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Slashdot over IPv6

chrisd posted more than 11 years ago | from the links-you-can't-follow dept.

The Internet 248

fuzzel writes "Even though Slashdot has run a number of articles about IPv6 (1|2|3) it apparently isn't reachable over IPv6 directly. But for the people that do already have IPv6 they can use http://slashdot.org.sixxs.org and they will be automaticaly gatewayed. This trick works for most sites by simply appending .sixxs.org to the domain part of a url, eg http://www.google.com.sixxs.org, the gateway will the rewrite url's to have it appended automatically so that everything goes over IPv6. Full information is available on http://ipv6gate.sixxs.net. Oh and yes if you don't have IPv6, those domains under sixxs.org won't work :)"

cancel ×

248 comments

That's weird.. (1)

glenkim (412499) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293146)

I have IPv6 (I know this because I'm chatting on an IPv6 IRC server), but the link doesn't work..

Re:That's weird.. (1)

Peridriga (308995) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293199)

We call the Slashdot Effect [techtarget.com] .

You learn something new every day.

Dont worry (1)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293243)

This happens occaisnaly. U see IpV6 has A.I. Embedded Logic cone addressing data pump. Today its not in a good mood dues to slashdotting.

Question: But are their enough /. users on Ipv6 to /. the network.
Answer: Dosentmatter buddy, even though I dont have v6, I tried clicking on it twice just to see what happens.

Tomorow is a weekend. So the network will be in a good mood.

Re:Dont worry (1)

martissimo (515886) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293272)

Question: But are their enough /. users on Ipv6 to /. the network.
Answer: Dosentmatter buddy, even though I dont have v6, I tried clicking on it twice just to see what happens.


Dont underestimate the power of a stubborn slashdotter, if i have learned anything from time here, it's that you must click every link several times to try and sneak a lucky page load in.

I probably clicked the slashdot and google V6 links 3 or 4 times a piece thinking there was no possible way slashdot or google had been /.'d ;)

Re:That's weird.. (1)

dannyweb (321535) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293568)

Are you using an IPv6 Browser? I believe that Mozilla is one, but I haven't a clue what other ones are out there.

whoa.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293147)

Do I really have first post?

Re:whoa.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293154)

No, dumbshit.

either I don't have IPv6, or.. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293149)

uh.. or it could just be slashdotted :P uhm, wait..
I don't know.

Oh great... (5, Funny)

magickalhack (648733) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293150)

"And in other news, Slashdot managed to bring down the entire IPv6 network today..."

Re:Oh great... (1)

trezor (555230) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293231)

"And in other news Microsoft just released The Microsoft Internet V6. However it does not, I repeat not, seem to be working at all.
This does not at the present time seem to be releated to browserwars or other gang warfare."

I'll guess I'll admit it.. (2, Interesting)

Longinus (601448) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293156)

I'm not entirely clear on why IPv6 such a cool/neccesary thing. As far as I, in my limited knowledge, know, IPv6 will allow for more IP address, but is that it? I'm not questioning its usefullness, but am simply curious if there are any other benefits that come along with IPv6.

Multicast? (1, Informative)

trezor (555230) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293162)

How about a nice, standard way of foing multicasting within the IP-stack? Sounds good to me!

oh... And the internet is running short of adresses. That might turn into a problem ofcourse :)

Re:Multicast? (1)

matt_fk (626813) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293264)

The 'net might run out of IP address space? Not a matter of if.. it's matter of when. ;)

Stupid question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293578)

What happened to IPv5 ?

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (5, Informative)

Aussie (10167) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293172)

try this link [ipv6forum.com]

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (5, Informative)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293224)

There are several other benefits to IPv6 IETF [ietf.org] is implementing while they are updating the protocol. They don't wish to do it too often for obvious reasons and will try to get as much useful stuff in the new version while they're at it.

IPv6...

- ... will support IPSec intrinsically to provide end-to-end security on protocol level.

- ... eliminates the need of NAT with special "local" addresses.

- ... supports QoS features.

- ... supports multihomed devices and load balancing, since an IPv6 address specifies a network interface, not a computer as in IPv4.

- ... uses "modularized" headers where only the necessary fields are used. This essentially makes IPv6 more optimized than IPv4. For example, if the payload of a packet is larger than 64KB, IPv6 will attach another field for "jumbo payloads" and set the 16-bit value to 0.

- ... contains improved multicast support (as an extension header), support for an authentication header (also an optional extension header), and an encryption header (also an optional extension header).

