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Kazaa: Happy In the Global Legal Briarpatch

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the hive-mind dept.

The Courts 262

Steve0987 writes "The Washington Post has an article on the entertainment industry's atempts to close down the file-sharing system Kazaa. I agree that copyrighted material shouldn't be freely distributed from an ethical standpoint. However, the entertainment industry has been acting in an arbitrary manner trying to impede anything remotely impinging on their industry. Go Kazaa."

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fp! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936796)

ferrets kick ass :)

Re:fp! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936804)

Ferrets stink. In fact, I have noticed an odd resemblence between the smell of your mother's genitalia and the smell of a ferret's unwashed anus. Interesting.

Re:fp! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936961)

Its the tommo effect!

Obligatory... (3, Interesting)

gearheadsmp (569823) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936807)

Freenet link:
http://freenetproject.org/cgi-bin/twiki/vie w/Main/ WebHome

Project goal is to be secure so that 3rd parties can't see what you're exchanging.

Obligatory injunction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936905)

Freenet == Kiddie Pr0n Exchange

Re:Obligatory... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936912)

From the freenet FAQ (re: child pornography):

What about kiddie porn, offensive content or terrorism?

While most people wish that child pornography and terrorism did not exist, humanity should not be deprived of their freedom to communicate just because of how a very small number of people might use that freedom.

Just in case... (3, Funny)

swordboy (472941) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936808)

If the article gets slashdotted, you can find it on Kazaa with the search query, Fuck Holywood.

Re:Just in case... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936822)

I hope you mean "Hollywood".

Re:Just in case... (5, Interesting)

liquidsin (398151) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936833)

hmmm...P2P sharing of articles to defend against the slashdot effect. It's about time KaZaA got a legitimate use ;)

But seriously, since /. is so reluctant to set up a cache to protect the sites they link, how about a distributed /. client? Sits in your tray, checks slashdot for updates every couple minutes, and if it finds any new links on the front page, grabs them and stores them on your harddrive. Then some sort of link system on the sidebar of the mainpage ("view the cache at http://slashdot.org/p2pcache?articleID=whatever") that links us all together.

Re:Just in case... (4, Interesting)

inerte (452992) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936872)

Yeah, it's possible... you could use GnucDNA [gnucleus.net] to make a browser plug-in that would request contents of a webpage not only to its server, but also by querying the p2p network for it.

I've tought about doing it several times, but couldn't find the time. It would not only help slashdotted websites, but anyone with large files (images, music or video).

And if you could setup a system where the server, while saving bandwidth, compensated an user who upload the content, it would be a success.

Re:Just in case... (3, Insightful)

bedessen (411686) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937031)

Sits in your tray, checks slashdot for updates every couple minutes, and if it finds any new links on the front page, grabs them

Sweet jeebus, you could flash-fry a server in 30 seconds with that kind of setup.

I think it would do more harm than good, think about the wastefulness of thousands and thousands of nearly-instantaneous hits for the sites linked. Sure, it would be useful in that when you get around to reading slashdot you'd have your own local mirror ready, and if not you could get one easily. But not everyone reads every story, etc, etc. There would have to be some way for the clients to coordinate before hitting the linked site. That way they could arrange for an initial handfull of well-connected clients to get the content and then pass it on down a tree structure, kinda like the old concept of the "phone tree" that schools and church groups use. The whole point is to not hit up the server, but rather use the peer network as soon as its available.

Keep it free (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936809)

Keep all the software free

Go Kazaa, Hotline, Carracho, and all the others that keep it free

Mongoose

Re:Keep it free (1)

BarrettAnderson (622397) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937017)

troll??? is it an inside troll or am i retarded? btw, kazaa rules. and it will never get shut down! (does it have central servers to shut down?)

Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters... (1, Insightful)

HomerNet (146137) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936827)

Go me! Anyway, does anyone know if Kazaa is still spyware? I've been interested in using it, but the installer requires WMP and there was a story awile ago that said that Kazaa was some freaky serious spyware.

Anyone know?

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (5, Informative)

sinnyin (530106) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936837)

Yes, regular kazaa has spyware in it. But you can download a spyware-free hack of kazaa here [kazaalite.com] . Most people in-the-know use this. It also removes the popup ads, etc.

Re: Kazaa-lite is illegal. They told me so. (3, Informative)

dagg (153577) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936968)

The problem with Kazaa-Lite is that when you are installing it, it says: "This software is illegal". No joke. If you install the software and use it, then you are breaking the law.

Re: Kazaa-lite is illegal. They told me so. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936992)

"Reading this post is illegal."

Looks like you just broke the law because my post said so.

Re: Kazaa-lite is illegal. They told me so. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937038)

It has nothing to do with saying so. It's because Kazaa-Lite is illegally distributing copyrighted software. (gasp!)

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (1)

Unregistered (584479) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937030)

Kazaa lite also works in linux with wine

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (2)

Mitchell Mebane (594797) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937150)

You can see how well it works (and tips to get it working) here [codeweavers.com] .

If you really want to run the original KaZaA, see here [codeweavers.com] .

Kaaza Lite (3, Informative)

RWarrior(fobw) (448405) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937051)

It's interesting to note that the spyware-free Kaaza Lite's webpage slams you with four popups and at least one window that dances across your screen, advertising casinos, Ebay, the University of Phoenix, and some "you're the millionth visitor!" nonsense.

Re:Kaaza Lite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937080)

WHAT?! It said *I* was the millionth visitor. Obviously you are lying.

Re:Kaaza Lite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937194)

Ha ha! IE-using loser.

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936839)

Yep.

use www.kazaalite.com..... its kazaa minus the spyware.

and weird, eh? i've posted 2 and both are in the first 20! w00t!

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (1, Redundant)

TomHandy (578620) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936842)

Yes, Kazaa still has spyware.

Fortunately there is a project that makes a version of Kazaa with the spyware stripped out. You can get it here: Kazaa Lite [kazaalite.com] . It seems to work just fine.

