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Web Server Packed into RJ45 Connector

chrisd posted more than 11 years ago | from the promiscuous-mode-on dept.

The Internet 448

VinceTronics writes "Electronic Design magazine has a review (.pdf) of the XPort by Lantronix, a product that packs an entire web server into the volume of an RJ45 connector! This includes an 80186 controller, an OS, the TCP/IP stack, a 10/100 Ethernet transceiver, and the LAN interface magnetics. Downside is that the serial interface to the controller tops out at 300 kbps, but for $33 (in 10K quantities) it's a cool, easy way to net-enable just about anything."

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448 comments

Another FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502243)

Yay for Naomi!

Who's Naomi? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502258)

and why yay for her?

Naomi (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502278)


she was my first true love of my life. It took me two years to gather the courage to tell her my feelings, but fucked it up at th elast moment.

Now she's married to someone else, has a lovely daughter, and is thousands of miles away, but I still miss her sometimes... *sniff*

Re:Naomi (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502375)

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHA! Faggot! If it's any consolation, she probably would have said no anyway.

Re:Naomi (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502415)

Yay for 32-year old male virgins like me!

First (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502245)

Sorry had to

Re:First (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502494)

Don't be sorry for being a failure.....it's ok not to be fa(s)t.

mirror (2, Informative)

RudeDude (672) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502246)

Just in case: The PDF review doc [mrhostbot.com]

The article (I hate PDF) (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502363)

Ultra-Small Server Web-Enables Any System Providing access to a LAN or the Internet, a Web server squeezed in an RJ45 connector shroud packs a full TCP/IP stack and OS. As companies trim labor overheads, they~Rre looking to fill the void with remote diagnostics, maintenance, and data collection. One method is to Web-enable more systems to use the Internet and World Wide Web to collect data and diagnose or control systems. Webenabling typically meant adding a local-area network (LAN) interface, a controller, a software transmission- control-protocol/Internet-protocol (TCP/IP) stack, and other circuitry and software. Now, all that has been squeezed into the basic RJ-45 connector shroud (0.64 in. by 0.57 in. by 1.34 in.), which would typically be soldered to the pc board. All the circuit design and pc-board space the LAN circuitry requires is now eliminated. The Lantronix DSTni-XPort lets designers without any LAN/Internet experience create Internet-ready systems in minutes. Within the connector shroud, the DSTni-XPort packs the company~Rs DSTni-LX (an 80186-based controller), a 2-kbyte boot ROM, 256 kbytes of SRAM, 512 kbytes of flash memory, a 10/100 autosensing Ethernet transceiver, a high-speed serial port, three programmable I/O pins, bicolor LEDs for diagnostics, the LAN interface magnetics, and a full TCP/IP network stack and operating system (OS) . Thus, the XPort delivers a full device server in the space consumed by only the connector. Designed to operate from a 3.3- V supply, the XPort functions from -40C to 85C. It costs about $33 each in 10,000-unit lots. Lantronix Inc. www.lantronix.com (949) 453-3990

No big deal... (3, Funny)

tha_mink (518151) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502247)

I used to have an ear ring that could run seti@home.

Re:No big deal... (2, Funny)

popeyethesailor (325796) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502264)

But does it have OGG support ?

Re:No big deal... (3, Insightful)

RupW (515653) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502276)

I used to have an ear ring that could run seti@home.

Point is consumer electronics manufacturers can use it to internet enable their devices at very low R&D cost.

Assuming, that is, they're willing to bump the retail price by $30 - $50.

Which they won't be. Until there's *serious* demand for this stuff.

Good Thing (4, Funny)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502251)

It's a good thing that the review wasn't hosted on one of these things! They sound really cool, but there's no way they'd handle a slashdotting! Then again...maybe a Beowulf cluster of them would...

OFF TOPIC??? MOD PARENT UP! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502277)

The above post was NOT offtopic. It was funny and ON topic!

Stupid anal-retentive moderator 'ontopic' nazis...

