Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Uni Students Slammed For Music Swapping

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the what-say-both-are-fudging-a-bit dept.

Music 437

jomaree writes "The SMH Online reports that Sony, EMI and Universal will be in the Federal Court today, in an attempt to stop students using uni computers to swap music files. Michael Speck, the director of Music Industry Piracy Investigations, is quoted as follows: 'And we're not talking about one track here, one track there,' he said. 'We're talking piracy, significant examples of piracy.' By contrast, Sydney Uni says it knows of one student with a handful of files on a website, which does actually sound quite a bit like one track here, one track there."

cancel ×

437 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Good for them. (3, Insightful)

Ilan Volow (539597) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324051)

Harsh, but preferable to some jerk putting DRM in my hardware.

Re:Good for them. (3, Insightful)

flatt (513465) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324196)

If that's how it would work, that would be great but don't you think they'd like to give you DRM anyway?

Re:Good for them. (5, Insightful)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324205)

> Harsh, but preferable to some jerk putting DRM in my hardware.

What makes you think these two are mutually exclusive? The university, ideally, should be fighting to control their computers, in service of its students, as they wish without outside influences

Do you really think devulging personal information, sniffing packets, and reporting this to an outside authority without a warrant is good? Do you really think DRM will be put on hold because some student gets busted as an, "example?"

I seriously doubt it. This is one of the many hard-armed tactics the record companies use. Its not a solution and certainly does not make DRM less appealing to the PC and content industry.

Pirates taking food from my kids mouths. (1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324254)

People are pirating my music instead of buying it. The fact that they have a pirated copy of my songs means they want them. I went to a lot of trouble, effort and expense to conduct business according to the laws of this country. If I am able and required to follow the rules, I damn well expect the consumers to do so as well. As far as I'm concerened, Palladium can't get here quick enough.

I followed the rules. If I have to use the full power of the law to get people to reciprocate, I will.

Re:Pirates taking food from my kids mouths. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324274)

Rot in hell, you ugly bat [cnn.com] !

FP! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324056)

First Post for me! K-Dawg!

Dogless Communists (-1, Flamebait)

x-bow (645555) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324057)

Dirty IP stealing convicts. bloody typical of the kangaroo botherers

!FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324059)

Uni? (3, Insightful)

Ozlore Electorov (601419) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324062)

Seriously, people. If you're going to submit a story, please bother to spell out the words, even the long ones.

Re:Uni? (2, Informative)

Skiboo (306467) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324072)

In Australia (and probably most other places), it's a very common abbreviation.

Re:Uni? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324136)

In Australia (and probably most other places), it's a very common abbreviation.

Nope, not in most other places. Doesn't say much about Australia, does it? Idiots.

Re:Uni? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324212)

But it doesn't mean the same thing in Northern Iowa. [uni.edu]

Re:Uni? (0)

Snoopy77 (229731) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324110)

So you can handle all the TLA (three letter acronyms) that run riot throughout the computer industry but when someone uses a common abbreviation you can't find a soap box quick enough in order to preach the evils of abbreviations. Time to take a chill pill.

Suck my fat hairy cock (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324249)

Uni.

Uni Students? (4, Funny)

shr3k (451065) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324063)

Yeah, it sucks for Uni students. I wonder how it will affect Poly students?

Re:Uni Students? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324159)

Unicorn students are grumbling over this one already.

Re:Uni Students? (0)

snack-a-lot (443111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324167)

Is that Poly as in Polytechnic?

Re:Uni Students? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324214)

no.
poly as in "many"

Cal Poly going Ivy League ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324221)

isn't California Poly going Ivy League soon (if it isn't already?)

Re:Cal Poly going Ivy League ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324248)

no. the Ivy League is centuries old, and schools aren't added to it. it hasn't changed for hundreds of years.

GASP! Another story about Australia! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324268)

Like, oh my God! That's so cool! Awesome! Who cares about the *interesting*, un-rehashed, non-clone stories from other countries, when we can jes' sliiiiiide another one about home right on in there, huh? Nobody will notice, and then we can say, like, "Wow, we're just so totally a big deal"!

Fuck off Michael and Timothy, and give us back our REAL, ACTUAL news...

heh (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324065)

*troll*
First!
*/troll*

I reiterate (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324067)

Come find me, RIAA. I have about 700 mp3s on my computer.

Be prepared for a legal battle.

Be warned: you sue me for piracy, I'll countersue for 17 years of extortion.

Re:I reiterate (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324103)

700? psh that ain't shit. I've got over 6,000, and my roomies have more. Fuck you, RIAA.

Sue those theives! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324068)

Sue those university students for all that they're worth!! ...
They don't have anything? ..
oh.

Re:Sue those theives! (4, Funny)

phorm (591458) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324162)

Sorry son, the RIAA won the court case... I'm afraid we'll have to take your hall pass, your beer cap, and all your boxes of Macaroni and Cheese.

Meanwhile, they will probably be kicked out of the University and possibly blacklisted at others.
<sarcasm> Yup... ruin a few college kids lives, the RIAA is really going to win a lot in this legal battle.</sarcasm>

cooperation is mandatory (5, Insightful)

Sneftel (15416) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324069)

Australia's major record companies, Sony, EMI and Universal, are acting on suspicions that students, and possibly staff, are using the universities' computers to swap digital music files. The industry says the three universities have not divulged information, but that others have co-operated.

