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Watching Kids Via Mobile Phone

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the substitute-subjects-for-children dept.

Privacy 315

Joe the Lesser writes "This BBC article says how parents could soon keep a much closer eye on what children are up to on their way to and from school thanks to a mobile monitoring system. It will send text alerts to their mobile phone if the child deviates too far from that route or takes too long getting there."

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I saw them first (-1, Offtopic)

Aliencow (653119) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586823)

Or did I?

Re:I saw them first (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586837)

youve been loadjackeD!!!!

GET OUT OF THE HOUSE NOW! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586912)

the calls are coming from INSIDE the house!

I like to look... (-1)

PedoPeteTownshend (641098) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586932)

Little video phone. In the changing rooms. Watching the kiddies taking their shorts off. Hmm. Nice.

My lighthouse is blazing tonight.

Fucking pedophile (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587118)

You make me sick.

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I watch... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586829)

...your little sister via mobile phone.

fifth post!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586834)

Ha! I got the fifth post! Take that all you slashdot scum! You can't have it. It's mine. Bwahh! Bwahh! Bwahh!!

Re:fifth post!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586896)

In soviet russia the fifth post watches you!

Whatever (4, Insightful)

jhunsake (81920) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586838)

Like this won't be hard to fool. Give your phone to a friend that *is* going to the school event. Or any number of a million different ways. Kids are very innovative.

Re:Whatever (3, Insightful)

Liora (565268) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586869)

Exactly. I can already see it...

"Hey, are you going straight home after school?"
"Yeah"
"Can you drop my phone on my doorstep on your way?"

That would have been my method at least...

Re:Whatever (1)

Dinjay (571355) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587030)

Wouldn't it be cheaper for the parent to just ring the phone when the child is suppose to be arriving at school? Then you might even get the chance to, talk to your child!

Initially, Alcatel is looking to sell the system in Israel, where adults and children live in fear of suicide bombs and other terrorist attacks.
If suicide bombings are the problem, then I can't see how this technology can help cause it can only let you know after the fact.

Re:Whatever (5, Funny)

Hayzeus (596826) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586889)

Which is why we surgically implant the phone into junior's abdomen. Let's see the little nippers get around THAT one...

Re:Whatever (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586976)

tinfoil underwear

Re:Whatever (1)

binaryDigit (557647) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586908)

That's assuming A) the parent is dumb enough to actually TELL the kid this is what they're doing. B) kid is willing to give up his cell phone while they're goofing off/whatever. But in general, this "feature" does seem sketchy at best.

Re:Whatever (5, Insightful)

stilwebm (129567) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586916)

Many of the kids who do stray from their path with get the idea from this type of "leash" technology.

Give the kids some responsibility and some space. Let them grow. Otherwise they will be thrown in to college or the real world with the need for responsibility for their first time. I've seen it happen, and believe me, it is not pretty.

From the article: (1)

Gortbusters.org (637314) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586927)

It will only work if the phone is switched on and is being carried by the child.

So, the kid turns the phone off, leaves it at a friend's house, whatever.

That's not the point (1)

mblase (200735) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587103)

It's more a security thing for littler kids who are at risk of abduction -- when they have to walk to and from school, for example, or run errands, or go outside to a friend's house. I can see this being a big seller for parents with the money to spare and who want to make sure their kids can enjoy a reasonable amount of freedom without watching them every single hour.

WW2 (4, Insightful)

conner_bw (120497) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586841)

Was world war II fought so that we could enjoy the freedoms we don't want our children to?

Some good parenting = trust ! facist paranoia.

Re:WW2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586875)

What the fuck are you talking about? Not everything is related to war, dipshit.

Re:WW2 (2, Insightful)

binaryDigit (557647) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586934)

Was world war II fought so that we could enjoy the freedoms we don't want our children to?

Like the freedom to get snatched while walking to school? As with any information utensil, it's only as invasive as you make it. Something like this appeals to me as a father of a young daughter. I wouldn't use it to track where she's going, only to alert me if something "went wrong". What they fought for in WWII is to allow me the freedom to utilize this tool if I think it necessary.

children's rights? (3, Insightful)

SHEENmaster (581283) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587130)

I know that legally colonial serfs had more rights than I do as a minor in the USA, but I wouldn't take shit like this.