Re:OFF TOPIC??? MOD PARENT UP! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502477)

"It was funny and ON topic"

In who's opinion? Yours or the moderators? Oh, i bet i know what you're thinking...

Re:Good Thing (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502294)

u just had to mention beowulf didnt you... you fucked yourself in the ass on that karma whore didnt you.

Re:Good Thing (1)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502326)

No, because I don't whore Karma. I say what I want and if it costs me that is just fine and dandy with me!

Re:Good Thing (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502364)

actually, that's not a bad idea. Imagine how many of these little boogers you could stuff into a chassis. Or a fly for that matter...

Great! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502254)

Now my fridge, toaster, washer & dryer can have their own IP addresses & websites.

Bring on IPv6 to deal with it!

Re:Great! (2, Insightful)

OneEyedApe (610059) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502269)

It sounds like that is what this is designed for.

Re:Great! (2, Insightful)

Fembot (442827) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502409)

Yeah but Ironicly theres no mention of IPv6 in that pdf anywhere that I can see....

Re:Great! (5, Interesting)

ip_vjl (410654) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502469)

Why would you need IPv6?

Are you planning on making your fridge world visible? If not, your appliances could all sit behind NAT and you'd still only need a single IP address for your entire house.

I wouldn't want to get home and find out I've been H4X0R3D and have a freezer full of rotten food, so I don't think I'd ever give them world visible addresses.

--

Not that IPv6 is a bad thing, but this probably wouldn't significantly grow the total number of world routable addresses much, as they'd be on private nets.

moron having your headers extracted from your .asp (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502255)

makes more room for the billybugs(tm).

lookout bullow. the daze of the Godless phonIE payper liesense hostage ransom stock markup badtoll are nearing an end.

take heart dough, almost everything's gnu now.

is that smoke coming out of your .asp, or are you just glad to be here? robbIE, tell 'em about the payper. bettor yet, ask lairIE to tell 'em. how about 10 UNmoderated questions for robbIE/lairIE? you asked for it.

I'm wondering (0)

dirkdidit (550955) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502260)

I'm really wondering who would buy these in a quantity of 10,000.

Yes these are cool but what purpose would they exactly serve in such a large number?

Re:I'm wondering (5, Funny)

Hulver (5850) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502302)

If you were a fridge manufacturer and wanted to web-enable your fridges, you would buy as many of these as you built fridges.

Imagine being able to check on the temparature of your fridge over the internet. Even install a web cam inside it. Check what groceries you need from work.

Pow. Cheep, web enabled fridge.

The only problem would be script kiddies. I 0wnzers your cuccumber man

Re:I'm wondering (1)

mirko (198274) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502362)

Check what groceries you need from work.
How about eatable RFID embedded in food, someone ?

Re:I'm wondering (4, Interesting)

Cyberdyne (104305) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502493)

How about eatable RFID embedded in food, someone ?

I don't know about edible, but I do like this idea; for most fruit, you could embed the tag in the skin, for example. I'd actually really like to be able to get a list of stuff in the fridge, be warned when something's approaching the eat-by date...

Better still: some RFID tags have sensors in. A simple Perl script could track a shopping list for me, and either order replacements online or be synced to a PDA for shopping. Maybe even couple it with a Pricewatch-type site, so I know which supermarket would be cheapest for that particular list; work out what recipe I could make, or what I'd need to add.

Alternatively - if this device can do 300 Kbit/sec in this version, how about cable-modem/ADSL routers? Up the bandwidth a bit, it would handle the load OK; as it is, it could make a nice easy dialup router. $33 with a serial port - add a simple modem, and you have the ultimate plug+play ISP: one end in the phone socket, the other in the NIC, and it's all preconfigured!

Re:I'm wondering (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502383)

web cam inside it.> At last! We will finally know if that little light really does turn off when you close the door!

