Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Librarians Join the Fight Against The Patriot Act

CmdrTaco posted more than 11 years ago | from the uncle-sam-taking-our-rights dept.

Privacy 438

An anonymous reader writes "This article at the New York Times (free reg.) shows how lots of libraries are moving to destroy privacy related data as quickly as possible and still others have gone as far as posting signs and handing out leaflets to scare / educate their patrons."

cancel ×

438 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685935)

fp

FP with T not NT (0)

JohnnySkidmarks (607274) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686031)

Why bother posting with nothing to say? Patriot Act = War on Drugs = War on Nam = War on Iraq. I'm glad to be in Canada we have participated in none of the above. These are all dirty acts and will dirty how the world remembers America.

Re:FP with T not NT (0, Offtopic)

Angry White Guy (521337) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686070)

With your nickname I'd be the last one whipping around the term 'Dirty'.

Canada the Irrelevant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686075)

You're right. Now that I think about it, I can't think of anything that Canada has actually participated in during the last 50 years. Great job!

Re:Canada the Irrelevant (1, Insightful)

Angry White Guy (521337) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686092)

Here's one: the Kyoto Agreement. The one the U.S. bailed on because it would cost them too much money in the short-run.

Here's another: The U.N.

foreign concepts I know, but if you want to sling mud, you'd better check what you're standing in.

There's nothing worse... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685936)

Than an angry librarian. Those books can really hurt!

Hi (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685937)

How are you?

Just Say No: +1, Patriotic (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685938)

Courtesy of The Democratic Underground [democratic...ground.com]

April 8, 2002
Trademark Idiocy Edition

If you're looking for conservative idiocy, the
ten listed below are trademark specimens. Jeb
Bush (1) tries to make it illegal to criticize him
during an election year, Rush Limbaugh (3) puts
"Crossfire" in the crossfire, and Rev. Michael Taylor
(4) says Dubya was chosen by God. Meanwhile,
Carl Ford and James Kelly (5) do the Taiwan slush-fund shuffle,
Spence Abraham (6) chows down, and Edmund Matricardi III
(7) engages in some (alleged) GOP dirty tricks. Finally, Bush
Administration Officials (10) don't think you're clapping loud
enough! So clap! Louder! And click here for the icons.

Jeb Bush
Itching to pick a fight with Governor Jebbie as he
struggles for re-election this year? Of course you are; we all
hate that guy. Here's a word of advice: you had better not
call the Jebster by name, because you might find yourself
slapped with a nasty lawsuit. You see, he's getting his name
trademarked so nobody else can use it. It all seems innocent
enough: Jeb claims to be upset that a GOP front group,
"Americans for Jeb Bush" shouldn't have the right to use his
name, because people might get confused... So he's
trademarking it. I know what you're thinking: Hey, if Jeb
wants to shut down a Republican group, that's great. Not so
fast there, buckaroo. What happens when some Dems start a
group called "Americans to defeat Jeb Bush"? Once Jeb
Bush(TM) has the legal precedent he wants, do you think he's
going to call off the lawyers when some Democrats try the
same thing? Don't count on it. I'm not real big on conspiracy
theories, but I'm guessing we won't see a very vigorous legal
defense from the folks over at Americans for Jeb Bush.

Right-Wing Warmongers
As the Middle East goes up in smoke and George W.
Bush sits on his ass in Crawford, right-wing warhawks are
lining up to encourage Bush to continue his do-nothing
policies. Bills Kristol and Bennett, the Wall Street Journal,
and the National Review (among others) have recently been
bashing any attempts by the administration - no matter how
pathetic - to restart the peace process as "moral confusion"
and "Clintonite wishful thinking." (Yes, we must end the
nightmare of peace and prosperity!) Of course, Bush's
nonsensical black-and-white "you're either with us or against
us" doctrine is causing a bit of a problem - because now the
same hawks who advocate direct intervention in Afghanistan
and Iraq have suddenly had to shut up when it comes to the
Israel/Palestine conflict. Which just goes to show that the
right-wingnut hawks would rather see endless war in the
Middle East than appear to contradict themselves.

