Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

The Top Ten Physics Highlights of 2002

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the physics-is-phun dept.

Science 183

Ocelot Wreak writes "Physics Web has a cool summary of The Top Ten Physics Highlights of 2002. These include anti-atoms, neutrino oscillation - a finding that requires new physics beyond the Standard Model, defying the second law of thermodynamics, and using neutrons to measure quantum gravitational effects, amongst others. For some reason, the Slashdot Effect and the latest research on iPod-based Beowulf clusters were not included..."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Ooo. (5, Funny)

slothdog (3329) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007742)

so when do we get the Top Ten Top Ten Stories of 2002?

Re:Ooo. (1)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007780)

so when do we get the Top Ten Top Ten Stories of 2002?

Well, they don't want to bombard you with them, so they're waiting to give you the top entry on the top ten list of top ten lists of top ten stories of 2002. Those editors, always looking to save us time by giving us only the quality stories!

Re:Ooo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007791)

Next will be Top 10 crap postings on slashdot

Re:Ooo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007826)

Now there's an idea. Any suggestions ?

Re:Ooo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008158)

In Soviet Russia, suggestions CRAP YOU!

Re:Ooo. (4, Funny)

anthony_dipierro (543308) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007844)

As soon as someone resubmits [slashdot.org] them.

Re:Ooo. (1, Offtopic)

Twirlip of the Mists (615030) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007892)

From the FAQ:

These are just mistakes on the part of the staff. They happen. We have posted over ten thousand stories in our history. The occasional duplicate is inevitable.

What they neglect to mention is that of the 10,000 stories posted on Slashdot, 4,000 of them were duplicates and another 1,000 of them were rumors, incorrect, or just plain trolls.

Re:Ooo. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007985)

What they neglect to mention is that of the 10,000 stories posted on Slashdot [...] 1,000 of them were rumors, incorrect, or just plain trolls.

And that blocking Timothy stories reduces 950 of those 1,000.

Please Stop (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007743)

these "top 10" things. Nobody CARES!!!!!!!

Keep it up (0, Redundant)

Catskul (323619) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008041)

At this rate pretty soon there will be a top ten "Top 10" list of 2002.

Re:Keep it up (0)

Chrispy1000000 the 2 (624021) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008234)

Well, we know at number one would be The Top Ten list of Top Ten lists of Top Ten lists that Slashdot Editors reposted. But in SOVIET RUSSIA, the Top Ten lists Vote for YOU!

#11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007751)

1999: Nuclear Fission

2000: Nuclear Fission

2001: Nuclear Fission

2002: Nuclear Fission

2003: Nuclear Fission

2004: Nuclear Fission

But the best news... (5, Funny)

core plexus (599119) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007764)

...is by far more women getting into physics

"12. Hope for the future More than 300 physicists from around the world -- most of them women -- met in Paris in March for the first International Conference on Women in Physics."

In a related story: Sex makes your brain grow [xnewswire.com]

Re:But the best news... QWZX (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007814)

...is by far more women getting into physics

There's nothing wrong with that, but I have q question: why is it particularly important for more women to get into physics? Why can't we just leave women alone and let them do what they want? Why do we need to perform "social architecture"?

My vote would be just to stop worrying about what group does what (and that includes race), and focus on what individuals do or don't do.

But then, maybe I'm just crazy and believe that society really should be color and sex blind. You may now begin flogging the heretic.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (1, Interesting)

First_In_Hell (549585) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007922)

That was the most intelligent thing I have heard in a while. Nice way to put it.

People always talk about striving to eliminate stereotypes & groupings, but always feel the need to keep reminding everyone about it anyway bringing us back to the same problem.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (3, Insightful)

MrDog (307202) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007987)

By analyzing social trends, it may become apparent *why* those trends exist. It has been the case in the past that groups of people were not able to do what they wanted as easily as others, and we could then modify or create laws to make the system in question more equitable.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008124)

we could then modify or create laws to make the system in question more equitable.

Dude, just remember this:

Equality of Opportunity does not equal Equality of Result.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (1)

MrDog (307202) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008329)

Of course not. I would never argue that it does. Only that equality of opportunity is the ideal. Whatever people do with their opportunities is their own business.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008467)

Remeber this also, however. Conversely, Inequality of Opportunity does equal Inequality of Result. Or, to put it more plainly and verbosely - if the barriers of societal pressures and mindsets are removed, there is no guarantee that the percentage of women who become physicists will equal the percentage of men who become physicists. However, if those barriers remain in place, it is guaranteed that the percentage of women who become physicists will be less than the percentage of men who become physicists.