- ... provides enhancements for DNS.

- ... provides automatic neighbor discovery which is especially useful for ad hoc networks and wireless devices.

- ... has a completely rewritten adress autoconfiguration.

See also:
IPv6: The Promise, The Problems, The Protocol [extremetech.com]
RDC 2373 [rfc-editor.org]

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293281)

>- ... supports multihomed devices and load balancing, since an IPv6 address specifies a network interface, not a computer as in IPv4.

This is no difference from IPv4. In IPv4, the original intention was to use an IP address for each network interface (appropriate for the network that interface is on).
The use of a single address for a computer is just a later common-practice that was introduced only because it was convenient.

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (1)

rela (531062) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293334)

- ... uses "modularized" headers where only the necessary fields are used. This essentially makes IPv6 more optimized than IPv4. For example, if the payload of a packet is larger than 64KB, IPv6 will attach another field for "jumbo payloads" and set the 16-bit value to 0.

Now, the first thing I thought of when I read that was: "What happens when someone finds out a that a major vendor can't handle it when the 16-bit length is 0 but there is no "jumbo payload" in the packet?"

Okay, perhaps not the best example, but are they looking to try to avoid (as much as possible) spots in the protocol that might in the future be exploited? 'Cause I'm sure lots of people here know better than I many ways to abuse IPv4...

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293376)

Yes, I also thought it added some complexity that might be exploited somehow. Hmm..

Another example:

An IPv6 packet can contain "chains" of headers since it has a "Next Header" field to describe the next extension header. I suppose an extension header has a similar field as well. I wonder what happens if you chain a huge packet together and send it? Would it be detected as illegal? The packet should still follow the standard. Is there an upper limit of total packet size?

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293381)

Doh. I was meaning "is there an upper limit of total *header* size" above...

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (1)

rela (531062) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293416)

Damn, that's a good point...

Lot of features - lack of simplicity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293345)

ipv6 has a features - which is why it lacks the simplicity that made ipv4 a huge success ....

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (2, Informative)

Max Romantschuk (132276) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293233)

IPv6 will allow for more IP address, but is that it? I'm not questioning its usefullness, but am simply curious if there are any other benefits that come along with IPv6.

For one thing I've understood that IPv6 will make routing possible without keeping track crazy amounts of addresses in huge routing tables. IPv& addresses are hierachical, and in a simplified sense work something like this:

country.state.city.area.house.etc.etc...

NOTE: this is not the actual layout... I don't remember the details. But the point is a backbone router only needs to look at the start of the address, and then send the packet "in the right direction" so to speak. The same thing applies longer down the chain.

Would someone who is more enlightened care to explain this in an official manner? ;)

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293400)

IIRC.. it will be something like bigisp.smallerisp.smallerip.mac_address_of_device

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (1)

yesod (25715) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293414)

Enforcing heirarchy where there isn't one will make matters much worse. In your example - what happens if you and your neighbour use different providers?

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (4, Informative)

Screaming Lunatic (526975) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293436)

country.state.city.area.house.etc.etc... NOTE: this is not the actual layout... I don't remember the details. But the point is a backbone router only needs to look at the start of the address, and then send the packet "in the right direction" so to speak. The same thing applies longer down the chain. Would someone who is more enlightened care to explain this in an official manner? ;)

Actually, this is done with IPv4 now as well. Originally, IPv4 was split into Class A,B, and C networks. Class A networks were larger blocks of addresses than Class B and C. Class A networks were allocated pretty quickly. So all there are left are Class C network blocks.

If an organization gets a Class C network block, they have to use stuff like NAT and subnetting to uniquley identify each machine in there network and make routing manageable.

These Class C network blocks are dished out geographically now. But the Class A network blocks that were dished out earlier are not being utilized well, because organizations don't have enough machines to fill them out.

That's a pretty shitty explanation. Partly because I forget the number of bits in an IPv4 address that identifies the network and the number that identifies a host. So I can't come up with a good example. But my IPv4 address looks like so: 142.179.xxx.xxx (I'm not gonna give you my exact address)

And my subnet mask: 255.255.248.0

So my (Class C) network is (probably) identified by the first 21 bits. (If my conversion is correct).

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (5, Informative)

BigJim.fr (40893) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293287)

The only solution available to provide Internet access to the hosts on the LAN was to use a private non routable subnet and to masquerade it behind the edge router. NAT also allowed some of these hosts to expose services to the outside world. But this solution has a major drawback : it breaks end to end connectivity and thus complicates the offering of many services that the Internet was meant for. Used like that, NAT is an evil kludge.