Ah, great. BSA-style enforcement that tosses the ol' "guilty until proven innocent" mythos out the window. The alarmist in me wonders how long it'll be before consumers are forced to prove their compliance with copyright, or submit to "music collection audits".

By the same logic.... (2, Insightful)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324257)

It means if i suspect EMI to be creating and album to harm me I can just take them to court without any proof.
This is getting ridiclous. The record labels are not police, and even the police cant take you to court without a warrant and reasonable evidence. The univs should counter sue, after all i bet there will be enough lawyers!

The article talks about shutting down (2, Interesting)

nizcolas (597301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324080)

a guys website which had a few songs to download. Then goes on to say.

"The focus of these organisations should be on people who are running or pirating music for clear commercial benefit,"

How does sharing a few singles on a website pose a pirate threat or count as pirating music as a clear commercial benefit. Granted I don't know the full situation but it doesn't sound like anything more than "Hey here are some songs I like from [Fill In the Blank] band! Check em out!"

Re:The article talks about shutting down (2, Insightful)

Sneftel (15416) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324115)

Read the article again. The quote you requoted is from a guy who thinks that the lawsuit is spurious. He DOESN'T think that the website is clear commercial benefit.

Re:The article talks about shutting down (1)

nizcolas (597301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324153)

They still shut down the guys site and are saving it to use as evidence against him. Obviously they believe the user is in some schism with the law. And yeah the guy I quoted disagreed with the lawsuit. What he said is, we need to be going after people pirating for commercial gain, not for people sharing music for the sake of sharing. What's implied is the site was shut down because the recording industry claimed the user was trying to make commercial profit off of his site, which he clearly wasnt, and, as you said, the lawsuit is spurious.

clear as mud now eh :)

Re:The article talks about shutting down (1)

RTPMatt (468649) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324126)

Great idea, pick on the starving students, who use to give all their allowence to the music corps, and surly will give money from their paycheck later, and now that they have no money to buy CDs or defend themselves in court, its the perfect time to sue

Re:The article talks about shutting down (1)

martingunnarsson (590268) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324166)

Yeah, come on, poor people shouldn't have to play by the rules.

Re:The article talks about shutting down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324226)

Depends who are making the rules and what they are.

If the rules are bad, then you SHOULD break them.

Re:The article talks about shutting down (1)

Evil Adrian (253301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324245)

The rules aren't bad. If someone owns the copyright to something, they get to choose the terms of distribution, not anybody else. How is that a bad rule?

My role model is an Enron executive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324198)

"Great idea, pick on the starving students, who use to give all their allowence to the music corps, and surly will give money from their paycheck later, and now that they have no money to buy CDs or defend themselves in court, its the perfect time to sue"

Maybe they're starving because they're up to their eyeballs in credit card debt [pirg.org] . Anyway don't do the crime if you can't handle the time. Or the 2002's version. Do the crime and hide your trail so you don't get busted.

Re:The article talks about shutting down (1)

gr0ngb0t (410427) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324234)

Being an employee @ Sydney University, over the past 6 years, I've noticed that there arent that many "starving students" anymore, but increasingly many, many more full-fee paying international and post-grad. students, and young rich first years who's daddy bought them a spot here because of some perceived "prestige" - you know, the sorta students who can afford to stay in hyper-expensive university owned accomodation [suv.com.au] .

Oh, and I've never swapped music files using the Uni network... not anyone who'd care anyway (as in not commercial music, but no-name out-of the way bands/producers)

Re:The article talks about shutting down (2, Interesting)

dasheiff (261577) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324195)

"The focus of these organisations should be on people who are running or pirating music for clear commercial benefit,"

How does sharing a few singles on a website pose a pirate threat or count as pirating music as a clear commercial benefit. Granted I don't know the full situation but it doesn't sound like anything more than "Hey here are some songs I like from [Fill In the Blank] band! Check em out!"


You didn't read the article closely, that's the defence here, saying that these students aren't getting commercial benefit.

Website is slow.. here is the full text (5, Informative)

vivek7006 (585218) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324082)

Print Article: It's war on a generation of cyber pirates


Print this article [slashdot.org] | Close this window [slashdot.org]

It's war on a generation of cyber pirates
ByAmanda Morgan
February 18 2003

The recording industry has launched its most aggressive offensive yet against illegal music swapping over the internet.

In the Federal Court in Sydney today, record companies will try to seize evidence of song swapping by students using the computer networks of the universities of Sydney, Melbourne and Tasmania.

Record labels in the United States and Europe have warned the world's top 1000 companies they must stop illegal music swapping on their networks or face legal action.

Australia's major record companies, Sony, EMI and Universal, are acting on suspicions that students, and possibly staff, are using the universities' computers to swap digital music files. The industry says the three universities have not divulged information, but that others have co-operated.

Michael Speck, the director of Music Industry Piracy Investigations, which tracks swapping on behalf of the Australian record industry, believes the illegal file trading is significant.

"And we're not talking about one track here, one track there," he said. "We're talking piracy, significant examples of piracy."

The University of Sydney says it knows of one student who established a website with a handful of songs for swapping on its system. It has "isolated the website, and will hand over the evidence at an appropriate time", a spokesman said.

There are hundreds of thousands of song files on personal computers worldwide. They are "swapped" for free using special software, robbing artists and their record companies of royalties.

But the president of the NSW Council for Civil Liberties, Cameron Murphy, said the industry was wrong to target students.

"The focus of these organisations should be on people who are running or pirating music for clear commercial benefit," he said. "I don't think there is any benefit to the community in prosecuting individuals who do this as a one-off. I mean, we'd have half the students in Australia in jail."

