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Putting A Lid On Chernobyl

chrisd posted more than 11 years ago | from the graphite-didn't-work dept.

Science 293

slicer622 writes "Chernobyl is finally getting a containment structure (Washington Post). Billed as the largest moveable structure ever built, its designed to help take apart the wreckage and keep most of the radioactive material from spreading. It will be 800 feet across, and 300 feet high and will cost $800 mil."

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Moveable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978070)

Are we really sure we want THAT? I'm just fine with it staying exactly where it belongs.

Re:Moveable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978320)

Did you not read the article? The dome to cover Chernobyl will be moveable... not Chernobyl itself. Since the dome will be so massive (I believe I read it to be over 800 feet high, and the steel will be 40 feet thick) that it will be moved into place around Chernobyl in four sections along lubricated steel tracks. Next time, learn to read more than just the headline.

First Post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978071)

haha, my first post?

Re:First Post (-1, Redundant)

6169 (318124) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978076)

I shed a tear for you.

Oh Dear (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978073)

How many "In Soviet Russia" jokes will this post spawn?

in SOVIET RUSSIA.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978079)

"In Soviet Russia" jokes spawn YOU!

Re:in SOVIET RUSSIA.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978090)

Soviet Sad Man is sad that jokes spawn you.

Re:Oh Dear (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978080)

How many "In Soviet Russia" jokes will this post spawn?

In Soviet Russia, this story wouldn't spawn any jokes -- at least, not while anyone official was listening.

Re: IN SOVIET RUSSIA... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978389)

...Chernobyl puts a lid on YOU!

NYET! (0, Funny)

TheOnlyCoolTim (264997) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978105)

In Soviet Russia, the fact that Chernobyl isn't in Russia realizes you!

Tim

Re:Oh Dear (-1, Flamebait)

anonymous coword (615639) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978203)

Dumbass, chernobyl is in Ukraine

The world's largest? (1, Funny)

YellowSnow (569705) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978077)

Stable door finally closes!

Quake 3 mapping. (5, Funny)

kpdvx (546561) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978078)

I always wondered what a Quake 3 map would look like in real life... :)

For those of you who map, you'll know what I'm talking about. :)

Re:Quake 3 mapping. (5, Funny)

Spyffe (32976) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978204)

I always wondered what a Quake 3 map would look like in real life... :)

Pretty much the same. But maybe the frame-rate will be a little lower, and textures won't be as detailed.
Most of the "real world" was actually produced for viewing using the ATI Rage 128. That's why computer games have become more and more attractive compared to the "real world" since nVidia unleashed the GeForce3.
Making matters worse, the physics model in the real world is also limited. For instance, rocket jumps are impossible because of improper collision detection between shards of the rocket casing and the jumper, resulting in shards improperly embedded in the body.
Unfortunately, the world was intended for full simulation on what was considered powerful in the 1980s. (The world existed before that, but only in a 2-dimensional form suitable for reproduction on thin, 35mm film.)

Re:Quake 3 mapping. (1)

delphi125 (544730) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978285)

Thank you for the clearest proof this millenium of the damage that radiation can do.

Re:Quake 3 mapping. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978294)

Is it just me or does the parent post make absolutely no sense whatsoever? I swear I read it like three times.

Re:Quake 3 mapping. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978369)

it's just you. read it again.

Re:Quake 3 mapping. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978278)

perhaps linkage to a picture for those who dont map would help?

Re:Quake 3 mapping. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978336)

Someone mod this down as Offtopic.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978085)

This post gets marked redundant!

Re:IN SOVIET RUSSIA (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978118)

Soviet Sad Man is sad that this post gets marked redundant.

Hundred Years? (5, Funny)

RobertTaylor (444958) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978086)

"The shelter is designed to keep water out and dust in for 100 years"

Great, in 2108 we are screwed again.

Re:Hundred Years? (3, Funny)

eingram (633624) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978092)

Great, in 2108 we are screwed again.

That won't be our problem, though. ;)

Re:Hundred Years? (5, Funny)

Subcarrier (262294) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978124)

That won't be our problem, though. ;)

Early indications are that kids from the Chernobyl fallout area will live to be at least 200 years old. The third arm comes in pretty handy, too.

Re:Hundred Years? (2)

Yorrike (322502) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978228)

But what about their fantastic ninja skills and the ability to fight crime and the forces of evil?

