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610 comments

Slashdot celebrates Negro Pioneers: Sammy Davis Jr (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384217)

Sammy Davis Jr.

On November 19, 1954, the career of Sammy Davis Jr. almost came to a sudden and tragic close. While driving to Los Angeles to record the title tune of the Universal International picture "Six Bridges to Cross", Sammy was the victim of an automobile smash-up and narrowly escaped death. He was so seriously injured that his left eye had to be removed. In spite of the terrible shock, Sammy rallied and went on with his work; he even insisted that he was the "luckiest guy in the world".

Since his accident, Sammy's courageous spirit and ever-growing talent have won him increasingly enthusiastic audiences. Let's hear it for Sammy Davis Jr. !

Celebrate Negro Month 2003 with Slashdot.

Re:Slashdot celebrates Negro Pioneers: Sammy Davis (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384250)


I will be celebrating negro month by seeing a movie every single day. I'll also loudly be offering advice to the characters in the movie, testing my cell phone tones, and putting my bitch in her place. I may also drink orange soda during said cinematic experience.

Re:Slashdot celebrates Negro Pioneers: Sammy Davis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384293)

What is with those Negroes? Why do they talk to the movie screen?

Also, where do the Negroes get their sense of "fashion"? I mean you got to hand it to them, who would have thunk that purple and yellow and lime green clothing accented by gold colored costume jewlery would be attractive.

What I really fail to understand is why they are incapable of normal speech. I truly think that for most Negroes, that they are incapable of speaking normally due to their genetic makeup. I saw an article recently where it showed that some species have the proper gene to be able to mimic the complex sounds required for speech. Mockingbirds, for example. White people and Asians have this gene too. But Negroes seem to lack the genetic "switch" which would allow them to master human speech.

Re:Slashdot celebrates Negro Pioneers: Sammy Davis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384377)

Think what you will.

I'll be thinking of rock & roll, a taste of freedom I'd likely never would have experienced, and the lack of a flat world.

Re:Slashdot celebrates AA Pioneers: Sammy Davis Jr (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384399)

Jesus loves you.

The Real Reason: (5, Funny)

DasBub (139460) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384218)

It's tired of hearing about Linux kernel releases every ten minutes.

Wow! (2)

cmburns69 (169686) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384219)

It makes me feel old to know that I was alive when this thing launched!

An online Starcraft RPG? Only at [netnexus.com]

Re:Wow! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384280)


It makes me feel old to know that I was alive when this thing launched!

I wish you'd die already before you become more of a burden on society.

Re:Wow! (4, Insightful)

kfg (145172) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384346)

When people ask me, "What sign?" I say, "Sputnik."

If you think you feel old now, wait until you start getting old, my son. :)

America's oldest man died on Monday. He was actually born in a log cabin and of high school age when the Wright Bros. first flew at Kitty Hawk.

Think about that one the next time you feel "old." Your world has hardly moved at all compared to his.

KFG

sorry,gotta do it.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384220)

FIRST POST!!!!

Sorry slashdot.. (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384223)


But I won't believe Pioneer 10 is dying until Netcraft confirms it..

Netcraft Confirms... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384267)

It is official; Netcraft confirms: Pioneer 10 is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered Pioneer 10 community when IDC confirmed that Pioneer 10 market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all web browsers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that Pioneer 10 has lost more market share , this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. Pioneer 10 is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be a Kreskin to predict Pioneer 10's future. The hand writing is on the wall: Pioneer 10 faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for Pioneer 10 because Pioneer 10 is dying . Things are looking very bad for Pioneer 10. As many of us are already aware, Pioneer 10 continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

Dada s///g is the most endangered of them all, having lost 93% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant departures of long time Netscape developers Jordan Hubbard and Mike Smith only serve to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: Pioneer 10 is dying .