Mr Murphy also questioned whether the universities should be forced into the role of policing their students.

Mr Speck denied the industry was making an example of the universities. "Somebody gets caught being involved in a wrongdoing and they utter, 'We're not the only ones, why are we here?' Well, you got caught."

This story was found at: http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/02/17/10453305 39310.html

=252) refR=refR.substring(0,252)+"..."; //--> '; if(navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Mac')!=-1){documen t.write(imgN); }else{ document.write(''+ ''+''+imgN+''); } } document.write(""); //-->

Re:Website is slow.. here is the full text (1)

GreatOgre (75402) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324219)

I mean, we'd have half the students in Australia in jail.

Only half! I would bet it would be higher than that. I think here in the US it's probably close to 75% of the students, maybe even higher.

This is just wrong (-1, Troll)

HanzoSan (251665) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324083)

We should be able to do whatever we want with the information on our computers and on our networks.

Re:This is just wrong-RTFA (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324130)

"Australia's major record companies, Sony, EMI and Universal, are acting on suspicions that students, and possibly staff, are using the universities' computers to swap digital music files. The industry says the three universities have not divulged information, but that others have co-operated."'

Who's computers and network?

Re:This is just wrong (2, Informative)

Exiler (589908) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324151)

"Information" doesn't always mean open content. They're protecting their copyrights, nothing more.

Re:This is just wrong (1, Insightful)

Tuffnut (618438) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324170)

We should be able to do whatever we want with the information on our computers and on our networks.

That's just wrong.

Re:This is just wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324231)

Oh cmon man. The guy basically has a HanzoSan-sucks club [slashdot.org] . I wouldn't take him too seriously.

John Q Student had a track... (4, Funny)

AntiNorm (155641) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324090)

By contrast, Sydney Uni says it knows of one student with a handful of files on a website, which does actually sound quite a bit like one track here, one track there

John Q Student had a track, EIEIO
And on this track he had a song, EIEIO
With a "track track" here and a "track track" there
Here a "track" there a "track" everywhere a "track track"
John Q Student had a track, EIEIO!

(God I love having to stay up late to do homework)

Re:John Q Student had a track... (1)

Russ Steffen (263) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324233)

Who is this John Q Student and why must he issue "Enforce In-Order Execution of I/O" [upenn.edu] instructions so often?

uni == university? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324094)

In this context it could mean university, United States, uniform etc. What the hell.

Re:uni == university? (1)

MisterMook (634297) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324180)

No, it's Sydney so in that context it's always university. Duh, you'd think you'd never brought rubbers to school or passed out after a good pisser.

Disclaimer: I'm not Australian, but I really think the Crocodile Hunter is stupid enough to watch.

Mod parent up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324228)

Mod parent up. The first thing I thought was "Who would study unicorns?"

Absolutely! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324097)

Although putting the perpetrators out of business, destroying the "infrastructure of terrorism" as the Bush adiministration would say, is not without worth, if any advocate of content providers' rights has learned anything over the past few years, it is that, just as Islamic terrorism starts with the corrupt, anti-semitic arab education systems, piracy is also the result of a deeply ingrained culture, and the most effective way to stamp it out is to cut it off at the roots.

People are always arguing that piracy is somehow reasonable, because "if only there were music available at the price I WANTED to pay, I would buy it, and I wouldn't have to steal it". Try this argument at the convenience store: "I think that bottle of malt liquor is only worth 10 cents, and if you won't sell it to me for 10 cents, I'll steal it". It doesn't work that way. Over the past several hundred years we have replaced the rule of the mob with free markets, which ensure an equitable price for both buyer and seller through the natural interactions of supply and demand. The availability of free stolen products, of course, undermines this market and makes content production ultimately impossible. Some efforts of this type may be necessary initially to restore the rule of law: But remember, if you don't like this kind of intrusion, the best thing to do is stop pirating music right now, let this culture of piracy be destroyed, and allow a market-based system of online music distribution to be established. Once this has happened, heavy-handed enforcement will be unnecessary, and everyone will be able to get what they want for a fair price.

Re:Absolutely! (1)

tetro (545711) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324145)

This is different, if you steal something from a store, you steal something from a store. What students are doing right now are trading "copies" of whatever art they are looking for. Although I don't condone illegal file sharing, I think MP3's and similar compressed music files are just copies and not as good as the original. Downloading a song or two shouldn't warrant the same punishment as actually going to a CD store and 5-finger-discounting the item.

Re:Absolutely! (4, Insightful)

phorm (591458) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324200)

Except I'm Canadian. I pay a rather nice premium on all the recordable media I buy, and they want me to pay more. I don't pirate music either.

All things considered, I'm paying the RIAA for copying music, ergo any song I download and burn should be considered paid for.

Oh, and for the record, once again:
piracy != theft
Theft=larceny [reference.com]
The owner is deprived of nothing tangible. There are still just as many CD's on the shelves as there were yesterday. And if all goes well, there will be plenty of crap CD's left on the shelves as people continue to revolt on the monopolism, scare, and crush tactics of the RIAA and their brethren

Re:Absolutely! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324239)

True, but under current law, on every country who has signed to several treaties on this subject, redistributing copyrighted material without permission of the copyright holder is subject to prosecution at a court of law. Under different jurisdictions the kind of offense varies, but it *is* a crime.

Don't like it? Change the law.

--
Account, nope, thanks.