I'm actually pretty impressed with Kazaa. The only real problem sometime is finding files that are mislabeled (i.e. in Kazaa they are listed as being by one artist but then when you get the actual file it turns out to be someone else).

-Tom

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (0, Redundant)

Huogo (544272) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936845)

Yes, it still has spyware, but Kazaa lite is kazaa without spyware. You can get it at Kazaalite.com [kazaalite.com] .

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (0, Interesting)

mwolff (594593) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936859)

On the last version of Kazaa that I installed I could actually choose whether or not to install some third party spyware apps. My firewall hasn't found anything strange trying to phone home so I don't think any hidden spyware is forced on you either.

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (0)

creature (250442) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936972)

I used to be really paranoid about spyware, but I talk to a guy about this, and he said the following:

"What do I care, all anyone is going to find on my computer is porn anyway"

Re:Wow, I'm actually one of the first 20 posters.. (2)

Yo Grark (465041) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937188)

Kazaa Lite. Kazaa, with the spyware.

http://www.kazaalite.nl/

Yo Grark
Canadian Bred with American Buttering

but it COULD be used for piracy! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936829)

Just one of the powers of the DMCA, whose vagueness prohibits owning a crowbar.

IN NAZI GERMANY (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936831)

You get SHOT for running Kazaa!

Firewalls. (0, Offtopic)

Trusty Penfold (615679) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936836)


I've said it before and I'll say it again ... we need firewalls whereever the internet enters the country. We can filter out kazaa etc. there and be nice and legal.

And don't give me any of that "violates free speech rights" nonsense ... we can have free speech inside and keep others' illegal speech out.

Re:Firewalls. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936873)

oh darn, I won't be able to access all those high speed links from Tailand if this happens...

censorship is damage that will be routed around

Re:Firewalls. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936935)

Kazaa will still run inside the firewall.

China (1)

gnarled (411192) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936964)

Just so we can be like China, a beacon of human rights in a sea oppressors...oh wait!

Anyone else find it strange? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936844)

That the article makes casual mention that the programmers who wrote the original Kazaa are now working on a new program with built-in DRM, for a company called Altnet? Sound familiar? It seems this Washington Post correspondant didn't bother to investigate how Altnet is linked to Sharman Networks... Altnet is virtually Sharman Networks...

Re:Anyone else find it strange? (2)

cioxx (456323) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937052)

I doubt it. Any kind of "Hollywood Style" DRM implementation, which prohibits regular Joe Swapper from downloading a certain _available_ file would drain their userbase. If you read between the lines in the article, it says they are "looking for ways..."

"Looking for Ways..." is another phrase for "We want to get paid"

You and I, both know that business owners are not in it for the thrill or the adventure. The bottom line is what's important to them. They are working on a way to restrict personal downloads to a certain number, unless you upgrade your account to a low fee of (x) dollars. And that's perfectly fine.

If I was a Kazaa user, I'd definately pay $5/month for the premium service.

Re:Anyone else find it strange? (0, Offtopic)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937148)

It seems this Washington Post correspondant didn't bother to investigate how Altnet is linked to Sharman Networks... Altnet is virtually Sharman Networks...

Maybe the reporter didn't want to get Mr. Whipple mad at hime and decided he wasn't going to squeeze the Sharman.

Civil Desobedience (4, Interesting)

famazza (398147) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936846)

Is a way to protest against laws that you don't agree, usually associated with passive resistence.

This means keep doing whatever you have always done ignoring the law, and of course paying the consequences. It works as a colective form o protest.

Let's suppose that the speed limit becomes 20 mph at highways. If everybody ignore this limit then the police won't be able to fine everybody.

The same happens here, if a considerable number of citizens ignore the way copyright works today it will be impossible to sue everyone, and of course they won't sue none of us!

That's how it should work, passive resistence.

But what happens when they change penalties... (3, Insightful)

TWX_the_Linux_Zealot (227666) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936892)

... to make an example out of people? It's not unheard of for law makers to change the penalties for infractions of things that the populace as a majority or large minority want to be legal, and still get away with remaining in office, in power. Worse yet, those that get caught doing whatever "bad thing"(tm) that has been legislated against suffer massive penalties. I don't personally want to be the one caught if something that I enjoy doing, listening to, using, etc, gets made highly illegal in an attempt to make an example out of me to the others if I should happen to be one who gets caught.

Regarding your speed limit argument, something to keep in mind in many states is that there is a 'resonable and prudent' clause, where certain speeds above the posted speed limit are acceptable. In Arizona, one can go up to fifteen miles per hour over the posted speed limit and not have broken the law, assuming that one can demonstrate how that was reasonable and prudent (ie, everyone was going that fast, or there was no one on the road for a mile in each direction). Those that do exceed the reasonable and prudent grey area, however, are now subject to criminal traffic citation, rather than the civil citation that normal speeding, red light running, failure to stop, etc, would qualify for.

The only way that I could see such civil disobedience working is if it's in conjunction with pressure on lawmakers to change laws, so that when massive penalties are dealt upon parties involved, there can be a public outcry that lawmakers might feel they have to follow, else their continuing jobs will be threatened. Even then, though, I don't know if the modern system of campaign contributions, favours, kickbacks, and the like will allow for such.

Re:Civil Desobedience (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936894)

Great idea! And let's "passively resist" the evil retailers by ignoring their checkout lines and not paying for merchandise while we are at it! And the next time you want something that your friend has, "passively resist" his attempts to keep you from pocketing it as well. As long as everybody ignores the rights of others, the legal system won't be able to protect anyone! Oh what a world it will be...

Re:Civil Desobedience (5, Insightful)

dirk (87083) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936898)

Is a way to protest against laws that you don't agree, usually associated with passive resistence.

This means keep doing whatever you have always done ignoring the law, and of course paying the consequences. It works as a colective form o protest.

Let's suppose that the speed limit becomes 20 mph at highways. If everybody ignore this limit then the police won't be able to fine everybody.

The same happens here, if a considerable number of citizens ignore the way copyright works today it will be impossible to sue everyone, and of course they won't sue none of us!

That's how it should work, passive resistence.


