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Melting Away Ice Hazards

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the electrifying-discoveries dept.

Science 131

RadioheadKid writes "Dartmouth College Professor Victor F. Petrenko is getting a grip on ice. He and his colleagues have found ways to take advantage of the "protonic" semiconductor properties of frozen water. They see many applications of this discovery from melting ice on power lines to electronic speed control for skis and snowboards. I guess those Petrenkos just love the ice."

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131 comments

cool (-1, Offtopic)

MeatMan (593183) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971546)

they can make my ice last longer in my kalua & milk?

Important information! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971623)

Heckler and Koch .44 USP Special Edition Semi-Automatic Handgun - Ballistic tests have shown that this handgun, when used by curious children who discover it in their parent's sock drawer, has a very low chance of accidentally going off and killing them or their equally curious friends. Any person who has purchased a Heckler and Koch .44 USP Special Edition Semi-Automatic Handgun may return it to the dealer in exchange for the brand new Heckler and Koch .45 USP Assault Model, which shoots explosive anti-children bullets designed specifically for home accidents. If you return your handgun now, you will also receive a free storage case which has a defective lock and reads "FREE CHOCOLATE INSIDE!!!" in large, festive letters.

Ice Conference (2, Funny)

Lord Bitman (95493) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971551)

the idea of someone being at an Ice Conference is troubling.

So is the little thing you call a penis (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971790)

Your penis is so small yo mama can't even find it when you tell her to suck it.

Re:Ice Conference (2)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972257)

I think there are large Italian men who have ice conferences all the time. But this is something different. ;)

Inventions in the near future (1)

absurdhero (614828) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971552)

Using this on skis and snow mobiles would be interesting. If this discovery is applicable to real life beyond melting lines, it could be very powerful. I doubt it will be life changing though. Most discoveries add small conveniences to life.

I agree (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971799)

And if you used it in your mom's pussy she might not be so frigid

Great... (1)

PaybackCS (611691) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971556)

Now those guys who can go 150mph downhill will be able to go 200mph...

If that doesn't change your life for the better, I don't know what else would...

Re:Great... (0, Redundant)

Stripsurge (162174) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971574)

210 if I overclock them :)

Re:Great... (2, Interesting)

mattcasters (67972) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971900)

Actually, the record is 248.105km/h or 154mph. A man named Harry Egger did it.

WorldRecord 1999 [speedski.com]

I've seen them ski in Les Arcs (France) in 1999 and although the view was very impressive, since then I'm convinced that these people are completely nuts or incredibly brave. :-)

Furthermore, I think that reducing ski-resistance is not going to help these people. I think it's wind resistance that's holding them back.

Cheers, Matt

your sig (2)

Dun Malg (230075) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972198)

I'm not making any sense? My head's filled with things like

POKE 53280,0

POKE 53281,0


Argh! That's black border, black screen! God Almighty, my brain is full of the same thing too, and I didn't even know it!

Re:your sig (2)

Negadecimal (78403) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972430)

Argh! That's black border, black screen! God Almighty, my brain is full of the same thing too, and I didn't even know it!

Now where's that Beagle Bros. poster when I really need it...

It would have been nice... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971557)

It would have been nice to have something like this on my car tires this winter when I was sliding around on the thick sheets of ice. I wonder what the time to market will be on this technology.

Indeed it would! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971832)

Dunstar Tetro-Cleany...

Only you - in your phantasmagorically subsistance based revenue stream - could possibly have set my Interplanar house of cards alight!

Even now - my tungsten shielded Caterpillar gunships are enroute to your Elven base of total DOOM!

Why, just this morning I had thoughts of rendering your subspace 38 degree grid TOTALLY and UTTERLY inoperable!

*pause for a deep breath* ...

Car traction? (1)

neksys (87486) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971559)

Couldn't this also be applied to vehicle tires? I know I just had a hell of a time driving home tonight, with all the frozen rain on the roads. I've got expensive snow tires on my vehicle, but on slick ice like this, I might as well have a set of skates. I don't know if its a workable (or affordable) solution, but I know I would pay good money to have some additional traction for these icy Canadian west coast winters.

Re:Car traction? (2, Insightful)

absurdhero (614828) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971566)

I think a lot of electricity would be required to melt that volume of ice almost instantaniously. power lines are stationary. they can afford to run it for 10 seconds or even minutes to melt it. Spinning tires are a different story, Im afraid.