IN SOVIET RUSSIA (-1, Offtopic)

Subcarrier (262294) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978274)

The crime fights YOU!

Don't worry! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978116)

You'll be dead by then! (Unless you live near their and the radiation gives you a mutant ability that allows you to live a really long time.)

Re:Hundred Years? (5, Insightful)

FTL (112112) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978186)

> Great, in 2108 we are screwed again.

This is actually really good design.

The first sarcophagus was built in great haste over a hot reactor. The article points out there there are huge holes in the roof, but doesn't point out that the holes are a feature of the design, not a bug. If it were air-tight it would melt.

It has been nearly 20 years, and the sarcophagus has done its job well. Conditions are much better, and it is time for a new containment structure that addresses the current requirements.

In 100 years when the new structure is worn out, it will be time to reevaluate the conditions, and build a permenant enclosure. Suggestions I've heard are that a simple (but large) sand pile might be the best option at that time (presumably waterproofed on the outside).

The requirement for a 100 year lifespan for the current enclosure is a good one. Any longer, and you end up designing something that has to perform two very different jobs.

Re:Hundred Years? (2)

stinky wizzleteats (552063) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978289)

... the holes are a feature of the design, not a bug. If it were air-tight it would melt.

So, reactor #3 is still in operation, which means that plant workers show up to work several feet away from a nuclear pile reacting in open air. I wonder what they have to be thinking every time a warm breeze wafts over from the sarcophagus.

Re:Hundred Years? (4, Funny)

InfiniteWisdom (530090) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978301)

speaking of sarcophagi...

why not just build a pyramid around it? They've lasted 2000 years, haven't they? (Dead pharaoh, nuclear reactor... pah... big difference)

Re:Hundred Years? (2)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978324)

Sand cannot be used as it is a insulator, and they need to control the temperature inside the (admitedly devastated) core. Basically if they did this then there is a small chance the core could get hot enough for another release.

gay sex! (-1, Troll)

Gay Sex Troll (637133) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978087)

i love gay porno, my name is david disque, my email is krisnotes1@aol.com. please email me with as much gay porno as you can, i really cant get enough!

state the obvious! (0, Offtopic)

RobertTaylor (444958) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978091)

"We will need a lot of shielding"...said Vincent Novak, director of the Nuclear Safety Department for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

Other uses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978102)

We could also use this dome to convince Paulie Shore to shoot "Biodome 2". Once he is trapped inside, we'll successfully rid the world of two of the most terrible horrors in the last 20 years.

in SOVIET RUSSIA (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978111)

containment structure builds YOU!

Re:in SOVIET RUSSIA (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978161)

Soviet Sad Man is sad containment structure builds you.

Thats All Great but.... (5, Interesting)

dirkdidit (550955) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978120)

what happens if the existing "sarcophagus" fails after the bigger one is built over top of it? Couldn't this still be a disasterous problem? After all, I've heard before that if it were to cave in, it'd be like having the accident all over again.

Why Shouldn't You Wear Russian Pants? (5, Funny)

yoyona (620892) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978122)

Because Chernobyl Fallout.

Radioactive Christmas trees (5, Funny)

Spudley (171066) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978129)

Ties in nicely with the story today about radioactive Christmas trees [bbc.co.uk] being sold by russian businessmen.

Re:Radioactive Christmas trees (2, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978194)

Ties in nicely with the story today about radioactive Christmas trees [bbc.co.uk] being sold by russian businessmen.

Hmmm. Reindeers with glowing noses may not be myth after all.

Re:Radioactive Christmas trees (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978332)

Just think of the electricity saving!!!

Glow in the dark :D

nuclear containment development cost (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978133)

They should outsource the development of this structure to India; there is plenty of skilled, cheap, English-speaking labor there.

Correction 16 years after (1)

YellowSnow (569705) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978137)

Engineers are completing plans for what may be the largest stable door ever built. How many riders of the apocalypse?

Riders of the Apocolypse? No joke. (3, Interesting)

MickLinux (579158) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978177)

Chernobyl is named for a small, bitter herb, "chernoblis", that grows in the region. Of course, that's the Ukranian word. In English, the herb is called "wormwood."

No joke.

Of course, to quote my father when he heard that, "That's nonsense. Chernobyl wasn't a star. A star is a ...

!!!