Re:I'm wondering (1)

TheEnglishPatient (173496) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502428)

On my fridge ( german can't remember the make off hand) the litle light DOESN'T turn off but goes dim instead
Something to do with keeping the internal temperature up if the external temperature is too low.
As me how I know Go on. Go on.
No, on second thoughts don't, it isn't interesting
N

Re:I'm wondering (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502309)

beowulf cluster? ;p

Re:I'm wondering (4, Insightful)

cdrudge (68377) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502311)

Embedded systems. Put one in your toaster, fridge, hair dryer, internal diagnostics on your TV, spa, whatever. It's not meant to be a webserver for a high bandwidth website, but more for controlling some device via a web interface.

Re:I'm wondering (5, Insightful)

walt-sjc (145127) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502392)

At $33 each in quantity, I don't think we are going to see them in toasters anytime soon.

As far as embedded systems goes, this is an order of magnitude or so too expensive. Manufacturers pinch pennies on even larger items like TV's, as each dollar increase in cost translates into something like $5 to the consumer, and potentially millions to the bottom line.

Frankly, this technology isn't even appropriate anyway. For something more in line with the applications you are thinking about, look here [echelon.com] where the technology is already imbedded in millions of consumer devices.

They'd make great controllers.. (4, Informative)

caveat (26803) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502312)

..for cheap home electronic devices you might want to web-enable (i.e. tell the 100-DVD jukebox to have the following playlist ready when you get home, have the fridge print you out dinner recipies, blah blah blah), but with 512kb of flash for the web pages and a (relatively) slow interface, they certainly wouldn't be useful for serving (and they aren't really being sold as such, despite what the tagline says - the PDF [commanderx.com] mentions serving, but the main push seems to be monitoring & control..good idea for something like this).

Re:I'm wondering (1)

klaasvakie (608359) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502316)

Yes these are cool but what purpose would they exactly serve in such a large number? beowulf cluster anyone?

Re:I'm wondering (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502322)

For selling them one by one to other people?

Re:I'm wondering (5, Insightful)

e8johan (605347) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502327)

Anything embeddable sells in tens of thousands. Stationary computers are the least produced computer type. Just imagine all microcontrollers in VCRs for example. I'd say that there are far more than 10000 VCRs sold each year. Now embedd a webserver into each VCR, so that you can program the timer over your private LAN. Thats a possible 10000 units. Now put the same protocol in your digital TV reciever/decoder to change channels, update codes, subscribe to PPV shows etc. and let the VCR change the channel of the decoder and you've got another 10k units.

10k is a small number in the embedded world.

Now, for the real price:
"The list price of the XPort is $49.00. Discount pricing on the XPort is also available in volumes of ten thousand."
according to http://www.lantronix.com/news/pr/2003/02-24-xport. html

Re:I'm wondering (-1)

supergiovane (606385) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502337)

Hey, this is Slashdot? How could I make the acclaimed BEOWULF CLUSTER OF THESE (R) without at least 10000 units?

Re:I'm wondering (4, Interesting)

amorsen (7485) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502343)

Ok, imagine your company makes sensors that output their results via RS-232 serial. Or controllers that are given commands via RS-232 serial. Or maybe you have machinery that is programmed through RS-232 serial. Either way, your would like to access those products remotely, and RS-232 just doesn't go very far. Add this thing, and suddenly your products are web-enabled.

The price is a bit high still, but there is a lot of equipment where $33 extra a unit would not scare customers away.

Re:I'm wondering (1)

AppyPappy (64817) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502404)

I'm really wondering who would buy these in a quantity of 10,000.


Soft drink and snack machines, Scanners in factories, traffic counters, any equipment that that you want to query remotely to see if it is operating.

Re:I'm wondering (1)

Pike65 (454932) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502432)

Yeah. It's a shame, because one having one of these things would be cool. I could finally retire my gi-fscking-normous old IBM full tower and replace it with an RJ45 ; )

I don't suppose there's 2000 other people out there thinking the same thing, are there? . . .