IPv6 provides a way out. There certainly are many other advantages in the use of IPv6, but end to end connectivity for the masses is what could have the deepest impact. Think about is : when every single workstation has a routable IPv6 address, everyone will have the potential to serve. This is is what the Internet was meant to be, and actually was in the early days.

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293422)

"Think about is : when every single workstation has a routable IPv6 address, everyone will have the potential to serve."
Just what your ISP wants, a bunch of kiddies serving up all sorts of crap over their lines.

NAT - eliminated? (1)

GT_Alias (551463) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293642)

Yeah, the need to use NAT due to a shrinking IPv4 pool would be eliminated...but what about the people that use NAT for home networks running over a common cable/DSL connection?

If you wanted to eliminate NAT, the ISP would have to provide an IPv6 address for every network interface in your house, and I'm going to assume they would tack on some sort of surcharge for each additional address. So I doubt NAT would go away, b/c if the majority of the home users can buy a single Internet connection and split it between multiple machines, what would be their incentive to fork out the cash for multiple addresses?

Also, what about the logicistics of bringing multiple static IPv6 addresses into a house? How would that work...a router in each home? I've never had that one explained to me.

Re:I'll guess I'll admit it.. (1)

The Analog Kid (565327) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293609)

Its all about the number 6. It makes you feel like your better in someway over IPv4. Its going to replace IPv4 anyway, slowly. Internet adaptation is pretty slow if you ask me, well not all the time, its just when Microsoft doesn't give out the patches fast enough to the clients so they can upgrade and use the new software.

Slashdotting... (2, Informative)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293157)

I think sixxs.org just found out the ultimate solution to prevent a site from becoming slashdotted. :-)

IPv6 Slashdotting? (3, Funny)

mikeophile (647318) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293159)

Are there enough /.'ers using IPv6 to /. sixxs.org?

If not, then shame on us.

Not yet ... (1)

fv (95460) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293255)

> Are there enough /.'ers using IPv6 to /. sixxs.org?

Apparently not yet:
felix/home/fyodor> ping6 slashdot.org.sixxs.org PING slashdot.org.sixxs.org(3ffe:4007:1:1:210:dcff:fe20 :7c7c) 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 3ffe:4007:1:1:210:dcff:fe20:7c7c: icmp_seq=0 hops=56 time=266.762 msec
64 bytes from 3ffe:4007:1:1:210:dcff:fe20:7c7c: icmp_seq=1 hops=56 time=257.366 msec
64 bytes from 3ffe:4007:1:1:210:dcff:fe20:7c7c: icmp_seq=2 hops=56 time=258.530 msec

Of course, authentication cookies won't work in that domain (unless they've hacked around that). And the login form uses a relative URL, so it posts your password to the .sixxs.org gateway. Whoever runs that will have a lot of low-UID accounts if he wants 'em :).

-Fyodor
Concerned about your network security? Try the Free Nmap Security Scanner [insecure.org]

IPv6 today? (1, Interesting)

_pruegel_ (581143) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293160)

Does it have any advantage to use IPv6 today? As far as I understood it is still experimental and has no practical use yet. What did I miss?

Re:IPv6 today? (3, Interesting)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293259)

Its fully usable, and is no longer experimental. There are a number of practical uses, although they vary from person to person. I use a ipv6 range for a number of different reasons, one of which is to protect me from attack when on irc (a ipv6 tunnel is a lot easier and more convenient to drop than your ipv4 connection :) ). The other reason is that you can assign IPv6 ips to machines behind a NAT gateway, and have fully routable addresses, which is handy if your broadband providor doesnt issue you with multiple ips.

Disclaimer: i help run ipng.org.uk, a UK tunnel broker.

Re:IPv6 today? (1)

spongman (182339) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293431)

you can assign IPv6 ips to machines behind a NAT gateway, and have fully routable addresses
please expand on this

Re:IPv6 today? (3, Informative)

Erik Hensema (12898) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293547)

An IPv6 address is 128 bits long. Of these 128 bits, 64 bits are reserved for the host part. Usually it's a somewhat mangled version of your ethernet MAC address (a router will broadcast a prefix, and client machines will simply append the mangled version of their MAC to the prefix -- this is called autoconfiguration).

This means you need a /64 subnet on each segment.