While civil disobedience is fine, that is far from what this is. Kazaa (and most other P2P systems) are built on the concept of being anonymous. That means the current P2P technology is built around not being caught and not being punished, which is anything but civil disobedience. If you want to use P2P as civil disobedience, you have to make sure the law knows who you are and what you are doing. Try using your real name as your user name. Share not only MP3s, but a file with your name and address that says you know what you are doing is illegal, and if the RIAA wants to come after you, here is where they can find you. Unfortunately, 99.999% of the people using P2P have no interest in civil disobedience, they are only interested in getting stuff for free. P2P isn't about anything but getting free shit for most people.

Re:Civil Desobedience (4, Insightful)

dh003i (203189) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936960)

No, that's what your narrow definition of civil disobedience is.

Civil disobedience simply means peacefully disobeying the laws. That's what people of Kazaa are doing. Why shouldn't they be anonymous? Anonymosity is a good thing: it protects our privacy. Getting a law to be changed due to massive non-compliance with that law does not require publicly disclosing who's disobeying that law. Ref. prohibition. But, oh wait, according to you, all the people who drank during prohibition were wrong b/c they didn't do so openly and "accept the consequences". Of course, that's absurd: the law was unconstitutional and should never have existed in the first place. There is nothing good or noble about allowing one's self to be punished by an unjust law.

Re:Civil Disobedience (2)

abe ferlman (205607) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937142)

If you want to use P2P as civil disobedience, you have to make sure the law knows who you are

You're right. In this respect sharing copyrighted files without express permission is more like disguised participation in the Boston Tea Party - deliberately making life difficult for those who would do you wrong, and violating the insane "right to profit" that seems to have popped up in this country.

We're much more like the American revolutionaries who refused unelected sovereignty than we are like Martin Luther King playing goodcop to sympathetic but tentative white people.

So I have to agree with both of you; it is not exactly the same as what people normally think of as civil disobedience, but it does constitute passive collective resistance in the tradition of the American revolutionaries.

Re:Civil Desobedience (3, Insightful)

2nesser (538763) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936910)

"Let's suppose that the speed limit becomes 20 mph at highways. If everybody ignore this limit then the police won't be able to fine everybody. ... if a considerable number of citizens ignore the way copyright works today it will be impossible to sue everyone, and of course they won't sue none of us!"
You may want to rethink your logic there. What would really happen if everyone drove 40mph over the speed limit besides the police handing out lots of expensive speeding tickets? This kind of takes me back to the playground in elementary school.
"Just because everyone else is doing it doesn't make it ok." -- Mr. Harder, my grade 5 teacher.
Is the bolded part of the quote a double negative?
Yes, you will get sued.
The probability of being caught is much lower because there are so many others who are also doing something wrong. You may be lucky and get away with it, but over time your chances of getting caught will approach 1.

Re:Civil Desobedience (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937145)

What would really happen if everyone drove 40mph over the speed limit

Not much. The highways were built to wistand that speed. The real danger is if everyone but a few people started driving 40mph. The most dangerous thing on the highway is people driving slower than the pack forcing everyone to pass them.

Piracy and the Common Good (1, Troll)

HanzoSan (251665) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936911)



When you decide on something, when you decide if its right or wrong, do you look at how something benifits you?

Well you can say Piracy benifits you because you save money and get free times, OK.

You can also say
Piracy benifits the majority of the people on this planet who also cannot afford to buy $500 software and $20 CDs.

So, what it comes down to is, Piracy is good because the majority of the people on this planet benifit from Piracy more than we benifit from not being pirates.

So Piracy is good because it benifits the common man. Intellectual property benifits maybe %1 of the worlds population if that, 99 percent of people in the USA do not own intellectual propery, most musicians dont have record deals, they dont make money off of their art.

Most people in other countries do not have the money to buy patented medications, most people on this planet simply do not have or own any information.

Why should we, the common man and owners of all information which man produces, give ownership to a select few when we can all own it?

Think about it, how do YOU benifit by giving Sony the right to own music? How do YOU benifit?
You dont benifit at all by doing this, so why do it?

Because its right? Its more right to share than it is to own.

Re:Piracy and the Common Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937049)

I agree with your statement in general. Piracy IS wrong and if let run amok will certainly destroy creation of new goods, clearly not in the best interests of society.

But you must also see the side that hte prices charged for these goods are excessive, and most of that money never goes to the content creators. There is no supply/demand based system here, because the content does not require significant resources to (mass) produce. The publisher is free to create nearly infinite copies, and charge as they wish.

We all understand at some primitive level supply and demand, and how this affects automobiles, food, gold, land etc. Regulating information is a relatively new problem. Supply and demand doesn't work, but the "people" are unsatisfied with "vendor sets price" since it really doesn't cost him that much to produce.

The evolved system has been piracy: a few people buy, lots of people copy. This was a more or less self regulating system prior to the internet. Usually you had to be physically near someone who bought the media, that person wouldn't let you be a freeloader too long ("Why should I buy all your music!"). With the internet, being a freeloader is not such a pain. Chances are you are freeloading off someone who himself didn't pay. The publishers see this, and are nervous. How will this system regulate?

On one hand, if they merely lock up their content, there will be a delay while it's cracked open, and then it's spread in the wild. On the other hand, if they lock up their content and make it ("really") illegal to break, fewer people will be inclined to break it open. A problem arises however, that us "people" are unhappy. How do we regulate the publishers? Do we call in the government, and have the government regulate prices? Yuck, that doesn't work so well. The DMCA isn't a good solution.

I think the answer has to be that the music industry encrypts their data nad expects it will take some amount of time to "break". During that time, they will push push push as many CDs/DVDs/whatever as they can. Most people I know are highly impatient and will BUY them during that time. After it's broken, expect sales to be lower.

Re:Civil Desobedience (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936982)

Let's suppose that the speed limit becomes 20 mph at highways. If everybody ignore this limit then the police won't be able to fine everybody.
Everybody already _is_ ignoring 55mph and the police already can't/won't fine everybody. They like it this way and would never accept a zero tolerance speeding enforcement policy. They want to retain their ability to bust people according to their discretion or the profile du jour.

