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LGP Announces Two More Titles

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the we-miss-you-loki dept.

Games 156

dolson writes "Earlier today Linux Game Publishing announced the next two titles that they will be porting to Linux. They are both made by Grim, a Swedish development company, and they are called Ballistics and Bandits: Phoenix Rising. One is a high-speed racing game, and the other is a driving/action game."

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NOOOOO (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062762)

No FP for me

BREATHE! BREATHE MY PASTY FRIEND! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062771)

YOU DID NOT FAIL IT (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062776)

CONGRATULATIONS, YOU DID NOT FAIL IT

sadly, i must not use so many caps, so blah blah blah

Holy Shit (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062782)

I got FP!
FUCK YOU MICHAEL

Fine Print (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062763)

Fine Print !

Do Linux Games Sell? (5, Interesting)

tealover (187148) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062770)

What is the best selling linux game of all time and how does that compare to the best selling PC games?

Just curious. I myself bought the Quake 2 games for Linux but that was a couple of years ago. I primarily play console games now.

Not really, but picking up the pace... (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062834)

One industry insider compares the community to the Macintosh community ("Small but fanatical", in his words). Apparently, while the Mac community is still considered a reasonable investment for many companies, the perception of rampant piracy among Linux users was largely bourne out in Loki Software's books. He explained that a niche programming company needed something like 24% penetration at normal game pricing to achieve a reasonable return, but that the last three 'blockbusters' got anywhere between 2%-5% of the estimated Linux base, which was rather surprising given the quality of the software he said (comparatively, they got between 10%-16% of the Windows market, which factored heavily into the design considerations for future product).

I pointed out that there isn't much point to running Quake and whatnot on a server, and he agreed, saying that if Linux ever really makes it to the desktop these companies that were just targeting it in the first place because it was "the next big thing" will revisit it.

Re:Not really, but picking up the pace... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062895)

Problem with Loki is they were run by fuckwits.

The fact is, if anyone wants games, they use Windows. What do they expect with Linux? People use it because it's free, and they wonder why people don't pay for software? Any gamer worth their salt knows XP is where it's at for games, and Linux is, and will always be, a pretender to the throne when it comes to being an OS that runs games well.

You can use XP and have a vast library of games, or you can use Linux, and get a few titles, but none of the big ones (like Warcraft 3, Championship Manager, the biggest selling game in Europe).

Re:Not really, but picking up the pace... (2, Insightful)

jvalenzu (96614) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063343)

Problem with Loki is they were run by fuckwits.

Well, no one who thinks you can make money selling GNU/Linux games is a genius. But in this case you can probably blame idealism more than lack of intellect.

Re:Not really, but picking up the pace... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063387)

You're slipping, Joe. It's "GNU/Lunix."

Re:Not really, but picking up the pace... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063595)

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain

Re:Not really, but picking up the pace... (1)

Joe Tie. (567096) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063670)

Any gamer worth their salt knows XP is where it's at for games, and Linux is, and will always be, a pretender to the throne when it comes to being an OS that runs games well.

Nothing lasts forever. Eight years ago people were saying that windows would always be subpar for gaming. Who knows what things are going to be like ten, twenty years from now.

Re:Not really, but picking up the pace... (2, Interesting)

unixbob (523657) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063741)

The fact is, if anyone wants games, they use Windows . . . . Any gamer worth their salt knows XP is where it's at for games

I beg to differ. Anyone wants games they get a console. Any gamer worth their salt knows Gamecube is where your hardcore gamer sits, and PS2 is where your casual gamer sits. Your XBox gamer sits somewhere in the middle and is usually an ex-PC gamer. I will admit that the only thing which keeps XP on my home machine is the lack of commercial quality games under Linux.

The PC gaming market is on the decline anyway. With the cost of a console at about the same price of an average 3d graphics card (£150 for a GeFrorce4 Ti4200, ~£160 for an XBox with 2 games), PC gaming is rapidly becoming uneconomical. With the gap between PC and console games visual tricks diminshing, PC gameing will soon go the way of the arcade. And the Dodo

Re:Not really, but picking up the pace... (1)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063970)

That is such a crock. Sales show that the PC market is NOT in a decline. The PC game industry has been dying for years if you listen to pundits, but the fact is, sports games aside, it's stronger than ever. Claiming it's uneconomical is crap too. I just picked up Warcraft 3 and the Brady strategy guide for less than half what the game was selling for two months ago. Also games don't have to pay their cut to any manufacturers (like console developers do) which means more profit. That alone will keep PC gaming around.

With the war between nVidia and ATI hotting up, PC's will very shortly take a quantum leap ahead of consoles again, only for consoles to catch up with their next iteration. It's been the same for over a decade.

As for graphics card prices, if you shop around, you can find the Ti series for under $100 if you know where to look.

Gamecube for hardcore gamers? WTF are you smoking? I know many hardcore gamers. Some have X-Box, some have PS2... Not *ONE* owns a Gamecube. While it's gotten a few more adult games, the fact is Nintendo is still weighted down with it's cutesy image and is still considered by many to be a kids console.

Hardcore gamers indeed...