Rush Limbaugh
Some conservatives aren't ashamed to contradict
themselves though, and here's the master: Rush Limbaugh.
Sweatboy had an interesting review of the new "Crossfire" up
on his website last week, a review which would leave even
the most hypocrisy-resistant gagging and clutching at their
throats as they struggled to stay upright. Comments such as,
"These are not broadcasters, folks, they're partisans. They're
childish, immature little kids in a sandbox kicking stuff
around," and, "Do they really think that a bunch of sniveling,
partisan hacks lying through their teeth is going to build a
huge audience?" leave one wondering whether Kaptain Krispy
Kreme has left the planet Earth for good and is now orbiting
a faraway sun somewhere in another dimension. Rush, here's
a mirror. Take a good look in it, and (assuming it doesn't
break) say H-Y-P-O-C-R-I-T-E two hundred fifty times.
Feeling any slight twinges of shame? Nah, thought not.

Rev. Michael Taylor
I would have thought that ministers of the Lord were
above such earthly pursuits as sycophantic brown-nosing,
but apparently that ain't the case in Bush country. George Jr.
got a good laugh out of his Easter service last week when the
Reverend Michael Taylor started banging on about how the
outcome of the 2000 presidential election was the will of
God. "My friend, President Bush, for us who believe, that day
of the counting it was all over but the shouting," he said, to a
rousing chorus of "Amen!" Taylor went on, "My friends, a lot
of you are here strictly to visit and to see dignitaries that are
with us this morning, but you really ought to be here to visit
with Jesus Christ." This was a reference to front row, which
was filled entirely by the Bush family, including George H.W.
Bush (sold arms to terrorists), George W. Bush (drinking,
drugs, draft-dodging, AWOL, executioner), Laura Bush
(vehicular manslaughter), and Jenna Bush (drunk and
disorderly). God certainly does move in mysterious ways!

Carl Ford and James Kelly
From the "honor and integrity" file: Recently, Taiwan
was rocked by news of a secret NT$3.5 billion slush fund
which was used to buy favors for Taiwan in Washington, DC,
and elsewhere around the world. Leaked documents indicate
that two Bush Administration officials received payments
from the slush fund before they were tapped to join the
administration. One official, Carl Ford, is now the assistant
secretary of defense for intelligence and research, and the
other, James Kelly is the assistant secretary of state of East
Asia. Online Journal reports that Carl Ford was responsible for
millions of dollars donated to the Bush campaign and the
RNC. This raises questions of possible indirect foreign
campaign contributions, something which the GOP tried
(unsuccessfully) to pin on Al Gore. So, where's the outrage
about illegal Chinese campaign contributions this time? And
why isn't the liberal media all over this story?

Spence Abraham
Spence Abraham has one of the most difficult jobs in
Washington - planning his entire schedule around food.
According to the Washington Post, "His appointment
schedule is crammed with culinary references," including
"scheduling lunch," "working lunch," strategy lunch," and "a
'get to know each other' lunch." But it's not just lunch - how
about, "snacks," "heavy hors d'oeurves," "breakfast,"
"sandwiches," "cocktail party," "dinner," and, of course, a
"cook-off." Interestingly all this gastronomic information
comes from the energy policy documents which were
released recently but mysteriously censored (see Idiots 61).
Seems that the Bush administrations is much more
interested in you knowing the content of Spence Abraham's
stomach than knowing exactly what Dick Cheney did for Ken
Lay...

Edmund Matricardi III
This just in from the Republican dirty tricks
department. Last week the Associated Press reported that the
executive director of the Virginia Republican Party, Edmund
Matricardi III, allegedly tapped illegally into a telephone call
between Democratic Governor Mark Warner, Democratic state
legislators and their lawyers as they plotted strategy in a
redistricting case. While Matricardi refused comment on the
case, one prominent GOPer gave an eyebrow-raising
explanation: According to House Speaker S. Vance Wilkins,
the most powerful Republican legislator in the state,
"operatives play these games all the time." Oh really? Maybe
Republican operatives do.