Usually providers will assign you a /48 addressspace, giving you roughly enough space for 65000 subnets.

Of course these addresses are routable: you don't need NAT and your machines are reachable from the internet.

Re:IPv6 today? (4, Informative)

Diabolical (2110) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293271)

See this link [ipv6forum.com] for more info regarding IPv6 and it's advantages in today's networks.

Finally! (1, Insightful)

kinnell (607819) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293167)

...a good reason to upgrade my machine to IPv6 - Not

Big deal (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293171)

Ok so now lets see how many Slashdoters are using IP6! Ohhhhh Now that REALLY MATTERS!!!

the ironies (5, Funny)

lingqi (577227) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293198)

I get a feeling in my gut that says sixxs.org is not as impervious to slashdotting as slashdot itself,

so maybe we will finally be able to slashdot slashdot, or at least the IPv6 gateway,

BUT maybe there are not enough slashdotters using IPv6 to be able to connect to the IPv6 slashdot in order to slashdot slashdot's IPv6 gateway,

and... [head explodes]

the rewrite url's what? (5, Insightful)

tamnir (230394) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293203)

the gateway will the rewrite url's to have it appended automatically so that everything goes over IPv6.


I think I get the general idea, but it took me some time. Funny how a couple of spelling mistakes can lead to a quite obfuscated sentence. Anyway, here is what I now think (after checking the site: boggled at that sentence in vain! :) ) that it meant:

the gateway will then rewrite URLs on the pages sent back to your browser, appending automatically the ".sixxs.org". This way, all the links will still go through the IPv6 gateway, letting you transparently surf the web over IPv6!

Re:the rewrite url's what? (1)

MourningBlade (182180) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293227)

the gateway will then rewrite URLs on the pages sent back to your browser, appending automatically the ".sixxs.org". This way, all the links will still go through the IPv6 gateway, letting you transparently surf the web over IPv6!

Yes, but now the phrase is better! Yes, better! It's been enhaced with an exclamation mark!

You too can have all the fun and glory of high-priced translators and english professors by the mere addition of an exclamation mark! Yes! You!

(sorry, I couldn't help but be an ass here...)

Damn. (1)

JanusFury (452699) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293219)

My OS supports IPv6, but my router doesn't. Doubt that my ISP does either. Apparently this will only be truly possible for people with direct pipes (T1, etc.) Or does anyone know of ways around these problems other than nagging my ISP and router manufacturer?

Re:Damn. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293240)

yea go and sign up for a free ipv4-ipv6 tunnel somewhere. It'll create a virtual interface on your pc with the end point on some ipv6 network somewhere. ten seconds on google will tell u where to find this, the only url i can remember is he.net but they are not only full of spammers but also laggy as fk so I would find somewhere else.

tbh most of the current implementations of ipv6 are slow as shit, I am hoping this is just because they are overloaded with people testing them...

There is also the small fact that IANA is still holding about 60 class A's in their reserved zones, so forgive me if I say the ipv4 address shortage is bullshit. I bring this up lots here but nobody can ever give me an answer as to why they are holding back millions of perfectly useable addresses while at the same time making us all jump through hoops to get any address space and claiming we are running out.

Re:Damn. (4, Informative)

fo0bar (261207) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293249)

My OS supports IPv6, but my router doesn't. Doubt that my ISP does either. Apparently this will only be truly possible for people with direct pipes (T1, etc.) Or does anyone know of ways around these problems other than nagging my ISP and router manufacturer?

Use a tunnel broker. It lets you tunnel ipv6 connections over ipv4 to another endpoint. Two of the most popular are Freenet6 [freenet6.net] and Hurricane Electric [he.net] . Hurricane Electric requires a static ipv4 IP, but Freenet6 works with dynamic IPs.

Re:Damn. (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293261)

How does your router not support it? all it has to do is pass the protocol 41 which is the IPv6 gif tunnel, and the vast majority of routers do this fine. No ports need forwarding, and infact on my home router and a number of other routers ive set ipv6 up on, needed no configuring at all to get the tunnel working.

Disclaimer: i help run ipng.org.uk, a UK tunnel broker

Re:Damn. (1)

spongman (182339) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293439)

Heh, i replied to you in anoth post in this discussion. I'd love to know more details on how you can do this. I have a T1, how can I use IPv6?

Re:Damn. (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293475)

Its very very easy. Give me a email on richard.price@ipng.org.uk and i will discuss it further with you!