Re:Absolutely! (3, Insightful)

MisterMook (634297) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324278)

But we all know that won't happen because the current industry model won't allow it to happen. There are too many pockets being lined by inflating prices on music and not enough to lose by keeping prices fixed at their current levels.

When was the last time you saw the price of music DECREASE besides when all the hair bands went into the discount bin in 91? There isn't a free market in the music industry, there is a price fixing cartel of less than a handful of companies that collectively control most of the music that gets put on shelves.

Basically they're going against a smoking type arguement. Everyone knows that smoking is bad for you and can have serious consequences, and that music swapping can lead to jail time. If they had made smoking down and out illegal though they would have forced everyone who smoked into an us versus them midnset and pretty much pissed off the general public of "don't kick the common man" mentality. This is exactly what the music industry has done and continues to do, furthermore they shamelessly promote and profit from filesharing in their other corporate faces. It makes them look like asses, and stupid asses at that. Sony Music basically says "don't do anything that our other division, Sony Electronics, makes easy with their huge sales of portable mp3 players." With that kind of corporate logic it's hard to take them seriously.

Linux is the answer (-1, Troll)

jchristopher (198929) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324100)

As usual, Linux / Open source presents a simple and obvious solution. Linux, frankly, is so user hostile that no college student could ever use it to pirate music.

First the college student would have to get the video card and mouse working properly (no trivial task). Then, use a floppy disk to get the ethernet card drivers installed. If they managed to get past that step, they would still have to compile the P2P software. (As we know, almost nothing that you download every successfully compiles). Linux software is rarely (ever?) distributed in a user-friendly precompiled format, so the student can't go that route either.

After a while, the student will just give up and go back to smoking grass or whatever it is that college students do these days.

All in all, it's a virtual impossibility that anyone using Linux could figure out how to swap files, therefore, making all university students install Linux is the answer.

Re:Linux is the answer (1)

josh crawley (537561) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324172)

You've never installed and used Linux, have you?

"Then, use a floppy disk to get the ethernet card drivers installed."

Huh? What'cha smoking? Them's DOS stuff.

"they would still have to compile the P2P software. (As we know, almost nothing that you download every successfully compiles)."

I'll give you that one. I use Lopster all the time, and I have to pull it from CVS. I wouldnt expect my dad or somebody to know how to do that, let alone have the tools to pull. Still, lopster's proven great for me.

"rarely (ever?) distributed in a user-friendly precompiled format,"

how's:

apt-get install neato_program
(CHING CHING) 2% 32% 65% 100%
Installing neato_program
Done

Even a brain-dead windows user could do that (no offence to those brain-dead windows users- I know there's smart ones out there).

"it's a virtual impossibility that anyone using Linux could figure out how to swap files, therefore, making all university students install Linux is the answer. "

I LOVE that answer!!!! Do you know how many default install Redhat boxes there will be? Lots and lots! of shared files ;-)

Re:Linux is the answer (0)

snack-a-lot (443111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324251)

Can't you notice a joke when you see it?

PetWolverine matches this profile (-1, Offtopic)

josh crawley (537561) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324101)

Heh, take a look at his ftp server: louise.dhs.org . A few movies, shitloads of mp3's and pirate copies of MAC software. And for a traceroute of that box..

6 551.at-1-0-0.XR1.CHI2.ALTER.NET (152.63.65.218) 139.929 ms 139.788 ms 139.922 ms
7 0.so-2-1-0.XL1.CHI2.ALTER.NET (152.63.67.129) 140.065 ms 139.914 ms 149.934 ms
8 0.so-7-0-0.BR6.CHI2.ALTER.NET (152.63.71.94) 150.057 ms 139.814 ms 139.924 ms
9 bpr1-so-6-0-0.ChicagoEquinix.cw.net (208.174.226.1) 139.926 ms 139.943 ms 139.484 ms
10 dcr2-so-4-3-0-X.Chicago.cw.net (208.175.10.237) 139.936 ms 139.886 ms 140.048 ms
11 agr2-so-6-0-0.Chicago.cw.net (208.175.10.198) 139.815 ms 139.846 ms 139.959 ms
12 iar1-loopback.Chicago.cw.net (208.172.2.16) 139.980 ms 139.505 ms 139.934 ms
13 merit-its.Chicago.cw.net (208.172.10.138) 169.940 ms 149.871 ms 159.945 ms
14 atm1-0x24.michnet8.mich.net (198.108.23.82) 149.922 ms 149.999 ms 149.815 ms
15 a-arbl-merit1.c-arbl.umnet.umich.edu (192.122.183.74) 179.937 ms 169.802 ms 159.931 ms
16 A-ARBL-FXB-BB.c-FXB.umnet.umich.edu (141.211.4.106) 179.923 ms 149.919 ms 179.915 ms

Wow! It ends up on the university of michigan's doorsteps. Now, look at google for a user recently on slashdot called "PetWolverine". Now go visit him in the slammer.

Re:PetWolverine matches this profile (1)

josh crawley (537561) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324116)

http://slashdot.org/~PetWolverine is his profile, as is saying

"I have 60 GB or so of MP3s that you need. "

That, and his server 'seems' down. Then again, A-ARBL-bla bla sounds like a dns rbl list. Whoops.

Re:PetWolverine matches this profile (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324171)

and you read his /. journal and he keeps mentioning how he keeps losing connection with his uni's ResNet jee I wonder if its because you're probably shelling out gigs of warez to people every day... and surprisingly umich.edu hasn't pulled the plug.

