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292 comments

My stupidity is reaching new heights. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226326)

Im not just confused; I am utterly baffled! therefore I am also quite stupid. And I say, again, once more : thanks for your time reading this. I bet you wish you had the last x seconds of your silly life back. HAHAH BITCH. Eat that.

Troll 13 of 208 from the annals of the Troll Library [slashdot.org] .

S1M0NE rocked (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226413)

This is a troll, right? That kak wasn't really # 13/208!

Re:S1M0NE rocked (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226498)

Bitch-ass moderators, learn to read!

The subject line is on topic, and the body is in reference to the parent post, so that can't be offtopic!



Slashdot should just hand out shit that the moderators can fling at the trolls! (Who cares if some innocent bystanders get splattered in the process! If you have nothing to hide, you shouldn't care.)

8==(,,.)==D ~o ~O (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226503)

Re:My stupidity is reaching new heights. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226744)

Confused by Blair? Baffled by Bush?

Join the anti war protest in Hyde Park, London on Saturday 15th of February at one o'clock. Probably the largest ever demo to be held in England, bring your friends for the booze, batons and birds.

Largest piss up ever, followed by one of the largest parties ever, and closed with the largest fireworks displays ever in Baghdad as the governments once again ignore the opinions of the general populace.

FP? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226327)

This first post was brought to you by your mama.

fp (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226330)

fr1st ps0t

lollers

Man I'm lame (-1, Troll)

Zep1a (632445) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226335)

First! heh

Oh come on..troll? (-1, Troll)

Zep1a (632445) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226386)

Been reading /. for years, tho just registered recently. Let me have my moment in the sun, my 15 minutes of fame, my lame FIRST POST! post. Don't deflate my joy bubble!

Zep--

Wha? (-1, Funny)

Compuser (14899) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226353)

Anyone care to translate this post into English.
Max Headroom? Network 23? WTF?

Re:Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226372)

Bwahahaha. You don't know what Max Headroom is?!?! Go play with your tinker toys...

Translation (5, Informative)

Acidic_Diarrhea (641390) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226379)

Max Headroom was a television show from the 80's [I believe, I could be off with the period.]. The character named Max Headroom was completely computer generated and the evil corporation of the show was Network 23. english translation complete.

Re:Wha? (4, Informative)

nomadic (141991) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226380)

Old, amazingly well-done (for the time period, and medium)cyberpunk show. Main character, a reporter, had an artificial simulacrum named Max Headroom. Worked for network 23. The network created high-energy bursts of commercials that would occasionally cause people's heads to blow up. Reporter investigated. Etc.

Re:Wha? (3, Informative)

mughi (32874) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226396)

Max Headroom? Network 23? WTF?

Why, just use Google and see what you can find [google.com] .

Re:Wha? (1)

Anonvmous Coward (589068) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226511)

"Why, just use Google and see what you can find [google.com]."

Because Google gives you information, but doesn't put it into context. Try using Google to figure out the 'In Soviet Russia..' jokes.

Re:Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226628)

context galore, including kuro5hin article
http://www.google.com/search?num=20&hl=en &lr=&ie=U TF-8&oe=utf-8&safe=off&q=%27in+soviet+russia%27+jo kes&btnG=Google+Search
im too lazy to put in tags

Re:Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226660)

Oh crap!

I jsut realized, thanks to you, that the in soveit russia things were jokes!

I'd been taking them seriuosly!

Can't resist, but I'll do it at 0 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226727)

In Soviet Russia, jokes take you seriously!

unitron
5733

Re:Wha? (2, Funny)

neomiasma (639496) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226397)

You call yourself a geek? I want to see your membership card, Mister! Try this link [maxheadroom.com] for starters. If you get TechTV, try catching some episodes.

Re:Wha? (2, Funny)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226455)

I know Max Headroom, but who's Carson Daly and whats the simaluacarom?

Isn't he the guy from MTV that does the show about Boy Bands?

Re:Wha? (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226541)

3rd Edition PHB P252.

From the SRD.

"Simulacrum creates an illusory duplicate of any creature. The duplicate creature is partially real and formed from ice or snow. The duplicate appears to be exactly the same as the original, but there are differences: The simulacrum has only 51% to 60% (50%+1d10%) of the hit points, knowledge (including level, skills, and speech), and personality of the real creature. Creatures familiar with the original might detect the ruse with a successful Spot check. The character must make a Disguise check when the character casts the spell to determine how good the likeness is.