Bradley County, Tennessee
The Constitution forbids the display of the Ten
Commandments in public schools. But public schools can
teach about the Ten Commandments, as long as it is done in
a historical context. So fundies across the country have been
trying to do an end-run around the U.S. Constitution by
posting the Ten Commandments in a historical context. But
usually the effort spent adding "historical context" is so
half-assed that these displays are blatantly unconstitutional.
(Imagine a giant full-color poster of Moses holding the Ten
Commandments, next to tiny white three-by-five cards with
ball-point-pen stick figures labeled "Julius Caesar,"
"Alexander the Great," "Phaeroah" [sic], and, for good
measure, "Martin Luther King, Jr.") After Bradley County,
Tennessee, decided to display the Commandments in a
similar fashion, a clever student filed suit asking that they
also display the Five Pillars of Islam in a historical context.
School officials who were previously so keen on teaching
religious history, suddenly lost enthusiasm. "At this point we
have our agendas full, and there's no point in the immediate
future to address that," said Commission Chairman Mike
Smith. Score another victory for separation of Church and
State!

Paul Scott
Paul Scott, a parent in El Cajon, Califorinia, recently
filed a discrimination claim on behalf of his school-aged
daughter. According to the claim, Mr. Scott thinks that his
daughter's right to privacy is being violated because she has
to share a bathroom with lesbian students, so he wants the
local school superintendent to designate separate bathrooms
for gay students and straight students. Fortunately, local
education officials rejected the claim outright. Apparently Mr.
Scott didn't get the memo when the whole "separate but
equal" thing was rejected by the Supreme Court about half a
century ago.

Bush Administration Officials
And finally: If you ever get the opportunity to go see
George W. Bush in person, remember this: APPLAUD.
VIGOROUSLY. Because if you don't, you see yourself on the
receiving end of the over-sensitive and easily provoked Bush
Administration Spin Machine. Just ask Paul Krugman. At the
recent Gridiron Dinner, while the rest of the media elite were
clapping like a pathetic bunch of trained sea lions, Krugman
did not. According to an anonymous White House source,
Krugman "refused to applaud any of the military leaders who
were announced, nor did he applaud the president, the vice
president or any members of the president's staff." The
source added that Krugman, who was seated in the audience
with hundreds of other people, "stuck out like a sore thumb."
Things are getting ominous here, people. It used to be that
you would get attacked if you criticized the president. Now
the Bush goon squad will publicly savage you if you don't
clap hard enough. See you next week!

Jesus Saves! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685939)

Ask Jesus into your heart today!

The ONLY Way, Truth and Life!

Re:Jesus Saves! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686054)

But George Nelson withdraws!

A library destroying data? (2, Interesting)

oilisgood (161130) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685940)

Is that kinda like book burning?

Re:A library destroying data? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685986)

Is that kinda like book burning?

No, it's kind of like letting you read a book, and then not running to the FBI to inform them that since you read "Catcher in the Rye" you must be a suicide bomber.

I'm a lone nut, just like everyone else! (4, Funny)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686086)

If you're reading "A Catcher in the Rye", you're probably not borrowing it from the library. You probably have several copies issued by the CIA themselves.

JD Salinger was a well known member in intellignce circles in his day. Like the Scientologists, the spooks like to bolster their own, so all their brainwashed MKULTRA manchurian candidates are given a compulsion to buy the book, hence inflating the sales.

I should know, since I just made this shit up [davidicke.net] !

Re:A library destroying data? (5, Insightful)

altp (108775) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685987)

No. not anything like it.

Libraries are trying to protect their patrons rights so that people will feel safe using what ever material is in the building.

Without having to worry about big brother. If we don't have the material to give when the feds come knocking, we can't violate a persons right to privacy.

Altp.