Follow the money: The speeding-fine racket long ago ceased to be about safety and enforcement and is now all about money. I don't mean only the fines collected; that's the smallest piece of the pie. I mean the ability of the insurance industry to maintain artificially high rates on n percent of the public. That's why there are ticket quotas. It doesn't matter who gets the tickets, as long as the police continue to deliver a population of sub-prime insurance customers. (not to blame the officers, this is obviously driven by their politician bosses).

Notice they'd rather spend their time hiding behind a bush waiting to issue an easy speeding ticket -- that's easy. But patrolling for the darting, weaving, tailgating agressive driver? That's hard, so they'll just hang out behind the bush the last week of every month.

Notice the amount of the fines is always carefully calibrated to be about the cost of a day's work. So you have to decide whether you want to miss a day's work, or pay the fine.

If everybody showed up to fight every ticket, even if unsuccessful, the financial racket would collapse, and they would be forced to re-examine their selective enforcement and speed laws.

Sure? think again! (1, Offtopic)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937028)

They will start making examples
Suppose, 20Mph is limit... they stop you.. then beat you to pulp in front of other drivers... how many will take chances next time? Of course we have rights(hopefully) and this cant happen, but as far as civil laws go... you have no rights.. money talks and it talks loud

I agree (2, Insightful)

cdrj (556227) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936851)

Kazaa has basically made it too easy to pirate all things. Before, because of the inherent difficulty involved, (FTP, IRC, etc...) some people were prevented from doing so. Now, everyone looking for an alternative to Napster, has begun to pirate much more than just games. I feel that sooner or later, the majority of consumers will pirate software, rather than vice versa.

Re:I agree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936899)

"the majority of consumers will pirate software, rather than vice versa."

so the majority of software will pirate consumers? :)

Re:I agree (5, Insightful)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936942)

While we're at it, let's ban Colt semi-automatic pistols, Saab cars, and Hitachi VCR's, because they're all specific examples of technology that can be used for bad things. That'll set an example, and everyone will stop making and using that technology and we can put the genie back in the bottle, right?

Alternatively, we could live in the real world. Remember Napster? When that was destroyed, people moved to Kazaa. Destroy Kazaa, and people will move to Morpheus. Destroy Morpheus, and they will move to (e.g.) Gnutella. Destroy Gnutella (how?) and they'll move to Freenet. Destroy Freenet and, well at that point we've destroyed the internet in its current form. Let's give ourselves Ashcroftian superpowers and pretend we can do it. Do that, and people will go to BBS's or to Neighbourhood Area Networks. Do what you like, people will keep sharing.

Are you getting it yet? We can't put the genie back in the bottle. So go ahead and destroy Kazaa if it makes you feel good. The War on Sharing is about as winnable as the War on Drugs or War on Terror. They all have the same purpose anyway: making the hard-of-thinking feel safe and happy and protected. So you enjoy your cozy little fantasy world. Send us a postcard!

Re:I agree (1)

DarkKnightRadick (268025) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936985)

Amen brother! (BTW, I still occassionaly share files on IRC with a few friend). And being a Linux user, I use GNapster (which is still up and running as strong as ever). My future brother-in-law has found a spy-ware cleaner for KaZaA and uses it exclusively. I tend not to use file sharing software for very long periods of time. Just don't need it. When I do, I install it, us it, then uninstall it when I'm done.

Re:I agree (2)

Russellkhan (570824) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937012)

"I feel that sooner or later, the majority of consumers will pirate software, rather than vice versa."

Rather than sofware pirating the majority of consumers? What is this, Soviet Russia?

Re:I agree (2)

CySurflex (564206) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937069)

I feel that sooner or later, the majority of consumers will pirate software, rather than vice versa.

The majority of software will pirate consumers?

Re:I agree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937176)

I don't totally agree with you on that. Before I shared just about everything, well one copy for the three of us in the house, or anyone that came over for a LAN party. Now I have a job where I can afford to buy my own copy, and I tend to tell my friends to go buy their own now(Cheap bastards, they can afford it.) On the flip side, a small amount of sharing is called for. Some software while very good, doesn't deserve the high price tag companies tend to stick on it. Especially when they expect you to cough that amount for a slightly improved version year after year. Music is a totally different story. I think it is ridiculously over priced. The music industry was born due to copyright laws of the last 50 years. Before that music was more or less free, though you did have to play it yourself:). Most musicians don't have the skills to work at Taco Bell, but for some reason they should be made millionares, come on! In addition the slimy recording companies that they sold their souls to make billions. What we're seeing now is a market adjustment. Once the price matchs the quality of the content, then people will start buying again. Of course the recording industry will be the first to deny it. They think it's fair to charge $15+ for one or two good songs. Personally I think $1 is closer to the mark. Add a couple more dollars for a video or extra content. At the moment they're trying to stop the file sharing and make examples of people, but I'd like to see them stop everyone online or better yet the postal service! Kaza doesn't anything on the USPS. My collection is in the neighboorhood of 110gb of music, and I didn't download a thing. It's called a portable hard drive and priority mail! Kind of sad that the post office still has a faster "upload/download" rate than the internet. I personally don't share online or with those who don't have their own CD collections, as you should have paid something for the music you listen to, just not the over inflated price of retail.

I love KazAA!!!!!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936852)

http://www.geocities.com/julielavine/julie1.jpg

Notoriety (3, Interesting)

Bob Bobbinson (574371) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936854)

The music companies did win their case against Napster, and we all know that Napster is dead and buried because of this, but would we all have known about Kazaa if the Napster wrangle had never been made so public? I can remember using Napster in it's very early forms, and very few people back then had even heard of an MP3 file, let alone peer-to-peer or Napster. Now even my aunt and uncle who have only just recently bought their first ever PC have Kazaa nicely installed on their computer. Surely something like as high profile as this will surely turn out to be will just be another shot in the foot for the music and movie industries. Especially if they don't end up closing it down, just think how many more people will know about it.

