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H2O/IP

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the waterpik dept.

The Internet 124

AltImage writes "This interesting project uses water as an organic network between two computers. It analyzes the color of each pixel and 'prints' out pulses to the electronically controlled water valve - a different pulse pattern depending on the color of the pixel on screen."

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124 comments

first post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980528)

first post

cam

Water isn't organic.. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980529)

damnit.

Re:Water isn't organic.. (4, Funny)

DeadMoose (518744) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980553)

Water isn't organic..

I don't know, some of the stuff I've gotten out of the tap probably contains more organic material than most snack foods.

Re:Water isn't organic.. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980557)

and it is ip/h2o, not h2o/ip...

Re:Water isn't organic.. (3, Insightful)

Black Perl (12686) | more than 11 years ago | (#4981115)

and it is ip/h2o, not h2o/ip...

Well, it should be H2O-232 because it's more like a serial protocol. It's not bidirectional, so no handshaking is possible.

Re:Water isn't organic.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980563)

DAMN YOU ALL TO HELL water is organic and I use moisturiser without chemicals.

Re:Water isn't organic.. (2, Interesting)

markov_chain (202465) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980572)

"organic" is an artists' word. They use it to indicate that something is life-like, real-worldly, fuzzily defined, synergized with nature, etc. They don't really intend to imply the scientific meaning.

Re:Water isn't organic.. (2)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980772)

It's also used by chemists to refer to carbon-based chemistry. Hence "Organic Chemistry" and "Inorganic Chemistry".

Re:Water isn't organic.. (2)

gilroy (155262) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980775)

Blockquoth the poster:

"organic" is an artists' word. They use it to indicate that something is life-like, real-worldly, fuzzily defined, synergized with nature, etc. They don't really intend to imply the scientific meaning.

Then they probably shouldn't invoke the air of science by using the scientific formula, H20, either...

Re:Water isn't organic.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980733)

That is an excellent open source businessmodel.

1: Write free software.
2: ?
3: State that water isn't organic damnit.
4: Profit!

Re:Water isn't organic.. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980770)

Well when the utility contracters hooked the green pipe up to the blue pipe our water had lots of organics in it.

water cooling? (2, Funny)

cozman (610450) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980530)

so how long before i can use this to cool my computer and send the data?

Re:water cooling? (1)

mirko (198274) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980573)

Hey, you could also use this water to power your PC (it'd however require you to have a huge Hoover-Dam-sized computer room ;-)...

After IP/Electricity you'd then get IP+Electricity/water :-)

Cool. (1)

irc.goatse.cx troll (593289) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980534)

This is a verry cool idea, But I can't help but think about how enviroment specific this would need.
The signal seems like it would be way too fragile, a little movement could screw it up.

Great... (2)

xchino (591175) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980535)

Now we have to worry about dumb windows users mistakingly drinking their data.

Re:Great... (1)

Kajakske (59577) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980552)

Hmmm, actually ...

Would the water taste like apple when you first send a picture of an apple accross it ?
Or like chips ? Or candy ! ...

The possibilities !!! :)

Re:Great... (1)

Loligo (12021) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980754)

>Would the water taste like apple when you first
>send a picture of an apple accross it ?

Knowing what makes up most of the images on the net, I'm not sure I'd want to taste it.

In fact, I'm pretty sure the water would need to be changed FREQUENTLY.

-l

Dear Clowns (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980537)

You all suck. Slashdot is clown shit.

There's nothing organic about water. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980538)

Go look up your science books for the definition of organic.

ARGH! Conservative science! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980571)

Damn them! They are fucking up organic chemistry! Impeach Bush!

RFC for this? (2, Funny)

Lord Prox (521892) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980544)

This sounds about as funny as RFC 1149 [ietf.org] IP over Pigeon [com.com]

Re:RFC for this? (5, Funny)

reaper20 (23396) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980607)

Yes, except that if the IP pigeons drink the IP water, the universe will explode.

Re:RFC for this? (3, Funny)

torpor (458) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980655)

Damn, we've finally invented a network where one protocol can *actually* consume another protocol.

Gotta read these RFC's ... Sci-fi cyberpunk fantasies will never quite sound the same..

Re:RFC for this? (1)

miu (626917) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980833)

I am a going to get serious for a momment here and ask each and every person reading this to not write their own April 1 RFC. They had their day back in the early 90's, but it has now become sad and not at all funny.

Interesting as technology (2, Insightful)

Kajakske (59577) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980545)

This seems interesting as a technology on itself. Like for scientific purposes.

But as a Real Life application ?
Why would we need such new and complicated technologies if the current ones just work fine ?
I agree, new technologies might be faster and/ord better in the future, so it's defenetly worth looking into it some more.