Re:Not really, but picking up the pace... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063908)

The only way I can see flamebait like this getting moderated up is when someone with moderation points posts anonymously, then moderates their own anonyous point up.

- Sam

help ID this quote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062932)

One industry insider compares the community to the Macintosh community ("Small but fanatical", in his words).

Which game company discontinued its Mac ports, and when they got deluged with shitmail the president made some really snotty comment like "If people feel so strongly about Mac games maybe they should buy some"? I'm going nuts trying to remember.

Or perhaps not (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062947)

Somehow I doubt the reason was piracy among Linux users... It's more likely Linux users bought the game from their local shop for their Windows partition, rather than mail-ordering from a distant location, and paying more to boot.

For example, the Bungie game Myth 2 Soulblighter: there was a MacOS version and a Windows version, with about 45% and 55% respectively on each platform. Loki ported it to Linux. However, out of the many thousands who played it online, I only ever _heard_ of several _individuals_ who were playing it online on Linux, and at least one of those was a programmer who worked at Loki!
Now considering how much more likely high-tech Linux users are to play a game online, and even if a whoopingly low 5% of buyers played it online, that means Loki sold well under 1000 units.
If they did that badly with Soulblighter, how badly did they do with other titles? No wonder they weren't making any money.

Real life story - RTCW (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062921)

I bought Return To Castle Wolfenstein for my brother as a christmas present because we really like the multiplayer demo - and because Linux version was available.

The problem is that the demo is a much better product than the commercial version. I'm talking about the multiplayer network game here - single player game is about the same in both and works well.

Installation required that windows install should be run first and then some files should be copied from the place A to place B.

Install text actually recommended Wine if Windows installation was not available. This was actually not that bad since Wine was easy to install and it worked well for RTCW installation. It could have been done better.. like using normal files that the linux installation could have copied.. or could have just told you to copy certain files from the CD.

Anti piracy features like CD keys cause much more trouble. It is actually recommended (by their support pages) that you keep a pause after changing server. Keys are checked on connect and it might look like multiple use of the same key if you change servers too fast/often/whatever.

Demo doesn't check/need any special keys and you are never rejected for CD_KEY failure. My heart always jumps because I don't know if someone has generated the same key with some key generator software - only way to continue playing in network then is to buy another copy (Yeah, right..) or use some generator yourself.

Even more trouble is caused by anti cheat features. There's a Punk Buster installation bundled with the game and most servers require it. We were never being able to join any server that had this feature enabled. Either we didn't have a correct version installed. There are many different versions used on different servers and they are not compatible. Only servers where PB was disabled allowed us to join.

After a lot of this PB trouble we also patched the game hoping some of this trouble would go away. After that it didn't allow us to join to any server. Client "wasn't pure" any more. Support pages say that we were trying to join an incompatible server. I'm sure this was not our fault since server was on the same patch level.

So.. using Linux instead of Windows caused quite a bit more trouble than Windows installation would have. After all this the game don't even work when patched correctly and causes constant trouble when working. I'm never going to recommend buying this game for anyone after going through all this shit. That might be a hit for their Linux sells? Perhaps not.

I'm sure they would sell this game a bit more for Linux too if it was more usable. At least I won't by another copy for my own computer like I had planned.

Re:Real life story - RTCW (2)

StarTux (230379) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063212)

Never had those issues, even after installing the patches. Actually its been really great so far, so are you sure all your issues were to do with Linux? Sounds like you did something else (those patches install just like the game itself...).

I do agree that having to install RTCW under Wine first was a PITA.

One way around that would have been to have purchased the game from Tuxgames, they include their own installer. It is also a seperate purchase if you're so inclined.

Re:Real life story - RTCW (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063686)

I don't think it was so hard because of Linux but because publishers don't care so much about it.

Installation could have been better, things should have worked out better after applying patches, ..

Patches installed just fine and the game worked - after that no server would just accept in. I'm glad it works for you, but I don't think there's much that can go wrong.

Purchasing from Tuxgames was not an option for me at the time. I was looking for present at Dec 21 and shipping to foreign countries takes time and money :)

Re:Do Linux Games Sell? (3, Insightful)

dattaway (3088) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062924)

I haven't been playing games since I switched to Linux several years ago. But looking at the screenshots of these games [grin.se] , that may change. It might be hard to resist that kind of virtual world.

Re:Do Linux Games Sell? (2)

afay (301708) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063348)

I don't think any Linux games have sold well... or at least not the ones ported by Loki. I just went to Microcenter in Cambridge, MA today and bought both Myth II and Railroad Tycoon 2 for 1.99 a piece. If anyone's in the Boston area and wants some cheap, professional games for Linux, go to microcenter. They still have about 10 or 15 copies of each left.

It's sort of unfortunate that Loki went under because they did port the games well. From what I've heard, it was more mismanagement and bad decisions. They might have been able to stay alive if they had made better business decisions.

Re:Do Linux Games Sell? (2)

Kiwi (5214) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063834)

John Carmack [slashdot.org] has posted here that all of the Linux games, combined sold as well as a single moderately sucessful Windows game.