Re:Notoriety (2, Informative)

einTier (33752) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936988)

No, they did not win. Napster ran out of money to fight, sold out to Bertlesmann, and there was no point in pursuing the case any further.


You make it sound like Napster actually went to court and was found guilty by a judge and a jury -- when in fact, they never got to the trial stage at all.


You don't have to be right when you have enough money to sue the other guy into bankruptcy.

Bhahhaa! (0, Redundant)

Isbiten (597220) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936855)

The thing I like the most is that the american court will have sooo much trouble if they want to put all these dudes on trial. :)

Go Europe!

Suspicion (1, Insightful)

jarda (635462) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936860)

File sharing is suspicious. CD copying is suspicious. What follows next? Internet is suspicious. Just allow the people to use officially approved sites, officially approved software, since we now best what they can do.

p2p (1)

zoloto (586738) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936864)

**AA's and any other corperation shoudln't be allowed to have any more influence than a single citizen in this country regardless of how much money they make.

p2p /. would be nice though, supporting different platforms would great:)

The industry needs a sanity check (3, Insightful)

EvilAlien (133134) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936869)

They are doing far more damage to their bottom line by these petty holy wars against P2P than P2P could do, even if the claims that people no longer buy music could be supported.

What is happening is that the industry is bludgeoning the public with their short-sightedness, forcing everyone to realize that far too much money gets page to music publishers, far too little rights actually belong to the artists themselves, and the big sell-outs like Metallica (s/big/has-been/) who jump on the "STOP THIEF!" bandwagon even damage and (prematurely?) end their own careers due to the PR fiasco.

Its time the recording industry focused on making music and less on making headlines.

Except for... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936876)

"However, the entertainment industry has been acting in an arbitrary manner trying to impede anything remotely impinging on their industry"


except FTP sites and IRC, which do it the most.

SO WHERE IS THE LInux client? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936887)

It doesn't exist. Linux loozers!

Re:SO WHERE IS THE LInux client? (1, Flamebait)

kinobsd (621182) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936957)

It's called Gnutella, grow some ballz kthx

Re:SO WHERE IS THE LInux client? (1)

Unregistered (584479) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937065)

what do you do after you download both songs of gnutella. and the linux client is KazaaLite w/ wine.

Re:SO WHERE IS THE LInux client? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937180)

what do you do after you download both songs of gnutella

Very true!

impinging (2, Funny)

vudmaska (584760) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936888)

[anything remotely impinging] Isnt that what you do when you see if your chat buddies are on line?

cliche: information wants to & eventually will (4, Insightful)

indiigo (121714) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936890)

Free.

So they shut down Kazaa. The Consumer available models of file trading are all gone? No, more effort put into efforts like freenet, or Edonkey, or much more sophisticated methods that are decentralized, encrypted, and much more difficult to shut down?

No, witness DC++, which is 99% warez, and no efforts to shut that down.

What they don't realize is people want this, they can get it, and their efforts truly are being wasted. At least the Motion Picture industry is attempting to head them off at the pass with their own service ramp-up.

For music? It's too late, they have lost the battle for distribution. And to think, if they had their own distribution model in 1998, we would likely all be paying for it, and be happy!

Your ethics are backwards. Heres why (5, Insightful)

HanzoSan (251665) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936891)



Theres two options.

Option A, people who make something always own what they make forever.

Option B, people who make things share what they make with all of humanity.

The same arguement which claims we should have software be open source because it benifits the whole instead of one part of the whole is the same arguement we use with file sharing.

More people benifit from file sharing than those who dont, the purpose of technology is to benifit the people.

When deciding what is more ethical, I look at patents as something mythical in my world, I do not know anyone who owns a patent in anything. I know musicians like my mother or my father who both make music but never made any money.

I make music but I never make any money. I know artists who when they make art because they have to begin to not like drawing anymore. Some things are meant to be an art, and some things are meant to be a business.

Its not very logical to try to turn bits of information into a product, it doenst benifit the majority of the people in this world. People in africa cannot buy medicinee because of this. People in afganastan cannot get educated because of patents on books. People in the USA cannot learn programming or be productive in todays society because of patents.

Why do we need patents? So a few hundred people can make billions of dollars? How does this help me? IT doesnt, I benifit more from Open Source than I do from closed source because I have no money.

I benifit more from file sharing because if there were no napsters and gnutellas of the world I simply wouldnt have the money to listen to music AT ALL, PERIOD.

Re:Your ethics are backwards. Heres why (4, Insightful)

bogie (31020) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937050)

"I benifit more from file sharing because if there were no napsters and gnutellas of the world I simply wouldnt have the money to listen to music AT ALL, PERIOD."

Well there is something called a radio.

Fuck the RIAA and all that, but don't act like your downloading music is some sort of humanitarian benefit to society. People download because A) they could care less about copyright B) they're tired of overpaying for CD's or C) they think its some form of protest against the record companies and/or copyright. The no money arguement is bogus. If you have no money, do without. Music isn't included in the basic Food, Clothing, and Shelter need we all have.

Morally I could care less about downloading music and I would never hold anything against someone who does. I simply don't care enough. But file sharing is no big benefit to society, its a convenience pure and simple for those who fit in one of the categories I described above.

Re:Your ethics are backwards. Heres why (1)

sulli (195030) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937105)

Or (D) they're lazy fucks. I have definitely found myself in that category from time to time.

Re:Devils Advocate... (1)

loucura! (247834) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937103)

Theres two options.

Why does there have to be only two options? Shouldn't those who create something have the ability to gain from it, as well as enrich the world?

Copyright itself isn't the problem, the problem is the -term- of copyright, and perhaps the ability of corporations to own copyrights, but whatever.

There are always more than two options. If you simplistically reduce a complex problem to a binary problem, you miss out on a lot of good solutions.

Its not very logical to try to turn bits of information into a product,

Business isn't about logic, it is about profit.

it doenst benifit the majority of the people in this world.

This is going to sound very harsh, but I don't owe anyone in the world anything. It is not our responsibility to give them benefit. Certainly it is an honourable task to attempt to give them benefit, but you cannot fault someone for failing in responsibilities that are not their own.