Re:Car traction? (1)

SamBeckett (96685) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971904)

I too was afraid of spinning tires.. Then one day, my dad set me in front of a pitching machine and the ball smacked me in the head. To this day my fear is displaced to my father and that cute dimply baseball.

try the second link (3, Informative)

The Tyro (247333) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971580)

They are claiming a theoretical traction increase of 90%(!) potentially using some kind of conductive rubber in car tires.

What's most interesting about the opposite application (deicing) seems to be that they are using the ice to melt itself.

The deicing will clearly be more efficient, since resistive heaters are so very inefficient... but they should still have to expend at least the amount of energy that would be needed to convert the ice to water... 80 calories per gram, if I recall my Heat of Fusion values correctly (physics was like 15 years ago, so I may have that totally wrong)

Still, to avoid all those losses from inefficient resistive heaters? Potentially very lucrative tech here.

They even have prototypes already... I'm impressed.

Re:try the second link (2, Informative)

pyrote (151588) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971736)

ya they mention a power module every 100 kilometers using only 50 watts. not bad compared to normal resistive technologies

Re:try the second link (2)

alienw (585907) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972026)

Actually, resistive heaters are 100% efficient if you ignore the losses in transmission lines (i.e. they convert 100% of the electricity you put into them into usable heat). Now, getting that heat to the ice to melt it is another matter, but it has nothing to do with resistive heaters.

Re:try the second link (1)

smokin_juan (469699) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972263)

Oh now, I'm not too sure about all that... Turn your [electric] stove on. Turn your hair drier on and LOOK at the heating element. Mmhmm. LIGHT energy.

Nothing is 100% effifient except people... They annoy me 100% of the time.

TELL THE TRUTH: YOU WERE WANKING WHILE DRIVING! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971683)

Re:TELL THE TRUTH: YOU WERE WANKING WHILE DRIVING! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971688)

Mmm... my high school girlfriend gave me once a handjob while I was driving. Still she wouldn't suck me because she was a prude and wouldn't have sex before marriage. Giving head to her was OK, though. Go figure.

Re:TELL THE TRUTH: YOU WERE WANKING WHILE DRIVING! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971750)

Huh?

So you gave her head, got a raging boner and she didn't finish you off because she "wouldn't have sex"? And you settled for that?

What an idiot.

Re:Car traction? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971792)

Couldn't this also be applied to vehicle tires?

Perhaps reading the articles would help? They specifically mention an increase of 90% in tire traction.

Fascinating stuff (4, Interesting)

The Tyro (247333) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971561)

Protons carrying the charge, hmmm? I suppose any charged particle could theoretically carry a current, but I must admit I never thought of "proton flow" as a way to do it...

Water really is an interesting material.

Universal solvent (polar solvent, for you organic chemistry nitpickers)

Has its greatest density BEFORE it reaches its solid state of matter (ice). If you ever wondered why ponds and rivers don't freeze from the bottom up, that's the reason. Someone correct me, but I think the temperature of greatest density is 39F.

That's really quite a discovery... can't wait to see if they can make something useful out of it.

Re:Fascinating stuff (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971606)

The mere existence of water should be proof enough of a divine creator.

Re:Fascinating stuff (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971786)

Ripper:

Have you ever seen a commie drink a glass of water?

Mandrake:

Well, no I... I can't say I have, Jack.

Ripper:

Vodka. That's what they drink, isn't it? Never water?

Mandrake:

Well I... I believe that's what they drink, Jack. Yes.

Ripper:

On no account will a commie ever drink water, and not without good reason.

Mandrake:

Oh, ah, yes. I don't quite.. see what you're getting at, Jack.

Ripper:

Water. That's what I'm getting at. Water. Mandrake, water is the source of all life. Seven tenths of this earth's surface is water. Why, you realize that.. seventy percent of you is water.

Mandrake:

Uhhh God...

Ripper:

And as human beings, you and I need fresh, pure water to replenish our precious bodily fluids.

Mandrake:

Yes. chuckles nervously

Ripper:

You beginning to understand?

Re:Fascinating stuff (1)

PD (9577) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972345)

Did you hear about the guy who won the Powerball lottery? The odds are astronomical! The odds of that man winning the lottery are so low that there's no way he could have won by chance. It must be proof of a god.

Re:Fascinating stuff (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971783)

Ripper:

You know when fluoridation first began?

Mandrake:

No. No, I don't, Jack. No.