Re:PetWolverine matches this profile (0)

snack-a-lot (443111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324184)

Wierd, I was just looking at that for the first time this morning, a couple of hours before this story .. and now it's gone.

SHORTEST AND LONGEST BOOKS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324102)

SHORTEST BOOKS EVER WRITTEN

"A Guide To Arab Democracies"
"A Hiker's Guide To The Ho Chi Minh Trail"
"Advanced Linux User's Guide"
"Blacks I Met While Yachting"
"Career Opportunities for Liberal Arts Majors"
"Excellence In The CFL"
"Fast And Efficient Windows Applications"
"How To Be A Good Sport", by Tonya Harding
"How To Win The Super Bowl", by Jim Kelly
"Keebler Elves That Touch Themselves"
"My Life As A Woman", by Martina Navratilova
"The Engineer's Guide to Fashion"
"Young, Single Males Speak Out Against Masturbation"
"How to be Normal" and "How to be Polite" both by RMS
"Easy to use Linux"
A Canadian telephone book
"My Social Life" by ESR
"Correct Spelling and Grammar in English" by Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda
"Business Ethics" by William Gates III (with foreword by Ken Lay)
"Heterosexuality among the Slashdot crew"
"Truths I have told" by Al Gore
"How to Speak Clearly and Correctly" by George W. Bush
"How Canadians Stand Up for Themselves"
"How to Get a Date with a Woman" by your local LUG
"How to Tell the Truth" by William J. Clinton
"The Names of Women Interested in Linux Geeks"
"Successful Business Plans Using Linux"
"What I Wouldn't Do For Money" by Jon Katz
"How to Write Software People Would Want to Buy" by Linus Torvalds
"Addresses of Houses in Canada that aren't Igloos"

LONGEST BOOKS EVER WRITTEN

"Loneliness, Buttplugs, Linux and You" by ESR
"Why your name should have 'GNU/' in Front of It" by RMS
"Being Rude to Foriegners" by the French Government
"How to Sexually Abuse Penguins" by Linus Torvalds
"Homosexuality among the Slashdot crew"
"How to Look Like a Cave Dwelling Communist" by RMS

Quit picking on the poor students... (5, Insightful)

$$$$$exyGal (638164) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324106)

Says the president of the NSW Council for Civil Liberties:

"I don't think there is any benefit to the community in prosecuting individuals who do this as a one-off. I mean, we'd have half the students in Australia in jail."

I totally agree. As long as these students are not making money by trading this music, this seems like a real cheap shot. Before you know it, they are going to prosecute college kids for putting a quarter on a string and getting their laundry done for free.

On the other hand, SHAME ON YOU TODAY'S COLLEGE STUDENTS! If you're going to be engaged in these illicit activities, at least make a minor effort to hide your tracks. That's what college is all about ;-).

--sex [slashdot.org]

Re:Quit picking on the poor students... (4, Insightful)

Evil Adrian (253301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324204)

So it's ok to violate someone's rights, but only if you only do it a little bit?

Re:Quit picking on the poor students... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324247)

Who says someone have rights?

I have a right to decide that you can't borrow milk and sugar to your neighbour.. Yeah, that's correct! I just bought the right!!

BLEAACH!

I remember a time when sharing were considered a virtue, and nobody had monopoly on music and arts. Too bad it was sold out for margin profits to big fat bald white trash. If we don't turn the tide, society will be far worse for it.

Re:Quit picking on the poor students... (1)

Evil Adrian (253301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324262)

That makes no sense.

If someone creates something, the art is his. Who the hell are you to take it, copy it, and give it to other people without his permission?

Your (idiotic) example is the same as piracy. You are imposing your will on somebody else.

Sharing is nice. If someone wants to share, they can.

However, people have the right to NOT share things if they don't want to.

If you have a problem with that, too bad. Go download freely-distributable music -- there is plenty of it at mp3.com. But you do not have the right to distribute someone's music if they don't want you to.

Re:Quit picking on the poor students... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324252)

"I don't think there is any benefit to the community in prosecuting individuals who do this as a one-off. I mean, we'd have half the students in Australia in jail."

There's nothing like destroying a couple of lives (easy targets), in order to scare the rest into compliance.. Mmmmm, the fear tastes delicious. Of course, the money is good too.

You can't beat efficiency.

Re:Quit picking on the poor students... (0)

snack-a-lot (443111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324283)

If you were to destroy a couple of lives, you would kill the people containing them. Locking someone up in jail isn't destroying anything of such magnitude. Who knows, they may even benefit from it.

Note to the editors (2, Informative)

WIAKywbfatw (307557) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324108)

Where it's not obvious, could you please expand on any acronyms used by story submitters?

Someone who's Australian (or world travelled) might know off the top of their head that SMH refers to they Sydney Morning Herald but it would be nice if the rest of us don't have to go clicking through links or searching the web just to find out what this TLA (three letter acronym) or that ETLA (extended three letter acronym) stand for.

On the other hand, that sounds too much like actual editing for a /. editor to do, doesn't it?