Now, I myself bought a few Loki games, even ones which do not run on my present computer (ugh, no 3d acceleration): Heretic II, Quake III, Heroes of Might and Magic III, Railroad Tycoon, and Alpha Centauri.

However, I think many people, even people who use Linux, do not understand that with freedom comes responsibility. Such people have a Windows partition on their own computer; do not develop libre software nor contribute to Linux in any other meaningful way. These people are not willing to make real sacrifices to have a libre system, and will not wait six months and pay a little more for the privledge of not having to dual-boot. In fact, such freeloaders often times pirate video games instead of paying for them, so they don't help the development of games for Windows either.

- Sam

This is just what Linux needs to expand! (0)

L.Torvalds (548450) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062774)

Nothing like shitty old games that nobody has heard of to light a fire under linux gaming! Good thing nobody is developing original games for linux!

Should I care? (3, Insightful)

wideBlueSkies (618979) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062801)

On one hand yes. I wish these developers every possible success.

On the other hand. Well, I haven't heard of Grin, or it's games. Sorry. I can't recall seeing anything in a PC Gamer, or a box in a software shop.

There's no planetbandits.

Oh well. I wish everyone involved the best.

YAULSS. Yet Another Useless Linux Slashdot Story

Re:Should I care? (1)

Geccoman (18319) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062857)

Most of you earthlings have no idea what is out beyond your puny solar system. Perhaps this game will further our cause to open a dialogue between my people and yours. Geccoman PlanetBandit (yes, we exist) Actually, it does make me smile to see companies making an effort to bring linux appeal to as large of an audience as possible. I seriously doubt that we'll ever see any major piece of software out there (commercial) that can only be run on Linux, causing people to flood in droves over to Redhat's site and spam their message boards with posts asking why Linux is "so hard to work." For a good example, check out the message boards for ShowEQ [sourceforge.net]

Bleh

Re:Should I care? (0, Offtopic)

Geccoman (18319) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062871)

gawd, I suck at HMTL (and actually reading my previews)

Re:Should I care? (2, Insightful)

Black_Logic (79637) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062881)


I haven't heard of the game either, but there happens to be a link to a description of the game right above your post,.. how handy.

The Bandits game looks kind of cool, since when did a linux user care what's in some mainstream windows centric pc gaming magazine?

Re:Should I care? (4, Insightful)

wideBlueSkies (618979) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062903)

>> since when did a linux user care what's in some mainstream windows centric pc gaming magazine?

Since the LINUX user in question happens to use multiple operating systems for both work AND gaming.

This kind of comment really pisses me off. Grow up bud. LINUX is a tool, not a religion or a way of life. The same can be said for Windows or any other hunk of software.

It's a tool provided by a very generous group of people, and one extremely generous individual. They deserve our support, and our thanks. But even they know, I think, that LINUX isn't everything. Nor can it be everything.

Re:Should I care? (1)

xwred1 (207269) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063029)

Why can't Linux be used for games? In the cases where a port of a Windows game has been done, the Linux version runs a little faster and with less administrative hassle.

No dll hell, no fumbling with DirectX versions, no bluescreens or corruption, no goofy cd checks, game preferences stored in your home dir.

Its quite a nice experience to play in Linux. Not to mention its inconvenient to reboot for a quick 15 minute deathmatch or something.

Re:Should I care? (2)

VistaBoy (570995) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063507)

Actually, last Saturday I installed Linux Mandrake 9.0 and Windows XP on a dual-boot configuration. I knew before I reformatted that on Quake 3, 640x480 with Vertex lighting, I could achieve nearly a constant 125 FPS. I installed the Loki version of Quake 3, which upon running froze up while it was initializing sound. Therefore, I had to deal with trying to get my sound working on Linux, which involved me having to read more documentation about my sound server than I ever really thought I'd need to know. Also, I had to make a shortcut to automatically run Quake properly with "artsdsp -m quake3" so that it would automatically emulate the old way of doing Linux sound. Even though I did this, the sound STILL lags behind the action of the game unless I set the buffer to be shorter, which wastes my time because I had to restart the sound server to do it.

Did I mention that I also had to use unofficial precompiled RPMs to install the nVidia drivers with ANY kind of convienience? Also, I had to mess around with an XFree86 configuration file.

Finally, when I was playing Quake, the same settings as before yielded a steady 80 fps. Whee.

I haven't used Windows very much, so I haven't really gotten around to installing Quake3, but normally it involves simply running nVidia's install EXE, then putting the CD in the drive and hitting install. No crashes, no problems, and it's faster.

Re:Should I care? (1)

lgp-vogon (640435) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063623)

I installed the Loki version of Quake 3, which upon running froze up while it was initializing sound. Were you running KDE or GNOME, or ? If you're running KDE, the aRts sound server should be disabled in the Control Center, as it grabs the DSP and doesn't let go. Even though I did this, the sound STILL lags behind the action of the game unless I set the buffer to be shorter, which wastes my time because I had to restart the sound server to do it. "esound [replace with arts/yiff/what have you] is junk. The only thing esd has is a good client API for going boing at approximately the right time. Anything else is beyond it." -- Alan Cox Did I mention that I also had to use unofficial precompiled RPMs to install the nVidia drivers with ANY kind of convienience? The unofficial ones that are on the driver section of nVidia's Web site? Also, I had to mess around with an XFree86 configuration file. The README should've spelled out the install process clearly enough. Finally, when I was playing Quake, the same settings as before yielded a steady 80 fps. Whee. This is a sign that either: a) you're not using the same settings as before. or b) something's hogging CPU (probably aRts.) Switch to a console (Alt+Ctrl+F2) and run ps auwx. Check to see if anything besides quake3 (or perhaps "quake3.x86") is taking a noticeable amount of CPU time.