Re:Interesting as technology (3, Funny)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980679)

Yes we need it.
Imagine, just turn on the shower and you have a movie playing.
Feds at your door, just drink the water.. poof
The plus side is that now you can have internet access from your tap and finally we can stop bitching about cable companies....

Negatives:
Overclocking your AMD can vaporise your data... as if burnt motherboards werent enough ;-)

Re:Interesting as technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980735)

I tell you why, because it's a great open source businessmodel!

1: Write free software.
2: ?
3: Use water for communication.
4: Profit!

Re:Interesting as technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980821)

Actually this technology is used a lot in ventilators you'd find in hospital ICU's for controlling the timing of breaths to a patient.

Its generally refered to as 'fluidics' (well technically it uses bursts of air not water used to control the timings..but air's behaves as fluid in this case..technically speaking).

So the theory has actually been put to practicle use.

faster development (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980547)

To reduce costs, the development of this cool technology should be moved to India!

Now (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980555)

I am jamming to Iron Maiden. 666 The Number Of The Beast. What ever happend to good rock?

Man this one is begging for it! (5, Funny)

FunkSoulBrother (140893) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980556)

If this pans out, soon we'll be able to Surf the 'net!

Re:Man this one is begging for it! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980739)

That is an excellent open source businessmodel!!!

1: Write free software.
2: ?
3: Surf the net on real water!
4: Profit!

this is just art (3, Insightful)

hfastedge (542013) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980558)

I dont mean this as an insult. And its very good art, but observe:
The core technology behind StreamingMedia is a new network protocol I'm developing for water transmission called H20/IP. H20/IP functions in a similar way as TCP/IP but focuses on the inherent viscous properties of water that are not present in traditional packet networks. These properties include fluidity, heat index, tri-state properties, density difference depending on state, and surface tension. Based on the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) Model, H20/IP exists as a physical layer consisting of custom-designed hardware throughputs, a network layer used to decode incoming and outgoing messages, a transport layer between messages and communication interfaces, and an application layer that allows for connecting infinite input and output mechanisms. Depending on the design of the StreamingMedia network, the data layer can dynamically adjust to each change while maintaining the integrity of the network.


This simply uses water as the medium instead of: fiber, wire, or air. Most likely, I would conclude that solid water is just too dynamic of a material to get anything useful out of it. For example, this display uses water drops, which are huge compared to electrons. Now, using electricity over water would be a little more interesting, but then it REALLY just becomes another medium for fiber wires. And if you want to get really creative, you can say that since there is so much matter in one drop of water, you can automagically make use of this inherent fact to send more data...then I say bah....because you can inherently make use of the quantum properties of electrons to get more out of them, and this is where we are REALLY going towards.

Thanks for contributing to the entropy of this planet you artist!

So: Just art...but good art. Well done!

Re:this is just art (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980742)

Ok, that may be a good open source business-model.

1: Write free software.
2: ?
3: View networking by water as art.
4: Profit!

Re:this is just art (2)

gilroy (155262) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980771)

Blockquoth the poster:

Most likely, I would conclude that solid water is just too dynamic of a material to get anything useful out of it.

I would conclude that, as solid water -- ice -- is crystalline, it isn't dynamic at all. :)

Re:this is just art (1)

personxx (581793) | more than 11 years ago | (#4981198)

So this means we can use an ice machine and drop ice cubes from a height? And use ice as our medium to transmit data :)

Re:this is just art (no its science) (2)

SirSlud (67381) | more than 11 years ago | (#4981268)

I dont know what artists you know, but coding a rudimentary delivery mechanism for a trans and protocol out of water drops doesn't sound very 'arty'. Just nerdy, but in a good way. Lots of interesting discoveries happen when people are just noodling around.

Somebody above pointed out that this is the branch of science known as 'fluidics', and the equipment he used he may have gotten from any number of companies that produce fluidics instruments [fluidics.nl] .

Why waste the water? (1)

Max Romantschuk (132276) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980561)

This is cool, but a system employing a cycling loop of water would be cooler... after all water temperature could be used as an encoding medium, and peltier devices (heat pumps) to control the temperature.

Turbulence could be a problem, but challenges is what's it's all about, right? :)

Imagine.. (2)

Doomrat (615771) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980566)

..a webserver connected via on of these. You could get your page slashdotted and boil water for coffee at the same time!

Clever, But Useful? (2)

CBNobi (141146) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980567)

Forgive me, but it's 2am, so one of my reactions to the article included "oooh, pictures."