That said, intellectual property is meant to be a compromise between the interests of the innovator and the public. The system is broken, I admit, but it doesn't mean that the system is a poor system.

People in africa cannot buy medicinee[sic] because of this. People in afganastan cannot get educated because of patents on books.

Patents do not prevent people from buying medicine, and a product patented in the US is -not- patented in other countries, unless they have signed a treaty to honour each other's patents.

Books are copyrighted, not patented, just like everything anyone (in the US at least) writes.

People in the USA cannot learn programming or be productive in todays society because of patents.

No, people cannot learn to program because they don't take the time to learn to program. You can program something that makes use of a software patent with no fear of reprisal so long as you do not distribute the program with the peices that make use of the patent.

That is the purpose of patents, to give a period of "profitability" to the innovator, while giving society as a whole the benefit of the innovation.

I benifit more from Open Source than I do from closed source because I have no money.

You do realise that the only reason Open Source software exists as it does is because of the copyright system that you despise. Without copyright there would be -no- way to prevent a malicious person or organisation from taking the fruits of the OS software, and including it in their proprietary software.

I benifit more from file sharing because if there were no napsters and gnutellas of the world I simply wouldnt have the money to listen to music AT ALL, PERIOD.

Shouldn't the musicians whose copyright you violate deserve some benefit also? You can't say you don't owe them anything, because you use their services. It is not their responsibility to provide you with free music.

I'm going to make a base assumption, forgive me if I'm wrong, but I don't think you're the type of person who would give your services freely to just anyone. If (assuming you have a job or ever get one) your boss asked you to work for free, would you?

After all, think of the benefit it would be to him.

Re:Your ethics are backwards. Heres why (2)

Monkeyman334 (205694) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937127)

Patents are there so people will share their knowledge and in return they get exclusive rights to their patent for a while. So yes, permanent patents are a problem because it defeats the whole purpose, but that's a different debate. Maybe you're just used to seeing stupid one-click patents, which are indeed, stupid. But there are much better uses for patents and history shows that inventors that don't get compensation for inventing will in fact, not invent. Go figure.

Artists don't like to make money? What kind of argument is that? Yes, I'm sure some artists don't like to make money, I won't touch that. But ... why are you telling other artists that do want to make money, that because your family didn't make money off art, that it's okay to steal their work?

IT doesnt, I benifit more from Open Source than I do from closed source because I have no money. Right. The solution is to find free music. People that do agree that artists don't want to get paid. Even RMS himself uses a license, to protect the rights of ... of ... guess who? The creators. Even if your family wrote code for years for public domain, I bet RMS would be upset that you thought it was okay to violate the GPL because of it. How would you feel if the RIAA tried to violate the GPL?

Just playing devil's advocate (0)

slashuzer (580287) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936893)

Urm not really, but my point is:

Aren't we supposed to be living in a democratic enviornment? Aren't we really free? Aren't we allowed too have governance "for the people, of the people, by the people"? In which case I have just one question:

Why haven't we abolished copyright? If such a large majority of population goes against a law, isn't it time to get rid of that law? Even more so, why do we have to worship our ancestral laws like some article of faith? I ask these questions very seriously.

Copyright has to go; or in the very least, it's "term" should be reduced to, say, three years. Such asinine laws may have made sense many years ago, but toda a creator has greater freedom to promote and distribute his/her content and does not have to depend on the patronage of royalty. (Who in an case were snobs who wanted to have control over how content could be propogated).

We have to be grateful to our ancestors for a lot of things. But that doesn't mean everything they did was right, wholesome, and to be worshipped. Times change, learn to change with times. Get rid of copyright.

A brief history of the Kazaa empire. (5, Informative)

Catharsis (246331) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936909)

My memory is a bit sketchy in places, but I am sure y'all will fill in the blanks with /.'s usual enthusiasm.

So we begin.

A few internet cowboys, seeing the demise of Napster, cobble together Kazaa -- a decentralized filesharing network.

Originally, the software was licensed for distribution under three names, Kazaa, Morpheus, and Grokster, each of which was essentially the same program, with a different skin.

Kazaa was known for making an attempt at placating the record industry by only allowing lower bit-rate songs to be downloaded, whereas Morpheus had no such restrictions.

Forgive my lack of knowledge about Grokster -- the programs were all so close to identical that I never tried it.

Now, Kazaa came under legal fire in the Netherlands, but didn't get an official shut down.

Fearing their investments (and possibly their freedom), the original owners of Kazaa sold Kazaa to Sharmin Networks, who are perhaps the dodgiest software company I've ever seen.

Sharmin is also infamous for their spyware, and Bonzi Buddy. I can't remember who the founder was -- and Sharman Network's web page has mysteriously disappeared, but they were involved in some great scandal in Australia, and even a cursory Slashdot search (of the kind I'm unwilling to do on a saturday morning) will turn up the details, undoubtedly.

Sharmin was the one who loaded up Kazaa with enough spyware to make Back Orifice look like a legitimate client application, and has a EULA including a clause giving Sharmin permission to use your clock cycles, bandwidth, and hard drive space however they want.

This was part of what is known now as AltNet, Sharmin's answer to the Seti@Home project, or ud.com's Cancer curing project. Turn Kazaa users into a giant super computer... And then sell the time to the highest bidder.

Only one problem -- Kazaa's reputation was so bad, everyone was using Morpheus, who's tagline was something along the lines of "File-sharing without spyware".

Kazaa responded by ejecting Morpheus from their network by poisoning all the Kazaa hosts that upgraded to the new version. Any Morpheus client that touched an infected node was killed -- Kazaa overwrote a part of your registry to ensure you would never be able to use Morpheus again.

Around that time, they put up a button on the front of their site offering amnesty for refugees in this file-sharing client war, and Morpheus released Lime-Wire as Morpheus 2.0b.

Basically, the new morpheus was an old fork of the limewire code with an M for a logo, and was just a klunky gnutella client. There was some hullaballoo about open source this, and no source code that, and then Morpheus released the code again. Checking their web page now, they claim to have a final 2.0 out, but I haven't used it and cannot vouch for its quality.