Re:Should I care? (1)

lgp-vogon (640435) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063640)

Well, darn. Should click "preview" next time. Properly-formatted reply follows.

I installed the Loki version of Quake 3, which upon running froze up while it was initializing sound.

Were you running KDE or GNOME, or ? If you're running KDE, the aRts sound server should be disabled in the Control Center, as it grabs the DSP and doesn't let go.

Even though I did this, the sound STILL lags behind the action of the game unless I set the buffer to be shorter, which wastes my time because I had to restart the sound server to do it.

(replace "esound" with arts/yiff/whatever.)

"esound is junk. The only thing esd has is a good client API for going boing at approximately the right time. Anything else is beyond it." -- Alan Cox

Did I mention that I also had to use unofficial precompiled RPMs to install the nVidia drivers with ANY kind of convienience?

The unofficial ones that are on the driver section of nVidia's Web site?

Also, I had to mess around with an XFree86 configuration file.

The README should've spelled out the install process clearly enough.

Finally, when I was playing Quake, the same settings as before yielded a steady 80 fps. Whee.

This is a sign that either:

a) you're not using the same settings as before.
or b) something's hogging CPU (probably aRts.)

Switch to a console (Alt+Ctrl+F2) and run ps auwx. Check to see if anything besides quake3 (or perhaps "quake3.x86") is taking a noticeable amount of CPU time.

(Sorry if I come off as condescending.)

Sir you should use Windows! (0)

Herkules (460636) | more than 11 years ago | (#5064080)

Hey if you dont like dont use it!

Its not realy made for gamers!

Re:Should I care? (2)

be-fan (61476) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063159)

And a Porsche is just a car. Right...

Re:Should I care? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063461)

It's a tool provided by a very generous group of people, and one extremely generous individual.

You mean Richard Stallman?

"one extremely generous" Must be RMS! (0)

Herkules (460636) | more than 11 years ago | (#5064056)


Hey no linux without GNU...

Re:Should I care? (2)

StarTux (230379) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062897)

Yes, plenty of great games out there that you may not have heard about. I didn't :).

This is just really a start to LGP, if they make enough income and become more widely known expect more games.

Think it this way too...We only really here about big block buster movies, not so much about independent, yet many great movies or films have come out of independent studio's.

Of course I am waiting for some games that are original to come out on Linux first :). Other than Open Source ones I don't see this happening for awhile yet.

StarTux

Six Flags (1)

Kircle (564389) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062986)

I play Ballistics a while ago at Six Flags. They had a few cabinets running the game on WinME, and all I can say that it is extremely FAST. Very, very cool game. But I agree, never heard of it until that point.

Re:Should I care? (2)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063045)

On the other hand. Well, I haven't heard of Grin, or it's games. Sorry. I can't recall seeing anything in a PC Gamer, or a box in a software shop.

Me neither, but I don't care, I'm an absolute sucker for fast racing games. Pansy ass cars are no good for me, I need, and I mean medically need speed. Up until now I got my fix from Supreme Snowboarding, which lets you go at a simulated 130km/h on a snowboard in places (if you're leet enough ;) but Ballistics looks damn cool.

I played their port of Creatures 3 and was very impressed, it was a high quality port. I didn't buy the game, Creatures just wasn't interesting enough (i used to play v1), but I'll be looking forward to the demo of Ballistics.

I stopped reading gaming mags a long time ago, so even if it'd had loads of coverage I still wouldn't have found it. Now I've seen those screenshots I'm interested.

Re:Should I care? (2)

Ami Ganguli (921) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063177)

It might actually be an advantage that the games aren't well known.

Fanatical gamers will buy the blockbuster games soon after they come out. If they're Linux users they'll keep a Windows partition around and play on that. By the time the Linux port comes around (if ever) they already have the Windows version and aren't likely to buy another copy. That's what sunk Loki.

These games, on the other hand, might be pretty good and will likely get some publicity in Linux circles. Linux users who play games probably don't have the Windows versions yet.

Who knows if it will work out, but I think they've got a better chance than Loki.

In Soviet Russia... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062811)

In Soviet Russia, Tux Racer sells you to Micro$oft!

Anyone remember Ballystix for the Amiga? (2)

PhantomHarlock (189617) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062816)

Every time I see the title of that new game I think of the hugely awesome Amiga game by (I think) Psygnosis.

Re:Anyone remember Ballystix for the Amiga? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063667)

Not a single person reading this will buy either of these games. All the good games are on the PC and you know it. If you're that much of a Microsoft hater, you'll be happy with your PS2. But don't sit here and lie and pretend this crap is real gaming.