IPv6 - Chicken and egg ? - no! (3, Insightful)

SilverSun (114725) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293225)

This whole discussion and the support of IPv6 is completely pointless. There are 101 ways to bridge your IPv6 to IPv4 and the other way round. There is no chicke and egg problem. The real reason why IPv6 is not widely deployed is that nobody really needs it.

This is just like HDTV, yes, it's better, cooler, has nifty features, but the old thing does most of the job for much less money/effort.

With IP this situation 'might' (not necessarily 'will') change with the vanishing IP address space, but I am convinved it's perfectly safe to wait till we get there.

If any ISP really thinks he needs v6 he will just install it. Why should I (as a user) try to convince any ISP to use v6. It's just nothing that matters to me. (Multicast?? ha!) I can tell you, that I (as an ISP) don't even know why I should convince anybody. This whole discussion is probably sponsored by cisco's PR department.

Cheers.

Re:IPv6 - Chicken and egg ? - no! (5, Informative)

TheSunborn (68004) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293300)

This is not true, there are real problems getting ip address from Ripe The result is that where I live we got 500 Computers behind a single nat gateway because we can't get an ip to each use. The result is a lousy network.

Re:IPv6 - Chicken and egg ? - no! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293319)

no shit, I'd really like to be able to use the default ssh ports and change the machine names instead of have a differnet port for every service on every machine behind my home nat.

ipv4 is worthless.

Re:IPv6 - Chicken and egg ? - no! (1)

mbyte (65875) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293474)

I can second this. Getting IP adresses from RIPE is a major pain. their current policy forbids (!) to assign unique IP adresses to virtual web-servers, so you have to resort to name-based virtual hosts, which creates a whole lot of problems ... (SSL, etc ..)

Re:IPv6 - Chicken and egg ? - no! (1)

SilverSun (114725) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293636)

That doesn't contradict my point.

I say: If you can live with a lousy network, you don't need v6. (You can live with lousY NTSC, you don't need HDTV).

If you think, you could be more costeffective with v6, because you can maybe fire sysadmins, because you don't need NAT anymore, why don't you just do it? There are ISPs providing v6, change ISP, what prevents you?

Cheers.

Re:IPv6 - Chicken and egg ? - no! (1)

MrSubtle (603608) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293403)

I imagine you'll feel an urgent need to take steps when ARIN announces that anybody who doesn't support v6 won't get any more v4 IP addresses, and an even more urgent need when they start taking away address blocks from those who aren't taking steps to support v6. Just a thought.

Re:IPv6 - Chicken and egg ? - no! (5, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293492)

but I am convinved it's perfectly safe to wait till we get there.
Good point. Also, I see no reason why we should bother researching renewable forms of energy until we actually run out of oil. After all, the perfect time to solve a problem is when our infrastructure depends on the solution - solving a problem before it's a catastrophe is just wasted effort.

Re:IPv6 - Chicken and egg ? - no! (1)

SilverSun (114725) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293592)

I didn't say we should stop researching! Rersearch is necessary. But actively pushing for it is nonsense. An ISP will nerver provide v6 because think it is 'cool' to use v6. He will switch is big corps decide that it is more cost effective to change the ISP from a cheap v4 one to a more expensive one that provides v6. It's as simple as that. This is called 'free market' and it works.

Now, fossile/renewable energies is a completely different issue. Bringing it up in this context is plainly stupid.

Cheers

Is this a meta-story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293238)

Soo...

Are we allowed to discuss about Slashdot's weaknesses and possible improvements under this un-story, or are the messages going to be modded as off-topic?

Damn Irresponsible (2, Funny)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293247)

hey Taco. dont you have sense. In this oil scarce world you are going on V6s!!. guys dont listen to these nerds, stay on V4 and save the earth.

Re:Damn Irresponsible (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293391)

s/V4/inline4

MOD PARENT STUPID. (0)

OverRated (613866) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293434)

If only people would actually make sense when they posted a /. comment.

It's good to dream, isn't it?

Tunnel Brokers (4, Informative)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293250)

The best way currently to use IPv6 is via tunnel brokers, who give you a range of ips (/64 or /48, both of which will vastly outnumber any number of electrical components in your house).

These work by creating a ipv6 GIF tunnel over ipv4, to a server which has either further tunnels to the 6bone or native connectivity. Once you have this setup (and its preety easy to do on Linux, Windows, and very easy to do on the BSDs) then any ipv6 traffic can be routed automatically. This way you dopnt need to use a gateway, and you can use pretty much any app over ipv6, including ftp, ssh, www, email etc.