At all times the simulacrum remains under the character's absolute command. No special telepathic link exists, so command must be exercised in some other manner. The simulacrum has no ability to become more powerful. It cannot increase its level or abilities. If destroyed, it reverts to snow and melts instantly into nothingness. A complex process requiring at least 1 day, 100 gp per hit point, and a fully equipped magical laboratory can repair damage to the simulacrum."

Re:Wha? (2, Funny)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226577)

Thank you.

I recall someone trying to explain that to me in grade school once, but his head was submerged in the toilet bowl at the time, and I was busy counting his lunch money.

Keep your fricken head DOWN! (1)

Hubert_Shrump (256081) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226545)

From the /. FAQ:
You must never, ever, have anything less than perfect competence in everything, and if you are to post anything that may call this into question, you must be ridiculed by at least 3 people.

I'm assuming that you're feeling really secure about yourself, to go and post something like this. ;)

If you are not old enough (or American enough)... (1)

johnpaul191 (240105) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226709)

... to remember Max Headroom [imdb.com] you can catch the 80's TV show on TechTV late at night. Set the Tivo/VCR if you are one of those sleeping persons.

In short Max Headroom was a computerized head that spoke to you from a TV (played by Matt Frewer, later on Psi Factor). I guess the Max Headroom charcter started either as a spokesperson for Coke or a MTV thing. I didn't have cable TV back then so i don't remember where he started. Eventually they created a TV show around him.

i hate carson daly (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226361)

i hate carson daly
and i hope he reads this

Na na na na (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226371)

Behold the power of the Proxy! Your IP ban cannot stop me!

Blipverts? (1)

giel (554962) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226373)

Blipverts? Exploding heads? Makes me think of stuff like David Cronenberg's Videodrome...

Videodrome (1)

giel (554962) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226590)

For a movie dated 1983 it contained some very interesting and or prophetic ideas. Some of them similar to Max Headroom. A few:

  • The image on the screen will become reality for the viewers and people will live their lifes in this reality. Today think of all sorts of media as soaps, forums, chats, online games...
  • People will have digital names. For example chats, forums, domainnames.
  • The television broadcasts of videodrome contain an invisible 'signal' sending messages to its viewers. Yes, videodrome of course was after total world domination.

simula- wha? (2, Funny)

The Other White Boy (626206) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226381)

*runs to the nearest thesaurus*

Re:simula- wha? (2, Insightful)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226490)

Simalcrum: from the D&D spell (and maybe from wherever that came from.)

In AD&D, a "Simalcrum" was a lesser form of a "clone", made of snow & ice and a bit of the caster's flesh.

I'm sure that there's a bigger Sci Fi reference, but I wager that most of /. (and a good portion of the net) gets the vocabulary from AD&D.

And on that note--why doens't the Jargon File mention RPGs? AD&D Trolls are most vulnerable to fire--which has always struck me as the most likely reason why "Trolls" are attacked by "flames." (I think "flame" came first, and "troll" came second.)

Re:simula- wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226705)

Umm...

I think "troll" alludes to the fishing method, not the bridge-dwelling creatures. The idea is to drag a lure or bait (i.e., a provocative statement) through a fishy-looking spot (i.e., a newsgroup or forum) to see how many suckers take the bait.

Likewise, I doubt "flame" had it orgin in D & D either.

For the NY Times disabled (5, Informative)

Dugsmyname (451987) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226391)

Carson Daly rose to fame as the host of "Total Request Live" on Viacom's MTV. Less well known is his side gig as a superhuman D. J. With a little help from digital editing, Mr. Daly can do a top-10 countdown show tailored to the phoned-in requests of radio listeners in 11 different cities without actually knowing which songs he is counting down.

Mr. Daly's syndicated radio show, "Carson Daly Most Requested," is produced by Premiere Radio Networks, a unit of the broadcasting giant Clear Channel Communications. The program runs each weekday on 140 stations -- most of them owned by Clear Channel -- although only 11 receive the digitally customized version that seeks to simulate a local program.