That's great... (2, Interesting)

Sayten241 (592677) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062824)

but is it really worth the effort? If you really wanted to play games on your computer just run a dual-boot for god's sakes. I know Windows is expensive, but I'm sure you can find a copy of windows 98 for pretty cheap, and that (as far as I'm awayre) should still play most games. It will certainly be able to play all the games that have been ported to Linux so far.

Re: That's great... (3, Insightful)

a_n_d_e_r_s (136412) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063419)

Well some of us don't even bother to get Win98 or any other bad operating system...

Single boot - the only way to live!

Linux will empower high end gamers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062831)

Because you can recompile programs and drivers optimised for your proessor. If more game engines were open sourced then gamers will beable to get more vital fps and polys out of their hardware. Try it, games usually DO run faster then their windows counterparts when they are compiled from source!

Its another convincing arguement for open source, because linux DOES PUSH my older hardware to limits that windows just cant!

Re:Linux will empower high end gamers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063097)

You think that source code is compiled just for your hardware?

Sorry. Try again.

::Looks up:: (-1, Redundant)

moody834 (449404) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062835)

No other game matters besides Doom III. If it's not Doom III we're talking about here, then I don't care. ::Goes back to rigging IV caffeine drip in preparation::

LGP :) (4, Insightful)

StarTux (230379) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062837)

I know many people will bemoan the fact that they cannot get some brand new highly known game to run on Linux. The reason why is simple: Economics.

OTH, having LGP port lesser known games has opened up a whole new world to games I would never have known about, because they don't have the publisher to spam all the well known gaming magazines with reviews etc. Also, not having the huge publisher gives the smaller developer a chance to release the game they want :). And also lets the customer actually have more of a voice...

I'll be getting these games for sure, a little more expensive than the Windows versions, but thats a small price to pay in terms of having to run on an OS I don't like to use.

StarTux

Economics of Stupidity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062905)

Free OS + Poor Quality, more Expensive Games = ?

I just dont see the cost savings on the free OS in terms of being a game player.

Slashdot
News for Linux. Complaints about Microsoft.

Re:LGP :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063294)

better get em fast before the go bankrupt ;)

Where to buy? (1)

blogan (84463) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062845)

I clicked on their reseller link and clicked on the one line they had for the US. That page only had Quake for Linux under the software category.

How do they expect to make a profit if they're only reseller for the US doesn't carry their stuff?

Re:Where to buy? (3, Informative)

lgp-vogon (640435) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063583)

Try Tux Games [tuxgames.com] . They ship to the US, too.

Good news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062853)

This is extremely good news to Linux and open source OSs in general. Eventually this will pay off. Now we just need to support these guys by buying the titles.

Some Ballistics info (5, Informative)

wpmegee (325603) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062875)

On the Win32 side, Ballistics was one of the first games to use DirectX 8 vertex and pixel shaders, which where introduced with the Geforce3.

Here's a Maximum PC review [maximumpc.com] . It got a 7, with gorgeous graphics but not too much content. Interestingly, it only listed for $30.

Death Race 2000 ... (2)

HealYourChurchWebSit (615198) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062879)



Every time I read or hear abou ta new driving game, I just think of the fuss back in 1976 when an arcade game based upon a really bad B movie [rottentomatoes.com] of the same title came out ... Death Race 2000 [coinop.org] . Ah, but then I'm just showing my age ...

Actually, what I'd like to know is if these games actually compete with titles on "that other operating system" enough to tell my kids, Mandrake 9.1b1 [slashdot.org] is enough for you skippy?

Yea..So? (0, Troll)

Pave Low (566880) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062883)

So a couple of old, obscure games are being ported to Linux! Woo Hoo! Based on sales figures from more popular established games on Linux, I figure they will sell 10, maybe 20 copies.

Anyone smell a clever product placement here?

.

Re:Yea..So? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062960)

Well, not clever so much...

I can't decide which would be worse, if $100 and a case of beer buys you a story on Slashdot, or if the editors just give these things away to anyone willing to say, write about or use Linux in public.

Well.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062891)

Well - I think its fantasic that something like this is happening. And I'd have to agree with some comments posters made above. The fact that no *big-name* game houses make games for Linux simply opens up the door for smaller companies who are willing to create/port games for the Linux community.

devil's advocate (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062907)

How are we going to play these games on Linux, when setting up 3D is such a dark-art voodoo nightmare? I cringe when thinking of trying to make OpenGL work.

Re:devil's advocate (2)

be-fan (61476) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063082)

On Gentoo
emerge nvidia-kernel
emerge nvidia-glx
vi /etc/X11/XF86Config; find 'nv' change to 'nvidia'
Done.
You can do the same for ATIs drivers, I think.

Re:devil's advocate (2)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063129)

Hmmm? If you use a decent distro this should be entirely automatic? I've used several distros and never had any issues with OpenGL on decent cards. If you're thinking of the nVidia drivers, it's normally just a case of installing the RPMs.

Re:devil's advocate (2)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063395)

I am a serious gamer and have been since DOS 5 /Win3.1. Believe me setting up a Mystique 1 with Voodoo Grafics or trying to get DX[fill in random iteration here] makes *me* cringe.
Setting up GL on Linux is a piece of cake compared to that. And it's predictable. It will allways work the same way.