Also, as a reply to the original message - yes, references to gender and racial types may at a point reinforce the barriers which the user may be attempting to break down. But on the other hand, ignoring the fact that there is still a great amount of gender bias in the world is also dangerous. How can one address the issue of bias without referring to the group being biased against?

Re:But the best news... QWZX (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008066)

But you see, if more women get into physics, then more men will. I was a physics major and, trust me, the dating scene was grim.

We need more physicists. This is an important first step.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (4, Funny)

arknrbn (560151) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008111)

Heh, being a woman, and being a Physics major, I can honestly agree that the dating situation was indeed grim.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (-1)

613746 (613746) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008247)

Oh thank god. I thought I was the only woman here. This place is full of very strange people, scary people.

Anyway, I am interested trimming the shrubs and mowing the lawn.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (5, Insightful)

michaelggreer (612022) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008135)

This is a common misconception. Trying to get more groups invloved in science (art, etc) is not just social engineering. It is also an attempt to make science better. The more people lend their talents, the better it will be. This is obviously true in sports, as African-Americans became able to join professional teams. As Jesse Jackson once said, "we never knew how good football could be until everyone could play". The same is true for science: we will never know how good it can be until everyone can participate.

What "women want" is highly influenced by what paths in life seem available or attractive to them. This is hardly something one is born with, but much more likely the product of cultural atmosphere. The fact that there are more American women scientists than Afnagni ones makes this obvious. A restrictive environment of possibilities acts as a real barrier to entry for women, many of whom don't even think of themselves a spossible scientists. And all of that is prior to active prejudice on the part of others.

My mom is a chemist and she had to fight like hell her whole life just to work, much less to do that work and still be considered a woman. Anything that makes science more viable for all individuals sense of identity is positive, and clearly benefits science.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008324)

My mom is a chemist

And probrably not a good one.

Being that the primary beneficiary of Affirmative Action is upper middle class white women, chances are she got into school (especially postgraduate) in the first place to fill a quota.

Ford has the most women engineers. They also manufacture the worst cars.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (1)

michaelggreer (612022) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008515)

She got into school on a National Merit Scholarship, and is the Chemistry chair at a major university. There were no quotas when she got into Chicago for post-grad. Wrong all over, Coward.

Re:But the best news... QWZX (2)

milo_Gwalthny (203233) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008551)

Main Entry: prejudice
Pronunciation: 'pre-j&-d&s
Function: noun

2 a ... (2) : an adverse opinion or leaning formed without just grounds or before sufficient knowledge.

(Merriam-Webster [m-w.com] )

Re:But the best news... (2, Funny)

Mononoke (88668) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007816)

"12. Hope for the future More than 300 physicists from around the world -- most of them women -- met in Paris in March for the first International Conference on Women in Physics."
When does the 'first international Conference on Men in Physics' take place? Is it likely that most of the attendees will be men?

Re:But the best news... (1)

Mr.Gibs (637393) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007825)

True, but I can't believe that it took this long for us to "allow" women to contribute!?!? Why is it that society believes that women are any less capable of contributing in the field of physics than men?

Re:But the best news... (2, Funny)

L. VeGas (580015) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007897)

Since men have a both an X and a Y chromosome, men are better at phYsiX. Lacking this, women are better at phXsiX, which isn't a real science (in America anyway).

Re:But the best news... (1)

RedWolves2 (84305) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008204)

This explains why my wife can't get sexy but loves sexx.

Re:But the best news... (2)

kin_korn_karn (466864) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007907)

yeah, that silly Madame Curie, she never did anything useful.

Re:But the best news... (1)

bofkentucky (555107) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008044)

...yeah like hand seperating uranium ore, or suckering her husband into helping.

Re:But the best news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007832)

So your saying that I might actually be able to get a date? Of course a rejection would rip the nuclear bonds of my heart:(

Re:But the best news... (1)

grub (11606) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007920)


.is by far more women getting into physics

You tell that to all the starving men wondering how to operate a stove or run the washing machine.