This is just begging for waterproof-testing, dogbiteproof-testing, bullyproof-testing, backingcaroverproof-testing, and fireproof-testing. I can understand the acceptability for much younger children, but by the time we get a single friend with a driver's license the "leash" idea is dead in the water.

You celebrate that the government doesn't have the right to put a radio collar on you, yet you jump at the oppurtunity to put one on your own child!

"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

Re:WW2 (1)

EverDense (575518) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587135)

But any intelligent criminal (even if they aren't technically savvy) knows that the location of
mobile phones can be tracked.

Your assertion that WWII was fought to allow you "the freedom to utilize the tool if I
think it necessary", is both ludicrous and myopic. The _main_ reason the USA entered
WWII was because the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbour. Any other grand ideals
were secondary.

Re:WW2 (5, Insightful)

DaemonGem (557674) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586977)

"Some good parenting = trust ! facist paranoia."

I never had this problem with my parents. They always trusted me, I'm pleased to say, however, I'm not here to discuss me. There are a million ways to get around this, such as ... leaving your phone at home, or turning your phone off. Now perhaps people will say that since they are kids, and most kids are irresponsible, this is a good thing to do. However:

"Rules are meant to be broken"
-Some wise soul

I take for example spy software that my best friend's mother put on his computer. He wasn't computer savvy enough to bypass it, however, if I had had such software on my computer:

1. I would hate my parents, and feel resentful towards them.
2. I would do my best to bypass this with things that are available here [peacefire.org] .

Don't people realize that spying on your kids will only make them want to break the rules? If I knew that my parents were the type that would spy on me while I'm at school, then I would refuse to have a cell phone.

This seems to me to be something for overly paranoid and protective parents that think they can't trust their kids, and need to know at what second of the day their kids are doing anything.
-Dae

Re:WW2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587027)

Was world war II fought so that we could enjoy the freedoms we don't want our children to?


in short, no.

Re:WW2 (1)

Anonvmous Coward (589068) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587049)

"Was world war II fought so that we could enjoy the freedoms we don't want our children to?"

Um what freedom's being taken away? It's not a mandatory service.

Here's a tip for everybody: If it's optional, then it's not a rights or privacy problem.

Thr0d ps1t (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586842)

This thr0d ps1t was brought to you by blah blah blah

Sounds good to me (1)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586844)

Now everyone panic about the 'privacy' of 6 year olds being violated by their parents.

YOU ARE MOST LIKELY A GAY HOMOSEXUAL FAGGOT (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586861)

You probably like it when men stick their penises up your butthole.

Re:Sounds good to me (1)

bugnuts (94678) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586923)

Not many 6yo's have cellphones.

Re:Sounds good to me (1)

intermodal (534361) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586936)

last time i checked, screwing kids over from a young age makes them more likely to bend over and take it when they get older...personally i prefer a kid that will rebel against injustice.

Is it just me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587044)

Or did anyone else read this as:

"Screwing kids at a young age makes them more likely to bend over and take it when they get older"

If you are screwing young kids, I sure as hell don't want to know about it!

Re:Is it just me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587057)

I think it's important to know about it, actually. And the cell phone tracking system will make it just that much easier to catch this sick pedo.

Move Over Big Brother (5, Funny)

razablade (118107) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586846)

Big Mother is watching you...

Yet another use for a cell phone... (1)

PaybackCS (611691) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586848)

Why not use the cameras in so many to provide live video feeds too?

Re:Yet another use for a cell phone... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586902)

Do you really want to see your kids having sex? Common...you child porn freak!!

Can I use it.. (4, Funny)

Hayzeus (596826) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586855)

To keep them from deviating too close to the refrigerator? Sign me up!

The Zapper (1)

Dinjay (571355) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587133)

Why stop there? Can we also program the phone to release a small but unpleasant electric charge into junior if they get too close to the refrigerator? How about that for negative reinforcement!

No Thank you, Big Brother (1)

downlo (529531) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586856)

No need to put the chip in my body, I have one in my cell phone.

Cheat on wife (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586858)

I guess I cant cheat on my wife anymore!