In Other News... (1)

AndreAtlan (529906) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062908)

In Other News... LGP will begin selling its newly ported games for linux on www.thinkgeek.com

Games for linux are a very bad thing. (2, Funny)

Krapangor (533950) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062929)

This is a major setback for Linux.
The increasing distribution of Linux in the industry is mainly due to the fact that there are no decent games for Linux so that people play less and work more, increasing efficiency and profit.
If now such nerd companies develop better and better games for Linux most companies will switch to other powerful, game-free platforms like Solaris or OpenBSD.
In the long term this might be a very big setback in the competition with Microsoft. You might argue now that you will gain more distribution on private computers - but people are already using Windows for this task which is much better suited and a complicated unix system is not the right thing for non-professional private users. And the gaming industry (even MS) is moving more and more towards Playstation like boxes these days.

This playing thing was really a big problem until Linux, I remember an admin saying that they had to install Linux on electronic cashier systems (the big ones with a 15" monitor used in travel stores) because some secretaries found out how to install Doom on them.

Not all games can be ported to everything (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062948)

Can you buy Super Mario Sunshine for the Xbox? No, but you dont whine about it.

Can you buy Halo For game cube, No.

Shut the fuck up, if you want to play ALL the games, then buy all five platforms. (Windows, Linux, PS2, Gamecube, Xbox)

Re:Not all games can be ported to everything (-1)

Roto-Rooter Man (520267) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063175)

So you consider Linux to be more of a gaming platform than Dreamcast, GameBoy Advance, and the Mac?

Why do you need Linux to play games? What games exist for Linux only? I've even seen TuxRacer and BZFlag for other platforms.

Face reality. These games suck. Gaming on Linux died with Loki.

Re:Not all games can be ported to everything (1)

deeboTux (551480) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063824)

I think you're under the misconception that games CANNOT be ported to those platforms. Its not that they CANNOT be ported, its that they WILL NOT be ported because of licensing. Nintendo will not give up Mario games to other platforms (yet) because that's the reason most people buy Nintendo.

Since server is quite slow... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062958)

I've mirrored the demos of the games here:

Ballistics Demo [brettglass.com]
Bandits Demo [brettglass.com]

Brett Glass to the rescue

Re:Since server is quite slow... (2)

sczimme (603413) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063323)

by Anonymous Coward

Brett Glass to the rescue

I would say you're not really anonymous any more...

Re:Since server is quite slow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063359)

Nice 404, d00d.

Re:Since server is quite slow... (1)

lgp-vogon (640435) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063504)

Wow. That's one hell of a trick, seeing as how the developers don't even have the code yet.

The goal is FUN (3, Insightful)

Amsterdam Vallon (639622) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062985)

When it comes to games, I urge you all to ditch your "only Open-Souce" principles.

The goal of gaming is to have fun. Stop worrying about device drivers, monitor drivers, serial numbers, low ping connectivity, mouse drivers, keyboard configurations, etc. and just play fun, easy-to-use games on a traditional console gaming system.

Gamecube and X-box are the two best choices these days. You can get a Gamecube for $139 (half of a day's salary) and all you do then is simply chuck one of the many amazingly fun games into the device, turn on your TV, and start smiling.

An X-box is as low as $199 and now includes special new controllers and two great games in this starter package. It's a great bargain, and with their new online play, it's better than ever. You can turn everything on and be playing HALO against someone in China and someone in France in less than 15 seconds.

Really cool!

When it comes to games, I don't care if it's Linux or Microsoft or whatever, I just stick to the proven console games that always work since all the hardware's the same. It makes life so much easier.

Re:The goal is FUN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5062993)

blech XBox.
I wonder why you didn't mention the PS2.
I'd rather buy a PS2 than that crippled PC from M$.

Re:The goal is FUN (1, Troll)

conner_bw (120497) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063025)

> When it comes to games, I don't care if it's
> Linux or Microsoft or whatever,[...] It makes
> life so much easier.

So true, let's follow through all the way.

"When it comes to principles, it makes life so much easier if you don't have any."

Or to quote the Dead Kennedy's:

"Give me convenience of give me death."

I love this New World(TM) we live in!

/me vomits with disgust.

Re:The goal is FUN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063209)

Xbox? And I thought the goal was to have more games than Linux.

Re:The goal is FUN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063327)

whoa whoa whoa...

"Gamecube for $139 (half of a day's salary)"

half a days salary? what? you a manager? $10 an hour (a bit above min wage) would still get you only $100 (not to even mention you only take home 40% of that) in a 10 hour day.

you'd have to work about 4 days to get $140, and then its never $140, theres taxes on that too, so its like $150.

some of us arent so fortunate... ... you insensitive clod! :(

Re:The goal is FUN (2, Funny)

Sean Trembath (607338) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063341)

I didn't know you made $278 a day working at EB.

Re:The goal is FUN (3, Insightful)

StarTux (230379) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063379)

Screw the Xbox, why?