Re:But the best news... (2)

core plexus (599119) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007997)

That won't be a problem. Most of the men I seen around here would not starve for 2 months or more without eating, and they don't know how to run a washing machine, or at least find clean clothes.

Re:But the best news... (0, Troll)

grub (11606) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008087)

My washing machine broke down the other day.. I gave her a smack and told her to get back to work.

Amen... (2)

efuseekay (138418) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008600)

As a horny unattached male physicist, let me tell you this :

EUREKA!!!!!!

THESE are the top stories of 2002 (-1)

PhysicsGenius (565228) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007781)

These are great theoretical discoveries and all, but I can't help but compare them to years past. How does the spin of a neutrino stack up against Faraday's invention of the electric motor and generator? How does anti-matter compete with James Watts creation of the first working steam engine? Who cares about dark matter in light of Maxwell's promise of information transfer via radio waves?

Science used to make our lives better but what has it done for us lately?

Re:THESE are the top stories of 2002 (2, Insightful)

Anonymous CowWord (635850) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008202)

When the electric motor was invented, I doubt everyone in the world had it within a year. I doubt trains were made everywhere within a year of making the steam engine.

Just because the reasearch doesn't provide immediate benefits doesn't mean its useless.

Also, science isn't just about making life better. Part of it is also about satisfying curiosity and knowing more. If someone found the edge of the universe tomorrow, it would not help life in any way, but I would still regard it as the one of the most compelling achievements in science.

And just one more thing; how does anti-matter compare? anti-matter, if successfully harnessed would be a clean pure source of energy. Go talk to the people of Chernobyl and they will tell you how important it is.

How dare they defy the 2nd law of thermodynamics (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007782)

Homer: "Lisa, in this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!"

Re:How dare they defy the 2nd law of thermodynamic (1)

mstyne (133363) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008289)

that was funny ha

Moderators on crack! Sentance error! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008390)

You are supposed to separate ideas using a comma. Your post, corrected, as follows:

Homer: "Lisa, in this house, we obey the laws of thermodynamics!"

The purpose of separating ideas in a sentance is to make sentances 1) negligible, 2) organize information presented to the reader, 3) prevent run-on sentances, and 4) allow the author of a sentance to proof-read the quality of the formed sentance by randomizing each comma-separated idea to judge the quality of the chosen words and their formation.

You, sir, have violated rules #2 and #3! OFF WITH YOUR HEAD!

Too many commas, comma boy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008525)

and another thing dipsh!t, sentence doesn't have an a in it

Re:Moderators on crack! Sentance error! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008534)

What about you? You spelled SENTENCE wrong.

Amazing (4, Funny)

TimeReliesOnLadyLuck (634991) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007790)

"For some reason, the Slashdot Effect and the latest research on iPod-based Beowulf clusters were not included..."

Amazing, now the editors are trolling US! You know where.

Re:Amazing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007859)

Where? Do you mean IN $#@#$fdscv NO CARRIER

Re:Amazing (1, Offtopic)

Twirlip of the Mists (615030) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007916)

$#@#$fdscv

Yeah, but if you use English; you can just say $SHOE_SIZE instead.

On Soviet Slashdot... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007953)

editors troll you!

welcome to slashdot. (2, Funny)

sulli (195030) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008112)

Amazing, now the editors are trolling US! You know where.

New here, aren't you?

Actually 12 highlights... (5, Funny)

robbyjo (315601) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007792)

But the last two points are just "Low points of the year" and "Hope for the future".

The lowpoints... you guess it, the great sham by Victor Ninov on Ununoctium.

The hope is... more women in physics! Oh the joy! You guys in Physics should be happier now... :-) If only this happens as well in Computer Science...

Re:Actually 12 highlights... (4, Funny)

anonymous loser (58627) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008335)

A former girlfriend was a physicist. Being an engineer, we always got into the endless debates of "theory" vs. "practice". As a physicist she seemed to prefer talking about sex, whereas I preferred actually *having* sex.

Electron neutrino flavour (4, Funny)

sboyko (537649) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007793)

In April, physicists at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) in Canada presented conclusive new evidence that electron neutrinos oscillate -- or change 'flavour' -- on their way from the Sun to the Earth.

So they don't taste like chicken anymore?