Using organic materials for data seemed to be perfect with cybernetics and other cyborg-esque technology; however, this idea is far from it. It's more closer, it seems, to Morse code - it apparently uses differing amounts and timings of water droplets to signify the color of the particular pixel.

In addition, the packets are supported by gravity; hard to imagine how this could be done in a horizontal setting - I'm sure most of you know how fluids and pressure work. (Difficult to pass packets of water horizontally)

So, anyone have good uses for this 'protocol'?

Re:Clever, But Useful? (2)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980701)

Difficult to pass packets of water horizontally

Not to mention trying to ACK the received packets/droplets... I wonder what transfer speeds he gets, around 1 dps[1] maybe? Would it be possible to modulate the droplets to achieve higher speeds? Or add a squirt gun to pass water upwards/sideways? The possibilities for getting really wet are endless!

[1] drop per second, of course. :-)

How refreshing. (4, Informative)

jericho4.0 (565125) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980577)

This is a cool project. It reminded me of this [mit.edu] project (from this [slashdot.org] /. posting. A guy building logic gates with water flow.

There was another link I can't find anymore to a lab moving microscopic drops of water around on a sillicon substrate really fast. The target apps are in biochemistry, but iirc the design used the liquid to do some logic, also.

Imagine a beo.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980579)

Ok I'm stopping there...
Really what could this do to further our technological needs? Water is great for cooling down computers, but fundimentally you do NOT want the water to be in your computers...

Could be a shockign experiance.

Granted you could use temperature change, speed of the water, and the state to transmit data, but you have the same ability with binary code :/

which already has a standard as well...

Imagine the standards they'd use for water...

the fluid standards (tFS for short)
the Solid standard (tSS)
and finally the vapor standard (tVS)

which could lead to other problems as well...

For instance what to do with the water if you happen to need to shut down your system

Drink it?

(note sarcasm)

What this REALLY is! (2, Funny)

jamesjw (213986) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980585)


Its really a .JPEG to Atari 2600 image converter isnt it?

Come on now.. you can call it all the fancy shmancy names you like but that what it is eh?

Cant fool us!

Dirty Linux Hippies (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980587)

Statistics show that the average linux user/admin:

*bathes 2.3 times a week
*cleans their teeth every third day
*has 18 fillings
*doesn't shave
*enjoys mexican food
*is afraid of people/sunlight/dogs/anything un-PC related

In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980588)

Water uses YOU as an organic network between two computers.

Re:In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4981313)

Soviet Sad Man is sad that Water uses YOU as an organic network between two computers

Creepy! (3, Funny)

Subcarrier (262294) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980599)

I put a contraption like this under my leaky kitchen tap and got...

HELP! I'M BEING HELD PRISONER AT THE RESERVOIR!

I keep telling myself it's just the water company messing with our heads, but...

So given this new technology... (1)

JohnnyBigodes (609498) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980614)

... and all its applications with packet networking, I presume we will be calling the next tsunami a waterwall? :)

Based on an old idea (Cryptonomicon) (3, Insightful)

FyRE666 (263011) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980617)

This is reminiscent of an idea used in the "first computer" developed in the book Cryptonomicon [cryptonomicon.com] . The RAM is a series of tubes holding mercury, which store values based upon waves introduced into the tubes which closed electical circuits (if I remember rightly). It'd be cool to see one actually working ;-)

Re:Based on an old idea (Cryptonomicon) (1)

QuMa (19440) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980658)

Mercury delay lines have already been used quite succesfully in machines like UNIVAC and ENIAC. Google for it to get pictures and descriptions.

HDTV watch out (2)

SHEENmaster (581283) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980623)

This is amazing! Just look at that picture quality! It claims to be 2 bit, but I only see three colors. Can I buy one and sue for a refunt?

Would this still be "/. worthy" if it transmitted 1280x1024 true color X sessions? Or only if a beowulf cluster was implemented through this?

Serious: This is a neat "geek" project but nothing spectacular. Would the height difference be needed if we closed off the system so that pressure waves could transfer?

Binary arithmetic 101 ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4981024)

With 1 bit you can represent 2 values.
With 2 bits you can represent 4 values.
You need 2 bits to represent 3 values.

moron stock markup FraUD .conspiracIEs (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980624)


"In the case of software sales, which often involve multiyear deals, a major gray area exists in determining whether to book the revenue when the deal is signed, or when some or all of the software is delivered and installed. The problem worsened during the boom, when both software and Internet companies were signing many multiyear deals ultimately ?worth? tens of millions of dollars."

L0L(tm) [trustworthycomputing.com]

"People who are compensated in options had an incentive to inflate prices," he said.