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

Pioneer 10.org leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of Pioneer 10. How many users of Galeon are there? Let's see. The number of Pioneer 10 versus Galeon posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 Galeon users. Chimera posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of Galeon posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of Chimera. A recent article put Netscape 6 at about 80 percent of the Pioneer 10 market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 Netscape 6 users. This is consistent with the number of Netscape 6 usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Pioneer 10, abysmal sales and so on, Netscape went out of business and will probably be taken over by AOL who sell another troubled browser. Now AOL is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that Pioneer 10 has steadily declined in market share. Pioneer 10 is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If Pioneer 10 is to survive at all it will be among browser dilettante dabblers. Pioneer 10 continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, Pioneer 10 is dead.

Fact: Pioneer 10 is dying

Re:Netcraft Confirms... (1)

grub (11606) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384314)

Not a bad try, better man sed though, you missed a couple. ;)

So long old friend (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384224)

They just don't make 'em like they used to.

Re:So long old friend (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384350)

So sad, now it is only good for Klingon target practice. :(

Re:So long old friend (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384407)

Note that the triumphs of NASA date from the era when engineers ran the programs, and not political hacks like now. I feel sorry for the young engineers now who will never experience the greatness which was NASA.

There were no slackers then. There were dedicated young engineers with buzz cuts and and a slide rule. They didn't listen to "Hip Hop" or "Heavy Metal". They didn't wear baggy pants. They weren't interested in fashion or political correctness. Their uniform was a crisp white dress shirt, a string tie, and a pair of drip-dry Hagar slacks, accessorized with a leather holster--which held an 18 inch slide rule. Bang.

These men were focused on quality and greatness. They were patriotic, dedicated men who strove each day to make America first with the best engineering the human mind could conceive.

Today NASA is run by "professional" managers and bureaucrats. They cow-tow not to quality but to politically motivated "quotas" and false "diversity". Slackers abound. "Getting over" takes precedence over "getting it right".

The saddest thing of all is not the failures of the current space program, as disturbing as they might be. The saddest thing is that we have lost the spirit and the system and methodology which yielded our greatest triumphs.

Thats one old satelite (2, Interesting)

kelceylehrich (600264) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384226)

It is older than me by 14 years.

Any one have any really really good pics its taken?

Re:Thats one old satelite (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384320)

Uranus [goatse.cx]

Re:Thats one old satelite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384355)

C'mon, that's gotta get a +1 Funny!

Re:Thats one old satelite (0)

dotgain (630123) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384419)

Um, yeah. Checked the links in the blurb? The article?

Pioneer 11 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384228)

Here is the simplest computer around, and the interface is perfect because we are all born with it - the interface is human DRIVE. The computer works like this: I stick my pee sprout in your mom's poop chute for 1, and I stick it in her pee hole for 0.

poop chute = 1
pee hole = 0

Sometimes I stick it in her mouth, but that is for parity.

Sometimes complex operations can take a long time to complete, but that's okay! We're looking for simplicity here, not speed. And waiting for this interface isn't that bad.

This simple computer is very susceptable to visuses. In fact, it comes pre-loaded with several.

For review:

poop chute = 1
pee hole = 0

This computer also fits into Microsoft's .Net strategy - namely, pay per use. It costs $10 per computation, or 15 minutes, whichever comes first.

poop chute = 1
pee hole = 0

Rest in peace (4, Insightful)

andyring (100627) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384229)

Pioneer 10, and other satellites of that era, worked far beyond what they were intended, and did a darn good job (and then some) at what they did. Pioneer 10, you did good. May you rest in peace. A job well done.

Re:Rest in peace (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384261)


This has got to be the gayest fucking post ever on slashdot. Good thing it's not here now, I'd expect to see you trying to stick your dick into it. You do realize that Pioneer 10 is an inanimate object and doesn't have feelings, don't you? Much like your mom whilst I rape her.

bAWAHAHAHA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384285)

lol......

Re:Rest in peace (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384403)

Dude that guys mon is like 80 years old! At least wait untill she is dead so that you can have the glory of being a necrophiliac, otherwise you will just be a raper of elderly women...

You are walking down a road, suddenly a raper of old women jumps out of the bushes!"

Roll a 0-20 and he thinks that YOU are an old woman and rapes you. Take 2 20d damage points

Roll 21-40 and he trys to negotiate mutual gay fagghorx sexsxhor wit you. Roll 2 d6 charisma, if roll fails you become goats.cx gut and take 2 d100 damage.