Universities are major RIAA/MPAA targets (2, Insightful)

sh!va (312105) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324117)

Universities often represent some of the fastest connections to the internet that aren't traffic monitored. People have fast connections at work as well and its the threat of their IT department monitoring the network, finding out about P-2-P and getting the employee fired, that prevents people from filesharing at work (albeit some companies have lenient policies with regards to this)
Universities, OTOH, aspire to higher ideals of complete freedom (else all of us students would protest, at least in theory). Hence no threat from the University IT department, for the ones that haven't capitulated to such RIAA blackmailing.
As a result, a very large chunk of filesharing traffic originates or ends at university IPs. Hence they make the perfect RIAA target. Its fairly logical.
We just have to hope that universities don't give in to this kind of blackmailing. The question of threatening a student's freedom is much larger than that of stopping some of them from taking part in illegal acts.

not just about money (4, Insightful)

Mdog (25508) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324118)

It's not just an issue of money. It's a question of control.

The RIAA's accountants know that their profits have increased in the past few years. The RIAA's lawyers know that their profits have increased in the past few years. But there are people out there that are not using officially sanctioned music in officially sanctioned ways at officially sanctioned times with officially sanctioned equipment. That means there are people out there who are not under the control of the company, the mythical "consumer." This cannot be tollerated.

Microsoft has been making money hand over fist for two decades. Someone installing WinME on three of their computers when they bought one copy is not doing them any harm. If anything, it means fewer copies of Win98 in use, which means less old stuff for them to support. That's good for them. But it means that there are people out there not using the product in the officially sanctioned way on the officially sanctioned number of systems. Microsoft (and Bill Gates in particular) simply cannot deal with the concept of someone not using the product on their terms.

All of that goes back to one of the fundamental flaws in the capitalist mindset: The consumer. The mythical consumer is not a person. The mythical consumer is a machine that stands on the other side of a cash register and accepts input (products) and returns output (pictures of George Washington). They can be reduced to a mathematical equation of supply and demand. They can be manipulated by marketing. They can be made to fit into nice little cells on a spreadsheet. In short, the consumer can be controlled.

It fits nicely into the whole financial theory. Passive object Consumer (C) is convinced by active object Marketing Department (M) to purchase passive object Product (P), created by passive objects Employees (E) under the employ of the active object Owner (O). Add it all up, and you get a nice tity profit (n) for the Owner.

(C + M) + P(E) = O(n)

(A very efficent method, eh?)

There's just one problem: Not all human beings are passive objects C. Humans are not a mathematical equation. The equation works when it is not possible for a person to function otherwise. You force them into playing the role of C or E, and the equation comes out nicely. Everying is predictable, profitable, and controllable.

But as soon as something comes along that threatens the stability and controllability of that equation, panic mode sets in. The printed book would be the death of learning. TV would be the death of radio. VCRs would be the death of movies. DAT would be the death of radio. Cable would be the death of movies. E-books will be the death of learning. The Internet will be the death of civilization. And so on. A little control slips away, and the end is nigh, defend the System to the last lawyer.

No one likes uncertainty (except possibly Shrodinger), and no one likes surprises (except at birthdays). It's not your money that the RIAA or the MPAA or Microsoft want. It's your passivity. They want to know that you can be controlled, not because they want power or greed or world domination but because then you are predictable, and they can wrap their minds around something predictable. Everyone likes things to be predictable. Everyone likes knowing where their next meal is coming from.

So what do we do? Don't be a consumer. Don't be passive. Don't be swayed by marketing. Don't be a part of a machine, however well intentioned and genuinely useful it is (and it is). Most importantly: Don't take your business elsewhere. That doesn't work, it only makes your life more difficult. Saying "we'll just use open source software" doesn't do anything about the continued growth of draconian attempts at regaining control with their collateral damage. Turn and take the issue head on, at its core level: The law.

Re:not just about money (1)

Evil Adrian (253301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324224)

So, do copyrights even factor into your argument at all? You know, the rights that people have to decide how their material is distributed?

I think it's perfectly reasonable for the person that owns the copyrights to decide the terms of how their material is distributed.

The fact that people are pirating their materials, and avoiding their distribution channels (avoiding payment) is hurting their business.

This has absolutely nothing to do with people downloading freely-distributed music. It has to do with people ripping the record companies off.

They're not trying to "control" you. It's nothing sinister -- they are trying to control their distribution channels, something that is perfectly within their rights.

Re:not just about money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324273)

It's nothing sinister -- they are trying to control their distribution channels, something that is perfectly within their rights.

The only problem is that in the process of trying to achieve control, they are also trying to trample on fair-use privileges of the public.

Shooting flies with an elephant gun... (5, Informative)

Max Romantschuk (132276) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324139)

Try it yourself... Would you be able to kill all the flies in the world with an elephant gun? I sure wouldn't.

For anyone who hasn't read it yet, read Tim Oreilly's piece on OpenP2P.com [openp2p.com] . I won't parrot his thoughts here, but I will say I agree with them.

Oh, and pirate my music [mp3.com] :)

Blech, universities are completely inept... (5, Interesting)

Feztaa (633745) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324146)

... when it comes to stopping piracy.

I live in residence at my university, and I don't download much. Basically, I have a year-long track record of going easy on university bandwidth (less than 5MBs/day, on average, I'd say).

Then one day, I downloaded about 1.3 GBs of public domain movies from the Prelinger Archives [archive.org] , and the university blocked my connection (I had to go and bitch to some guy in some office to get it turned back on).

Contrast this with the other guys on my floor who download at least 1 GB of illegal music, movies, and software every day without incident.

Oh yeah, and I'm now on some kind of "bandwidth probation", if I ever download too much again, I'll get banned for life from the university's bandwidth, and I could face being kicked out of university, too.

Where's the justice?!?!