Did you see? (1)

YellowSnow (569705) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978375)

The episode of Millenium (by Chris Carter of X-files) about Chernobyl, that was one of the scariest things I've ever seen, despite being a sceptic and non believer in the supernatural.

Re:Riders of the Apocolypse? No joke. (1)

LucVdB (64664) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978377)

...and ?

Surrounding areas (2)

slycer9 (264565) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978140)

I'm curious about how much the surrounding areas have been irradiated...as far as how much the 'hot zone' has grown. Has anyone given any concern to the groundwater contamination? The dome is a great plan to prevent atmospheric contaminants, but I've not seen any below-ground plans. This seems like a half-baked (no pun intended) plan to me...at least they're doing SOMETHING.

Re:Surrounding areas (2)

core plexus (599119) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978217)

See my post below yours for some info on that.

Re:Surrounding areas (5, Informative)

dirkdidit (550955) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978221)

About 7 years ago they built a huge concrete wall that goes underground and is meant to stop the flow of groundwater(to some extent) from the contaminated areas. The last I read of this said that the wall had begun to fail. The Pripyat River, which was Chernobyl's water supply, was severely contaminated.

This map [brama.com] shows the "hot zone." It actually covers quite a large area.

Re:Surrounding areas (2)

dirkdidit (550955) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978233)

Bad to reply to your own comments I know but I forgot to mention that the wall was built very near to the plant. I did, however, manage to did up some more information on it.

From Chernobyl.com:
"To stop rising ground water (Chernobyl is next to the Prypiat river) a concrete wall was built 30 meters into the ground between the riverbank and the reactor. That wall is now acting like a dam."

And that's not the REALLY scary part (5, Interesting)

core plexus (599119) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978144)

They want to reopen Chernobyl. This article [bbc.co.uk] states "Officials from the European Bank for Reconstruction have criticised plans by the Ukrainian authorities to reopen a reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. They say they are concerned about the safety of reactor number three, which sits next to the remains of the world's worst nuclear disaster, because of a failure to put in place extra safety measures that had been agreed. " Here is a link about the facilities. [chernobyl.com]

Hey, some of it works just fine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978155)

Once you get past the radiation problem, parts of that reactor are just fine for using. The country needs that energy.

Old article. (2)

TheOnlyCoolTim (264997) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978165)

I'm pretty sure that Reactor 3 is shut down now, but that only happened recently.

Tim

Re:And that's not the REALLY scary part (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978176)

You are linking to a story that is several years old.

Re:And that's not the REALLY scary part (4, Interesting)

core plexus (599119) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978191)

Here are some newer ones, sorry: SFChron [sfgate.com] NYTimes [nytimes.com] Try here [google.com] for more.

Re:And that's not the REALLY scary part (4, Interesting)

FTL (112112) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978259)

> They want to reopen Chernobyl.

It's not as scary as it sounds. Two reasons:

  1. The Ukranian government has a history of politically milking Chernobyl for all it's worth. Need some foreign loans? No problem, just pull out the Chernobyl reactivation plans (again) and watch Europe go nuts and provide aid (again). Rinse, repeat. Take these plans with a grain of salt.
  2. Even if Chernobyl were reactivated, it isn't that big of a deal. Chernobyl isn't as ludicrously safe as western reactors, but it isn't bad. The only reason it blew up is that the _mechanical_ engineers were running a test to see what would happen if they turned off all the safety systems, removed all the control rods, and shut off the power (duh). The _nuclear_ engineers were horrified at the proposed test, but under the Soviet system they didn't get veto power.

I remember reading that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978163)

in the now abandoned city (except for the cleanup workers), music is blasted over loudspeakers, to keep the workers from going crazy in the isolation (isolation from people, and from their senses since the cleanup suits insulate them somewhat from the environment) of the cleanup process. I guess they can hear through the suits, or wear hearing devices.

Re:I remember reading that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978223)

Or to scare away animals?

Rave at Chernobyl!
LOL

Obligatory Simpsons Reference (0, Offtopic)

Cyno01 (573917) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978167)

"...birds and squirrels and birds come and go all the time."
So do they have squirrels like in that one ep where Mr Burns was dumping radioactive waste in the park and that squirrel came outa the tree and zapped off the acorn with beams from its eyes and snatched it up with an extending tounge?

GIR: I saw a squirrel! It was goin like this.

Have we got... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978170)

...a mosix cluster of these yet?