Re:Cheat on wife (1)

CyberBill (526285) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586895)

I guess I cant cheat on my wife anymore!

You are a horrible person. And its FRIGGIN SWEET!! LOL!!!

-Bill

This Just In: (4, Funny)

burgburgburg (574866) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586864)

A.G. John Ashcroft requires all citizens to carry mobile monitoring system. "Stop whining, be patriotic and recognize that this is for your own good. Now bend over."

Current events.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586870)

Re:Current events.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586905)

Die you fuck.

Re:Current events.. (0, Offtopic)

the Man in Black (102634) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586964)

Yes off-topic, but that first link is a pretty good story. I was wondering if anyone would get around to mentioning what a bleeding hypocrite Rumsfield is being with his blustering about the Geneva Conventions.

This worries me (2, Interesting)

ObviousGuy (578567) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586872)

It's a very small step from branding kids with these tracking units to implanting tracking units in every citizen. Though such a move would no doubt improve the ability of the police to track down criminals, I worry that it could be used in such a way to discriminate against certain groups.

This is a bad usage of this kind of technology.

Re:This worries me (1)

BabyDave (575083) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586969)

Obligatory reference to Captain Cyborg [theregister.co.uk] ...

Re:This worries me (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587151)

> It's a very small step from branding kids with these tracking units to implanting tracking units in every citizen.

Being from San Diego, CA, we've had a very bad string of child kidnappings/murders. Something like this would be met with favorable discussion here by parents well able to tell the difference between monitoring kids' whereabouts and "branding" them in some fashion or doing comprehensive tracking implants in adults.

Obligatory Simpson's reference (4, Funny)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586882)

"This leash demeans us both!"

Re:Obligatory Simpson's reference (2, Funny)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587084)

Over Spring Break, I went up to the Grand Canyon. Really just a day trip; I was going to ski but the place where I wanted to ski was just too crowded for my taste. Seems Arizona has had the best snow in decades. And the weather made my second choice a bit too dangerous (hiking a slot canyon in Utah, entirely possible that it could become deadly in a flash flood, and it was raining up there.) So I went to the Grand Canyon. Most beautiful day I've ever seen there.

Anyway, as I was walking along the rim, I saw a woman with her child on a leash. My very first thought was the Simpson's reference. Then I remembered where I was. There are *lots* of opportunities for someone to slip, lose their depth perception, or simply not see the drop. Some of those places have only a 5 meter drop. Others have a sheer drop of 1200 meters. Either would make a really bad day for the mother of a 2 year old. Suddenly I approved of the strategy.

Now, if only there was something similar for the very drunk 45 year old that I saw a few minutes later, staggering down the Bright Angel Trail. Sure hope he made it.

Screenshot of it! (5, Funny)

Wind_Walker (83965) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586884)

You can find out what the new device looks like here [harbucks.com] .

Honesly, you can barely tell he has it on!

Would this work for congressmen, too? (4, Funny)

Doctor Memory (6336) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586886)

I'd like to know when my legislators stray too far away from the capitol (and too close to a lobbyist's "hospitality suite").

1984 is almost here! (1)

hellfire (86129) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586888)

I can't wait for all the "Big Brother is watching" jokes. Bring 'em on /.ers!!

Good and Bad.. (1)

Gortbusters.org (637314) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586891)

The good: When I have kids, I will know if they get kidnapped (assuming the criminial isn't smart enough to throw away the phone), or if they run away, get lost, are sneaking off to bad parts of town, etc.

The bad: As a citizen I hardly want a system that knows my whereabouts at all times. Hey, maybe those phone booths on the corner will be useful yet!

Re:Good and Bad.. (1)

Nhoderis (561827) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587125)

Perhaps an alternate would be a device that they can activate when they are in trouble. The system would not track them until they want to be tracked.

Effects on kids? (5, Interesting)

TFloore (27278) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586897)

Okay, I don't have any kids, so maybe I'm missing something here...

I understand parents being spooked by news reports of kidnappings and related badness, and wanting to protect your kids from the bad things in the world. I agree with this.

I just worry about the effects of too-close monitoring like this on kids. What kind of adults do you get when the kids are raised with this kind of monitoring/oversight?

