

So does this mean that if I pay twice as much as I should for a CD (as we all do with the industry's fixed pricing) that I've really bought the equivalent of two CD's?

The register needs to check its facts (3, Informative)

User 956 (568564) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893244)

From the article:
The other curious aspect of yesterday's release is the use of Secret Service agents in the bust. The Secret Service, we naively presumed, was employed to protect high-ranking elected officials[*]. Perhaps this is a further indication of who's really in charge.®

Uhh... no.. actually, the Secret Service was created to track down counterfeiters [bbc.co.uk] .

Re:The register needs to check its facts (5, Informative)

nukem1999 (142700) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893303)

Did you read what the [*] referenced?


*Bootnote: In fact the task of talking into one's sleeve at a press conference only came 28 years after the Service was
founded [secretservice.gov] in 1865, to combat counterfeiting. Back then, there was no FBI, or equivalent federal agency, and the Presidential protection role was formalized in 1913.

Re:The register needs to check its facts (1)

eht (8912) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893312)

They seem to have amended their article.

Re:The register needs to check its facts (1, Troll)

NineNine (235196) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893314)

The Register checking facts would be like Slashdot not duplicating articles. It ain't gonna happen.

counterfeit money (5, Interesting)

recursiv (324497) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893328)

From your linked page:
The other crimes investigated by the USSS include counterfeiting of US currency; the forgery or theft of US Treasury cheques, bonds or other securities; telecommunications fraud; identity fraud; credit card fraud; and other crimes against federal financial organisations and infrastructure.


As you should now be able to see, none of this applies to any of the CDs which were being burned at higher than average speed.

Statistics (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893247)

What you are missing is that these silly statistics aren't designed for the general public--they are designed for POLITICIANS.

The **AA doesn't give a damn what the general public thinks--this is all PR for bought-and-paid-for politicians. The lobbyists will show up, wave around these silly statistics, flash some money and boom! suddenly there will be more laws/levies/taxes on recordable media faster than you can type 'cdrecord'.

Equivalent, eh? (2)

Mitchell Mebane (594797) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893249)

Let's say the "average" is 24X... I have a 12X burner. I guess that means I have the equivalent of 0.5 burners... I'm not a threat! Yay!

As Disraeli put it... (2)

JessLeah (625838) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893252)

"There are three kinds of lies: lies, damn lies, and statistics."

C'mon, such a huge percentage of all statistics out there are dubious. Did you really think the RIAA is above a little "data cooking"? ;)

Well, actually... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893369)

to be exact, 91.73% of all statistics out there are dubious. Get your facts straight before posting! ;)

that is racism, yo. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893255)

Just because one burner can work faster that two burners doesn't mean it counts as two burners. Take for instance black people. Black people counted as 3/5ths of a person not too long ago. But did a black man work 3/5th as hard as a white man? Heeellll no! Black man had to whip his black ass into shape to get up with whitey. These days we see the same thing. A black man as to work 2/3rds harder that whitey, bustin his ass so he can get some fuckin chicken in the afternoon. Shit dawg, fucking RIAA putting down the black man. Ought to bust a cap in those motherfuckers.

I have three cars!!! (5, Funny)

erroneus (253617) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893256)

In accordance with the RIAA logic, I can now beat any speeding ticket by claiming to have the equivalent of more than one car! For example, if I were busted doing 60 in a 20, I can claim I have three cars. After all, it's 3x faster than the average driver travels through such a zone. Stands to reason that I simply have the equivalent of 3 cars driving at a legal speed and therefore I am innocent.

Yeah... I think that'll work...

Would someone PLEASE bust them for lying. I can't even consider this "spin doctoring." You can't make a claim with any amount of seriousness that a "fast" cd writer is the equivalent of two or more "average speed" drives. I can't decide which is worse: Scientology or the RIAA.

What's next? (5, Funny)

SpookyFish (195418) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893258)

So now if I gnutella on a T3 am I suddenly stealing 28x the music because it's "really fast"?!

Just another sign of these idiots' attempts to ignore the progress of technology out of sheer stupidity and too much laziness to develop new business models that embrace it.

Re:What's next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893384)

Umm.. well, yeah. Probably. I would, at least.

CDR prices (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893267)

Ok, According to Pricewatch, the price difference between a 4x and 48x is $13.00. Who wouldn't buy a new 48x vs a 4x if they had the money?

Oh, and I'd like to declare... (2)

JessLeah (625838) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893270)

...that I have precisely TWO 4x burners, for a total of 8x, so I must declare that I own "2/3 of a burner". Ahhahhah.

But I use the Evil Commie P1-r4t OS Linux... maybe the RIAA will come get me for that one ;)

And you are surprised? (3, Insightful)

Montreal Geek (620791) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893273)

This is amusing.