Re:Electron neutrino flavour (1)

Tseran (625777) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008016)

This is a prelude to a new take-over attempt by Baskin-Robbins and KFC. First they are going to buy all the electron neutrino flavours, then they are going to sell them back to us. The all new Electron Neutrino 31 Flavours! Then, KFC will be taking over all the chicken flavoured electron neutrinos. Of course, some years down the road, people will claim that the Neutrinos are being called CFNs instead of Chicken Flavoured Neutrinos because KFC decided to not use real chicken flavouring.

Re:Electron neutrino flavour (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008119)

mmmm...Neutrino's Althought is seems their flavor does not last too long.

Re:Electron neutrino flavour (2)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008245)

The Standard Model of physics doesn't allow for the Chicken Neutrino, only the Electron, Muon and Tau neutrinos. This is why I consider the Standard Model flawed, and I've proposed a new model, dubbed the Craptastic Model.

Among other innovations, the Craptastic Model does allow for the existence of Chicken Neutrino. What's more, the CM allows for an indefinite number of types of neutrinos, potentially thousands of them. It is my intent to auction off the name rights to these new fabulous types of particles. For instance, by paying the proper fees, there could be a Tropicana Neutrino*, or the General Motors Neutrino*. What could be more prestigious than having an elementary particle named after your company? The marketing potential is incredible! Get in now before they're all gone!

* Experimental evidence of these neutrinos withheld pending receipt of standard fees.

Never gets old... (-1, Redundant)

kingkade (584184) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007809)

For some reason, the Slashdot Effect and the latest research on iPod-based Beowulf clusters were not included..."

Nope, never gets old at all...

Must top 10 list (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007810)

Top 10 ways to get a slashdot reader to get laid

-by CmdrTaco

Re:Must top 10 list (2)

Twirlip of the Mists (615030) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007955)

I know what #1 [slashdot.org] will be...

Re:Must top 10 list (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008140)

Funny...It seems to me that the #1 way for Slashdot readers to get laid would be to stop reading slashdot. A close #2 would require you to leave your parents basement.

bah (-1)

SlashdotTroll (581611) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008254)

You obviously aren't a geek, or a a recoving one that has been too f*cking long *from your computer.

You skipped step 0: "Bathe in Tomato Sauce to remove hot grits"

Obviously (1, Redundant)

First_In_Hell (549585) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007819)

Slashdot Effect and the latest research on iPod-based Beowulf clusters were not included..."

That is because neither of those have anything to do with physics. Hate to state the obvious.

Re:Obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007860)

'Hate to state the obvious'. Then *DONT* !!!

n/a (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007828)

sometimes i crawl inside other people's arses for a look around

The Best Part (4, Funny)

Sargent1 (124354) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007829)

This list is great if for no other reason than it gives me a chance to say "Superkamiokande!" in a superhero-like voice.

Say it with me. It'll make you feel better. "Superkamiokande!"

Of course, having research I worked on [duke.edu] mentioned in passing ("Researchers also reported on the unusual expansion characteristics in an ultra-cold Fermi gas this month") was cool too.

Re:The Best Part (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008267)

You can't just say Superkamiokande. You also have to pose dramatically and exhibit some sort of glowing aura.

what? (1)

tps12 (105590) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007840)

No Segway?

Re:what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008167)

You already told that joke. [slashdot.org] Think of another, please.

Re:what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008221)

Yeah, that wasn't the first time, either. It's such a good joke, I have to post it whenever I get the chance. Which is like every day or two.

-tps

Re:what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008588)

Oh, and another thing... I'm gay and can't find enough cock! Can anyone help me out?

-tps

Re:what? (1)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008169)

Wrong article - the top 10 vaporware list was yesterday.

FP BABY (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007852)

FP Fubar BABY!

Got DEW??

Huh??

Stupid micheal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007881)

Its 2003-01-03 now!

top twelve? (1)

pummer (637413) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007924)

"PhysicsWeb selects its top ten stories of 2002 -- a year that will also be remembered for two high-profile cases of scientific misconduct.


1. Anti-atoms at CERN
2. Cosmic microwaves reveal polarization
3. New results confirm neutrino oscillation
4. Defying the second law
5. Advances in Superconductivity
6. Ultra-cold atoms research continues to make advances
7. Magnets in nanoscale logic devices
8. Neutrons used to measure quantum gravitational effects
9. First evidence for 'tetra-neutrons'
10. Bright times in optics
11. Low points of the year
12. Hope for the future


hmmmm, someone didn't learn their numbers

Re:top twelve? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5007946)

It would be the top "10" in base-12.