Are they going to be too dependent on someone swooping in to save them when they mess up, and not self-reliant? Possibly too accepting of governemnt oversight of their every move? Too scared to deviate from an established pattern for fear they'll have to explain to someone that fact that they just felt like doing something different that day? (Admit it, you've "lived up to" expectations that you found limiting before, haven't you?)

Maybe they'll be amazingly good at evading monitoring and doing what they like anyway?

I don't know. I doubt we will know for quite a while. But I worry about it.

Re:Effects on kids? (1)

Telastyn (206146) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586974)

You mean like modern American adults that are in no way responsible for their actions because the previous generation overreacted to "poor Johnny got sent to jail for a mistake/accident and ruined his life"?

*shrug* there's a happy medium for most of these things, which society can never settle on.

Re:Effects on kids? (1)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586990)

> I just worry about the effects of too-close monitoring like this on kids. What kind of adults do you get when the kids are raised with this kind of monitoring/oversight?

99% - Reliable workers.
The other 1% - Special Ops Recruits :)

Re:Effects on kids? (1)

FatHogByTheAss (257292) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587102)

I just worry about the effects of too-close monitoring like this on kids. What kind of adults do you get when the kids are raised with this kind of monitoring/oversight?

I worry about the kinds of adults you get when kids are raised with no monitoring/oversight.

All about context and maturity (5, Insightful)

Donut (128871) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587117)

As a parent...

A child's ability to deal with a situation is dependant on many factors. Their age, their maturity, and their experience, their education. My job as a parent is to provide increasingly challenging responsibilities to my children so that they can try, make mistakes, and learn in a controlled environment. It is up to me to make sure that they are ready for the next "phase", and monitor their progress, and catch them if they fall. The end result, hopefully, is that around 18 or so, they can function in the real world without supervision, and will make decisions that will help them reach their goals (and stay out of trouble).

Believe it or not, as kids are striking out on their own in more and more areas in life, they want and need to know that their parents are backing them up.

Anyway, a tool like this would be ridiculous for a 17 year old, but it might be perfect in middle school. They say they are going somewhere. They may or may not be testing their boundries. This device would sure beat following them around.

Good parenting involves controlled risk, safe consequences, and constant learning. Pretending that they are adults at 13 is perhaps the worst crime a parent can commit.

-Donut

Excellent! (5, Insightful)

smcavoy (114157) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586899)

Well now that the last piece of the puzzle has been found, I'm ready to have kids.
Between that, net nanny and the V-chip I can enjoy having kids by spending time where it's needed (i.e. not with them).

Thanks for these wonderful time saving inventions.

Leash Your Kids Now! (1)

inc01 (628920) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586901)

One could also market this service in some Islamic countries.
"Is your wife staying next to the owen while you're gone? Make sure of that with this service by $yourcompanyhere!"

My point being that this sounds like something from 1984.

Re:Leash Your Kids Now! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587016)

biggot

uggghh... (4, Insightful)

matt[0] (12351) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586903)

I'm glad I grew up on the cusp of the computer revolution. Kids these days will need to do so much crap to avoid surveilance. Obsessive parents get yet another tool to shelter their kids and contribute to growing population of under-socialized children.

The next step... (4, Interesting)

bahwi (43111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586906)

In 2005 we'll see this slashdot post (emphasis added ):

"This BBC article says how governments could soon keep a much closer eye on what their citizens are up to thanks to a mobile monitoring system. It will alert law enforcement officials if the person deviates too far from the government approved route or takes too long getting there."

No, I'm not a paranoid/delusional freak. I just thought it's something to think about. I highly doubt that will actually happen, but hey, technology is improving. Let's see where it will take us, and let's see when we can log onto the net and see where it is taking us (literally).

Re:The next step... (1)

Telastyn (206146) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586989)

Or dispatch a police car to check up on the cellphone that seems to be moving 80 MPH... Who knows if the tracking system caught the speeder, or if the cop just happened to be there...

What about X Cams? (1)

vasqzr (619165) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586911)



X [x10.com] cams.

Re:What about X Cams? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586938)

X cams would be good if they could get rid of the crufty legacy crap.