THANKS TJERNOBYL! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978175)

FUCK! BECAUSE THEY DIDN'T CARE ABOUT SAFETY MEASURES IN RUSSIA this devastating accident happened and innocent people in NORWAY, SWEDEN, FINLAND AND ESTONIA died ALSO in cancer. FUCK. Radioactive clouds don't care about county borders, unfortunately. I wish all the radioactive stuff would have stayed in russia - IT WAS THEIR FUCKIN' REACTOR THAT BLEWED!

Re:THANKS TJERNOBYL! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978192)

Im sure the welsh were glad for the radioactive sheep

Re:THANKS TJERNOBYL! (1)

MickLinux (579158) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978196)

I'm sorry. Did you forget Lithuania? It seems to me that Lithuania, not Estonia, was at the center of the maximum fallout path. Right over Klaipeda, if I remember correctly.

Re:THANKS TJERNOBYL! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978214)

Yes I did forget Lithuania and I'm sorry about that.

Re:THANKS TJERNOBYL! (1)

nkrumm (625879) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978197)

Well, it happened. Thats partially why we have new saftey measures these days, and also why other countries are paying 768 million dollars to clean it up. To protect their own citizens.

Re:THANKS TJERNOBYL! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978253)

Stuck inside of Memphis with the mobile home, sing:
Mother Russia
Mother Russia
Mother Russia rain down down down
Mother Russia
Mother Russia
Mother Russia rain down

Note: if you don't get the quote, check here [geocities.com]

Obvious Russian Solution (5, Funny)

limekiller4 (451497) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978187)

Leave it to the Russians to come up with a solution that is, in essence, one big matrioshka doll [www.arsa.ru] .

Now I want to see the heir of the peasant who invented these things sue for IP infringement.

Re:Obvious Russian Solution (1)

Chalex (71702) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978287)

The counter at the link said 106 when i saw the page :) Now that the parent comment is (+4 Funny), whoever owns the webserver might need to build a containment structure of their own.

Re:Obvious Russian Solution (1)

limekiller4 (451497) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978339)

You know, I noticed that counter too, but it didn't occur to me what would happen as a result.

That's going to be one confused webmaster...

"What the 1234 is a 'Slashdot'??"

Re:Obvious Russian Solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978350)

Oops, that should have been "what the !@#$ is a 'Slashdot'??" =)

Twighlight Zone (3, Interesting)

checkitout (546879) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978188)

This reminds me of a "new" Twighlight Zone episode circa 1987, where a guy has a fallout shelter in his basement.

His wife and kid go to the grandmothers for the weekend. Meanwhile, he's chilling with his friend drinking a beer, and a nuclear bomb touches down. They both go into the fallout shelter. They guy thinks he's lost his wife and kid forever.

Months go by in the fallout shelter, and external radiation levels aren't going down. They can't tell if the detector is broken, or what. Eventually some "scavengers" come pounding on the door, and the father has to stop his friend from making any noise.

More months go by, there's an argument and the friend finally says fuck it and leaves. Now the father is by himself, and even more months go by... finally he decides it's hopeless, puts on his sunglasses and heads out of the fallout shelter.

Next scene, the wife and son are looking at the father's grave. Talking about him, etc. Then the camera pans up, and there's the city about 10 miles away with a huge glass dome over it.

I found this summary of the episode as well:

Shelter Skelter
Teleplay by : Ron Cobb & Robin Love
Based on a story by : Ron Cobb
Directed by : Martha Coolidge
Starring : Joe Mantegna; Joan Allen
Summary : A survivalist believes he has lived through a nuclear war in his shelter. In reality, it was an accident which destroyed his town and contributed to bringing peace to Earth, and he has been entombed for ever.

Re:Twighlight Zone (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978231)

This story is remeniscent of what it is like trying to pick the right stocks or the right career.

BTW, how did the wife and kids survive before the shell was built? Maybe they were waaaay out of town at the time?

Re:Twighlight Zone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978326)

BTW, how did the wife and kids survive before the shell was built? Maybe they were waaaay out of town at the time?

IIRC they were at his wife's parents/sister with the kids, out of town, when the incident happened.

The man was hopeless because he had no contact with the outside world. Even if his shelter had radio equipment, he was just showing it to his friend when the meltdown came, so the antenna which was normally kept sealed shut was blown with the rest of the town.