Because of the reason you have to pay for Xbox Live and that you will be charged automatically each year, for a price that has not even been decided. Oh and you need to cancel your live! enrollment before they renew it, or you'll be charged.

I got a PS2 :). $40 for network adapter and now I am free to go on the 'net with it and pick and choose manufacturers without worrying about being charged extra by a monopoly. Is it true also that with the xbox you need to buy something extra just to be able to play DVD's?

Anyway, even with a PS2 I still buy and play games on my computer system.

StarTux

Diesel engine? (2)

at_18 (224304) | more than 11 years ago | (#5062989)

From the screenshot gallery:

This gallery shows screenshots from the Diesel Engine(TM) rendered environments of Ballistics(TM).

How can you make a racing game with a Diesel engine??

Re:Diesel engine? (1)

gordyf (23004) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063820)

You have to cook it. You can't eat it raw!

Pure garbage (0, Flamebait)

netwalkr (562377) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063000)

This junk won't sell. If it does it is to a zit faced geek attempting to convince his friends Linux can play 3d games too. Meanwhile at home their laughing uncontrollable and playing ravenshield on windows machines.] RIP LGP

GSG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063897)

Get Some Grammar.

What About Tux Racer? ;) (3, Interesting)

Milo Fungus (232863) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063002)

I think Tux Racer is about the coolest game I've ever played. My very favorite course is "Who Says Penguins Can't Fly?" although I have become somewhat partial to "Path of Daggers" lately. Anyone else out there love Tux Racer?

Re:What About Tux Racer? ;) (-1)

Original AIDS Monkey (315494) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063182)

Anyone else out there love Tux Racer?

No. At least not anyone who has played modern games for any other OS or console.

Terrain Popping (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063850)

The terrain suffers from horrible terrain popping (greater resolution triagles instanteously replace the lower detail version, very noticable if the change is large enough), even up close, and there's not even a hint of geomipmapping! Maybe they wanted to run on lower-end systems, but I have a freakin' GeForce 4! Descent 3 also has the popping problem (even with all of the graphic options set to the max, it's still noticable), but I doubt Outrage will ever release a 1.5 patch that would fix it (even if they did, they probably would not have somebody build a Linux patch.) Floating point operations for Checksum computations forever!

Anyway, I wish LGP the best and I cannot wait to play the new games.

But (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063019)

Its still using X Windows? Bleh, pass.

X windows is a bloated bitch. Its the worlds largest strap on.

Re:But (1)

lgp-vogon (640435) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063530)

Actually, LGP is an SDL [libsdl.org] house. So if you're using a windowing system that has both an SDL backend and a decent OpenGL implementation, you should be fine.

X Window System (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063887)

And, like, what were you expecting them to use instead? DirectFB? SVGAlib? A kernel module? GGI? Berlin? Glide? Think about it, man. If you want to play OpenGL-based games (which these are or will be), then currently you're stuck with X (DirectFBGL supporting the Radeon just isn't enough). If you are only interested in software-rendered games, then you can always stick to playing Quake and Wolf3D with SVGAlib.

Open your minds (5, Insightful)

be-fan (61476) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063109)

I keep hearing "oh, these games aren't AAA titles, they must suck. Well, some of the most pure fun games I've played are obscure titles like these. They have nice graphics (not bleeding edge, but pretty) and fun gameplay. They not be the deep, sweeping experience of something like HalfLife, but they're still good entertainment. If the price is right, this games might be a good buy.

Re:Open your minds (2)

Teach (29386) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063488)

Well, some of the most pure fun games I've played are obscure titles like these.

I completely agree. The game I've spent the most time on in the last five years is not Half-Life, Diablo II or Unreal Tournament (all three of which I own). Rather it's Elastomania [elastomania.com] . It's a silly little side-scrolling platform game on a motorcycle, with passable graphics and cheesy sound effects. It's even difficult to learn the controls. But once you do, look out. I've been addicted for five years. Best $10 I ever spent. (By the way, it requires DirectX 7 or higher. Haven't tried it on WineX.)

Oh my... that game is so classic... (2)

danro (544913) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063655)

Warms my heart to see others play this game too...
I liked it as lot, but my brother suffered from serious Elastomania addiction, for a long time.

Forget dual booting (3, Interesting)

tjwhaynes (114792) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063216)

To all of those who think that dual booting really holds the secret to playing games when most of your work is done in Linux - forget it. This machine here I'm on has Windows 98 and an up to date Linux distro. I bought Black & White almost on the day of release, thinking that I would boot into Windows just to play it. Its a great game, particularly if you liked Populous. But after a week, it has barely seen the light of day. Rebooting back and forth is too much of a pain. When I want to play, it's normally for 30-40 minutes. If I reboot back and forth, it had better be really worth it. I got hold of GTA3 and it's the same story. I got off the first island and it hasn't been played since.

Now I have a healthy collection of Linux games on my box, including a fair number of Loki ports, some of the source code released games (Abuse, Freespace 1 & 2, Aliens vs Predator), and a bunch of improving open source projects, from Vegastrike to Foobillard. And Black & White and the other Windows only games don't provide sufficient allure to make me reach for the reboot.