Roll 41-60 He doesn't care that you are a fat 35 year old virgin, in fact that turns him on, much like the hicks in deliverance were turned on by Wilburs fat virginity! You are RAPED! Roll 2 d 20 for damages. Lower Charisma by 1 d20

He gives you a blowjob whilst you read Hustler. AAhhh memorys of college... roll 1 d100 as a temporary personality gain. last 1 d100 turns

Star fronteirs or Gamma World? BackOriface2K or Sub7? Our generation is fscked! Roll 1 d100 and if the resulting roll is 1-99 you become a w0rm writig skriptkiddiot dreaming of owning your own real doll [realdoll.com]

ShafTroLL rolePlaying games, inc. A division of kogal raping cthulhu monsters limited.

Re:Rest in peace (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384301)

..."of that era", being the key phrase. Apparently that was before metric was invented, causing flumoxation to contractors and NASA alike.

Re:Rest in peace (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384319)

don't you mean been rest in space. har har har.. i crack myself up.... yep that was a good one. space! ahhhhhh. ok I'm done.

4th post? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384231)

Can it be? Is it true? I doubt it. If only I didn't have to wait 20 seconds, this could have been it. More likely, this is around 12th...

am I the only one (5, Interesting)

outsider007 (115534) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384232)

I worry that we're leaving a trial of breadcrumbs for conquering alien races to find us. fight the future.

Re:am I the only one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384289)

Probably :)

Re:am I the only one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384300)

yes.

i am I the only one Shaftr0ll (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384333)


What you mean "it don't mean a thing?"
SHUT YOUR MOUTH!!
But I'm only talkin about clit sizes
AAww yeahh... talkin about clit sizes on slashdot....
What you KNOW about clit sizes sucka?"
Tongue-fuck her. This feels divine. Check it out yo. See if her clit has gotten hard enough to peek out is' hood. If so, lick it. If you can't see it, it might still be waiting for you underneath. So bring your tongue up top of her slit and feel for her clit. You may barely experience it's presence. But even if you can't feel the tiny pearl, you can make it rise by licking the skin that covers it. Lick hard now boy!!
Damn Shaftr0ll! You is da pussy eatin masta'"
You know it baby..

Re:am I the only one (5, Interesting)

Blondie-Wan (559212) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384357)

If that were a concern, the constant stream of radio, TV and other telecommunications signals we've been pumping into space for most of the 20th century would be a far bigger problem. There's effectively a big sphere of signals expanding around Earth in all directions at the speed of light, and anyone in space who chanced to stumble across any of our physical probes like Pioneer 10 would most likely have already detected us long, long before. Earth really calls a lot of attention to itself with its broadcasts, and our signals just get stronger and more blanketing as time goes by. Not only that, but even if we stopped all broadcasts tomorrow, there'd still be all our old signals moving out through space, and anyone out there with the wherewithal to detect them would be have several of our earth decades of opportunity in which to do so.

Moreover, many think it's profoundly unlikely any alien races would be interested in conquering us. Even assuming others out there are hostile, the effort and expenditure of resources to get from there to here would probably mean the payoff for attacking us wouldn't be worth the trip.

It's also been argued that any extraterrestrial civilizations capable of detecting us will almost certainly be much older and more advanced (the thinking being that on the cosmic timescale, we're just starting off, and any civilization even a little younger than ours wouldn't have the tech to detect us, and the odds are high against another civ reaching this stage of development against the exact same time we do, so if they can hear us they've probably been around a while), and that (presumably, anyway) anyone so advanced wouldn't be warlike, so we'd probably have a lot more to gain than to lose from others finding out about us. I'm certainly no expert, but this does strike me as a fairly reasonable line of thought.

No need to worry (5, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384360)

They're only coming to serve man.

KFG

Re:serving man (1)

Rauser (631244) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384381)

... in a nice curry sauce with some decent wine!

Re:No need to worry (2, Informative)

AsbestosRush (111196) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384393)

And now that we have the cursory Twilight Zone [cox.net] reference out of the way... :)

+1 funny, tho.