The funny part is that the scavengers where (supposedly) officers that were making sure nobody was left inside alive.

Re:Twighlight Zone (2)

checkitout (546879) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978334)

BTW, how did the wife and kids survive before the shell was built? Maybe they were waaaay out of town at the time?

Yeah, they were at the grandmothers house, very far away from the city.

Re:Twighlight Zone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978322)

I totally remember that episode. He also lost the ability to communicate using his radios since he was just showing off to his friend when the accident happened, and he forgot to lower the antenna, which was then destroyed in the accident (I think it was a nuclear bomb factory nearby).

At last, a practical use for... (0, Offtopic)

NewtonsLaw (409638) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978189)

At last we have a practical use for all those AOL CDs eh?

Cost (5, Informative)

dokutake (587467) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978199)

It will be 800 feet across, and 300 feet high and will cost $800 mil.

The dome itself will not cost $800 million, the whole project, including cleaning up inside the dome once it's there, will cost $768 million.

Re:Cost (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978300)

Thank you, I'm glad I'm not the only one who actually read the article and found this grave typo (?).

Photos and Poetry from Pripyat. The worker's town. (5, Insightful)

muonzoo (106581) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978200)

I stumbled (ok Googled) across some interesting and moving photos from Pripyat [wsu.edu] , the town where the Chernobyl workers were housed.
Shocking and worth a read / look.

Bechtel (2)

Jeffrey Baker (6191) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978211)

Great, Bechtel. If the budget is $800M, Bechtel will blow $4B for evaluation and planning, never build the thing, then punt the project off to the next biggest bribery outfit. Bechtel's main accomplishments have been building a massively overpriced and non-standard rail system in the Bay Area, screwing up the water distribution systems of several nations, ripping off Malta, and repeatedly gassing the residents around the Carquinez Strait.

Bechtel = CIA ?? (1)

handy_vandal (606174) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978270)

Is there anything to the rumor that Bechtel does CIA work, is a CIA front company, etc??

Chernobyl accident information (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978246)

A lot of stories about the Chernobyl accident can be found here. [chernobyl.co.uk]

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster On April 25th -26th, 1986 the World's worst nuclear power accident occurred at Chernobyl in the former USSR (now Ukraine). The Chernobyl nuclear power plant located 80 miles north of Kiev had 4 reactors and whilst testing reactor number 4 numerous safety procedures were disregarded. At 1:23am the chain reaction in the reactor became out of control creating explosions and a fireball which blew off the reactor's heavy steel and concrete lid.

The Chernobyl accident killed more than 30 people immediately, and as a result of the high radiation levels in the surrounding 20-mile radius, 135,00 people had to be evacuated.

Is their a secret message in slahdot's recent...? (-1, Offtopic)

AnonymousCowheard (239159) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978262)


Nuclear this...Nuclear that... and now a containment structure.

I want to sound the least rude as I say this...my genitals are indeed verry nuclear. They are so nuclear, I needed to post this within my house just to shield my laughter from irradiating to other bio-logical life-forms.

Cover Story (3, Funny)

limekiller4 (451497) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978265)

I've seen more than enough movies to realize that this is a mere cover story to hide the real purpose of this "container" -- sheilding a priveleged few thousand against a rogue earthbound asteroid.

I'll bet you ten bucks that nobody knows where Bruce Willis is right now, either.

Can't fool ME.

Causes of the Chernobyl accident (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978269)

How can this happen in REAL LIFE???

CAUSES OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

* Lack Of A 'Safety Culture' - The organisations responsible for the Chernobyl Nuclear Power plant lacked a 'safety culture' resulting in an inability to remedy design weaknesses despite being known about before the accident. A secret USSR memorandum in the Russian archives "Chernobyl Construction Weaknesses" clearly illustrates this fact.

* Design Fault In The RBMK Reactor - The RBMK reactor type used at Chernobyl suffers from instability at low power and thus may experience a rapid , uncontrollable power increase. Although other reactor types have this problem they incorporate design features to stop instability from occurring. The cause of this instability is:

+ Water is a better coolant than steam

+ The water acts as a moderator and neutron absorber (slowing down the reaction) whilst steam does not.

Excess steam pockets in the RBMK design lead to increased power generation this is known as a positive void coefficient. This excess power causes additional heating thus producing more steam and means less neutron absorption causing the problem to escalate. This all happens very rapidly and if it is not stopped quickly it is very hard to stop as it supplies itself.