A good idea would be start over with the idea from scratch and design an X cam for a single-user environment. The speed increase as a result of the reduction of networking overhead would be pretty signicant.

reminds me (1)

frodo from middle ea (602941) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586925)

reminds me of the SOUTHPARK episode on child abduction.
First they build a wall around southpark to keep outsiders away, bocz stranges abduct children
then they isolate other families from their children coz a new study shows children are more likely to be abducted by someone they know
Then they send their children away, coz a newer study shows that parents are in fact most dangerous.
quoting directly from the episode "dude, seriously our parents are so stupid".

Think of the Children of the Corn! (2, Funny)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586928)

The horrible murders of the parents happened because 'He Who Walks Behind The Rows' didn't want to pay a monthly fee.

Besides, Iowa cornfields are no place for cellphones.

Won't somebody please think of the Children?

Pedo Pete Ought To Sign Up. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586931)

Him and that child rooter, Katz. They'd love to "watch" children on their mobile.

Why stop there? (1)

Mister Black (265849) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586937)

parents could soon keep a much closer eye on what children are up to

And soon your boss could do the same to you

Too easy to get around (for the kids)... (1)

Dave21212 (256924) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586942)

From the article, "It will only work if the phone is switched on and is being carried by the child."

Hell, I switch mine off every chance I get already. Sometimes I lose battery, or get out of area... would this report back to the parent as "your child is kidnapped, please panic now" ??? Besides, my kids won't get their own phones until they are well into the ages where I feel safe that they can manage their way home. (They won't be getting a TV in their room, or their own car, or anything else these spoiled brats get today!, unless maybe they get deans list, or a scholarship, or heaven forbid - *a job*, first !)


Congrats to them on the (evil) marketing savy to encourage people to buy this, "for the children" though.

no problem... (1)

rhexx (515677) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586944)

I hear they don't work so well after a quick visit to the microwave.

"Sorry, Mom, that's the third one this month!"

Profoundly old story (1)

JUSTONEMORELATTE (584508) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586950)

A quick googling found a CNN [cnn.com] story from August, 2002.
I know there were products on the market a year ago that offered the same service, but can't remember the company name off the top of my head.
Anyone find an older reference?

'Connect to' (0, Offtopic)

PktLoss (647983) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586957)

Well, My first post-laptop purchase was a lock. It connects to my laptop via the convienent hole on the left side. It was not however, XP Certified. For that matter, neither was my USB keyboard light. Yet another stupid policy, and another reason to buy from independent chains.

Preparing them for the Future (1)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586960)

[cynacism]Won't this just get them used to the future we're heading towards anyway?[/cynacism]

I think that policing your children like this is going to sow more distrust than anything else. And, by teenage thinking, as long as they are going to get blamed for stuff they are not doing (distrust=blame in teenland), then they may as well do it. You would be, in effect, reinforcing the cycle of poor choices.

I realize that the article expressly states that the system is designed for 8-12 year olds, but it would most likely see application in the teen area as well. Further, if you start at the 8 year old range, won't the same effects occur later on? Only, this time the teen can point to distrust over the preceding 4+ years.

On a side note, I wonder if this technology will be picked up by somone of the blog type crowd. We'll have web pages with continous updates of the site owners location. Always something to look forward too...

Just like to find my car (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586961)



And the guy that stole it so I could beat him to within inches of his life, let him recover, then beat him all over again.

Didn't steal my car yet, just want to be ready.

I don't want to pay Lojack a wooden nickle. I want to put something in my car, then be able to home in on it on my own without paying any ridiculous fees, or alerting anyone that I'm about to beat someone senseless.

Re:Just like to find my car (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5586996)

Brutus is quaking in his boots that he's just been threatened with a beating to within inches of his life by a pencil-necked geek.

You keep talking, tough guy.

kidtracker ? (1)

sPaKr (116314) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586963)

Really these people need to stop watching SouthPark for ideas of new products. What next.. are they going to bug them as well to listen in.. just in case they are talking to a bad person.. or using language they dont like? Doesnt this show complete lack of trust in your children.. and when the parent doesnt trust the child will the child ever trust the parent? I mean wont they belive all rules and such are in place to control the child and not protect? Bah, if a parent buys this they should save the money.. and just buy the lotech version.. I think its call a CAGE.