Ripper:

Nineteen hundred and forty six. Nineteen fortysix, Mandrake. How does that coincide with your postwar commie conspiracy, huh? It's incredibly obvious, isn't it? A foreign substance is introduced into our precious bodily fluids without the knowledge of the individual, and certainly without any choice. That's the way your hard core commie works.

Mandrake:

Jack... Jack, listen, tell me, ah... when did you first become, well, develop this theory.

Ripper:

Well, I ah, I I first became aware of it, Mandrake, during the physical act of love.

Mandrake:

sighs fearfully

Ripper:

Yes a profound sense of fatigue, a feeling of emptiness followed. Luckily I was able to interpret these feelings correctly: loss of essence.

Mandrake:

Yes...

4 deg C is greatest density (4, Informative)

spineboy (22918) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972064)

That's for relatively pure water, and that works out to be about 39 deg F. OF course adding salts and other things to raise the molarity (ionic concentration) of the water will depress the freezing point - I've forgotten what it'll do tho the density curve something about packing inefficiencies

Ice Hockey players electrocuted - new ice blamed (2, Funny)

zeendr (621380) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971563)

I can already see the headlines

Re:Ice Hockey players electrocuted - new ice blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971633)

I wonder if this could be used on ice skates. Olympic speed skating may never be the same...

Re:Ice Hockey players electrocuted - new ice blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971650)

Fortunately I only watch speed skating only for the magnificent asses and thighs of the female skaters.

Re:Ice Hockey players electrocuted - new ice blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971691)

Ok...but wonder if those asses accelerated and stopped in half the time...imagine the ass movements.

These guys up in New Hampshire have really hit on something here. This maybe in practical terms the scientific application of the year.

Re:Ice Hockey players electrocuted - new ice blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971743)

better use duracell, otherwise you'll be seeing asses smacked all over the ice from power failure. going from 50% friction to 190% normal can get annoying quick.

Reasons not to love ice (2)

MacAndrew (463832) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971565)

New Scientist linked this story [newscientist.com] from the ice piece. I know this is sorta OT, but wow, I'm always stunned when I read a hail story like this.

Ice not nice.

Off topic thread. Thread as in Pern (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971576)

I don't want to make light of this. That was a very horrible event, alright. It did remind me of the dragonriders of pern....

News Item: Total protonic reversal melts ice. (2)

jerryasher (151512) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971569)

He and his colleagues have found ways to take advantage of the "protonic" semiconductor properties of frozen water...

That's bad right?

Re:News Item: Total protonic reversal melts ice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971804)

not as bad as your breath shithead

Ice.. (-1)

Reikk (534266) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971577)

Ice Is nice You can stick it up your arse, once twice and thrice Jon Katz has lice cuz he likes to fuck mice Chinks like to eat rice the best boxer of all time: mike tys.. on Best rapper: vanilla ice he fucked heidi fleiss best show: miami vice the black guy wasn't very nice and in parting one final word of advice: or many words to be precise, don't shock yourself with an electrical device unless it's for a hefty price

Vanilla Ice (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971627)

Ice, ice baby...

I wonder what that jerk is doing these days. Probably drinking malt liquor and smoking crack in some white trash ghetto.

Re:Vanilla Ice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971730)

He's living off royalties...he's got a damn fine wife too.

Re:Vanilla Ice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971752)

What? Are you saying that artists actually can live off royalties and are not starving to death because RIAA, CPCC and other evil corporations are ripping them off?!?!

If this turns out to be true, it will test the faith of a self-righteous slashbot!

Re:Vanilla Ice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971985)

He's also doing some booty-core type nu-metal stuff (like Limp Bizkit) reusing some old lyrics. It's pretty awful.

Ice Poem (-1)

Reikk (534266) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971582)

Ice

Is nice

You can stick it up your arse,
once
twice
and thrice

Jon Katz has lice
cuz he likes to fuck mice

Chinks like to eat rice

the best boxer of all time: mike tys.. on

Best rapper: vanilla ice
he fucked heidi fleiss

best show: miami vice
the black guy wasn't very nice

and in parting
one final word of advice:
or many words to be precise,

don't shock yourself with an electrical device
unless it's for a hefty price

Europa Exploration? (4, Insightful)

MystikPhish (218732) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971599)

So could this effect be applied to the skin of a Europoa ice rover that would melt its way through 2km of ice?