"There is a pattern here," he said, referring to company behavior. "There will be more indictments."

maybe the kingdumb will call IT, FUDux.0h0h

doesN'T l00k LIEk they're goon to be abull to call IT Lindows(TMp). that sure would have been handy. would have made a nice name used to priNT up some more phony billonly stock markup payper, to "spin" off onto trusting old J. et AL.

likely, that bullshipping(tm) co. won't go for the FUDox lowgo. has anyone heard how elmer fudd's name dilution/defamation litigation is going? he was the won whois hurt the MoSt, we think.

kode capture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980673)

so va lairy et AL, is now the "keeper" of the o-s sacred/secret kodes?

so, if somebody gives lairy money, he'll see to IT that your work belongs to them? sounds fishy?

so, if you fall out of terms with lairy's guise, his kodemonger(tm) system kicks in, & you're out?

sounds like some other failed dictatorship. we've seen these types of "relationships" before. be careful.

banner ads, sheesh.

Why water? (5, Funny)

coloth (630330) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980636)

Seems to me, water was an uncreative choice for a creative project. Why not:

Wine - An object lesson in classy networking.
Milk - Don't have a cow, but your MOO just got creamed.
Diesel - Oh, you knew they were going to get into high tech somehow.
Coffee - Finally the name "Java" makes sense!
Antifreeze - Hey, it just might work!
Urine - For something that has pissed you off so much over the years

yeah antifreeze ! (1)

inoffensif (604265) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980767)


... would be especially useful for keeping WANs up and running in nordic country winters eh?... and besides it tastes soo yummy...

Reminds me of Soggy Noodle... (5, Funny)

torpor (458) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980649)

... a few years back during a LAAAATE night hacking session on a device driver for some hardware, I decided I'd had enough and needed to do something fun.

I unglued myself from the swetty membrane that had formed between the edges of my ass and the chair, delved deep into foggy memory banks for details on how to move my arms and legs, got up and robo'ed to the kitchen with curled fingers to make pasta. It was a LOOONG code session, damn.

Halfway back, I got the idea to use noodles to connect the device I was working on to my PC, just for fun. Easy enough to do: the serial line from my debugger to the outboard gear was just three wires.

Some avid hacking with duct-tape, judicious use of PCB-posts, and 10 minutes later, I had things working!! I could talk to my device over the soggy noodle!

So funny, sending commands over pasta!

Okay, I went home after that. It didn't work so well the next day, when the pasta had dried up and stuck to the edges of the PCB ... and I got a few odd looks from a co-worker as I cleaned up, chuckling to myself, but hey...

Imagine... (-1, Troll)

LotusFlower (634967) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980651)

...a Beowulf Cluster linked together by one of those!

Note - this is certainly my first and probably my only 'Beowulf Cluster' joke, and am hoping to be modded 'Funny', and will manage to pull this off by sheer beginners' luck.

Re:Imagine... (3, Funny)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980693)

this is certainly my first and probably my only 'Beowulf Cluster' joke

First I cant vouch for.. but definately it will be your last after you get modded to hell and back, and before you go for the ride.. dont forget to turn of that TAP, you dont want ATARI 2600 images travelling around your house.. do you ;-) ?

One practical application (2, Interesting)

katalyst (618126) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980674)

This technique can be used to convert the movements/vibrations made by fish into some kind of visual form: and what might be the purpose? Art... beauty... abstract communication ??

Re:One practical application (2)

jamesjw (213986) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980863)


Now.. I could be wrong here.. but isnt this exactly what a fish tank is for?

To turn the movements of a fish into something visual?!

Re:One practical application (2)

katalyst (618126) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980871)

Lol.. don't be so naive. If we have photographs and digital images, why are paintings still popular? Your question is as bad as this one....

Other way around? (3, Funny)

alanwj (242317) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980685)

Am I just confused, or wouldn't this be more appropriately titles IP/H2O?

Alan

Re:Other way around? (2, Interesting)

Gekke Eekhoorn (27027) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980721)

I agree, at the very least, it should be IP/H2O. But the story also doesn't tell us if the creator actually uses IP.

If I was making something like this, it would probably have a low-bandwidth protocol. I mean, look at that grayscale picture. That just spells "My Network Is Very Slow". I wouldn't go encapsulating the packets in IP....

In Dutch, we would call his naming "Dichterlijke vrijheid", which translates to "Poetic freedom". It doesn't have to make sense, it should just convey the idea :). H2O/IP is probably wrong, but it conveys the idea.

Re:Other way around? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980780)

Yup. Looks like some Slashdot editors are from Soviet Russia.