* Violation Of Procedures - While running a test of the reactor numerous safety procedure were violated by the station technicians.

+ Only 6 - 8 control rods were used during the test despite there been a standard operating order stating that a minimum of 30 rods were required to retain control.

+ The reactor's emergency cooling system was disabled.

* Communications Breakdown - The test was carried out without a proper exchange of information between the team in charge of the test and personnel responsible for the operation of the nuclear reactor.

US$800 Mil? (1)

ddtstudio (61065) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978286)

That's nothing. Just cruise around www.fuckedcompany.com for a while and look at executive compensation, not to mention the billions venture capitalists have tossed around each year.

Now, if the advertising market were still hot, and the owners sold lighted space on it... it'd sell itself.

Don't make me angry... (1)

Stillman (185591) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978288)

Lethal gamma rays escaping from the reactor's damaged core would make the center of the arch too hot for humans to work.

Not to mention the Hulk-tacular side effects.
It'd cost them a fortune in clothing repairs for the hulking-out workers! ;)

I dated a girl from there... (0, Troll)

SoVi3t (633947) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978298)

Her brother and her were given money constantly by the Ukrainian Government...meanwhile, her brother ended up going through numerous surgeries...but man, she was good in the sack ^_^

Most? (2)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978302)

Hmm ' will keep MOST of the material from spreading '.

Glad i dont live around there.. :)

I wonder (2)

Strange Ranger (454494) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978335)

It will be 800 feet across, and 300 feet high and will cost $800 mil."

How cheaply could we hurl the whole thing out of orbit?

Current costs are ~ . . . (2)

kfg (145172) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978380)

$20,000 American/pound.

Do you have a "plan B"?

KFG

Reactor covers, build it before the accident! (1)

more (452266) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978340)

It is most likely cheaper to build the reactor cover before the accident rather than waiting for one and then trying to figure out how to cover it. Also, the workers will receive far less radiation.

Also, in Soviet Ukraine (nor anywhere else in the right-minded world) people do not use feet to measure distance. Feet are strictly reserved for walking purposes.

Come on, you are supposed to be the information age intellects. Where is your nerd-pride? Pounds, feets and inches, oh dear!

And in an unrelated story..... (2, Funny)

Darth_brooks (180756) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978341)

...The City of Cincinnati has offered the Bengals another new stadium 'out in the suburbs.' Mayor Charlie Luken Deemed the new stadium a 'multi-use facility' and plans are in place to have the team moved within the next 90 days.

Changes not as big as people thought (4, Informative)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978344)

according to this article [accessexcellence.org] The impact on wildlife and even humans is not as worse as people thought it would be.

For example: Years ago, some researchers theorized that a severe nuclear accident like the one at Chernobyl would cause such severe genetic damage that animals would be born showing drastic changes in appearance. So far, the Chernobyl accident has not borne that out, the researchers note.
and
"For instance, there are probably two million people in the contaminated areas, and only a few thousand are actually sick from diseases than can be reasonably linked to the high levels of radioactive contaminants. We really don't know why this is yet," said Dallas.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA (0, Troll)

JanusFury (452699) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978359)

In soviet russia slashdotter who make joke about chernobyl get to help build new sarcophagus... Without pesky protective gear

Mutants? (2, Interesting)

haggar (72771) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978360)

I have been thinking about this for a very long time: since we have this exclusion area around the reactor since 1986, animals were exposed to the radioactivity and no doubt, many died. But did any survive? Did the radioactivity produce some major genetical changes (some believe that the increase of cranial capacity in the Homo Sapiens was due to mutations from increased gamma rays)?

perfect place for it ... (1)

HealYourChurchWebSit (615198) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978367)


I think they've got land cheap up at Three Mile Island [pbs.org] that might be able to accomodate some of the waste.

OH GOD, DON'T LET IT HAPPEN AGAIN! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4978387)

That's all I can say.. Take a look at the pictures of the dead city.

Why build another one (5, Funny)

Boiling_point_ (443831) | more than 11 years ago | (#4978388)

Psssst - I know where you might be able to pick up a suitable enclosure really cheaply, if you don't mind using second hand [millennium-dome.com] equipment. As an added benefit - it seems to do a good job of discouraging tourists! ;-)
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