Since then, Sharman Networks has been keeping a fairly low profile, and a hacker named Yuri has started releasing KazaaLite. KazaaLite is not a stripped down version of the software, so much as a stripped down version of the installer.

One without Bonzi Buddies, or yellow link underliners (remember that little ad-fad?) or any of the other myriad hacks and stupidities which Kazaa inflicts on your system.

KazaaLite does actually include a few patches to the executable, mostly to ensure Kazaa can't monitor your usage or install spyware on your system, and new versions are released with some regularity.

Well. Now we're up to the current date, with somewhat foggy bits along the way, and probably a few confused details by myself. I would appreciate any clarifications or corrections, as this all came from memory.

Cheers, and remember: KazaaLite is the answer.

Re:A brief history of the Kazaa empire. (2)

davidstrauss (544062) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937036)

Excellent history overall, but Morpheus 2.0b was not based on LimeWire. It was based on Gnucleus.

In other news...... (5, Funny)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936919)

RIAA MPAA have filed a suit against the ear. Apparantly people were storing data in neural networks without paying royalty using a highly sophisticated device ear. This device actualy can work around any copy protection mechanism to feed data into a neural network. Moreover this data can be broadcoast to other nodes using another devilish creation called the mouth and while doing so it rips of copy protection from stolen data.

The Courts have shown favourable response to the petition.. after all they dont want our poor homeless singers and bands to suffer. Probably earplugs will become mandatory at concerts.. insider sources said.

"Due to this stealing, our artists are so poor. Look at the music videos, they dont even have clothes to wear and have to appear in undergarments" said a RI** executive.

two towers on kazaa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936929)

I downloaded the two towers from kazaa last night but can't get any codec to decode them. Has anyone gotten the [tmd] movies to work, with mplayer or windows media player? If so, how?

For those who are about to yell "DIE PIRATE!" or something similar, please don't. I saw the movie once already and am going again tomorrow, so it's in Peter Jackson's best interest to keep me on the hook.

travel plans? (2, Funny)

DuctTape (101304) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936938)

I'll assume that Tallinn, Heinla and Kasesalu have no current plans to visit the U.S. anytime soon.

I know who'll meet them at the airport.

shutting down Kazaa isn't the answer... (2)

garcia (6573) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936949)

yeah, the Subj is a bad one, I know.

Anyway, the MPAA went after individual users on ATTBI and ATTBI responded by shutting those people off for TOS violations. Basically, don't share files and they can't really catch you.

There was a quote in the article, something like "it's software that allows you to request a file and download it, that's all it does". It's not illegal to do that, we have been using programs to req. files and download them for years (BBSs, FTP, etc).

Asking for the source to the software to find out "how it works" is non-sense. They know perfectly well how it works. It's P2P just like any other sharing program these days.

I'm sorry that people abuse the software. That's not the fault of the programmers or the 5% of the Kazaa userbase (a large number no doubt) that use it for legitimate reasons.

Go after those people that are sharing the stuff. If you can't find them, I'm sorry. That's not Kazaa's problem.

Go Kazaa? (0, Redundant)

or_smth (473159) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936970)

I'm sorry, in every manner Kazaa is much worse than the people trying to shut it down.

I have no intentions to support software that is 50% spyware.

Do not tell me to download some bullshit hack, I don't want to support a network with a base of spyware.

In other words, I hope Kazaa gets crushed, crashed, burned, trampled on and forgotten. I will never use the words 'Go Kazaa' in my life.

Going after the wrong people... (2)

xchino (591175) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936975)

I seem to remember an artivle from a year or so back dealing with Kazaa. The article stated that instead of going after Kazaa, which has failed in the past, the lawsuits would be against FastTrack, and forcing them to shut Kazaa's p2p abilities down. Is Kazaa still based of FastTrack's p2p?

Re:Going after the wrong people... (2)

davidstrauss (544062) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937064)

Yes, Kazaa still uses FastTrack. Kazaa's control of the FastTrack network is what shut Morpheus (non-gnutella version) down.

Are they really that stupid? (3, Insightful)

WildBeast (189336) | more than 11 years ago | (#4936989)

If they shut it, something else will come along. It's not as if Kazaa is the only p2p program.

hmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4936995)

I agree that copyrighted material shouldn't be freely distributed from an ethical standpoint.

So you must hate Linux then? The local independent newspaper gets you in a tizzy? Broadcast TV and radio make you turn red?

Or did you mean "without the copyright holder's permission"?

In that case, yes I agree. It shouldn't be distributed from an ethical standpoint, but rather through an electronic computer network.

*rimshot*

LEGITIMATE USE!!! (4, Interesting)

Cyno01 (573917) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937000)

Me and some of my friends just shot a short film(sort of) and have been distributing burned CDs with the movie in several formats (*.mov, *.mpg and DivX'd *.avi) and with a readme file on the cd urging people to share these files on KaZaA, gnutella etc. and to burn copies for their friends. Now to me this seems like a perfectly legitimate use of both CD burners and P2P file sharing. I'm not naieve enough to not think that 99% of whats on P2P nets is copyrighted (its against the law, but i'm not morally opposed to it as i have 100+GB of tv shows on my computer) but what about the other 1%. These are easy means of distribution to independent content producers, if they're shut down, what are we supposed to do.

PS: Anyone interested in a Star Wars Themed Mullet Hunting video(complete with rotoscoped duel) search KaZaA for Mullet Wars: Episode One the Phantom Mullet or star wars mullet or something of the likes, also feel free to e-mail me about it.

Re:LEGITIMATE USE!!! (1)

JayBlalock (635935) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937174)

These are easy means of distribution to independent content producers, if they're shut down, what are we supposed to do.

Isn't it obvious? You are SUPPOSED to sign away your soul to the big trade federations and not operate independently. In their eyes, you are JUST as bad as a pirate, if not worse. (since you're advocating the free voluntary distribution of material) Every person who works independently is another chip away at their shield. If enough go 'solo' then they crumble, and they know it.