I would think /.ers already knew our four letter friends (MPAA, RIAA, etc) lie through their teeth at every avaliable opportunity. They keep saying how p2p is running them into the ground (yet keep posting remarkable profits) and how nobody buys CDs anymore because of it (yet they manage to sell hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of carefully marketed trash from Dion and Spears).

The fact that they count funny when doing a "bust" of evil pirates is exactly what I'd expect. I'd be surprised if they came out with an announcement stating that

"A small copying operation have been shut down, with less than two hundred cd burners seized. While this operation ran for profit and is fairly unequiovocally bad, we don't expect it has significantly impacted our business either way and is basically insignificant compared to the much vaster amounts of copying done privately by millions of individuals which we can do nothing about and never will."

-- MG

I bet the RIAA doesn't use basic economics (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893276)

RIAA says the damage could be as high as 90million.

These groups, I'm sure, don't use take into account "Opportunity cost". Just because I bought a pirated CD for $2 (or obtained it for free), doesn't mean I would also pay $20 for a legimate copy if no pirated copies existed.

I have a better computer than I thought (0, Redundant)

preternatural (322346) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893277)

I guess I have a better computer than I thought. All this time I thought I only had one burner, but it turns out that I have the equivelent of 10 burners! Sweet!

Or equivalently... (5, Funny)

efuseekay (138418) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893280)

They have 800 CD burners, but most of them are slow.

Thanks RIAA! (0, Redundant)

bcliftondotcom (632765) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893285)

I used to think that I only had one CD-RW drive, since only one CD/CD-R/CD-RW fits inside at any given time. Thanks to the RIAA, I now know that I really have at least 3 or 4 CD-RW Drives! This is the best news that I've heard all day! Thanks RIAA! Your "new math" is awesome!

I can't wait until next week, when my processor is so fast that Microsoft decides that my single processor is the "equivalent of a quad processor," so that I need Windows 2k Server instead of 2k Pro.

The stupidity of this amazes me.

Truth? Get Real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893306)

"How they expect anyone to take their statistics seriously is beyond me."

What does the truth have to do with anything? The only people to fool are politicians, but corporations have no need to fool them. The languauge of politics is money. Corporations have it; politicians want it. Truth never enters the discussion.

421 !=156 (3, Insightful)

WIAKywbfatw (307557) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893313)

At least not until the price of buying 421 CDs has come down to the price that 156 CDs would cost you retail right now.

As Benjamin Disraeli said, "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics". We all know which kind were looking at here.

Re:421 !=156 (5, Funny)

haggar (72771) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893348)

As much as I respect Disraeli (beyond this very famous phrase), I think these are not even statistics. The RIAA just looks like a bunch of fucking morons.

Sorry for the language.

repeat after me... (1)

drDugan (219551) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893316)

"victimless crime"
"victimless crime"
"victimless crime"

Re:repeat after me... (2)

Anonymous Cowtard (573891) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893394)

So? A victimless crime is *still* a crime. It will remain such until enough people lobby to have it changed from being a crime. However, I really don't see how what these people were doing (pirating material on a large scale) is something that should be supported in any case. These guys are just trying to profit on other's work.

(Waiting for the smartass "Who? The RIAA or the pirates?" response from some immature /.er.)

The RIAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893319)

"Largest CD-R Manufacturing Operation In U.S. History, Major Blow To Piracy In Area"
Surely they mean CD-R burning? They're not manufacturing media (but the RIAA would bust them all the same if they were...)

"...the equivalent of 421 CD-R burners and the arrest of three individuals. This operation alone had the potential to cost the industry an estimated $90 million annually."
So really they mean 1 indivigual and $30 million?

""This is a major blow to the music pirates who were robbing record companies, artists, legitimate retailers and countless others in the industry of millions of hard-earned dollars," said Frank Creighton, Executive Vice President and Director of the RIAA's Anti-Piracy Unit."

countless others? who exactly? The only indivuals who stand to lose here are those getting royalties (a return on an investment) and the media manufactures. I think the RIAA can count them if it tries..(couldn't resist the cheap gag)

Software Pirates Up In Arms Over Faster CDRW's (1)

Spoticus (610022) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893323)

In Other News...

Recent updates in CDRW technology Have software Pirates up in arms over the cost of media to support higher speed cd-burners. In a recent interview, KeWl WaReZ d00d stated "I used to be able to get spools of 100 CD's for under $30, now I have to pay almost $ .80 each for blank CD's to support the faster speeds - that's represents a huge cut into my profits". KeWl WaReZ d00d is starting a campaign to boycott these new, faster burners, and is garnering heavy support in the warez world. Warezers all over the world are banding together in a class action suit against Sony, Phillips, and Hi-Val.

More details as the story develops...