Disclaimer: I help run ipng.org.uk, which is a UK tunnel broker, who gives you a /64 (thats 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 distinct ips :) ) and delegates full forward and reverse DNS to you for this range.

Re:Tunnel Brokers (1)

mikeophile (647318) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293295)

Want an idea of how big a /64 IP range is? Imagine giving an IP address to every cell in your body, plus 180,000 or so other people.

Re:Tunnel Brokers (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293315)

The number of IPs in a /64 is 18,446,744,073,709,551,616. Thats a lot!

Re:Tunnel Brokers (3, Interesting)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293328)

Ignore that, what i meant to say was:

For a complete matrix of ipv6 ranges right down to a /16 and the nubmer of ips in each range, check out powersource [powersource.cx] , who has a fantastic representation of the scope of ipv6.

Re: Tunnel Brokers (5, Funny)

iangoldby (552781) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293311)

These work by creating a ipv6 GIF tunnel over ipv4...

That is just so stupid and typical. Why oh why do we have to put up with this recyling of old and broken technologies, and patent issues to boot? You would have thought that if they are making a fresh start with a new so-called modern protocol, they would at least use a new and modern specification such as, let's say, PNG? Duh!!!!

Re: Tunnel Brokers (1)

cioxx (456323) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293555)

that's the dumbest attempt at a joke i've heard on /. in a long time.

Congratts!

US Alternative Tunnel Broker (5, Informative)

fv (95460) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293323)

>Disclaimer: I help run ipng.org.uk, which is a UK tunnel broker,
>who gives you a /64 ... and delegates full forward and reverse DNS to you

Great! And for those of us in the States (especially California), Hurricane Electric offers a free tunnel broker [tunnelbroker.net] with these characteristics that I would recommend [slashdot.org] .I have been using it for more than 6 months, and find it quite stable. You do lose your /64 if HE can't ping you for 24 hours, but a new one is only a mouse click away. And what kind of geek would leave their computer inaccessible for that long anyway? ;). Initial activation does take a day or so.

-Fyodor
Concerned about your network security? Try the free Nmap Security Scanner [insecure.org]

Whaa? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293333)

From the Hurricane Electric site.

Our tunnel service is oriented towards developers and experimenters that want a stable permanent tunnel.

Yet you lose all 18 bazillion IP's if you can't be pinged for 24 hours? Stable and permanent my ass!

Re:Whaa? (1)

caino59 (313096) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293505)

well, if you cant be pinged for more than 24 hours, i think huricane electric is the least of your problems

either get your server fixed or get a better ISP.

Re:Whaa? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293595)

If I can't be pinged for 24 hours, it means i'm not home, and my PC is OFF.

Re:Tunnel Brokers (1)

Twirlip of the Mists (615030) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293344)

thats 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 distinct ips

Great. Every goddamn atom in your computer has its own bloody IP address. Tell me again why this is important?

Re:Tunnel Brokers (4, Funny)

mikeophile (647318) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293479)

Suppose you wanted to replace each cell of your body with a nanodevice.

You're going to need a way to address them aren't you?

Re:Tunnel Brokers (2, Informative)

grolim13 (110441) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293499)

It makes configuration easier - like DHCP, only without needing DHCP :) Once your router/firewall/gateway machine has an IPv6 address, it broadcasts it the prefix (first 64 bits, IIRC) to the local network. Other machines on the network will configure their own IP address to be the prefix, with their MAC address tacked on the end, and likely set their default gateway to the router.

Of course. (1)

bbtom (581232) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293269)

Our 'technology' college doesn't have IPv6. There's a suprise. It's good, and therefore we don't have it.

Why the Weird Gateway? (4, Interesting)

ewhac (5844) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293280)

My limited understanding of IPv6 is that you can deploy v6 addresses locally, and advertise them globally via DNS using AAAA records. You can then talk over the larger Internet using a 6-over-4 tunnel.

Assuming this is correct, why doesn't Slashdot simply advertise an AAAA record, then accept connections through a 6-over-4 tunnel (or natively, if their bandwidth provider can speak it)? What are the technical considerations preventing this from working?