Did you see the article a few days ago which suggests the RIAA has entirely fabricated its claims to massively reduced profits due to file-sharing? Turns out that the amount their profits are down almost perfectly lines up with how many fewer CDs they're putting out. Therefore, even for a deluded marketeer, the billions they've been spending to stop file sharing is nonsensical - unless it ISN'T about piracy at all, but rather about trying to stop *all* electronic distribution of content they don't control. Then it all makes perfect sense - in a horrible, Machiavellian sort of way.

Interesting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937013)

But more importantly, which of the many hundreds of files on Kazaa labelled 'Two Towers' is not a fake? You've got to help me!

Re:Interesting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937073)

You mean The Two Towers didn't star Ben Stiller and Will Ferrel in something called Zoolander?

Distribution always wrong? I think not. (4, Insightful)

MenTaLguY (5483) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937027)

I agree that copyrighted material shouldn't be freely distributed from an ethical standpoint.

If that's the way we're talking, then the RIAA have already won. There are plenty of legitimate circumstances to distribute a lot copyrighted material -- and that's not even getting into fair use yet. Consider examples in software [gnu.org] , or other types of media [creativecommons.org] .

It's not an issue of copyright per se, it's an issue of what's permitted by the license.

Ethics and pirating (3, Insightful)

Murdoc (210079) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937029)

Of course the whole reason companies are trying to shut stuff like this down is because it is "stealing". A lot of us don't care because these same companies are so rich that any *actual* losses they incur (as opposed to their *projected* losses that assume that if everyone who pirated music were to buy it they would make), are negligable at best. Then comes the arguement that the artists are losing out, and so on.

Of course I wholeheartedly beleive that artists deserve something for their work, and certainly deserve a decent living (don't we all?) The fact that they either have to use their art to make money or get an unrelated job that impinges on their artistic efforts is simply a symptom of our ever-present scarcity economics. Wouldn't it be nice if artists (and programmers, and others) could live without economic insecurity, simply giving to the community as is their basic impulse to do so? This would make the need to make an income from their work irrelevant, because most of these people do not do it for the money (at least not as the primary motivation). I'm sure many of the people here, more than most places, understand this. This would solve issues like Napster and Kazaa, since the free flow of information (and sharing of files, whether they be art, music, or software) could proceed without any harm to anyone. If an author doen't want his work shared, he simply need only keep it, or give it to people he trusts. Perhaps there could even be a copywrite law that gives the artist/whoever the power to decide how "free" his/her work is, but there would still be no need to do so to earn a living, i.e. artificial scarcity.

So how could this be done? Scarcity, we are told, is forever with us, an unsolvable problem. But is it really? People like Jeremy Rifkin (The End of Work [amazon.com] ) have shown us that work as we know it is obsolete. Machines and automation can do most if not all of the tedious tasks that make life dull, freeing up human society for more creative persuits. So scarcity no longer exists, except that we continue to impose it on ourselves because we know of no other way of doing things. And this creates its own set of problems, believe me!

The only thing missing now is a workable system of economic distribution that does not employ scarcity, and its tools like money and debt. If this could be done, all crime due to poverty would vanish. There would be no point to stealing something you could very easily afford yourself (pathology aside). Millions of property and litigation laws would also become obsolete, releiving the justice system of a huge infrastructure. Banks, stocks, all business related to money need no longer exist, and what results is a huge outpouring of people to now share what little work need be done. Thus, with secured incomes, people need not work more than a few hours each week, and could have a standard of living that far exceeds what we have now.

It's too bad more people aren't trying to think of ways of doing this, because it is possible. It would be a world were programs like Linux would be the norm, and no one could make shoddy MS-like products (or they could, but no one would have to use them). So far the only serious research group with any credibility that has devised such a non-scarcity economic system is Technocracy [technocracy.org] . They've been working on this idea since the 1920's, so they have a pretty detailed and workable plan. I hope we one day switch to a society they they propose.

Backing the "victims" into a corner (1)

NeoMoose (626691) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937035)

An appeals court in the Netherlands, meanwhile, ruled that local distributors of the software shouldn't be responsible for piracy by its users.

My personal feelings: Damn right.

Me as the Devil's Advocate:
Unfortunately if you rule that the company isn't responsible and the users are then it basically tells the labels/software companies/etc that they can't do anything about it. They can't ask the file-sharing program's owner for user information because of the wonderful world of privacy. Lovely!

Copyright (5, Insightful)

javacowboy (222023) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937041)

I agree that copyrighted material shouldn't be freely distributed from an ethical standpoint.

Well, I don't know about you, but I don't agree with large corporations making money off artists 90 years after they died.

Peer to Peer for Linux (1)

mcraw (571702) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937044)

So, what's the best peer to peer application for linux these days?

Threat ? (1)

EpsCylonB (307640) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937046)

This case "is one in a series of skirmishes that will determine whether the information network the public enjoys five to 10 years from now is open or closed and to what extent different countries will have a role in controlling it," said Jonathan Zittrain, co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

This almost sounds like a threat...

"all you naughty people start behaving yourselves or you'll ruin the internet for everyone else"

fuck Kazaaa (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4937130)

the MPAA is all and you are mine

Remotely??? You gotta be kidding (0, Redundant)

stilleon (601857) | more than 11 years ago | (#4937132)

Do you really think Kazaa only remotely impinges on the entertainment industry??? That's the sole purpose of this software. Pirating music, movies and software.

I know this will be marked flamebait because the thought police who vote on such things for Slashdot will not like what I have to say. (Funny for a baord that talks about guarenteeing free speech uses such measure to supress thought they don't agree with them). Let me put it bluntly: you guys are on crack. How about if I need food I walk in your house and raid your fridge? Or if I need to go somewhere I steal your car. Does that sound any different than "I want to hear a song, let me download it wihout paying?"

People create entertainment and DO NOT deserve to be ripped off. If you don't like how much it costs, that it has region coding or macrovision or whatever, don't buy it. But please, don't justify stealing as free speech.

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