Re:A library destroying data? (2, Insightful)

zachjb (221132) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686144)

I think that it is actually pretty cool that librarians are doing something like this for their patrons. It shows that they really do care.

Sort of (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685990)

But in the same way a German Jewish sympathiser might have burned their nehibor's linage records when the Nazi party was in power.

are they (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685943)

i dont believe this gibberish. off with it.

Librarians (5, Funny)

mrgrey (319015) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685946)

Oh, librarians, not libertarians.

Re:Librarians (1)

mobets (101759) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686020)

That's how I read it the first time too. I got confused when the write up mentioned libraries and had to re-read the title.

NYT (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685949)

I'm still not interested in registering at NYT.. so I'll not be able to read the article and flame here instead...

This article sounds like facists in the U.S. have the chance to burn books in public... Strange.. Who'll liberate the U.S. from Texas?

Re:NYT (1)

curtisk (191737) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686003)

Heres another site that refers to the story....

News from Babylon [newsfrombabylon.com]

theres probably others, I just happen to come across this one yesterday...

Re:NYT (3, Informative)

Smidge204 (605297) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686008)

I'm still not interested in registering at NYT.. so I'll not be able to read the article and flame here instead...

Simply replace the www with archive. eg:

http://archive.nytimes.com/2003/04/07/national/0 7L IBR.html

Presto! At least until they fix the hole...

And now that you can RTFM, you'll notice that the librarians aren't burning books, they're cleaning out their old paperwork so the gov' can't collect the info under the patriot act.
=Smidge=

Re:NYT (5, Insightful)

NeoOokami (528323) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686015)

It's not a matter of destroying public information. It's a matter of destroying what was private information. This has absolutely nothing to do with fascism at all. The Patriot Act makes a lot of what would be private information availible to the government, something that is quite possibly unconstituional (Hopefully the Supreme Court will take a look at it soon..). The librarians want to uphold that kind of privacy and so they're choosing to destroy the information rather than leave it to be confiscated by someone in the government. They're taking a risk for what has always been until recently an American freedom.

Now you KNOW it's evil... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685950)

Even the damn librarians are against it!

link to story (no reg req'd) (5, Informative)

klparrot (549422) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685954)

You can read the story here [nytimes.com] without registering. Whenever a NY Times link gets posted, replace www with archive to avoid registration.

Re:link to story (no reg req'd) (0)

sandbagger (654585) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685991)

Re: www with archive.

That is about THE niftiest tip I've read in a while. Thanks much.

Re:link to story (no reg req'd) (1, Redundant)

missing000 (602285) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686143)

Heres another nifty tip:
Editors, please start posting articles with archive instead of www.

Then people like me could stop putting this in our sig lines:

Nice job, whore! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686102)

How come every karma whore who posts this "informative" information about how to read a NY Times article without going through the tremendous 5-minute time investment to register, he/she/it is immediately modded to +5? Give me a break, they should all be modded down as "redundant". Fucking morons.

No Login (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685955)

here [nytimes.com]

For the lazy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685959)

Well I for one am pround..... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685962)

I am very proud that I am not able to exclaim out to the masses "FIRST POST!"

Troll-Kore forever!!!11 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685963)

- TROLL-KORE FOREVER
- I hate you, I hate your country, and I hate your face!
___
/ | \
|_____| #TROLLKORE
/|||||\ IRC.FREENODE.NET
| o /\O |
| UUUUU |
\_____/
| | LOOK AT MY SHINY BELL,
| | AND MY HUMPED BACK!
| 8 | - Prince of Knobstradamus
|S S|
/8S8S8\
|8S8S8S8|
|S8S8S8S|
\__/__/

Cmdr. Taco sucks your knob!1!

Patriot Act (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685966)

There are lot of privacy concerns ever since the "war on terror". It seems to be the "war on privacy", and coupled with the governments ability to hold anyone for as long as they want without charging them, this is quickly becoming a place where you are guilty until proven innocent, and even then it doesn't necessarily mean you will not be prosecuted.