I kind of expected to read (1, Funny)

Argon (6783) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384233)

So long and thanks for all the fish :-)

Such pessimism.. (3, Funny)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384237)

Just because we can't hear its signals doesn't mean THEY don't. /me looks forward to the return of P'neer.

Just as well, it belongs to another age (-1, Troll)

Adam Rightmann (609216) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384242)

an age where Pioneer was a noble term, a term for a rough and rugged man willing to brave terrible hardships and sacrifices to open up the wilderness for the betterment of mankind, and bring light unto the Savages.

In this kinder, gentler, PC world, perhaps the next solar system probe can be named "Differently Advantaged," or "Quotas", or "System of Non-rational Beliefs," or even "White Men are the Cause of all evil".

Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384245)

I guess it got too much of the Slashdot effect. That makes it your fault!

Pioneer when you see (3, Funny)

nlinecomputers (602059) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384249)

...the Klingon bird of prey decloak, DUCK!

Re:Pioneer when you see (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384299)

was that not voyager space probes?

Re:Pioneer when you see (1)

Beebos (564067) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384422)

I think you are thinking of Voyager's appearance in the original series transformed into V'ger. V'ger was the probe that was destroying all the imperfect species and thought Kirk was "the Creator".

Another article (3, Informative)

Zipster (555990) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384251)

There is another article on the news.com.au [news.com.au] site in case the first goes down.

So Long So Long Sorry to See you Go (3, Interesting)

mrs clear plastic (229108) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384254)

So Long
So Long
I'm Sorry to See You Go
I'm So Sad You Are Gone
I Dearly Miss Your Feeble Little Signal
You May Be Gone
But You Are In My Heart Forever
My Tears Will Follow You Wherever You Go

Haiku (4, Insightful)

sconeu (64226) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384255)


A little spacecraft
Far away among the stars
Rest well, Pioneer

Another Space Era comes to a close (3, Insightful)

dWhisper (318846) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384258)

This is the second major deep space probe in the last few months that has gone south. Sad, because Pioneer 10 was the one that paved the way for so many other missions (like the Voyager Missions).

Here's to a long and steady life to the remaining deep space missions out there.

Re:Another Space Era comes to a close (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384272)


This is the second major deep space probe in the last few months that has gone south.

If you're talking about the incident with your mother you can relax. The tests came back negative.

Re:Another Space Era comes to a close (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384373)

What goddamn tests? She's not my mother? She's not female? What incident? You don't have herpes? I hate you Anonymous Coward, you always try to stir things up, much like me stirring around your mothers porridge after your dog has finished with her.

Yeah you heard me. And what are you going to do about it, eh?

Nothing, that's right nothing, because, you see, we're brothers man, we're brothers. We be brothers in arms, and I want to love you like a brother, I want to continue to take part in the sharing of our mothers, lets keep it in the family man.

It's Done For? (3, Funny)

rice_web (604109) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384259)

So, it's just dying out there? And what about our other "deep-space" probes? Yep, on the death bed.

So, using rice_web's ingenious stupidity, I've come up with:

(1) Send a new probe to follow our dying probes and act as a relay for the information.

(2) Just completely start over and get new probes up and running, and moving more quickly than our dying probes.

Pioneer 10 isn't dead.... (5, Funny)

Sergeant Beavis (558225) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384260)

It was just Slashdotted, that's all.

Watch, in 5 years, someone will hear from it again.

Lifespan? (4, Interesting)

1000101 (584896) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384262)

What is the approximate lifespan of the craft? Will the harsh environment of space eventually destroy it, or will it simply drift along forever? Unless of course it collides with something which I would think would be highly unlikely.

Re:Lifespan? (2, Interesting)

Sergeant Beavis (558225) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384278)

I think they said Pioneer 10 was lucky to have just survived the radiation it was exposed to as it passed Jupiter. I think it's safe to say that it last MUCH MUCH MUCH longer than anyone anticipated.

Re:Lifespan? (5, Interesting)

kfg (145172) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384387)

Actually, other than the low temperature the enviroment of space isn't very harsh.

It's when you start getting near things, like planets and stars, that things get dicey.