These seem cool (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502270)

Sure, a lot of these devices seem cool (and I'll agree that they are), but to me and others in my line of work they're a security nightmare. Due to the small size, it's not hard build a device that could be hidden inside of a building on a network leaving it open to the person who left it there.

I'd still love to have one to play around with, though!

Re:These seem cool (1)

mrtroy (640746) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502334)

Ya, seriously!
I would love to have one and plug it in any empty connection at school/work/etc

I could host everything from there!

Re:These seem cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502344)

Now that's a great idea! Thanks!

Re:These seem cool (4, Interesting)

rtaylor (70602) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502359)

Can't see why that would bother you. You encrypt everything between the desktop and the server room anyway right? Just like your wireless access?

I bet someone could generally walk in the frontdoor with a laptop and sit in the meeting room to accomplish the same thing without anbody saying anything.

Re:These seem cool (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502365)

So there is the proof that it was a good idea to make the network dumb and put the "intelligence" into the leaves. It's time to rethink network security with that old paradigm in mind. Firewalls, network address based access controls and physical network access protection mean very little with devices like these around, and even less when the ethernet socket gets replaced with a WiFi transceiver. We need end-to-end authentication instead of "safe networks".

But does it have wings? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502272)

Isn't a fly [slashdot.org] smaller than an RJ45 connector?

Not that big of a downside... (4, Insightful)

heldlikesound (132717) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502273)

Downside is that the serial interface to the controller tops out at 300 kbps

This seems doesn't seem like that big of a deal, for the kind of appications this is targeted for (security system modules, refrigerators, answering machines, etc...) I'd think 300 kbps is more than adaquate, you can even do some streaming video, with a reasonable bit-rate.

Re:Not that big of a downside... (1)

Fembot (442827) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502464)

...and It would prevent comprimised devices from wreaking too much havok. (Lets face it it will happen sometime)

I cant think of any reason why you'd ever want to have a domestic fridge/awnswering machine etc serving more than one request at anyone time.

Imagine a beowolf cluster of these... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502279)

...it'd be really small.

No prob (1)

ceeam (39911) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502378)

A hub looking like a hedgehog.

I am not a cynic... I am not a cynic... I am not a (-1, Troll)

LS (57954) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502281)

but is anyone else as absolutely non-interested in this "news"? So what if they fit a webserver inside a fly's asshole. You know, I once parked in front of a nightclub with one inch between the front and back car bumpers. But I'm not going to go post photos of it on some website. Ok, so this isn't the best analogy, but haven't we already done the small webserver thing? bah

Re:I am not a cynic... I am not a cynic... I am no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502303)

if you were to fit a webserver in a fly's ass, how would you connect the cable? if it's a wireless server, how do you keep the fly from flying away?

Re:I am not a cynic... I am not a cynic... I am no (0)

MSTCrow5429 (642744) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502465)

It's a dead fly. They must not decompose quickly.

Re:I am not a cynic... I am not a cynic... I am no (2, Insightful)

p00ya (579445) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502318)

but is anyone else as absolutely non-interested in this "news"?
/me raises his hand.
I don't think the actual chips/integration-scale is news at all, people are just finding applications (read: places to put) them.

Re:I am not a cynic... I am not a cynic... I am no (0, Offtopic)

cyb3r0ptx (106843) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502320)

You know, I once parked in front of a nightclub with one inch between the front and back car bumpers.

Are you serious!? Please post some photos of this online, I'd like to see it.

Re:I am not a cynic... I am not a cynic... I am no (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502444)

Wow, so your car is 2 inches long?

Re:I am not a cynic... I am not a cynic... I am no (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502338)

I'm so uninterested about this that I had a hard time managing to care enough to type this very reply. Now I'm not interested in typing anym-

Wow (-1, Flamebait)

Tuxinatorium (463682) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502282)

Why not just use some real web serving software instead of a RJ45+Microchip gimmick thingy? It's completely FREE... ;) I mean open source, yeah...

neato... (0)

Mister Black (265849) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502284)

now i need to just rig up a firewire to xport adapter and I can turn an ipod into a streaming server. ? © ® by me.