I always hear that using heat to melt it would be impractical, but with a drill and this electric field effect maybe something more energy efficient could be done?

Re:Europa Exploration? (2)

Hubert_Shrump (256081) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972324)

...a drill and this electric field effect...

And stun every fish in the pond? At what cost progress!?

The Hazards of Using Smoke & Mirrors (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971607)

to pretend to clean up a BiG pile of felonious FraUDs.

Will Auditing Reform Die Before It Begins?

For the accounting industry, 2002 was the year of capital punishment, in both senses of the term. But will prosecutorial vigor lead to real reforms in an oligopolistic industry?

The death of Arthur Andersen, which shrank the Big Five to the Final Four, resulted from a Justice Department prosecution that startled accountants. But in showing they were tough, the prosecutors also eliminated the possibility that a new Andersen, under Paul A. Volcker's guidance, could lead the way to reform.

That auditors have sometimes not lived up to their obligations was proved this year as never before. But what the public needs to know is whether spectacular audit failures are isolated events or reflect systemic problems, either in the way audits are conducted or in the financial pressures that confront the auditors.

What is clear is that the new Sarbanes-Oxley Act could not end the fundamental conflict facing auditors: the people who hire the audit firm, and can replace it if they choose, are from the very company being audited. The people who depend on the job being done by the auditor -- the investors -- have no say in the matter.

What is needed is for someone to audit the auditors regularly, to review the way they conduct audits and to essentially reaudit some companies. That could show what problems exist, leading to new audit procedures where needed. But the most important effect could be one of strengthening auditors' backbones. Knowing that all the documents might be reviewed by outsiders, auditors might be far less willing to cave in to their clients' demands.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act gave that responsibility to the new Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. But Joel Seligman, the dean of law at Washington University in St. Louis and the author of the leading history of the Securities and Exchange Commission, says no change in securities law ever had "a slower or more inept" start. "They don't have a full board, don't have a budget, don't have a staff, don't have an office, don't have a plan," Mr. Seligman said. "It's as sad a beginning as one can imagine."

To both Mr. Seligman and John Biggs, the pension fund executive who was passed over for chairman of the board, setting off a controversy, the way the board conducts its inspections will be the most important issue confronting it. "The major function of the board will not be enforcement so much as working with the firms to develop better assurance of quality control," Mr. Biggs said. "The means for the board will be through the annual inspections."

The law establishing the board was full of compromises. Just how thorough those inspections will be, and even who will do them, is up to the board. Reformers want it to hire its own staff and to carefully review numerous audits each year. Many in the accounting industry would prefer that the board do little more than the "peer reviews" that used to be carried out under the auspices of the ineffective Public Oversight Board, in which one major accounting firm would bless another firm's work.

Unfortunately, the accounting industry got Congress to specify that when the board finds problems with the quality control systems of an auditing firm, that information will be kept secret if the firm addresses the issue within a year. Similarly, disciplinary proceedings may remain secret until the S.E.C. has considered appeals of the board's rulings, a process that could take years.

That secrecy means that investors will have limited ways to be sure that the board is doing a good job and makes it all the more important that the board's chairman be someone whose record provides assurances of a commitment to reform. William Donaldson's choice for that job after he is confirmed as S.E.C. chairman may determine whether the scandals of 2002 bring real changes...." [nytimes.com]

remember, dysfunction STARTS [trustworthycomputing.com] , at the "top".

easy come, easy goo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971644)

don't be an ediot. NOTHING has changed on wall street of deceit.

the hole thing's toast anyway. J. Public doesn't have enough cash left to float their boats for won daze. ucann bet your .asp dough, if J. EVER gets even, he'll be itching to bet again, so george et AL, are ?working? right now to make sure the ill eagle WINdose payper liesense stock markup scam, stays afloat. right robbIE?

does anyone know what percentage of the toal value of "our" fairytail, totally bull, "economy", is based on gov't. supported/encouraged ill eagle stock markup ?pr? FUDgePacking/outright larceny?

Wait...wait...wait (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971622)

How will this help me get MORE drunk @ 3 in the morning...melting ice cubes perhaps?!?!?!?

Re:Wait...wait...wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971638)

Why would you be getting more drink at 3 in the morning?

You are supposed to be screwing the brains out of some brainy red head.

Pussy Pussy Pussy (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971656)

Pussy Pussy Pussy

Re:Pussy Pussy Pussy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971667)

Where would I find a hot redhead [imdb.com] for some serious fucking?