Spelling and Grammar (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685969)

"I bet myself I can beat to this light of street with mine catty," I commented mine brew. "not a possibility," I answered, looking at the pure height of the light. Mine brew removed its catty and loads a rock in slowly. Extracting it stops backwards the rubber band of the fiber of the polyester hardwired to the wooden peice in form of Y, it left the rock fly, and broke the clean light. "wow, that a shot" I will exclamarei. Mine brew waited uproar of me and its proper brew. Although and his brew are relatives of the blood, in some ways it and its blood brew was not so close how much it and I. Exijiu the these his brew and I both make examination of similar shots in the remaining lights of street. I removed mine catty and load a rock in, eyeing the light of next the entire street. I left the rock fly, but he only stapled the edge of the street light. "Darn," I muttered. Its proper brew catty had loaded a rock in its, pulled the back part of the rubber band strong, and had left its fly of rock. It lacked to little for a measurer. "that it was a bad shot," it said mine brew meditatively to its proper brew. "in the fact, that one went off was inexcusable." His brew looked at it questioningly. "I always considered it a good oak, incapable of forces neglecting of others and only concentrating in its weaknesses. Certainly you he will not move now " "in the the opposite, I am a good oak for this much reason. She is all to a question of the counterbalance. Its shot badly gliding and was delivered, and the street light was not beaten same. What you have that to make now, each only light of street in the block is rupture. Each street, "answered the his severely brew. I winced. That age a rough punishment not to beat the street light. Brew for comply had few other options but for his, and breaks the entire game of light of street in the block. It would be a immense enterprise, making examination of many hours to go off careful with one catty. His brew abilities catty was not until risk for the work, me counted. In a scale of 10, his brew was approximately 4, comparative to the my proper 7 and its 9. Although I did not have no doubt his for brew I would improve to little a 6, asking it that to go off in each light of street in the block he was not entirely just.

Round 1! Fight! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685973)

Hadouken!

Shouryuken!

Tatsumakisenpuukyakuu!

Shin-Shoryuken!

Re:Round 1! Fight! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685996)

You must defeat Sheng Long to stand a chance.

Re:Round 1! Fight! (-1, Offtopic)

REBloomfield (550182) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686111)

er...

Fireball

Uppercut

Hurricane kick

?? Damn it's been a long time since i played Streetfighter...

Texas!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685974)

We're assholes, ok. But at least we're texanian assholes...

Weee-haw...

Re:Texas!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686071)

What the fuck are you talking about ?

And it's "Texian" if you mean old-skool Texan, and "Texican" if you mean a flamboyant sort of wanna-be hispanic who drives a ricemobile refers to Daddy's $400,000 house as "mi casa in the barrio" -- you know, San Antonio people.

But back to my first point: The First rule of being a Texan is to NEVER APOLOGIZE FOR ANYTHING. If we are assholes BRAG ABOUT IT, don't say "but at least . . .". Further transgressions will result in your IP address being reported to the Eyes of Texas Are Upon You Monitoring Committee.

I don't see any horns on you, boy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686115)

Texas sucks!

don't piss off librarians (4, Funny)

viking099 (70446) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685978)

Everyone knows that to piss off a librarian is to call down unimaginable wrath, the consequences of which are often unpredictable.

I'm glad they're on our side, as they are very tenacious, and having a dedicated, intelligent, and socially-friendly ally will do more for the cause than a hundred thousand emails to congressmen.

Re:don't piss off librarians (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686050)

All I can say is "Conan the librarian"!

Use the partner link, Luke. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685979)

Somebody please explain this to me... (3, Insightful)

CommieLib (468883) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685981)

So basically the Patriot Act says that library records can be used in terrorist investigations. Is that it, or is there something more sinister I'm missing? Honestly, I'm not trying to troll here.

If that is it...then good grief, what are we talking about here? What is there about borrowing a book that should make it a sacrosanct activity like confessional, or attorney-client privelege? I'm sorry, but what books someone has borrowed certainly seems like it could be relevant to me. We're supposed to ignore this information, why?