Let me get this straight (1)

TopShelf (92521) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502287)

What sort of applications would this be used for? PC-based terminals like cash registers and the like, which could then be maintained from a central point using a web interface? I'm just trying to wrap my head around why this would be useful...

Re:Let me get this straight (1)

odyrithm (461343) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502323)

well you could put one in your coffe machine, and code up a web page to turn it on and off.. for starters..

Re:Let me get this straight (1)

Max Romantschuk (132276) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502328)

What sort of applications would this be used for?

Armed with this and a crossover cable you could do instant network card, network settings and browser settings tests.

A hell of a lot easier than debugging your network to see if a workstation is working properly. In some scenarios anyway :)

The application (1)

hhawk (26580) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502355)

You have some device which has a variety of data about it's operation. This lets' you store that data (for some period of time), let's others access this data, and could allow for some remote interaction.

1) Yes or NO, Allow or Cancel

2) It could be used in more interesting ways.

a) Built into a Phone, it could download and store rates of various phone companies based on area code and time of day and then the phone could use this database to route your call to the beste carrier.

b) Built into a device that used lots of energy (electrical or other types) it could download times when it was allowed or not allowed to be operated (based on over all usage in the system ((household, local, town-wide, or even on the reginal grid)).

c) Built into devices in a hospital or an office, it would provide all sorts of data about the operational status of critical equipment.

Re:Let me get this straight (4, Funny)

Saint Aardvark (159009) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502396)

Where have you got a crapload of RJ45 cables? That's right, an office. What's the biggest driving force behind Internet technologies? That's right, pr0n. So just imagine the HUGE surge in live secretary upskirt cam websites this product will enable.

Hell, there'll be so many, it'll simultaneously turn around the tech slump AND drive us all to IPv6.

Until, of course, someone mistakenly installs 10,000 of these babies in the server room. All those geeks...<shudder>

Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502289)

What is it going to serve? Does it come with a mini-hard drive?

Forget about stealth Dreamcasts! (4, Insightful)

Gudlyf (544445) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502295)

In a previous article [slashdot.org] , there was talk about the possibility of hackers placing small Dreamcasts on corporate networks for packet sniffing and whatnot. If they can make a webserver as small as an RJ45 connector, what's stopping someone from making one that can spy on the network?

If somehow someone puts one of those in your network closet (or heck, anywhere on the network), good luck finding it -- it's a connector for godsakes!

Re:Forget about stealth Dreamcasts! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502345)

Time for the insane firewalling rules.

Re:Forget about stealth Dreamcasts! (4, Interesting)

Daytona955i (448665) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502463)

It still needs to connect to your network which means a new light on your hub/switch/router. A regular portscan of your network ip address range would find this, then you can just pull the connection at the other end. I don't think the security concerns are as great as everyone seems to think. I think it would be cool to modify it to integrate a wireless card with it to allow a wider market. I for one don't really feel like running cables into my kitchen.
-Chris

Cool, this would solve the web server on the plane (1)

wadiwood (601205) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502296)

lack of.

Ie I think an aeroplane would be better off using a rj45 in the chair arm, and now they can squish the server in there too. Now we just have to solve how to connect it to the rest of the internet without interferring with the navigation systems and anti missile targetting.

It sure beats installing the webserver in a blowfly.

Re:Cool, this would solve the web server on the pl (1)

odyrithm (461343) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502340)

no no, you cant do that silly.. read the article.. its rj45 in -> serial out.. so you can control things like toasters and kettles..

Cable Modems! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502304)

I love to here about all the talk about web enalbed applainces and controlling your home from work. Great devices like this just really don't matter (or atleast won't ever be used by) to the majority of the home consumers in the USA. Why you ask because we allow Cable Modem providers to basically tell us how we will use our internet connection. Cable modems as I used to think were great now contain agreements stating no SERVER usage or they just block the ports. Trying to do this can have your service terminated! I believe in the free use of my internet service I believe if I want to setup a webcam at home and monitor my house while at work I should be able to.