LGP seems to have the right idea. The games they are porting are good games in their categories and they aren't costing a fortune for the porting rights. They are also managing to get games in more genres than just first person shooters. I hope that LGP hangs around long enough to break even or preferably show a profit. I hope that the Linux desktop market is starting to expand at a sufficient rate that the future for Linux gaming actually exists and that LGP is in a good position to reap the rewards.

Cheers,

Toby Haynes

The developer is named Grin... (4, Insightful)

OnyxRaven (9906) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063282)

Ballistics and Bandits are games that take a unique spin to current games. Ballistics could be called the first supersonic racing game, where your insane speed turns a game of reaction into more of a game of pattern. The developers at E3 2001 were able to complete most of the courses at full supersonic speed, where we could barely make it at subsonic speed.

The game is one of the first to introduce pixel shading and other features of the GeForce 3.

Bandits I know less about, sadly. I've been sitting around waiting for word of Grin's ever-in-development game, Vultures. The guys at Grin were nice enough at E3 2001 to give me their concept-art posters they had posted in their booth (Kentia Hall). From what I remember the game has gone under a couple design revisions, but the detail they paid in the rendered weapons and the concept art I have is amazing. It should be a game I wont be able to miss. That is, if it ever does get released.

So what if these arent Popular games? They use cutting edge technology and were probably easy to get a hold of (Grin is full of nice guys), so maybe the lessons learned from porting these games will enable LGP to publish those games you are clamoring for?

Again I'm taken back to my argument that people shouldnt purely deride games. If they are supported through either fans or at least constructive criticism, the whole industry benifits.

New motto for Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5063498)

We don't have the programs you want, but do have programs.

Why are some people feeling threatened? (4, Insightful)

core plexus (599119) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063532)

Many of the negative remarks directed at Linux I see from time to time here are from apparent windows or other proprietary OS users who exhibit signs that would indicate they feel threatened. Could it be because they feel that one of the last obstacles to Linux becoming more popular is in the area of gaming (among others)? That assumption doesn't answer the question. Why? I know why I strongly dislike microsoft, or at least their products and practices, and it isn't because someone else is using it. Frankly, I have made a boatload of money fixing windows screw-ups, but I also have fixed screw-ups on everything from a home box to an IBM mainframe.

I'd be interested in learning the opinions and observations of others. Meanwhile, I shall continue to support the developers of Linux products, as opposed to megacorporate closed-source proprietary/predatory fat cats.

Computer geek peddles bootleg porn from city hall [xnewswire.com]

Re:Why are some people feeling threatened? (1)

Joe Tie. (567096) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063756)

I've never really gotten that either. Every time one of these stories comes up it seems to make a lot of people annoyed, or even downright angry. I'd guess a lot of the flack comes just as much from Linux users as windows users though. I'm sure with how often the 'Linux sux cuz its got no games!' argument comes up it'd be easy to just build up a general resentment to anything suggesting Linux users might actually want to play games. I'd also guess people using it more as a geek status symbol than the OS best suited to them feel a bit annoyed deep down at such an indication of it's increasing appeal to the less technical user.

The trouble with linux gaming is... (2, Interesting)

rsilvergun (571051) | more than 11 years ago | (#5063831)

...Linux desktops are only going to appeal to consumers to the low end. Since if you're paying $500 for a computer it's no big deal to tack on an extra $50 dollars for a Windows license. But at $200 that extra $50 seems like a lot, especally with the lower profit on cheap hardware, the vender won't want to eat the cost of the OS himself.
Low end computers can't run games like this, they just don't have the 3D hardware. If linux is going to see more games besides a few oddballs (like these two) and the occasional blockbuster (UT2003) than it'll have to make inroads into the general desktop market. Or else much cheaper 3D hardware that has linux support.
Selling games that were released on Windows a year or two ago is not a good buisness model; customers with dual boot machines can often get your game for windows for $10-$20 in the bargin bin. And how many non geeks out there have a linux box that can run UT2003 (or something like it) and are running linux only?

Good for linux... (2)

Kjella (173770) | more than 11 years ago | (#5064075)

...because while I'm using Windows for gaming, I know a friend of mine who's trying to get as much as possible to work on Linux. I constantly hear him needing to tweak something to get it to run/play smoothly/get sound working etc, even on Windows games that supposedly "works" to run from Linux. He gets most stuff working, but if I was doing the same I'd get a pre-tweaked setup from him.

I think they're doing the smart thing, smaller games are it. Look at it from the producers side, if they refuse to licence it for a port they earn nothing. If they do, there's a chance they might earn *something*. Compare that to a big game that the producer assumes will sell "big" on Linux and charges accordingly. I'm pretty sure the work and cost for porting a game has little or no relationship to its popularity.

Besides, "unknown" games aren't that bad in a market with little competition, assuming you just want some game you'll enjoy, not only the latest wiz-bang things. I mean I still like to play my C64 games on emulator, or old DOS games. Though I must say I'm enjoying Warcraft 3 for the time being :)

From a friend of mine I know of a little girl that's hooked on Tux Racer. I'm sure it could be any one of a hundred other games, but it's Tux Racer because it's there, and it's free. I'm sure there are "better" games around, but that doesn't really matter...

Kjella
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