I guess they're just after communists, not thieves... :(

Re:Blech, universities are completely inept... (2, Informative)

Mark (ph'x) (619499) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324211)

Yeah... I got sold an 'unlimited 2mbit' connection from my residential college in aus. No strings attached.

They regretted this at the end of the year when the University IT tried to foist a AU$30k bill on us. (Bandwidth = Expensive over here)

End result was I got kicked out for some other minor misdemeanour.. but they were trying to get me to pay for it, until i asked them to take me to court ;)

On behalf of everyone (4, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324157)


They are "swapped" for free using special software, robbing artists and their record companies of royalties
On behalf of everyone and as a gesture of goodwill I would like to volunteer to try and make it up to Kylie for this heinous crime. Someone else can do the record companies

Re:On behalf of everyone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324282)

Virtually every child actor in the biz.

Would they stop printing books? (2, Insightful)

CrazyJim0 (324487) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324169)

If university students started putting their books online, would publishers go out of buisness? Would people stop writing books as a result?

Likely yes, and most definately no.

If people put music online, would the record producers go out of buisness? Would people stop making music?

Hopefully yes, and hopefully people would stop making bad music.

So who are the only people standing in the way of a revolutionary step in education? Darwin's corporate bastards :) Its funny that they chose to target university students for this, as if they wanted to paint their case a joke.

Re:Would they stop printing books? (2, Insightful)

Tim C (15259) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324207)

And what exactly do you have against all the people that the recording industry employs? I'm not talking about the people at the top, who say and do the things that annoy slashdotters so much - I mean the people who are just trying to do a job they love, and earn enough money to live in relative comfort. The ones who get told what to do, rather than ever having a say in any policy.

What have they done, to make you hope that the record producers go out of business?

By this, do they mean they will allow it? (0)

wzzrd (545802) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324177)

'And we're not talking about one track here, one track there,' he said. 'We're talking piracy, significant examples of piracy.'

Doesn't this mean, that having 'some tracks' and swapping those 'some tracks' would be insufficient for the RIAA et al. to go berzerk on you? Doesn't this sound like "Heck, if you're just some minor swapper swapping, we'll go easy on you and more or less tollerate your behaviour"? Or is it just me and does it sound like "We'll go for the big fish first and will then go stamp on all you little fish too [insert evil laughter]" to the rest of you?

This shit AGAIN? (-1, Troll)

Evil Adrian (253301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324182)

Do we have to keep dragging the piracy issue out every five minutes? It's piracy, even if it is one song here, one song there, it's still damn illegal. It's simple, DON'T PIRATE. There is PLENTY of FREE, LEGALLY DOWNLOADABLE music (go to mp3.com for God's sake!) There is no excuse for it. COPYRIGHTS are RIGHTS. Therefore, the COPYRIGHT HOLDER gets to decide how copies are distributed, not anybody else. UGH.

Re:This shit AGAIN? (0)

snack-a-lot (443111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324264)

They are only rights because someone decided they are rights. Intellectual property isn't an obvious extension of physical property, it just seems so now because it is taken for granted so much.

Re:This shit AGAIN? (1)

Evil Adrian (253301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324266)

So are you against intellectual property rights?

Re:This shit AGAIN? (0)

snack-a-lot (443111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324280)

I feel that authorship of such items should be acknowledged, but apart from that I'm quite undecided. It all comes down to what has the most benefit to people generally. But to figure out what has the greatest benefit you would need to know the goal of the human race. It all comes down to the meaning of life in the end, and that is something I have no answer for.

error in the article (4, Insightful)

Niadh (468443) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324189)

The line:

There are hundreds of thousands of song files on personal computers worldwide. They are "swapped" for free using special software, robbing artists and their record companies of royalties.


Should read:

There are hundreds of thousands of record companies worldwide. They are using special contract software, robbing artists of their royalties.

Re:error in the article (0, Flamebait)

Evil Adrian (253301) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324213)

There are hundreds of thousands of artists out there who had the option to not sign that record company contract.

So, you are wrong.

Re:error in the article (1)

moncyb (456490) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324277)

I think it should read:

There are a handful of media companies worldwide. They are abusing the legal system, robbing everyone of technology and free speech.

;-)

University of Cincinnati Is Cracking Down Too (1)

Richardsonke1 (612224) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324193)

Some students at the University of Cincinnati have also gotten in trouble for file sharing. You can check out the story on UC's Newsrecord [uc.edu] . These students were visited by two IT people as well as four campus police officers. The students that got in trouble were using Direct Connect to share files. Some students had 150+ gigs shared. All students that were on the Direct Connect server had their internet connections shut off (in the dorms) and the people who were sharing a lot got in major trouble. As the newsrecord article says, the university decided, however, to keep all the consequences internal instead of letting the music industry, etc, deal with them. Just goes to show that if you aren't careful and don't have ways to hide your IP address, you can be easily traced.

Monash University (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324194)

A staff member was suspended from Monash University (in the outer suburbs of Melbourne) a few weeks ago for "alleged infringement of copyrights in sound recordings and song lyrics published on the staff member's home page". Apparently this led to a large amount of co-workers' computers being forcibly searched as well. No other suspensions have happened, but a lot of people have become quite nervous. It's believed that this action was at the behest of ARIA, which is basically the Australian equivalent of the RIAA.

Now, many of us have recently been advised by our superiors that we will "infringe copyright" even by doing such things as copying our own CDs or encoding them to mp3 files and bringing them into work. Also, our networks are being regularly scanned for machines running file-sharing applications.