Time (1)

KinkyClown (574788) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980714)

Wouldn't that that forever? A 10 meter drop would take approximately one second. Since several drops are needed for one byte it will take 8 seconds for one byte to be send over. If they do not use TCP/IP and just send over a RAW 320 x 256 picture (MCGA) they would have to wait : 655360 seconds. This will be: 7 days, 14 hours, 2 minutes and 40 seconds...

Re:Time (3, Informative)

panurge (573432) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980975)

No, because droplets can follow one another with more than one in the channel at the time. They only need to be far enough apart to be sure they are distinguishable.

If we assume that drops need to start off at least 10mm apart, using the high school classical equation t = sqrt(2s/g), we get about .045s or around 20 drops per second. (They will be physically much further apart at the bottom, of course, but the same distance apart in time.)

Now assume we use classical serial communication, 1 start bit, one stop bit, one parity bit. That's 11 bits to a byte, or very roughly 2 bytes per second. The problem is mainly one of error correction. There is no back channel, so any errors cannot be corrected as there is no retransmit request. This is definitely not related to TCP/IP which was intended to be a robust protocol. It's just the equivalent of Morse code. Even so, at about 100 bytes per minute, and with the opportunity for compression, the transmission rate is about as fast as an ordinary Morse operator.

Re:Time (1)

Brane2 (608748) | more than 11 years ago | (#4981427)

Not quite true. Based on the experience with similar problems inside familiar electronics (analog modems, inkjets), there is much room for improvement here. One could use phase modulation (various time between droplets) in many forms and maybe even droplet size modulation. I guess it could be made to look quite effective with bit rates around 50 bits/sec or even more...

cool in innondable areas :) (0)

Balise42 (602049) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980734)

maybe we could avoid networks shutdowns at school due to "sorry, the cables are in the cave..."

I thought of this a long time ago... (2)

los furtive (232491) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980741)

Except that I wanted to use actual ping-pong balls. I'm sure I'm not the only one.

But is it Art? (2)

oldstrat (87076) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980751)


If someone says it's art, then I gauss it is.

It's without a doubt poor engineering. Inefficient and error prone.
If a hydro-exictric,mechanical means were to be used to do TCP/IP, and you chose not to conduct the electrical signal through what would probably be non-pure, highly conductive water, I would be more inclined to use water pressure to do the job rather than drops of water.

But then that's me and I never understood the art of Yoko Ono.

One Ring to Transmit Them (3, Funny)

Spunk (83964) | more than 11 years ago | (#4980785)

H20/IP functions in a similar way as TCP/IP but focuses on the inherent viscous properties of water that are not present in traditional packet networks.

So a Token Ring system done this way would be a viscous circle?

Organic network? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980796)

Get a girlfriend, you geeks!

And don't think about trying to resurect Sheila 3.0 from Virtuosity...she's mine.

Your organic network is as close to an attraction as you geeks will get! I recommend you use protection before you plug into any OPEN ports...sicko.

(Sheila, I love you. Bend over...*boing*oing*)

So to upgrade to more throughput... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4980908)

...does the guy get bigger pipes?

ba-dum-ching!

Finally the excuse I've been waiting for... (2, Funny)

saintan (608939) | more than 11 years ago | (#4981001)

Uhh...Professor, I don't have my assignment because my dog drank it...

DoS Attack? (3, Funny)

Quixadhal (45024) | more than 11 years ago | (#4981016)

So if water is the media for tcp/ip, flushing the toilet would be considered a DoS attack? I imagine flushing while someone else is showering would be a DDoS, hence the screams...

Big Deal (2)

derrickh (157646) | more than 11 years ago | (#4981063)

I don't see what the big deal is here. They're using water instead on electrons..whoopie. The same effect could be made using a small child as the data carrier.

A kid stands beside the PC. The Computer analyzes a picture, converts it to 16x16, blares out '2!', the kid runs downstairs, presses the number on a keyboard, runs back upstairs, the computer blares '0!', kid runs downstairs, presses number, etc etc etc. Voila! Greyscale image in the downstairs monitor.

Look, an organic network!

D

Come on, give me a break. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4981621)

This guy had a nice idea, fine, I'll give him that much. Yet it sounds to me like he doesn't know very much about what he's talking about. Water is NOT organic. Organic, as in organic chemistry, deals with the chemistry of carbon compounds. There is no C in H20. Think about it. This is very nice, and is as limited as it is nice. Kudos, but don't hold your breath.

What a relief! (1)

Phantasmo (586700) | more than 11 years ago | (#4981724)

I read the headline and thought IP = intellectual property - Jesus Tapdancing Christ! They're patenting water??? This project sounds cool.
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  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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