Re:Somebody please explain this to me... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686000)


So basically the Patriot Act says that library records can be used in terrorist investigations. Is that it, or is there something more sinister I'm missing? Honestly, I'm not trying to troll here.


Go to the library and read some history, before the books are edited. Then you'll understand the problems. I imagine reading Marx's works in the 50's, no, not Groucho - would get you a visit, put on lists, and maybe even thrown in the pokey for awhile. These are not good times for freedom.

Re:Somebody please explain this to me... (1)

Derg (557233) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686019)

I think that it has a bit more to do with people using the librarys PC's to access the Internet, and investigative parties forcing the libraries to turn over who uses which public PC and when. I am not clear, however, I do believe this to be more of the point than which book is being borrowed... Why should they have to tell (your favorite alphabet soup group) which PC I was using?....

unless I am off, which I might be...

Checked out the koran lately? (5, Insightful)

Unknown Poltroon (31628) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686030)

Terrorist.
Looked at a chemistry book?
Terrorist.
Read Mein Kampft(sp)?
Terorist
Read a physics book?
Dirty bomber
Che Guveras biography?
Terrorist
picke up a copy of 2600?
terrorist

When they control what you can read and see, they controll your mind. Of course it wont be illegal to read any of these(probably) but how many people will check them out to read once they realize that this will automaticaly get a record started on them with the FBI. I odnt know about you, but i buy my copy of 2600 with cash. How much longer will that be possible?

Don't forget! (2, Informative)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686129)

Crypto!

If you're checking books on crypto from the library, you're obviously a terrorist and a danger to the status quo [wired.com] !

Re:Somebody please explain this to me... (5, Informative)

cperciva (102828) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686040)

If that is it...then good grief, what are we talking about here?

Courts have ruled in several instances that if something is to be considered available, it must be available anonymously. Freedom of speech implies freedom of anonymous speech, because otherwise people will self-censor out of fear of retribution; access to abortions implies anonymous access to abortions, because otherwise the social stigma could stop people seeking abortions; access to public libraries implies anonymous access to public libraries, because otherwise people will avoid reading "subversive" material.

You're right, it is unlikely that the ability to access these records would be abused; but it has been abused in the past, so many people are very wary of giving law enforcement that ability again.

Re:Somebody please explain this to me... (5, Interesting)

kotj.mf (645325) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686069)

We're supposed to ignore this information, why?
For the same reason you probably don't want your ISP keeping permanent records of every site you've ever visited, ever. Privacy is a necessary component of intellectual freedom.

See the Library Bill o' Rights [ala.org] for a more concise explanation than I could ever give.

--kotj.mf, para-professional library drone

Re:Somebody please explain this to me... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686085)

Every book the library has was selected to be shared with the public. So there should be nothing wrong with borrowing anything, since it's public knowledge. Additionally, people who are serious about doing bad things know that library logs are checked; they will simply not check books out, and read or copy them instead.

So this is useless against people who are serious about committing crimes, just like a lot of the rest of the Patriot Act. What's it good for? Finding people who the government doesn't like.

I'm sure I know the answer to this question, but do you not care that someone might be sitting in a room somewhere some day, looking at a list of books you've borrowed, and using their judgement to decide if your interest one weekend in Nuclear Engineering means you should be flagged for checks every time you try to fly? Right right, you have nothing to hide.

Re:Somebody please explain this to me... (5, Informative)

warpSpeed (67927) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686091)

So basically the Patriot Act says that library records can be used in terrorist investigations. Is that it, or is there something more sinister I'm missing? Honestly, I'm not trying to troll here.

If that is it...then good grief, what are we talking about here? What is there about borrowing a book that should make it a sacrosanct activity like confessional, or attorney-client privelege?...

We are not talking about borrowing a book, we are talking about unfettered access, by the government, to records that we should reasonably expect to remain private. They want access to all personal data, in the name of national security, but there is no control over how that data is actually used. This can put a chilling effect on what we may or may not do just by association and the fear of being targeted for said associations.