Schwab

640k is more than enough for anybody (1)

prodangle (552537) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293331)

I read on this [slashdot.org] thread that the IP header's version field only has 4 bits (I'm not exactly sure what that means, but it sounds awfuly clever). We are currently of course using IPv4, and 5 is reserved for some stream protocol thingy [tldp.org] , then isn't it theoretically possible that we will want more in the future for other uses? If we decide we want 11 more, then there will be 17 differant IP versions, which cannot all be represented with 4 bits. Therefore we'll have to make the 5 bits (or 99 bits) for the version field, inso scrapping all previous versions including IPv6??

I have no idea whether this is technically accurate or not, does anybody else know?

Who is this article for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293339)

Those of you who can't read this article because you're running IPv6, should read this article which tells you how to point your browser to some other site, which in turn will let you read this site. Whah? Catch-22.

'Have' IPv6??? (3, Insightful)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293342)

But for the people that do already have IPv6 they can use

What exactly does it take to 'have' IPv6? What stuff neds to be upgraded? Application software? OS? Router? Does your ISP need to 'have' or 'support' it? It also seems a hell of a lot more complex to type in an IPv6 address than an IPv4 one, but I guess that only matters if you're not using a domain. Then again, with so many IP addresses available with IPv6 this may be the case, as there won't be nearly enough domains to hold everyone's IP!

I'm sorry that this will sound ignorant, but if I'm asking the question and I'm not exactly dumb, it's no wonder all the AOLers aren't using IPv6! I don't even know how you use it, and there are barely any servers using it either, no?

Re:'Have' IPv6??? (0, Offtopic)

prodangle (552537) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293354)

Everything, no, yes, yes, yes, it is, s'pose, and lol (I think). No - not at all, lol, and I don't know how to answer that triple negative .

Re:'Have' IPv6??? (1)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293389)

Application software doesn't need to be upgraded? Because I thought it would. Wouldn't Mozilla or Internet Explorer (older versions at least) complain if you entered "3ffe:0501:0008:0000:0260:97ff:fe40:efab" into the address bar? Isn't internet application software usually built to parse IP addresses of IPv4 type?

Re:'Have' IPv6??? (1)

prodangle (552537) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293419)

I think the browser would just send the string you entered into the address bar as part of the request, and if it was recognised as a valid IPv6 address, the content would be returned, I'm not completely sure though.

Re:'Have' IPv6??? (1)

grolim13 (110441) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293511)

Mozilla supports IPv6 natively. Not sure about Internet Explorer.

Re:'Have' IPv6??? (1)

kwuck (316308) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293465)

I use IPv6 with a free service, freenet6.net [freenet6.net] , and my linux with ipv6 support. You can read the directions in that web.

Re:'Have' IPv6??? (5, Informative)

WWWWolf (2428) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293593)

What exactly does it take to 'have' IPv6? What stuff neds to be upgraded? Application software? OS? Router? Does your ISP need to 'have' or 'support' it?

OS and applications. Many operating systems already do support IPv6, as do many applications (Mozilla does, at least, as does many IRC clients because there's distinct benefits.)

Router/ISP level support is Nice To Have, but there are tunneling servers [freenet6.net] that enable IPv4 sites to talk IPv6.

As far as setup woes go, my setup was as easy as 'apt-get install freenet6' =)

Re:'Have' IPv6??? (2, Informative)

JayJay.br (206867) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293627)

For an IPv6 network to work, all hosts need to be aware of IPv6. That would be "native IPv6" (not sure about the term, but you get the picture!). That is, you need your ISP/OS/Routers/whatever is in the middle to know IPv6.

You could also tunnel IPv6 over IPv4, so two ends could communicate using IPv6 in a v4 network.

Or, you could use a gateway, like sixxs.org. There is some info in the link [sixxs.net] supplied in the article, but if you want the big stuff, please RTFRFC [rfc-editor.org] 2460!

HTH!

virtualhosting/ssl (1)

jadavis (473492) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293353)

I understand that, in principle, you should only have one IP per machine. However, what about having multiple sites on one computer that need to use different SSL certs? This is of course common in virtualhosting environments.

Is there some other way that SSL can determine which certificate to use? It seems as though an SSL-based site (anything, even not HTTP) requires its own IP. Am I correct? What is the "right" thing to do?

Re:virtualhosting/ssl (1)

cehf2 (101100) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293405)

You are indeed correct that SSL sites need to be unique per ip/port combination, however there is an extension [ietf.org] to TLSv1.0 [ietf.org] (the IETF SSL standard) that allows the client to tell the server the host it is attempting to contact, (just as HTTP passes this information in the Host Header).