Pioneer is heading the other way, and there isn't any reason that it shouldn't drift on for millions of years, God willing and the crick don't rise none.

That's why they affixed the infamous plaque to it.

KFG

Distance. (5, Insightful)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384264)

It's 7.6 billion miles away. Almost 12 hours at the speed of light. And it will take two million years to reach a star considered to be in our close neighborood.

Incomprehensible space...it's incredibly daunting, yet unbelievably appealing. Pioneer 10 was sent out in the same spirit as the pioneers of early America: the lure of seemingly boundless space and undiscovered wonders.

This pioneer is blazing a trail we all hope to follow someday. Goodbye Pioneer 10, you have served us well.

Re:Distance. (1)

jeffy124 (453342) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384296)

wow .. and some people agonize over a network latency of a few seconds, imagine forcing them to wait 72 hours just for TCP's 3-way handshake!

Re:Distance. (1)

jeffy124 (453342) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384305)

yeah, i sure know my math: 12 * 3 = 72. That should be 36 hours.

Re:Distance. (4, Interesting)

digitalsushi (137809) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384298)

2 million years eh? Ok, here's a thought to ponder. Think some...thing from Earth will go get it before it gets to the next local star?

ObHHGTG (4, Funny)

jpetts (208163) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384361)

2 million years eh?

Just time for another bath! Pass me the sponge, would you?

Re:Distance. (1)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384374)

Maybe around the year 2300, if something along the lines of the Matrix occurs (however unlikely).

Plenty of room for Matrix plotline expansion if the dodging-bullets-in-the-Matrix thing gets old: let's see how far the AI has gone in terms of space research. Would make it pretty interesting if an alien race began attacking Earth because they viewed it as a hostile Borg-like planet. Perhaps some of the less hostile AI, which we get to see in some of the upcoming sequels, would join forces with the humans to defend the planet.

Anyway...it's not my job to come up with plot devices and make Hollywood any more money!

Re:Distance. (-1, Flamebait)

qnonsense (12235) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384317)

  • Pioneer 10 was sent out in the same spirit as the pioneers of early America
Riiiiight... I just hope that P10 hasn't been treating the folks out on Pluto the same way that our forebearers wiped out the people who were already living in that seemingly boundless space .

I'm sorry, I've never said this before on Slashdot (and I've been around a while) but your post is just plain insensitive.

Re:Distance. (1)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384342)

Most pioneers either tried to coexist with the Indians, or cowered and ran away.

It was the armies that came later that wiped out/corraled up the Indians.

Perhaps there are things we have learned from our history, that we will remember not to repeat.

Also, I was talking about the spirit of exploration, not the effects of civilization.

If you take offense at my use of the word civilization, what I mean by it is building farms, houses, and cities.

Re:Distance. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384366)

Ooooh, so the explorers should have just stayed at home minding the cows. Get over it, Europeans arrived and made use of the land. We're not going to go back in time hundreds of years.

Re:Distance. (3, Funny)

digital bath (650895) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384331)

Well said.
I wonder if someday we will pick Pioneer up again, or just let it drift forever. Were all probes sent with the "mankind peace" plaque? (the one that depicts a man and women and some other stuff that I can't remember)

Amazing... (1)

dgoodell (650627) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384266)

I still think it's amazing that these things lasted this long, whereas modern probes often don't even accomplish the mission before failing, let alone lasting 30 years. They just don't make 'em like they used to

Uptime (0, Troll)

gato_mato (572107) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384269)

Wouldn't you LOVE to do an uptime on that thing? My God the util% has to be WAY up there - then again so would the uptime

Gato

Obviously... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384274)



Obviously it has smacked into a city sized mothership on its way to destroy the earth.

Paraphrase from "Apollo 13" (2, Insightful)

Mr. Fusion (235351) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384277)

She sure was a good ship.
Farewell, Pioneer. And we thank you.

-Mr. Fusion

Hey Michael... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384284)

Not only are you a retard, but......YOU'RE ALSO A JERK!

DSN (1)

Stonent1 (594886) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384290)

The first thing I thought of was Deep Space Nine. And I thought... My God, that thing has traveled far!