Stop The Madness! (2, Insightful)

Newskyarena (643521) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586980)

They have similar devices already. Usually they are attached to the ankles of Inmates who are under house confinement. You want your children to grow up in fear, strap one of these phones to them and teach your children to be afraid of the consequences of deviating from the defined path. Why not proactively teach them the right way to conduct themselves through positive reinforcement rather than by making them paranoid?

Children as Products (5, Insightful)

SuperMario666 (588666) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586984)

An average one mile walk will have around 10 checkpoints but the parent can have fewer if they wish.

Maybe by the time my children get around to having children we'll have mobile phones that can completely rob our children of free will. Hell, since we're already starting to design them from birth maybe phone triggered on(wake)/off(sleep) switches as well. Anything to keep us from actually having to waste our precious time or assume any sort of responsibility for our kids - that's what technology and the government are for!

Please Dont Tell My Wife !!!! (4, Funny)

Dave21212 (256924) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586987)


...about these things !


I can just imagine, "Honey, stop by the grovery store, and the cleaners, and gas station, oh, and I'll be monitoring your progress so don't get 'lost' on the way..."
[shivvvvvers]

Re:Please Dont Tell My Wife !!!! (1)

User 956 (568564) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587120)

I can just imagine, "Honey, stop by the grovery store, and the cleaners, and gas station, oh, and I'll be monitoring your progress so don't get 'lost' on the way..."

You need one of two things: some balls, or a divorce.

I make my wife cook and clean in a nightgown and high heels. It's the natural order of things; you just have to explain it to them the right way.

Pay attention to your kids! (2, Insightful)

Occam's Hammer (463213) | more than 11 years ago | (#5586997)

Presumably, the reason parents aren't able to maintain a close trust-building connection to their kids its that they are too busy.

Yet...they have time to program their Sprint "Orwell's Friends and family" plan and change the parameters every time their kid goes to the mall.

<free advice> Invest the time in your kids rather than their phones! </free advice>

Re:Pay attention to your kids! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587029)

<free advice> Have some kids before spouting off the parenting of others </free advice>

Bring 'em on /.ers!! [ Reply to This ] fsdd (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587020)

e following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
Whatever (Score:4, Insightful)
by jhunsake (81920) on Monday March 24, @05:54PM
Like this won't be hard to fool. Give your phone to a friend that *is* going to the school event. Or any number of a million different ways. Kids are very innovative.

[ Reply to This ]
The next step... (Score:2)
by bahwi (43111) on Monday March 24, @06:00PM (#5586906)
(http://www.josephguhlin.com/ | Last Journal: Sunday February 16, @02:07PM)
In 2005 we'll see this slashdot post (emphasis added ):

"This BBC article says how governments could soon keep a much closer eye on what their citizens are up to thanks to a mobile monitoring system. It will alert law enforcement officials if the person deviates too far from the government approved route or takes too long getting there."

No, I'm not a paranoid/delusional freak. I just thought it's something to think about. I highly doubt that will actually happen, but hey, technology is improving. Let's see where it will take us, and let's see when we can log onto the net and see where it is taking us (literally).
[ Reply to This ]
What about X Cams? (Score:1)
by vasqzr (619165) on Monday March 24, @06:01PM (#5586911)

X [x10.com] cams.

[ Reply to This ]
Re:Cheat on wife (Score:1)
by CyberBill (526285) on Monday March 24, @05:59PM (#5586895)
I guess I cant cheat on my wife anymore!

You are a horrible person. And its FRIGGIN SWEET!! LOL!!!

-Bill
[ Reply to This | Parent ]
# 6 replies beneath your current threshold.

actually... (1)

burninginside (631942) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587087)

this isn't too bad of an idea assuming that the kid keeps the phone on, keeps the phone with them, that no one else can track it/identify who has the phone, etc etc...seeing as how the parents are legally responsibile for what the kid does & in some states the parent can be fined if the kid doesn't goto school, but phones aren't usually allowed to be on during school, etc etc...but those are a lot of assumptions & as other people have pointed out the kids will figure out a way around it...again assuming the kid knows about the feature on the phone....but as with all technology there are ups & downs & all technology can be abused no matter how well meaning it is....also don't most phones now have some sort of gps unit on it?...i've called the cops to report an accident & they knew where i was before i told them....