I believe that this extension will become standard soon, but then of course you need all the SSL browsers and servers to implement the extension before we can solve that particular problem.

Re:virtualhosting/ssl (1)

trib3003 (602101) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293413)

Dunno how you come up with SSL when IPv6 is the topic ;-)
But anyway:

Apache FAQ [apache.org]

Should answer your Question.

Ipv6 is great (4, Informative)

johnburton (21870) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293355)

I have a few machines at home and things like a tivo and a Zaurus that need IP addresses. Ideally they all should have proper routable IP addresses so the internet can be used as it is intended. Luckily my ISP (Andrews & Arnold) provide as many IP adresses for my ADSL as I want for no extra cost. But I'm still limited to 5 usable addresses. But they also provide Ipv6 access to the internet and give you a range of addresses. But instead of five addresses I get a whole /64 range which is 2^64 usable addresses. Anyway, if anyone in the UK wants ADSL and to use IPV6 I can recomment A&A as an ISP for this

Even I can have a site on ipv6 (1, Troll)

johnburton (21870) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293366)

How come slashdot don't have an IPv6 address. Even I can manage it. I have an ipv6 website at http://ipv6.jb99.co.uk/ (not that there is anything interesting on there)

Slashdot's IPv6 Address (1)

superyooser (100462) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293513)

Could be

h t t p colon slash slash slash dot dot slash dot dot slash dot dot org

:-P Just gimme the hex digits.

---BOYCOTT IPv6--- (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293498)

I tell you. IPv6 is the attempt to rewire the internet in a 'pay-by-the-bit' and 'ISPs-control-the-nodes' fashion.

Don't use it! In a couple of years there will be wireless p2p network. Let them waste their money, those who invested in IPv6. Ha!

Re:---BOYCOTT IPv6--- (1)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293598)

ISPs already control the nodes. Unless you know some other way of connmecting your home PC to the net? If so please let us all know.

Can't wait for... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293525)

goat.sixxs.org
(Well it works if you have a New Zealand accent:P)

Good work /.: there's money in them there hills (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293561)

I've just bought a book on IPv6 after years of hearing about it (it arrived yesterday :)

Now, just got to set up my home lan to use it and gateway out.

On another note, I think there is going to be a lot of money in setting up preliminary services such as DNS, MAIL, hosting, IPv6 specific services etc. as when the cross over comes there will be quite some demand.

ISP's won't be prepared. When they do start to make the leap the scale of the job will mean corners will get cut. If you can provide the corners I think there's some money in it.

M. (out of work for 2 months and looking for business ideas that appeal :)

I don't understard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5293587)

Why doesn't the IP get changed automaticly as part of the IPV6 protocol. It seems stupid.

IPv6 is like the Chicken and Egg story (3, Interesting)

lemmen (48986) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293602)

Everyone knows the Chicken and the Egg story (which came first), with IPv6 it's the same:

*) IPv6 is ready to deploy, however not much ISP's are supporting IPv6.
*) ISP's are not supporting IPv6 because there are no customers who uses it.
*) Customers aren't using IPv6 because there are no applications who uses it.
*) Software developers aren't creating software because nobody uses it.

As you can see there's a loop. The main thing is to break this loop and this project is a step in the good direction.

I'd like to encourage all ISP's to actively implement and promote IPv6. And you as 'consumer' can also promote IPv6, play with it even when you ISP doesn't support IPv6 yet (with IPv6 Tunnels for example).

Just my 2 cents.

IP6 is too complex for general acceptance. (2, Interesting)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293604)

Lets face it , unless you've got a Phd in networking chances are that some facet of IP4 routing , setup etc still confuses you. This goes for network admins too. Now multiply the complexity of ip4 by 10 and you get the nightmare that is IP6. I've tried to set up a home ip6 network that linked out to the internet but , oh my god , what kind of idiots invented this system? I'm sorry , but even computer admins are human (yes its true) and we REALLy don't want to have to mess around with 128 bit meaningless entries in routing tables that were complex enough with 32 bits! Yes ip6 does some autocofiguration but someone has to set up the system so that some host does the autoconfig. Ever tried it? Don't , not unless you want to end up in a padded cell. Even networking protocols should be designed for people to be able to use and I'm afraid with ip6 that simply hasn't happened. Back to the dsrawing board guys!

Uh oh... (-1, Offtopic)

slipgun (316092) | more than 11 years ago | (#5293612)

Imagine how easy it will be to put in goatse links [sixxs.org] when IPv6 becomes standard!
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