First "pics" or "pictures" not "pic's" post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384304)

An apostrophe + the letter "s" shows possession which is inappropriate in this context.

We should retrieve it someday (4, Insightful)

jonman_d (465049) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384307)

If/when technology permits, we should make it a point to send a ship to retrieve the probe, for both practical and symbolic reasons. It'd be interesting to see the ware and tare on a craft that's been through so much as it has; and, it has a great historical value. As a sign of respect to itself and its builders, Pioneer deserves to be in a measeum of sorts.

Of course, my other half tells me, for the same reasons, let it alone, in space, quietly, where its home is.

Re:We should retrieve it someday (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384382)

Sending another probe to inspect it would be a nice idea. Just as long as we don't disturb it.

If you ask me, I think we should just leave it in space. It truely is a monument in motion acting as a testament to humanity in space.

Not too shocking... (4, Interesting)

mraymer (516227) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384310)

The thing has been going longer than it was ever intended to anyway. It's really cold and really far away, so it's not too shocking that it finally quit.

Has SETI given up on it, too? I know they would do an informal test on their equipment by looking for the Pioneer 10 signal. SETI has been having problems tracking it for a few years at least... here's something Jill Tarter wrote about it. [msn.com]

If a nuclear war or asteroid or other event destroys all of humanity, probes like this will be our only legacy...

Re:Not too shocking... (4, Funny)

mahart (177794) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384405)

I wish our legacy had better pornography [nasa.gov] on it

Out of commision (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384311)

We should have bought more boxed sets.

Radioisotopes (1)

LordSah (185088) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384321)

...are really cool. Nuclear powered naval vessels don't last a third as long as Pioneer's radioactive batteries have.

It would be great if we could roll radioactive waste into similar devices to power cars, remote buildings, or even laptops--if we could effectively shield the power source with a small light enclosure.

Re:Radioisotopes (1)

ThePeices (635180) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384388)

as nice a thought it is, i dont think it would ever happen. youve got a few kg of highly radioactive material in a "battery", the potential for using it in a bad way is just too high. would anyone like to see our favorite terrorists using these as dirty bombs? i sure as hell wouldnt. Bring it on fuel cells. bring it on.

Its a Lie (2, Funny)

bastardman (631862) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384327)

I just detected that probe the other day... wait... perhaps that was a different kind of probe. Never mind then.

What they SHOULD have done (0, Redundant)

Hao Wu (652581) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384329)

... is to launch a series of probes that could relay signals back to one another. The probes would be like a long network of space chain. They could potentially travel to many times the distance achieved by Pioneer. Then they could reach another solar system, fall in to orbit around that sun, further to head back toward our own sun with information collected on data tapes and hard drive.

communication via relay? (1, Interesting)

klaricmn (244131) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384330)

i wonder if it would be possible to use some the other satelites that us earthlings have out the the solar system to contact these probes when they get farther and farther away.

Imagine a chain of probes sent out in the same direction, all relaying information back to earth via one another. I wonder if any research has been done on the feasibility of such an approach...

Re:communication via relay? (1)

ThePeices (635180) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384396)

i think the size of the receiving dish would be too high for any probe acting as a relay to get a decent signal.

The Last Transmission (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384334)

Khhhaaaannnnnnnnn!!!
sorry.

ac

Pioneer 10 is dying (1)

ItsBacon (32095) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384335)

It is official, NASA confirms: Pioneer 10 is dying.

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered Pioneer community when NASA confirmed that Pioneer 10's signal strength had dropped yet again. Coming on the heels of a recent NASA commnications attempt which plainly states that Pioneer 10 has lost all communication with home, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along, Pioneer 10 is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by being completely unable to send a receivable signal [nasa.gov] in the last NASA communications attempt.

Verizon Commercials (5, Funny)

dmuth (14143) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384336)

Did anyone else read that and think of the Verizon Wireless commercials?

"Can you hear me NOW?!?"

actually, (0, Offtopic)

Joe the Lesser (533425) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384337)

It's sick of all the nagging

Amateur time (4, Interesting)

tqft (619476) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384338)

OK Pioneer is dying from whatever I read it appears the problem is the signal to noise ratio is too low.