Re:Pussy Pussy Pussy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4972498)

Kind of a bog-beast, that one.
This one [imdb.com] is much much better.

Re:Pussy Pussy Pussy (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971722)

here we come !

8=========D ~~~
8======D ~~
8========D ~~~~

Re:Pussy Pussy Pussy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971729)

So Malda is the one in the middle?

Science solving real problems in the world (1)

jhair_tocancipa (545029) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971662)

"they see many applications of this discovery from melting ice on power lines to electronic speed control for skis and snowboards". Yes this discovery is a step further in the development of the mankind... Speed control for skis and snowboards..., this is an example how science can revolutionize the world (and solve some of its toughest problems). Fantastic!

Re:Science solving real problems in the world (5, Insightful)

jeti (105266) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971694)

Powerlines that don't break under the load of ice.
Trains operating in extreme weather because rails
and cables can be cleaned of ice fast and efficiently.
Fast de-icing of car windows.
Maybe car tires with a far better grip on ice and
new snow mobiles that are able to climb extreme
slopes (for alpine rescue crews).

This tech will likely save more than a few lives.

Re:Science solving real problems in the world (1)

smokin_juan (469699) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972280)

Why don't they mention anything about airplanes? Seemes kinds fishy to me.

Re:Science solving real problems in the world (1)

Fear the Clam (230933) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972437)

new snow mobiles that are able to climb extreme slopes (for alpine rescue crews).

...who'll be rescuing the idiots who were climing extreme slopes in their new snow mobiles.

Re:Science solving real problems in the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971800)

Rule #1 - Read the article before making a fool of yourself.

Yesss, faster skis... (1)

Longjmp (632577) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971665)

"After you, I'll be waiting for you down there." ;)

The article mentions... (1, Interesting)

Jace of Fuse! (72042) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971695)

The article mentions the possibility of making car tires that get 90% better grip in icy conditions, yet this article cares more about skiers.

For some reason, I'm thinking someone's vision on the uses for technology is a little out of focus here.

Re:The article mentions... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971725)

...and what about pepperoni sandwiches?? There is nothing in these articles about pepperoni sandwiches!

The research is what it is. It is new. Jesus, what does every expect all scientists to be God answering all questions?

Re:The article mentions... (2, Interesting)

uptownguy (215934) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971764)

The article mentions the possibility of making car tires that get 90% better grip in icy conditions, yet this article cares more about skiers.

For some reason, I'm thinking someone's vision on the uses for technology is a little out of focus here.

...Or maybe they don't live in shockingly cold places like many of the rest of us (Minneapolis, MN here -- hi everyone) where they need to DRIVE in conditions like that constantly for 5-7 months of the year. It is one thing to live in Southern California and take a drive to the mountains to ski every once in a while -- it is something else completely to have to drive 20 miles to work on a frozen freeway...

Re:The article mentions... (2)

Foogle (35117) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972300)

They live in New Hampshire. Not as bad as Minnesota, but clearly they have an idea of what icy roads are like.

Re:The article mentions... (1)

alchemist68 (550641) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971840)

Well I suppose if you're a skier this is great news. And I'm a skier, so I'm really happy about this news. There's nothing wrong with this guy's "focus". I'm sure you'd think differently about Micro$oft releasing some new [useful] software that the Slashdot readership thinks should be FREE and open source. Obviously, Bill Gates and his goons are a little out of focus.

Re: northern NH (1)

sporkboy (22212) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971970)

seeing as this comes from Dartmouth in northern NH I'm not surprised, skiing is a way of life up there and if people can't deal with the ice they have probably moved away.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971717)

ice freezes you !

Re:IN SOVIET RUSSIA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971810)

suck my dick you unfunny fucking stupid piece of retarded shit.

In... (0)

ATAMAH (578546) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971738)

... Soviet Russia - Ice is no obstacle (c) Mr. Petrenko.

*dodging slaps*

Re:In... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971825)

Eat shit you pig fucking cocksucker. Soviet Russia will stick it's penis in your eye.

any idea why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971740)

Kind of interesting...
One time I had a frozen bottle of water in the dark. I noticed that it producted a nice little spark inside the plastic bottle. Any idea what happen?