It seems that they're gearing up to instituting a policy where having a machine that has transferred large amounts of data and has been seen listening on certain well-known port numbers will soon constitute grounds for having the contents of its hard drive searched.

This will shut down legal swapping too (1)

thogard (43403) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324202)

There are about 3000 bands in Melbourne and I expect about the same in Sydney. Many of these bands give away their tracks because it promotes their tours small international tours.
For example there are 5 bands in this list [ozmp3.com] and four out of 5 of them travel around the world and play either as a band or as support for other bands. Based on the stats from the web page, I can can tell where in the world the different bands are (unless it gets /.ed). These bands make money by selling their CD's when they play and one sells two online but they make their money by playing gigs.

(and I am looking for assitance in maintaining the site for any live music lovers Downunder)

Why? (0)

Karem Lore (649920) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324209)

Why doesn't someone write an encrypted audio file? That way, when the file is on my PC, no-one can force me to allow them to know its audio!

Oh no,I forgot, that right has been taken away from us in the UK...You're a criminal if you don't cough up your encryption key...

Karem

Forgotten economics (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324210)

They are "swapped" for free using special software, robbing artists and their record companies of royalties.

Robbing implies that something is taken. College students by nature dont have much money. A poor college student wasnt going to buy the cd anyways, so their are no lost royalties. Furthermore, the artist will make money in the future when the college student goes to the artist's concert. That's what the industry should focus their efforts on. Making money from things that cant be duplicated (although I guess they're trying to make cds like that)

Great! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5324218)

The actual concern is *how are these people figuring out that the traded music can't be traded in the first place?* Are they going after everyone with MP3s on their webpage? Are they going after everyone with MP3s on their home directory? Or is it everyone with MP3s on their computer? I'm sure each and everyone of this universities has a TOS document, and it's probably ok for the sysadmins to search the user's home directories, but I can't imagine any sane TOS which states that it's ok for netadmins to search your box. It's ok if they find out using publicly available information, like, say, via a KaZaa client. But it's definitely not ok if they actively search the user's box.

From the article, the president of the NSW (?) Council for Civil Liberties is quoted saying "the focus of these organisations should be on people who are running or pirating music for clear commercial benefit [...]" No, sorry, you are dead wrong. They will go after whoever they please and whatever is easier to search and target at first. If that's student at universities, so be it. It will show that these people are serious about getting offenders to court. Of course they should be working on the bigger fishes in parallel, but that doesn't give the students the right to ignore copyright law. As for commercial benefit, at US$8 per CD, with 12 songs per CD, a collection of 2000 songs (not uncommon) is worth over US$1300. That's US$1300 that the students aren't shelling out. If that's not commercial benefit, I don't know what is. If you think that kind of money is peanuts, multiply by 10. That's 20 thousand songs, at 5 MB per song, 100 GB. More than once, people on this forum have bragged about their 100 GB MP3 collections, so it's not unthinkable nor undoable. This is over then thousand US dollars. I can't seriously call that peanuts.

You have several choices:

* Stop doing it

* Trade songs for which you have permission to do so

* Change the laws

The last two are of course, not mutually exclusive. The first one is a requirement until the last happens. It's really not that hard. The only ones who are going to see a loss from this train of action are the artists who won't get the pitty royalties for their work. Bad luck, next time look for a producer that doesn't enslave you like the one you have right now.

--
Account? The point would be... ?

In Other News (4, Funny)

nihilogos (87025) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324232)

Publishers Wiley, Springer-Verlag, Prentice Hall and others have indicated that they intend to pursue legal action in order to stop the piracy of books in Australian universities.

"It's not just a few students lending a few novels here and there" aaid spokesperson I.L. Douche. "Some campuses have an entire building filled with books which they lend out to anybody."

When are those record companies reducing prices??? (-1, Troll)

zymano (581466) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324240)

Like never. So fuck em.

15 $ for a cd is crap.

Sony Clie SJ33 (1)

Whitecloud (649593) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324261)

From the review of the sj33 [palminfocenter.com] The SJ33 uses standard memory sticks although the device doesn't come with one. With the focus on music playback, Sony might want to consider bundling offers because users are definitely going to need one.

wrong. When no one has any mp3's to save, there is no need for huge amounts of memory. Music playback will be limited to Sony's DRM, dog-robot music. All your mp3 are belong to us.

Incredible claim (4, Insightful)

SiliconEntity (448450) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324270)

By contrast, Sydney Uni says it knows of one student with a handful of files on a website...

Are you trying to imply that unauthorized file sharing almost never occurs at universities? Don't make me laugh! At least in the United States there are uncounted gigabytes devoted to this activity. Many universities have had problems with network bandwidth due to file sharing. It's a lot more than "one student with a handful of files"! How credible do you hope to be when you make claims like this?

Either not thinking, or this is short term (2, Interesting)

panurge (573432) | more than 11 years ago | (#5324276)

As politicians have good cause to know, pissing off the middle classes is not a smart move. It rebounds. The legal position of cannabis is a good example: politicians are having to take into account that respectable, well-off people are worried that their children will get arrested, and heavy handed enforcement becomes a vote loser the moment one party is perceived as having a more liberal agenda.

So Sony et al are either not thinking of the possible longer term consequences, or this is a short-term measure because they suspect in the longer run they will lose this war.

In the 60s and 70s, students demonstrated against bad governments (South Africa, Greece, US involvement in Vietnam, Chile and Cambodia). Perhaps the time is coming when they will demonstrate against overbearing corporations.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>