Perhaps all you amateurs with radio telescopes out there should ask NASA nicely (through whatever an organisation preferably) for the frequency and lcoation data that is not publicly available and do a big combined search.

Do you have procedures/software for doing VLBI? It would be a good project to do build it around if you do not already.

A few hours a day or days a month and you might still get some useful data from it.

Re:Amateur time (5, Informative)

ender81b (520454) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384378)

No offense but if NASA's DSN network, the most advanced tracking and recieving facility in the world, cannot detect it why would you think 1000 amateur astronomers would have any luck? I pulled this from the Voyager home page but presumably Pioneer would be much weaker:

" The antennas must capture Voyager information from a signal so weak that the power striking the antenna is only 10 exponent -16 watts (1 part in 10 quadrillion). A modern-day electronic digital watch operates at a power level 20 billion times greater than this feeble level. "

Then again I am no radio expert so maybe what you describe is feasible.

Take the long view..... (1)

siasl (541853) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384352)

..2 million years to Aldeberon?

Maybe our decendents x 100,000 (assuming 20 yrs/generation) will recover it...

One can only hope....

But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384404)

...when it gets to where Aldebaran should be, there will only be an asteroid field. Pioneer 10's sensors will, however, detect a disturbance in the area that seems to indicate the crying out of millions of souls and then a sudden silence.

Am I missing something here? (5, Insightful)

itallushrt (148885) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384353)

Why don't all you people stop thanking a hunk of metal and start thanking the scientist and engineers that designed, built, and launched Pioneer 10. They are the real reasons this post even exist.

Re:Am I missing something here? (1)

cranos (592602) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384379)

Hey its a common human activity to anthropomorphise inanimate objects, just one of those little quirks I guess.

Really what we are doing is paying homage to the idea embodied by Pioneer 10, that the human race is capable of becoming more than it is, extending beyond our own earth bound origins. When we do this we include the men and women who worked on this. Pioneer is a symbol, nothing more nothing less.

Not even Deep Space Nine?!? (1)

rollingrock (653505) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384356)

Man, you know its having trouble when even the advanced sensors on Deep Space Nine cannot detect its signal.

Pioneer 10, Dead at 55 (1, Funny)

egg troll (515396) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384358)

I just heard some sad news on talk radio this morning. It seems that space probe Pioneer 10 was found dead in its distant space home this morning. Even if you didn't enjoy its photos of our planets, there's no denying its contribution to astronomy. Truly an engineering icon.

Ha! (4, Interesting)

Quasar1999 (520073) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384362)

EchoStar and Bell should have gone with the guys that worked on that satellite... Check out how crappy modern satellites are (Lockheed Martin [sat-nd.com] for example)... hell, they're in low earth orbit and they can't last a whole month before dying(LM's Nimiq 2)... Pioneer went through the asteroid belt... come on... Evolution means going forward, not back... Can't we build reliable satellites of yesteryear?

Goddamn (5, Insightful)

cranos (592602) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384365)

You know you are truly geek when something like this almost brings tears to your eyes. I mean this thing had less computing power than your average calculator and yet it managed to be useful for thirty years?
See what happens when you actually give your space programme decent funding? You do something like this, something which comes close to making the human race look like something more than six billion savages scrabbling in the dirt.

Re:Goddamn (1)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384416)

I agree...but it only make the human race look like 5,999,000,000 savages scrabbling in the dirt. Do we even have 1,000,000 people in the world capable of doing something like this?

i met pioneer in a chat room (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384400)

He said "I'm 10, wanna see my pix?"

It's still serving part of its mission. (5, Interesting)

chaparrl (579943) | more than 11 years ago | (#5384413)

From the info at Nasa's page on Pioneer 10 [nasa.gov] "A plaque was mounted on the spacecraft body with drawings depicting a man, a woman, and the location of the sun and the earth in our galaxy."

30 years, that's nothing... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5384415)

Pah! That's not so special. My car is over 30 years old and it's still going. OK, the mileage is not as high but Pioneer 10 didn't have to worry about corrosion. In space, nobody can hear you rust.
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