Re:any idea why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971906)

What the heck were you doing in the dark staring at a bottle of frozen water? I'll tell ya what happened...you're lying in the back alley of some club after being thrown out for acting too high, and they toss your bottle of water at you too...you're so F'd up on K that an hour passes, so the water freezes...by the time you come back to present reality the E you took previously starts to kick in...it wasn't pure MDMA, though, it was actually aspirin and LSD...so there you are, some pathetic kid whacked out on god-knows-what staring at your frozen bottle of water, and you see a "nice little spark" which more likely was a reflection of the only lightbulb in the alley, or maybe it was a sign from your Angel to get up, go home, sleep, do your homework, and stop doing drugs that you buy from total strangers who have your health as their utmost concern in life.

Talk during sex? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971756)

I know that women are more verbal than men and I have heard that most women like a man who talks to them during sex.

So my question is: what should I talk about when I am giving head to a lady or playing with her breasts?

Re:Talk during sex? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971763)

I would advise you to rent a few good European hard core porn movies and write down what the guys say when they are pumping away. I would recommend German or Dutch porn.

Then go and practise the lines, the pose and delivery while jerking off.

If you do this for about a week, you should be ready to satisfy any woman.

Re:Talk during sex? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971772)

Uhhuh? And what if this said woman doesn't speak German or Dutch?

Re:Talk during sex? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971815)

then you have to cut your penis off and give up at the whole thing

Re:Talk during sex? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971942)

And what part of your body is going to do the talking while giving her head? Your mouth is busy -- look it up. Read a book.

In general, you tell her how beautiful she looks. Try to remember her name.

Women are more verbal...that means they like to TALK, not LISTEN. If you ever get a date, you'll find that out. Anything you say will eventually be repeated by her during an argument, twisted out of context, and used as proof that (a) all men are pigs (b) you are an insensitive clod and (c) you don't do the right things, but she won't tell you what the right things are, you have to just KNOW, because if she told you what she wanted then you'd be doing them just to please her and not because you really wanted to, but you can't read her mind so you can't know what she wants, which just proves that you don't want to do the right things and feel the right feelings etc.

Dear God, someone save us!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971819)

Victor F. Petrenko

Don't you see!!! The "F." stands for Fries [batman-superman.com] !!!

This was covered earlier (1)

Danta (2241) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971828)

Slashdot had an article [slashdot.org] on this back in February.

Re:This was covered earlier (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4971841)

Thanks for the update Sherlock.

nobody gives a rat's ass.

How skis work (2, Interesting)

squidgyhead (613865) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971872)

The article talks about how their discovery can be applied to skiing, and, analogously, driving and a bunch of other stuff, by melting ice and making it more or less slippery, depending on the interval between meltings. Small interval => more water, less freezing, large interval => more freezing, less slippery water. You get the idea.


I imagine that most of you know the ideal gas law, ie that pressure and temperature are (almost) linearly related. So, if you increase the pressure, you should be able to melt snow or ice, right? If it gets colder, you just squeeze harder. This means that warm snow should be slipperier, since you can melt more snow, which will lubricate better, right?


Unfortunately, below 30 degrees Celsius or so, there is no way to get water, no matter what pressure you apply. Look at the following ice/water/vapour [sbu.ac.uk]
diagram. You will notice that vapour and liquids don't take up much of it, it's ice almost everywhere. And all ice below 240K (=-33C) or so.


So how could we possibly ski at below -33C? The answer is that we just slide on the snow. Occam's razor, ya?

Wait ten or so years (2)

Martigan80 (305400) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971931)

Just you wait! Global warming should take care of this little ice problem we have down here;-) Can't speak for a couple of miles in the atmosphere...

piezoelectric roads? (2, Interesting)

sporkboy (22212) | more than 11 years ago | (#4971987)

The low power requirements of a system like this remind me of an idea that I had a while back. High-ice surfaces such as bridges (freeze first) could be equipped with a system like this to melt the ice, and the power for the system could be generated by the pressure generated by the weight of passing vehicles. Some sort of storage mechanism would be needed, at least small scale, to keep the ice off when traffic isn't passing.

Of course IANAEE (I am not an electrical engineer) so I could be speaking from the wrong end here. Not sure on costs of such a system either but it seems like it could have benefit, especially considering how expensive bridges are to begin with.

Re:piezoelectric roads? (2)

Dun Malg (230075) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972212)

piezoelectric roads?

too hard to generate consistent currents with piezo. Piezo effect creates sharp, sparky jolts. Cheaper and easier to just plug the whole thing into the power grid and be done with it.

de-icers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4972030)

More imediate practical applications include aircraft wing de-icing, and perhaps auto windshield de-icing. (some ultra fine filiment wires running through the glass composite).
There are doubtless alot of industrial uses this could benifit as well.
But maybe we get to see the drum bunny on skis next.