"Most Requested" has been on the air for nearly two years, but only recently have people not directly involved in the program become aware of the extent to which technology is allowing Mr. Daly to cozy up to local listeners. Radio experts say the program involves perhaps the most extensive use yet of digital audio processing to offer localized shows from a central location. And members of a major broadcasting union are investigating to determine whether the techniques violate local labor agreements.

Clear Channel executives and Mr. Daly declined to discuss the program and the technology. But according to former Clear Channel employees, Mr. Daly spends several hours a week in a studio in his Manhattan apartment, reading scripts with short song introductions and longer segments of D. J. patter. His audio feed is transmitted to Los Angeles, where the show's engineers turn the segments into digital files and drop them into a database.

With a lot of cutting and pasting, the engineers create 11 customized hourlong countdown shows for cities like New York, Philadelphia and Detroit, and two national pop and rhythm-and-blues countdowns for other markets. The customization means Mr. Daly can seem to be telling listeners in a particular city their most-requested songs for that day -- without ever seeing the city's top-10 list.

Clear Channel has been widely criticized for its use of so-called voice-tracking technology, which enables prerecorded D. J.'s to sound to listeners in a distant city as if they were both local and live.

Opponents of media consolidation say the technology allows Clear Channel to ignore its regulatory mandate requiring the company to have local stations serve local audiences.

In a case that will go to trial this week, the National Labor Relations Board is charging that Clear Channel violated the contracts of the staff at WWPR-FM in New York, a hip-hop and rhythm-and-blues station known as Power 105.1. The suit argues that the station began using a voice-tracked Los Angeles D. J. without union authorization.

The company has said that the show, "Power After Hours," was a syndicated program, which the contract allows.

Mr. Daly's show uses technology that is similar to voice tracking, but industry experts said that the digital manipulation of the host's words and phrases is so extensive as to put the show in a league of its own.

"This tells you that Carson Daly, as a brand and a personality, is worth the extra studio effort," said Tom Taylor, the editor of Inside Radio, an industry newsletter. "The technology has been advancing to the point where you can do that and make it sound really good."

Steven Dunston, a sound designer and editor in Los Angeles who worked at Clear Channel's Premiere Radio unit when the Daly show began in early 2001, said he helped build its innovative database, which had tens of thousands of audio samples in it.

He said that because Mr. Daly had only a few hours a week to devote to the program, phrases like "coming in at No. 4" were recorded once and stored in the database for reuse. The call letters and phone numbers of the 11 stations, in Mr. Daly's voice, were inserted throughout.

"It really was fascinating from a technological angle," Mr. Dunston said. "Nothing had been done to that extent before."

People close to the current show said its operations had changed little since it began. A spokeswoman for Premiere declined to answer questions about the production of Mr. Daly's show, saying that was proprietary information. She said Mr. Daly was unavailable for comment.

Not all of Mr. Daly's sentences are digitally constructed. The show's writers give him longer segments, like gossip roundups and customized introductions for New York and Los Angeles. But much of the material is written with recycling in mind, so a joke about Christina Aguilera that is used to introduce the No. 3 song in Boston can be used on another day when the song is, say, No. 6 in Atlanta.

Mr. Daly's unconventional countdown only recently caught the attention of the New York chapter of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, which represents broadcast personnel and opposes voice tracking. Peter Fuster, the chapter's assistant executive director, said the union had previously thought that the show was just a national countdown with local branding.

Mr. Fuster said, "We're looking into whether the customized package that they are preparing for New York violates our collective bargaining agreement" at Z-100 (WHTZ-FM), the station that carries the show in New York. If the station is giving Mr. Daly's show a list of songs to play, that would essentially be voice tracking, which is not allowed under the contract, Mr. Fuster said.

Mr. Daly is likely to be even more pressed for time now that he has his own late-night television talk show on NBC, "Last Call With Carson Daly." But when he needs some time off from his radio work, the database lets the countdown roll on. Before he goes on vacation, the show's producers try to make sure they have enough sound clips so his voice can introduce top-10 lists that have yet to be compiled.

That has not always gone smoothly. Mr. Dunston, the sound designer, said that at one point a new Michael Jackson song, "You Rock My World," unexpectedly showed up on the charts. Mr. Daly was unavailable that day, and because he had never introduced a song by Mr. Jackson, the engineers had to dig through old recordings to find a segment in which he made an offhand reference to the singer. Then they hunted down bits of the song title and assembled all the pieces.