My Fridge (2, Interesting)

hhawk (26580) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502306)

Sounds interesting. You take a modern Refrig. and you have all of the internal processor(s) and sensor(s) output their data to this thing and then while I'm sitting at work I can check and see how well my Fridge is running..

It might be more fun in the TV so it can keep a log of with the kids and the Spouse are watching not to mention the washing machine! [Dirty water detected, extend wash cycle (yes) (no)].

pop (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502339)

A speck of dust is all that remains after being slashdotted out of existence

Annoying. (0)

Dri (16940) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502348)

I read the doc to find out that there only was a Windows GUI Client. Still, nice tech.

big hairy deal (4, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502353)

the Siteplayer is bigger but does more and is easily afforded by nearly anyone at $29.00 in SINGLE QUANTITIES so buy one and mess with it, make the first toaster with an IP address, 10baseT and a web interface (I did. though it was neat, then dismantled it because it was reallllly silly.)

http://www.siteplayer.com/ is the place to go.

If you cant buy the product in single quantities for a very reasonable price, then it's not worth messing with.

I know I'm gonna get flamed for this... (-1, Redundant)

BuhSnarf (633686) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502358)

...but I *really* don't think I'll need a net enabled fridge. It's not that hard to go downstairs and check what I need. Or even check when I get home. Or even ring my girlfriend and ask her.

Why are we trying to get everything on the 'net. A lightswitch. Wow I could switch that on from my desk at work.

Sorry, I just find it silly.

Re:I know I'm gonna get flamed for this... (2, Insightful)

TobyWong (168498) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502459)


Then don't think of fridges think of ovens. DL a new recipe and the oven will take care of all the temperature adjustments and timing you just put your food in and press 'GO'.

The applications are only limited by your imagination.

Not a webserver (3, Informative)

merlin_jim (302773) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502367)

I didn't see where this is a full webserver. The documentation seemed to indicate that it's a TCP/IP handler. You put serial data in one side and TCP/IP network packets come out the other side.

At least, that's what it's targetted at; an addition to an existing embedded system. I don't think you could just write a backdoor and stick it on a network and expect it to work. Probably not enough memory/CPU capacity for that sort of thing...

A House of Cables... (4, Funny)

DasBub (139460) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502377)

Everyone suggests that these could be used in toasters, fridges, etc. etc... But would you actually run cables to all of these devices?

I can just picture Old Man Stevens handing his wife a juicer for her birthday. Old Lady Stevens lets out a little sigh and grabs a crimper and a spool of Cat5.

FIGHT THE FUTURE!

Re:A House of Cables... (2, Insightful)

larien (5608) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502449)

Hrm, might be off the wall, but how about using the power cable? We already have the ability to do broadband over electricity wires, how about we simply use that technology in the home to web-enable these kind of devices? If a home doesn't have the setup already, no sweat, you just miss out on the extra features. If you do have it, you simply plug in your toaster/freezer/whatever and it gets a DHCP address and it's on the net!

$33 (in 10K quantities) ... (-1)

borgdows (599861) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502380)

... which makes only 33000$ the Beowulf cluster!!

Hrmmmm (1)

Havokmon (89874) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502384)

Downside is that the serial interface to the controller tops out at 300 kbps, but for $33 (in 10K quantities) it's a cool, easy way to net-enable just about anything."

Sounds like an experience I had about 10 years ago.. I blew the removable flash bios chip on a motherboard. :( So after calling manufacturers all over the place, I managed to find one that sold the chips in qtys' of one.

"Great!", I thought. "This will be easy."

Two weeks later, and some after some head-scratching, I realized I was the feeling-silly owner of a brand-new, BLANK, flash bios chip.

"it's a cool, easy way to net-enable just about anything."

I'd suggest editing the comment, 'Easy' is relative.