Not GPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5587113)

Triangulation.

Re:Not GPS (1)

burninginside (631942) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587131)

wasn't totally sure....funny thing was the cops knew the exact exit i was passing....but thanks for the info

Location monitoring (1)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587089)

There have been a number of articles on location monitoring. Some of the technologies that are capable of doing this in real time are:

cell phones - as mentioned, you are always pinpointed by cell
credit cards - purchases link you to a database in real time
ATM - smile, they get your picture, too!
wireless networking - your MAC address is a unique ignature

The interesting part will be to find out who is getting exempted from the databases. For example, the US Congress has a history of exempting themselves from oversight that applies to everyone else.

Pink Floyd said it (5, Insightful)

PD (9577) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587091)

Hush, my baby. Baby, don't you cry.
Momma's gonna make all of your nightmares come true.
Momma's gonna put all of her fears into you.
Momma's gonna keep you right here under her wing.
She won't let you fly, but she might let you sing.

What we do to our kids, they will eventually turn around and do it to us.

Yeah, that's reassuring (1)

cyril3 (522783) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587096)

Certain countries could be more receptive to the idea. Initially, Alcatel is looking to sell the system in Israel, where adults and children live in fear of suicide bombs and other terrorist attacks.

Yeah, that's reassuring. Do we just assume the kids has been blown up if the signal drops out.

Does it send the good signal when you are not near a bomb or when you are near a cell tower that is guaranteed not to be near any known suicide bomber targets.

As for kids on the way to school, why not develop a long distance kid race like they have for their kids and dogs in the back yard. You know, the light chain on a wire guide so they can play anywhere in the yard but can't get over or under the fence.

If you had one of those all the way to the school you would know for sure where they were.

And any kid not attached to the wire in school transit time during a yellow or higher alert state would be swept up in the regular anti-truancy/terror patrols.

For their own protection of course.

Glad I'm not a kid anymore (1)

Brad Mace (624801) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587104)

That really sucks the fun out of childhood. It's bad enough that they've replaced all the cool playground equipment with lame tupperware.

Really bad (1)

giminy (94188) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587109)

Two reasons: .01) if you don't trust your kids, you're not a good parent. if your kids really are bad and something just went wrong, playing big brother won't help the situation. .02) how does the crypto work? is it really secure? what if a pedophile figures out how to exploit the system to track his favorite child?

This is just the beginning (1)

Montgomery Burns III (642155) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587112)


I believe a larger issue may have been missed here. Is it in 2006 when legislation takes effect in the USA that Cell phones must be tracable to a specific geographic coordinate?

Between employers, stalkers, and jealous spouses, there ought be plenty of room for unhappiness.

Normally I would Say SHUT UP... (1)

greymond (539980) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587123)

Normally I would say this is a stupid idea, but my boss would love this and use it...

He has about a 2 hour each way commute to work and currently has a webcam set up at his home to watch his wife and kids while at the office. This way he can see his child grow up and communicate via IM also...

Phones? Myself, I prefer... (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587129)

ear tagging. Just watch out which ear you tag or they'll catch a lot of flack at school.

Just like the Simpson's technology (1)

sacrilicious (316896) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587132)

Chief Wiggum: "We can use this new techology console thingy here to track the exact whereabout of your vehicle."
Automated voice from console: "Car gone. Car gone."
Wiggum: "Sheesh, we KNOW it's gone, now where is it?"
Automated voice (louder,faster): "CAR GONE! CAR GONE! CAR GONE!"

Opportunistic marketing or a lame business plan? (1)

iwrasahp (660861) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587137)

You have to love the bit about targeting countries at increased risk of terrorism... "Son, I'm very happy you weren't at the site of the bombing this afternoon but then I received this text page... we need to talk..."

Does This Story Mean Slashdot... (1, Flamebait)

reallocate (142797) | more than 11 years ago | (#5587141)

...is written for 12-year olds?

And why call this a "rights online" issue?

Children don't have the same rights as adults. Adults are responsible for their kids' behavior. If a parent has reason to believe a child is going somewhere and doing something he/she isn't allowed to go, this phone gizmo makes a lot more sense than tieing a long string on the kid.
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