"We had to cobble things together," Mr. Dunston said.

Re:For the NY Times disabled (2, Funny)

SubtleNuance (184325) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226493)

Mr. Daly spends several hours a week in a studio in his Manhattan apartment,

yet more evidence that we should eat the rich.

Re:For the NY Times disabled (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226505)

Isn't it funny how copyright infringement is okay unless it's open source software? I like that, it cracks me up.

I don't know what's scarier... (4, Funny)

gotroot801 (7857) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226395)

...the legal ramifications of voice tracking, or the fact that since CCC started this, there's only been one instance where they've had a song show up that they didn't handpick^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hanticipate making the Top 10.

Re:I don't know what's scarier... (2, Interesting)

GregGardner (66423) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226720)

Actually I find it interesting that in this case that they went to some trouble to air this song that they didn't expect to be on the Top 10. All of their stations use pre-defined playlists anyway, so you would just expect the Top 10 to come straight from that. If some listeners actually attempt to call-in to get some song not on the playlist onto the Top 10, I would have just expected them to silently ignore their request, given their track record and motives.

Are the listeners really going to find out what happened? Especially if they are already swallowing the crap that Clear Channel is sending down their throats. If those listeners actually tried to make a stink about it, they could just claim that it was obvious that someone was "stuffing the ballot boxes" or something like that.

It's obvious that Clear Channel is not in the business of pleasing the masses, just focusing on making money.

Wow. Great article. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226398)

The NYTimes needs a registration, and the Geocities link has run out of bandwidth for the hour. Whats the point of even posting a story that after 5 minutes no one will be able to read??

means? (1, Interesting)

qoncept (599709) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226410)

That's all a lot of work. Is this guy so important he cant put in (lets say.. an hour per show, since its an hour show and the music is (supposed to be) most of it, times 11 shows) 11 hours a week? What do they pay all the guys on the soundboards doing all the work?

Re:means? (1)

Lawbeefaroni (246892) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226530)

The program runs each weekday. 11 unique markets (140 stations), 1 hour show daily, 5 days. That's 55 hours a week. Nevermind the fact that it probably runs at the same time in a few cities which would make it impossible for them to do it any other way.

Unions are just looking to save their jobs (5, Interesting)

JasonUCF (601670) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226420)

This is just a simple case of a radio station using technology to bring high profile talent into a market.

It's been done for tens of years. Ok, so technology now allows them to fine tune it up to every tiny little word -- that's kind of cool, actually -- but anyway, do you really think Casey Casem or Dick Clark knew anything about half the cities they were broadcasting in?

It's America's Top 40 Dance Band Stand! Broadcasting right here in Minnoke!

The union's just looking to save their local DJs some jobs. Carson Daly is not going to appear on every radio dial. The fear is, though, if people tune into this, maybe they would like more high profile talent on their other radio shows.. not local talent. Good luck unions! ugh, would hate to fight that fight..

It would be cool to hear Carson Daly stuttering over his words digitally and repeating a star's name over and over and over again.

Re:Unions are just looking to save their jobs (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226516)

I have never before seen the word 'talent' used to refer to Carsan Daly.

Re:Unions are just looking to save their jobs (1)

sweetooth (21075) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226551)

I dunno about other places, but our local talent sucks ass. Not that I would want to listen to Carson Daley, but it would be hard to be worse.

Regulatory mandate (4, Interesting)

burgburgburg (574866) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226604)

Casey Casem was a clearly syndicated show, which is a format that radio stations are allowed to broadcast. But there is a federal mandate that local stations serve a local audience. The mostly artificial construct involved hardly qualifies as serving a local audience, but that is how the stations are counting it.

A good exemplar: calling this show local content is like calling ketchup a vegetable. And that's what they've doing for all this time.

Re:Unions are just looking to save their jobs (2, Informative)

gpinzone (531794) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226730)

Yep, I heard on the Howard Stern show that Wolfman Jack used to prerecord his responses in advance and left it to another person to create a conversation to fit in with his canned phrases.

Blipverts and Geocities (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226421)

Linking to Geocities in a story is just plain lame. Any Nerds worth his coffee knows that Geocities has a download limit 1e6 times smaller than slashdot will produce.

It's also sad to see how many of you nerds have never seen Max Headroom.