Re:Hrmmmm (1)

fruey (563914) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502440)

Yeah well you can fix that. You'd have to flash it with the right BIOS instructions anyway, and there's no way a chip manufacturer would know what BIOS to flash on there (nor would it be worth their while to do it)

There are some good bios rescue techniques. There's an Open BIOS flashing project, if you're interested then I can get you the URL. Worked to flash upgrade my BIOS where the original MoBo mfr tool didn't work, and has some pretty cool other options too.

What would be cool.. (1)

odyrithm (461343) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502389)

a wireless version of this.. now that would be intergrated ;)

cool (5, Funny)

JeanBaptiste (537955) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502405)

but dead flies are smaller, cheaper, and in greater abundance :)

But cables are so 2002! (2, Interesting)

HelbaSluice (634789) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502410)

...it's a cool, easy way to net-enable just about anything.

Which is fine, but the REAL killer device will be an embeddable, commodity-level wireless interface--whether 802.11 or its successor--paired with ubiquitous wireless access, at least on par with current digital cell service. I estimate we're only a few years away from the latter, and the former is already more or less available in the PCMCIA form factor.

When my toaster oven can download Pop-Tart-warming instructions from its manufacturer's website without an additional cable to the wall, that'll be something.

this web server is amazing (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502417)

.. if you're a fucking slashdot dork.

Remember me? I used to kick all your asses in high school. Oh yeah, and since I'm not socially inept like the rest of you, I'm your boss now!

I bang more women in a week than most of you will in your entire lives.

One more thing, learn the difference between 'lose' and 'loose' - and you losers think you're smarter than the rest of us! BAHAHA

I fucking hate all you losers.

MOD PARENT UP (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502452)

He has a point. You are all losers.

LINUX r00lz! Software patents SUX0RS. Microsoft bad, everything else good!

Fucking hypocrites.

linux kernel (1)

upt1me (537466) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502419)

is there room on that thing for the linux kernel?

Pulls over 200 mills! (4, Insightful)

rabryn (658834) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502420)

This is a great product but it pulls over 200 mills, not so great for low power embedded work.

Stealth... (2, Interesting)

dmayle (200765) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502422)

What this could really use is a pass-through ethernet hub built into the device, so that you can drop it in-line with a cable in place of some existing connecter...

Samples? (0)

ndecker (588441) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502425)

Do they ship samples?

Please spare us for once... (1)

psoriac (81188) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502439)

Please spare us, can people NOT post the requisite "their webserver must have been hosted on one of these" comments that this type of story always brings out like worms after a shower?

Re:Please spare us for once... (-1)

meadd00d (128188) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502486)

Dude! See a doctor. Worms should not be coming out of you after a shower.

*f*

mmmm....... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502455)

so that makes a Beowulf cluster a Beocub cluster?

etherme (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5502460)

i want to graft on onto the back of my neck

HTTP - Nice and Simple (2, Insightful)

fastdecade (179638) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502471)

Technology likes this really shows off how useful an open, ASCII-based, protocol can be.

Tell Me Something (3, Insightful)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502485)

It's a web server with an RJ45 port. How exactly will that "net-enable just about anything"?

Sure, you can plug a webserver into anything that happens to have an existing RJ45 port, but what use would that be? (Just what I've always wanted... a web server that I can plug into my laptop so I can browse the web at a blazing 300k/sec.)

I want to net-enable my car. Someone tell me how this RJ45 device will allow that. My car doesn't even have an RJ45 port...

Question (3, Insightful)

Quill_28 (553921) | more than 11 years ago | (#5502500)

I fully admit that my understanding of electronics is pretty weak, and I am confused.

I don't get it?
Everyone keeps talking about how you can hook up your toaster, coffee maker, etc. Do these devices have a serial port?
How would one interface with any of these kind of devices unless they had some sort of output interface?

I can see where these might work well with older legacy devices(printers, etc), and you want to be able put them on a network, but I fail to see how they would help in your home.

Enlightment anyone?
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