Lies, Damed lies and Statistics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893325)

This just goes to prove how easy it is to lie with statistics. The RIAA clearly need to make illegal copying of CDs a major issue, therefore they manipulate the stats to make their situation look dire.
But go look at Intel of AMD's performance statistics, and they will always choose whatever figures make their processor look best.
The government want unemployment to look low, so they "adjust the figures" depending when in the year it is.
Anybody can lie using statistics. To understand statistics, you need to know what data was collected and the exact methods used to process it. Only in this way can you tell if:
a) the statistics are a fair representation of fact.
b) the statistics have not omitted data.

In this case, the bottom line is that the RIAA are liars.

IF YOU SEE A MICROSOFT AD ON /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893335)


KLICK ON IT 30 TIMES!
(and close em as quickly as ye can ;-))

Off topic, yes, sorry.

uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893342)

Yeah, baby... I come in ten seconds, but that's like coming for two minutes after an hour!

How did they get 421? (3, Interesting)

jdhutchins (559010) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893344)

I know this sounds redundant, but how did they get 421? If one CD-R drive is 40x, does it count as 40 CD-R drives? If they did it that way, then it would seem like most of the drives being used were fairly slow, because otherwise the number would have been higher. It was a professional pirating business, so I'm guessing many of the drives would have been at least 24x. If each drive is at least 24x, then 156*24 = 3744. With the numbers they gave (and the speed of a CD player counts as many times), the average CD-R speed is just over 2. But that seems hard to believe, because these are (were) professionals, and they would have had the money to get faster CD-R drives.

The only reason the RIAA published this number is to make the media grab it more. This is the same thing they did with "Everyone using Napster is pirating music", which wasn't exactly true (many were, but not all). The media ate up the RIAA's headline, and ignored the real truth behind it.

Now I understand... (2, Funny)

HogGeek (456673) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893349)

...Why my auto insurance is so high!

The automotive insurance companies must use the same "math", and since my car is so fast they are charging me like I have two (possible three :-) )...

...I feel much better now

IN SOVIET RUSSIA... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893350)

...we would say they that it's the equivalent of 0.36 FAST CD-Rs.

$90 Million Anually (5, Funny)

Malicious (567158) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893353)

So, if they cost the industry $90 million, assume they were selling their CD's for 1/3rd the cost of Retail, Minus expenses... these guys would have made roughly 10 MILLION dollars. Why do they have less than 200 Fast CD burners?

Doesn't add up. RIAA's math skills should be used to power interstellar space ships.

Hope they have decent load balancers (2)

Hubert_Shrump (256081) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893356)

Millions of C64 page requests flood the register article!

ASUS 52X drives? (2, Funny)

loony (37622) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893362)

Glad we just had a threat about these new drives - do they count tripple?

Imagine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893363)

Imagine how we can now imagine clusters of beowulf clusters of anything!

Just the facts, ma'am (1)

Bendebecker (633126) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893366)

To the RIAA, the 'truth' is something that their PR department made up. It has no basis in reality what-so-ever. The 'truth' is something they want you to believe. They want you to believe that what happened happened as they said it did. The facts are what actually happened. They don't want you to believe those. The RIAA has a twisted view of reality, they see what they want to see. When something does not coincide with that vision, they warp the facts so that it will. This warping creates an end product that they call the 'truth'. Their PR department then goes about trying to persaude everyone that the 'truth' is correct, even when the facts do not agree with them.

What about the DVD-Rs? (2)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893368)

What? No DVD burners? Yet they got 10,000 DVDs. Where did those come from?

And if there were DVD-Rs there, did they count them in the CDR numbers?

Since DVD 18 can hold roughly 17 gigs, did they count that as 18+ burners?

When the RIAA reports these numbers, it makes me wonder how they do their taxes.

"Well, let's see. I gave a dollar to the kids in Ethiopia, and there are 3 million kids, so I'm going to write this off as the equivelent of 3 million dollars, because I don't know which kid is going to get it. Hmm, that sounds about right..."

Fun Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893372)

Click Here [riaa.org] and let the Slashdotting Commence. Honestly, they should be Slashdotted every time we have to read their propaganda in a /. headline...

Another "Equivalence" (3, Insightful)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893381)

According to the RIAA press release [riaa.org] - in the footnote:

"The Recording Industry Association of America is the trade group that represents the U.S. recording industry."

Indeed. Well, their supporting facts to indicate that they represent the entirety of the recording industry includes this:

"RIAA® members create, manufacture and/or distribute approximately 90% of all legitimate sound recordings produced and sold in the United States."

So, you've heard it here, folks. 90% = 100%.

The proof of the corollary theorem, 1 = 2, is left as an exercise to the reader.