Damn (2, Funny)

alaric187 (633477) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226431)

[sarcasm]
This whole time I thought that MTV and Clear Channel were picking songs that were really good instead of just shoving whatever happens to be popular down my throat.
[/sarcasm]

The technology can't be too far along... (5, Funny)

One Louder (595430) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226433)

She said Mr. Daly was unavailable for comment.
I guess they forgot to prerecord that part.

001100010100000101011001001001100101001101010111 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226457)

10935824650965590432185761
4532980763495763905642 9045
209435786234905642093562905826
275969784365 789216529235489
GOOD MORNING GOOD MORNING GOOD MORNING GOOD MORNING GOOD MORNING
43290586724091562904537693
4292758049578 62089576
3948572309578639845762890

What am I supposed to do? (0, Redundant)

Rocko Bonaparte (562051) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226466)

I read all this and couldn't help but mutter, "Wha?" I'm not a compulsive mouth-breather or anything; I just don't know what I'm supposed to think here. So please, who in the article am I supposed to hate? I am under the impression I'm supposed to hate somebody there. Is ClearChannel the bad guy? And what's this got to do with blipverts? ...Or even Max for that matter.

Wha?

Re:What am I supposed to do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226499)

That answer is simple: hate Clear Channel AND Carson Daly. THe only reason for this is their ability to program the youth of the United States and control our airwaves.

Re:What am I supposed to do? (1)

k3v0 (592611) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226562)

it can pretty much be assumed that regardless of the post name or articel, you can always call Clear Channel the bad guy

Re:What am I supposed to do? (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226652)

Not sure either, but Clear Channel is pretty much always the bad guy. The kind of stuff they pull makes Microsoft look like the monastic order of St. Francis.

Did I miss the point? (0, Redundant)

Anonvmous Coward (589068) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226467)

"With a lot of cutting and pasting, the engineers create 11 customized hourlong countdown shows for cities like New York, Philadelphia and Detroit, and two national pop and rhythm-and-blues countdowns for other markets. The customization means Mr. Daly can seem to be telling listeners in a particular city their most-requested songs for that day -- without ever seeing the city's top-10 list.
Clear Channel has been widely criticized for its use of so-called voice-tracking technology, which enables prerecorded D. J.'s to sound to listeners in a distant city as if they were both local and live."


So... what's the BFD as long as he doesn't soound like a Speak N Spell?

Re:Did I miss the point? (3, Insightful)

Fugly (118668) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226616)

So... what's the BFD as long as he doesn't soound like a Speak N Spell?

If you work in the industry, the BFD is that one guy just did your job in 20 different cities. It sucks for you because the number of available jobs has now shrunk to nothing. It sucks for the public because now they're all getting the same canned crap. There's one thing for dinner and if you don't like it, tough luck. It sucks for the public because there are fewer local on-air personalities that truly understand the experience of being a New Yorker, Clevelander, Los... um... Angeleser... um... whatever.

It's great for Clear Channel though because they just eliminated 19 paychecks. It looks great on the books and looks great to the stockholders. It's a shame that over the last 50 years it's destroyed one hell of a brilliant creative medium.

Max Headroom vs Carson Daley (4, Funny)

Dr_LHA (30754) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226513)

Max Headroom was great, however he was clearly from far in our future (the 20 minutes they suggested was obviously an gross underestimate). Current technology only allows creation of fake personalities with absolutely no charisma (has anyone seen Carson Daly's talk show?).

Hopefully with increased technology we will be able to create in the future a media personality with the charisma of Max Headroom.

Re:Max Headroom vs Carson Daley (1)

tchapin (90910) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226728)

Actually, I surprisingly like his talk show. He's had some very interesting guests, and has gotten into surprisingly non-typical talk show interview topics.

Todd

But we got BlipVerts! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226731)

We just call them java pop-ups instead.

Max was cool, but all cool TV shows get cancelled. Bad TV shows live forever.

Not exactly Max Headroom but.. (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226742)

Try here [ananova.com] and click on the video reports on top right.

Okay, she's got all the personality of Clippy, but give it time.

I NEED GAY SEX!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226524)

Please, somebody FUCK ME RIGHT NOW!!!!??!11!?111!?!?!!!11??1?1

Some Local Radio Stations Are Only Transmitters (5, Informative)

mrs clear plastic (229108) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226527)

I have talked with someone who have worked for
the likes of Clear Channel and other large
multi-station broadcasters.