Obligatory cynicism (2)

panurge (573432) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972072)

Why don't I see this as particularly revolutionary? Well, forget the problems of transferring power to rotating car wheels for a moment, consider that significant design changes would almost certainly be needed to make use of such a technology on overhead power lines, bridges, airplane wings etc.

And the life cycle of such things is enormous. There are standards (codes in USenglish) to consider, which will need to be altered. Given the fear of litigation over design failure, the difficulty of proving the cost benefits, and the innate conservatism of people who make things that can be involved in major catastrophes, the development cycle could well be fifty years or more before there was any widespread application.

And perhaps that's why snowboards get mentioned. Like piezo tennis rackets, there will be early adopters who aren't actually very good at winter sports but have lots of cash and who will attribute the improvement that comes with practice to the miracle technology...might just sell.

Yeah! (2)

mtec (572168) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972278)


If Man were meant to fly, he'd have wings!

And if he does, just think of the lawsuits!

Re:Obligatory cynicism (2)

Alioth (221270) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972476)

Depending how heavy the equipment is, the design change for aircraft wings (especially light aircraft) probably wouldn't be significant. Already, many aircraft types can have pneumatic de-ice boots retrofitted and hot props retrofitted or TKS 'weeping wing' glycol deicers fitted. Assuming this system weighs no more than the usual deicing stuff and can fit the leading edges of wings/tailplanes/propellors it could be a LOT better than boots (high maintenance), weeping wing (lots of fluid to carry around) or hot props (lots of amps off the alternator).

The real problem would probably be regulatory. The FAA is slow to approve things. Company lawyers are frightened of aircraft (because for some insane reason, plaintiffs have this misplaced belief that planes should be absolutely safe with no risk of crashing, and if there's ever an accident they sue anyone who has even touched the airframe). Also, the limited market tends to mean that new innovations in aviation tend to get limited to things that can be adapted from something else. The only thing that's really advanced in general aviation (i.e. non-airlines/military) has been avionics because of this.

Ice hazards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4972075)

I'm more worried about water hazards, not to mention bunkers. I lose more balls in water hazards, and way to many in the woods on each side of the fairway.

solar power (3, Interesting)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972086)

"Many properties are completely different, but there are similarities between ice and the usual semiconductors," he says. For instance, he discovered that ice crystals can exhibit protonic photoconductivity. "It would be possible to create an ice solar cell," albeit one with substantially lower efficiency than silicon. Field effect transistors made of ice have also been developed that "work the same way as silicon."

Ok, who right away thought of turning north and south poles into electricity generating power plants?

Re: IN SOVIET RUSSIA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4972130)

Ice Hazards melt away YOU!

Re: IN SOVIET RUSSIA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4972262)

please please stop... how much orignal thought does it take to poop one'a these out? You're hanging out on a geek board where the standards are a bit higher, you see? I know this is harsh but, I respectfully suggest you become a FARK contributer.

Yes! (3, Funny)

mtec (572168) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972242)

Canada has a purpose!

what a cool guy... (4, Funny)

mtec (572168) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972211)

There once was a man named Petrenko
who found flow where you'd not think to think so
In white Russian ice
he could make juice flow nice
now he dreams of cool cash and green dough

everything old is new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4972318)

Ice 9

melting (1)

djward (251728) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972399)

Observe it's effect on this ice swan:

{fizzlemelt}

Of course, that would've melted at room temperature, but I just wanted to get rid of it.

50 Watts per 100km? (1)

godot73 (182766) | more than 11 years ago | (#4972497)

There must be something definitely wrong. From the article:
It runs off small power units placed along the lines every 100 kilometres or so. The signal does not reduce electricity transmission through the cables, and because it uses around 50 watts per 100 kilometres of line it should cost a fraction of what it normally takes to keep the lines clear

So 50 watts per 100 kilometres shall be enough to melt quite a lot of ice? there is a lot of energy needed to transform ice of 0 C to water of 0 C, about 80 kcal = 320 kilojoule, so 320 kilowatts for one second or 88 watts for one hour. 50 watts will melt less than one kilogram of ice per hour, and that should be enough on a length of 100km cable?
I doubt it.

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