This is what the RIAA should be doing (5, Interesting)

Kiwi (5214) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893386)

These kinds of busts of people who willfully infringe on copyright is the kind of activity that the RIAA should be using, instead of attempting to encumber everyone's computers, regardless of the guilt of the computer user.

When the HRAA (home recording rights act) was passed, it set a dangerous precedent of being presumed guilty. No matter how one wished to use home stereo equipment which can copy audio digitally, one was treated like a media pirate.

For example, when I was burning a CD of my own music (which I own the copyright on) two years ago, I was not allowed to make a digital copy of one of my songs to the new CD. What happened was that a flag saying the song was a copy was set; my CD recorder does not allow me to make digital copies of copies. It assumes that all such activity is piracy, even though I use this equipment to make copies of my own songs.

In addition, the CD player forces me to pay extra for CD blanks because it assumes that my activities are copyright infringment activities. In other words, I have to pay the media companies royalties for the privledge of copying my own music. Fortunatly , there is a bug in the firmware which allows me to work around this issue and use far more inexpensive "computer" CDR blanks.

The RIAA and MPAA are trying to cripple computers in a similar manner, which such abominations as the SSSCA. They should stop treating honest computer users like criminials and start persecuting people who willfully engage in piracy.

People who do not think piracy is a problem are mainly in the US, where it is not the kind of problem it is in other countries. In México, for example, one can hardly walk down a street in a shopping district without noticing stands where people sell burned copies of music CDs, complete with inkjet printouts of the cover art for the CD. These kinds of sales do hurt the profits of the RIAA. Obviously not to the extent that every person who buys a burned copy is someone who would have bought a legitimate copy otherwise, but certaintly to a lesser extent.

The people who willfully pirate music and movies need to be persecuted to the fullest extent of the law; I will go so far as to say that the law needs to be set up to make persecuting these people easier. But only the guilty should be punsished; methods for duplicating and distributing music and movies, which are very helpful for promoting independent artists, should not be crippled by the media companies.

- Sam

Old wine in new bottles (5, Funny)

isomeme (177414) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893389)

I thought this sort of math was only applied to drug busts.

"We estimate the marijuana had a street value of 4.5 million dollars."

(Yes, if you sold it one eighth at a time to desperate, confused rich people.)

RIAA and reproduction (5, Funny)

Cheese Cracker (615402) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893392)

A man who fucks for 15 minutes before delivering the cream to the woman, result in a baby.

Therefor, a man who fucks for 5 minutes before delivering the cream to the woman, must result in triplets.

Of course, we're just talking about successful cases here... and I don't want to think about the poor guys who comes after 30 seconds...

For Sale (1)

n3rd (111397) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893393)

40 486SX 50 computers with 8 megabytes of memory each. Equivalent to a 2 Ghz system with 320 megabytes of memory, only asking $1000.

The reason the RIAA is taken seriously (1)

dcocos (128532) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893396)

Is because they have the money and power to lobby lawmakers.

By RIAA's logic... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4893397)

...my boss will be pleased to know that because my workstation has the fastest processor I am the most productive.

40x CDR's are for wimps.... (1)

helix_r (134185) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893412)

...for serious copyright infringement, buy a CD replication line for US $1M. Cycle time is ~4 seconds per disk with a materials/energy cost of pennies.

I knew it! (1)

thesophist (630380) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893414)

Approximately 25 percent of the product seized was Latin music.

Those shifty-eyed salsa and tango dancers... the ruffles on those rumbero shirts must come in handy for stashing the goods.

Fast CD burners? (1)

jabber01 (225154) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893415)

You mean those there dang new-fangled gadgets ain't cup holders?? Well sheet! Here I just thought that 40x meant it could hold like, a 40 ounce Slurpee! Dang nabbit! I just loves mah AOL-Internet! Thank yew Al Gore!

Why not quote a "burn-rate" instead? (5, Informative)

Tekmage (17375) | more than 11 years ago | (#4893428)

Holy obfuscation Flying-Mammal-Man!

First, congrats to the RIAA for shutting down a real piracy operation. However, if they wanted to get the idea across without messing with the facts, why didn't they say something like "...able to churn out X CDs a day..."? They obviously went through the trouble of doing some sort of calculation to come with that 156 burners = 421 average burners, why not put it in real world terms? Shouldn't be too hard to come up with really big numbers like:

(x_burners)(average_CD_burnt_per_minute)*24*60

Lets say average_CD_burnt_per_minute (aka burn rate) of a 20x burner burning a 70-minute CD is:

20/70min = 0.286 CD/min

You have a fascility churning out:

156*0.286*24*60 = 64,247 CDs/day

Now isn't that a much more impressive number? (assuming I've got me numbers correct; my brain only half-works on Sundays, which is how I average more than a whole brain during the week ;-)
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