This has been going on for at least two years now,
especially with the larger chains.

As I remember, he told me that the announcers
would say a catalog of phrases to be digitized
and cataloged into a data base. They would say
each city's name; common street names, names of
businesses, common school names, common church
names; the list goes on.

With this massive database of phrases (and many
that can be used for different locals; Saint
Mary's Church could be in Buffalo or Atlanta),
now they can put together just about anything
and make it 'local' to you.

What is interesting is that many of these stations
are becomming nothing more than a transmitter.
Studios, productions facilities, and even sales
and marketing have all but dissapeared from the
local scene. All of that is done remotely.

Local companies that want to buy ads now deal
with the national office. They come up with a script. The script can be assembed via computer
using the announcer's voice. Only if something unique needs to be said, does the announcer say anything. After all, Henrys' Fine Drycleaning
has probably been used before the Henry's Fine
Drycleaning in your hometown decides to advertise
on the radio.

School sports scores, news, and so forth, can be
handled remotely.

The long, slow, death of the DJ. (5, Insightful)

Fugly (118668) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226544)

The on-air personality is inches away from being a thing of the past. I have a lot of friends that work in radio. Most of them have had the stations they work for bought by clear channel. Most of my friends that are still on-air personalities (many are unemployeed these days) are being pumped out to at least 3 stations with little tweaks being done to the audio to make it sound like they are local. Frequently celebrity interviews are mocked up from a stock tape of the celebrity answering questions with the DJ's voice dubbed between even.

I keep hoping that eventually people will notice how sterile, packaged and crappy it is and that independent stations will be able to compete by way of superior programming. However, apparently people don't give a rats ass. They don't even notice how shitty radio is these days.

Re:The long, slow, death of the DJ. (1)

cliffiecee (136220) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226637)

Frequently celebrity interviews are mocked up from a stock tape of the celebrity answering questions with the DJ's voice dubbed between even.

Gee, I thought that was the norm...

Seriously, unless it was a live show, I always assumed that radio 'interviews' were recorded.

Maybe not with the answers recorded separate from the questions, but still...

Re:The long, slow, death of the DJ. (3, Informative)

Fugly (118668) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226751)

I don't know what the norm was for sure I suppose. What I do know is that my buddy who was on the morning show for one of the bigger local radio stations here used to do all of his interviews live when they were owned by Nationwide Insurance. They were over the phone most of the time of course but they were on the air live. After they were purchased by JCorp, he was still doing most of them but not all of them live. After they were purchased by ClearChannel, I don't think any of them were live anymore though I could be wrong.

It sucks too because he was an amazing interviewer who did stuff that you just won't here in a canned, pre-recorded interview. He has a great tape of himself doing his super exagerated Chubby Checker impersonation to Chubby Checker to get his opinion. Ok, it sounds dorky but it was hilarious, trust me. You just don't get creative stuff like that when it has to be general purpose.

Re:The long, slow, death of the DJ. (1)

Master of Transhuman (597628) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226748)


They don't - they're not listening to it...

They're getting their music from the Net...

I own a Walkman and haven't listened to it in a year. I either listent to my MP3's downloaded from the Net, or listen to radio stations broadcasting over Shoutcast through Winamp...

I suspect 50 million other people are doing the same...

A Different Breed (4, Interesting)

serutan (259622) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226574)

From the article: "...members of a major broadcasting union are investigating to determine whether the techniques violate local labor agreements." Groups like the RIAA apparently are not alone in wanting to make sure new technology doesn't disturb existing revenue streams, and wanting to thwart it if it does. This kind of thing reminds me that geeks seem to live in a completely different continuum from the rest of the world.

What would things be like today if, for example, computer programmers and electronics engineers had reacted in the same way to things like code-generating tools, CAD and microcircuitry, clinging instead to the practices of hand-entering 1's and 0's and wiring everything with a soldering iron, because more streamlined methods might threaten our jobs? I envision something like the computers in the movie Brazil, coexisting with pheumatic message tubes.

Re:A Different Breed (1)

bellers (254327) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226669)

I envision something like the computers in the movie Brazil, coexisting with pheumatic message tubes.