Those bastards at CERN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008459)

"PhysicsWeb selects its top ten stories of 2002 -- a year that will also be remembered for two high-profile cases of scientific misconduct.

1. Anti-atoms at CERN


I hate those bigots at CERN! Why are they so anti-atom? I, myself, am very much pro-atom.

They missed one.. (1)

grub (11606) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007960)


#13 : Nearly age 50, Ron Jeremy [ronjeremy.com] can still get it up.

Take a Lesson from David Letterman (1)

ifreakshow (613584) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007967)

Why do writers insist on making Top Ten list that start at #1. It ruins the suspense in an otherwise great article. And that's what Physics is all about ... suspense.

Re:Take a Lesson from David Letterman (0)

First_In_Hell (549585) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007988)

Dude everyone knows Physics is all about getting mad bizatches and getting laid every night!

Your sig... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008216)

Linux: If someone offered me open heart surgery for free, when I am 100% healthy, should I take it anyway?

For cases like yours, Linux offers free brain surgery.

Re:Take a Lesson from David Letterman (1)

SirSlud (67381) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008138)

I think when a 10 ten list of physics needs to provide suspense to somebody, they've clearly already got all the suspense they need. I mean, whats more suspenseful than not knowing and wondering what lies outside one's front door?

Ba-dum-ching!

Bah! (1)

eclectus (209883) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007991)

Top ten this, top ten that. Just let me know when someone finds out what the ??? is in that whole "Step 3:???, Step 4: Profit" thing....

Slashdot effect (2)

Mendax Veritas (100454) | more than 11 years ago | (#5007993)

The Slashdot effect wasn't eligible because it came in #1 last year. Look it up.

2nd Law (1)

Prior Restraint (179698) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008010)

...defying the second law of thermodynamics,...

How many times does it have to be said? Evolution does not violate the second law of thermodynamics!

:-P

Re:2nd Law (0)

syn3rg (530741) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008440)

I can't speak to that but according to the article: The second law of thermodynamics says that the entropy or disorder of an isolated system undergoing a cyclic process will increase or remain the same. In July, however, Australian researchers showed that entropy can decrease over short time periods for small systems.

<tongue_in_cheek>
Any parent knows that the less crap your kids have (the smaller the system) the easier it is to keep clean (avoid entropy).
</tongue_in_cheek>

Core memory is back! (1, Offtopic)

hpulley (587866) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008058)

"7. Magnets in nanoscale logic devices

Physicists in the UK built a nano-metre scale logic gate made entirely from metal that works at room temperature. ... If such devices could be built, they would be ideal for mobile applications such as phones and smart cards because the data could be stored without a power source."

Isn't that essentially core memory on a smaller scale? Everything old is new again...

Re:Core memory is back! (3, Interesting)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008273)

It's called a logic gate. Look it up in a book on basic logic theory. Duh.

Re:Core memory is back! (2)

Yokaze (70883) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008674)

Magnetical RAM (MRAM). Storage with access times and density like SRAM, but non-volatile.
In essence, this would allow a computer to resume its work after powered on in an instant from where it left before.

So, yes it essentially the same thing in a smaller scale. Like transitors are tubes in a smaller scale and the HDs are just smaller versions of floppy discs.

These people are apparently idiots (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008064)

The second law of thermodynamics says that the entropy - or disorder - of an isolated system undergoing a cyclic process will increase or remain the same. But this law only applies to large systems over significant periods of time. . . . They found that it predicted that measurable violations of the second law would take place in small systems over short time-scales.
How can small system/short time-scales have violations of the second law when the second law only applies to large system/long time-scales? These people are obviously mentally impaired.

iPod Beowulf cluster (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008120)

Well, doesn't that make your naughty parts tingle!!

Top ten physics highlites of 2002 are: (-1)

SlashdotTroll (581611) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008212)

Drum-role please...

10. First Post
9. Pirst Fost
8. In Soviet Russia...
7. In Communist China...
6. In Socialist Europe...
5. In Fascist America...
4. GNU (Gaysex's Not Unusual)
3. Goatse.cx!
2. Duplicate Stories (see number 2)

and the number one physics highlite of 2002 is...

drum-role please...

cross your fingers...