Yeah, that [diebold.com] would be really [diebold.com] weird [diebold.com] .

Hmmmmm (1)

ziggy_zero (462010) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226605)

I don't see why they don't just sit Carson down and read through a dictionary, a list of artists, a lists of songs, common phrases used for countdowns, and common phrases in general - so you could essentially write the script and plop each single word or phrase in there. Didn't IBM or somebody have synthesized speech software that used actual voice audio samples of all possible vowels? I remember reading that they basically paid these people to sit down and read a lot of shit so they could make whatever they wanted with their voices. Why don't they just do that for Carson Daly?

Re:Hmmmmm (1)

Master of Transhuman (597628) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226763)

Even better - it would be cheaper to hire some smuck, just call him Carson Daly, and let him read the stuff...

Of course, Carson would complain, but the only people with a legitimate complaint would be Carson's fans who would be defrauded...

porn stars (3, Insightful)

AssFace (118098) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226610)

I don't understand why this isn't done across the board with porn stars. considering how far they have come in 3d these days - just scan in a model for cheap and then they can do far more work.
hell, you could even get rough mo-cap done once at a franction of the cost of needing her around all the time.
the audio is obviously even easier than the carson thing.

hell - you could have a system where you customize it so that the person watching it can choose what they want - color hair, skin tone, % bodyfat, etc.
or even to the point of doing famous people, etc.

is it still cheaper to pay real people to do it all?
I could see if the technology wasn't there, but it would seem people would line up even at the level of playstation is right now.

then again, I'm not really all that much into porn, so perhaps this is already out there and I'm just out of the loop.

Re:porn stars (5, Insightful)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226638)

>>Is it still cheaper to pay real people to do it all?

Let's see..

CGI rendered porn model - millions in development, artwork and rendering time, plus expensive render farms to do the computations.

Drug addict in her late teens - $20 worth of crack and a Sony Handycam.

Yes, it's cheaper.

Use their tools against them. (5, Interesting)

mikeophile (647318) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226632)

What's to stop some enterprising folk from making their own, highly subversive versions of Carson Daly from recordings of his show?

What's to stop those recordings from being either broadcast locally from pirate rigs, or injected into a Clear Channel satellite feed?

Ok, maybe state and federal laws and the wrath of the FCC, if you care about that kind of thing.

DJ 3000 from the Simpsons? (5, Funny)

Spamlent Green (461276) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226639)

Does this remind anyone of the DJ 3000 from the Simpsons episode "Bart gets an elephant" ?

Boss: This is the DJ 3000. It plays CDs automatically, and it has three distinct varieties of inane chatter.
[presses a button]
DJ 3000: [stilted] Hey, hey. How about that weather out there?

Woah! _That_ was the caller from hell.

Well, hot dog! We have a weiner.

Bill: Man, that thing's great!

Marty: _Don't_ praise the machine!

Boss: If you don't get that kid an elephant by tomorrow, the DJ 3000 gets your job.

[Marty punches it]

DJ 3000: Those clowns in congress did it again. What a bunch of clowns.

Bill: [laughs] How does it keep up with the news like that?

Moviephone (3, Funny)

Torgo's Pizza (547926) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226640)

What?!? Are you also telling me that the guy on AOL MoviePhone isn't live? That they just cobble his sentences together with... a computer! This can't be happening! To think I thought we had something special together.

Exploding heads is bad enoug, but... (1)

gweihir (88907) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226650)

Max Headroom always makes me think of one of the most disgusting scenes I have ever seen in a movie: Somebody eating cold noodles (ravioli?) directly out of the can.

Urgh!

Network 23... ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226657)

23 Skidoo

Damn! Fooled Again! (1)

Master of Transhuman (597628) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226700)

From the first sentence, I thought Max was back!

I'd really like to see if Amanda Pays is as hot these days as she was then...

Max Headroom was a great show. Best line:

"You remember when we said there was no future? Well, this is it!"

Carson's Next Recording (1)

FosterKanig (645454) | more than 11 years ago | (#5226706)

Philadelphia, New York, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,ah,uh,oh,eeh,wah,tk,ck,bl,fd,ok, umm,brit,ney,sp,ears,lo,ook,pen,os,is,us,hizz,ouse ,word

I have nothing to add to this conversation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5226718)

Well i'll add Doyouwant2cds.com
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