1. You insensitive clod!

WE LOVE YOU COWBOYNEAL! In free-speech Slashdot.org, good night!

*Yawn* (1)

rigga (600504) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008218)

Wow, I think this is a contendor for "Top Ten Most Boring Story Submissions of 2002 on Slashdot". I mean even the Picture of Albert Einstein next to the article looks like he is sleeping. Now everyone go wake up your Sys Admin because if the poor sap read this he will be happily dreaming of Beowolf Clusters and napping on his keyboard.

Physics Financial (2)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008226)

Photons outpaced the market in what experts are referring to as a light trading day. Neutrino shares remain unchanged, while Top and Bottom Partners is still realing from the loss of their Quark building to a sudden fireball. Fire officals now place the source of the explosion to the inadvertant storage of the recently acquired anti-hydrogen bonds in the same vault as companies hydrogen bonds.

More updates at 3 minutes and 14 seconds past the hour.

A Top 10 list with 12 items? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5008253)

... I always thought the laws of Physics were a little odd!

Earlier Posting Of This Story (2)

cybrpnk2 (579066) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008272)

Sci-Fi Today [scifitoday.com] ran something I wrote on this story [scifitoday.com] a week ago. FYI, you can get daily Sci-Fi Today news headlines on your Slashdot Home Page [slashdot.org] ...

Re:Earlier Sci-Fi Today Posting Of This Story (2)

cybrpnk2 (579066) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008306)

Physics Web has announced the Top 12 physics stories of 2002, a number stretched beyond the usual Top 10 to include human-interest stories like the shortage of women in physics and fabrication-of-data misconduct. Advances in optics were lumped together as one achievement for work as diverse as sub-diffraction limit microscopy and quantum photon cloning. Neutrons were big news, providing insight on quantum gravity and atomic nuclei with neutrons but no protons. Some research was COOL, like Bose-Einstein condensates made from cesium and superconductors made from plutonium. One discovery was HOT, namely nanoscale magnetic logic gates that operate at room temperature. The top discoveries were totally sublime: solar neutrinos change identities on their trip from Sun to Earth, the Second Law of Thermodynamics may be broken (can perpetual motion be far behind?) and microwave radiation from the Big Bang is polarized just like a pair of Neo's sunglasses. The number one physics story, however, was straight out of Star Trek: creation of "cold" anti-hydrogen gas that could be stored indefinitely as long as it didn't touch anything while being held in a magnetic field. Maybe the top physics story for 2003 will be the development of a dilithium chamber to put the anti-hydrogen gas into...

Micro perpetual motion machines? (1)

I'm Spartacus! (238085) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008383)

From the article:

"The researchers state that the discovery could be important in the design of micromachines, and argue that the probability of thermodynamic systems running 'in reverse' will increase as they become smaller."

So does this mean that there is the possibility of creating perpetual motion machines at the microscopic level? What are the possible consequences of this?

Slashdot Effect (2)

spudwiser (124577) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008462)

It's in there. Just try to load the page. Pseudo-honerable mention I guess.

The Big Bang (1)

assaultriflesforfree (635986) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008598)

Ultimately polarization experiments may be able to investigate the Universe in the very first fractions of a second after the Big Bang -- when it underwent a period of extremely rapid expansion known as 'inflation'.

So, the Universe started a few fractions of a second before Carter was elected? Fascinating.

Sorry, 2nd law wasn't really violated. (3, Informative)

davebo (11873) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008607)

The reason is even mentioned in the article:
This law only applies to large systems over significant periods of time.

Basically, entropy boils down to probabilities - if you flip a fair coin a gazillion times, you'd expect 50% heads and 50% tails. These folks, in effect, were working at a level where they could detect some of the runs of 100 heads in a row. It's an impressive series of measurements, but won't require a rethink of thermodynamics at all.

Re: (2, Redundant)

rmohr02 (208447) | more than 11 years ago | (#5008612)

defying the second law of thermodynamics
"And can you believe this perpetual motion machine she built? It just keeps going faster and faster! ... Lisa, in this house, we obey the laws of THERMODYNAMICS!" - Homer Simpson, as he destroys Lisa's perpetual motion machine
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?