How long until you are stopped driving and asked for your 'papers', where are you going, why? Sounds far fetched, it probably is, but where it the line that once the governemnt crosses it is no longer OK for them to have unfettered access to our personal lives?

If the government wants to know that I have read "such and such author", they should be required to tell me that they want to know, and further they should show a good reason for neededing the information.

Re:Somebody please explain this to me... (1)

henbane (663769) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686100)

"What is there about borrowing a book that should make it a sacrosanct activity like confessional, or attorney-client privelege?"

It's not sacrosanct but basically the point here is that something as mundane as the library books I've checked out is none of the government's business - no matter what I intend to do with the knowledge I have gleaned from them.

A better URL (1)

j0hnfr0g (652153) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685985)

http://archive.nytimes.com/2003/04/07/national/07L IBR.html

Remove space between L and I in LIBR

John

I told you to watch out for those librarians!!! (2, Insightful)

newt_sd (443682) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685988)

I think they are on the right track. What we can do to help them is bring forth legislation that does the opposite of the patriot act. Lets make privacy a "right" again. If I was a more energetic I would try start some sort of movement to get this accomplished. Nothing like a little home grown legislation however I am just a lazy computer nerd and instead will post it to slashdot. However there is one argument that needs to be address first. And that is that you have the right to privacy not anonymity. Many people get confused by that. What I want is privacy just like I am suppose to have I don't need anonymity. Of course I don't break the law to often so maybe I would feel different then :)

Re:I told you to watch out for those librarians!!! (2, Interesting)

T5 (308759) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686072)

The Constitution/Bill of Rights has no right to privacy enumerated. Amendment IV of the Bill of Rights states

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

The Patriot Act doesn't bypass the "probable cause" warrant requirement of the above. A search warrant is still required.

mother hell (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685989)

.sometimes.when.i.am.running .through.the.trees.i .like.to.fall.down. and.run.against.the.wind. but then.again.i.like .to.hump.deer.in.their.tight.slits.and.fuck.their. tites

Text of Article (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5685992)

Librarians Use Shredder to Show Opposition to New F.B.I. Powers
By DEAN E. MURPHY

ANTA CRUZ, Calif., April 4 -- The humming noise from a back room of the central library here today was the sound of Barbara Gail Snider, a librarian, at work. Her hands stuffed with wads of paper, Ms. Snider was feeding a small shredding machine mounted on a plastic wastebasket.

First to be sliced by the electronic teeth were several pink sheets with handwritten requests to the reference desk. One asked for the origin of the expression "to cost an arm and a leg." Another sought the address of a collection agency.

Next to go were the logs of people who had signed up to use the library's Internet computer stations. Bill L., Mike B., Rolando, Steve and Patrick were all shredded into white paper spaghetti.

"It used to be a librarian would be pictured with a book," said Ms. Snider, the branch manager, slightly exasperated as she hunched over the wastebasket. "Now it is a librarian with a shredder."

Actually, the shredder here is not new, but the rush to use it is. In the old days, staff members in the nine-branch Santa Cruz Public Library System would destroy discarded paperwork as time allowed, typically once a week.

But at a meeting of library officials last week, it was decided the materials should be shredded daily.

"The basic strategy now is to keep as little historical information as possible," said Anne M. Turner, director of the library system.

The move was part of a campaign by the Santa Cruz libraries to demonstrate their opposition to the Patriot Act, the law passed in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks that broadened the federal authorities' powers in fighting terrorism.

Among provisions that have angered librarians nationwide is one that allows the Federal Bureau of Investigation to review certain business records of people under suspicion, which has been interpreted to include the borrowing or purchase of books and the use of the Internet at libraries, bookstores and cafes.

In a survey sent to 1,500 libraries last fall by the Library Research Center at the University of Illinois, the staffs at 219 libraries said they had cooperated with law enforcement requests for information about patrons; staffs at 225 libraries said they had not.

Ms. Turner said the authorities had made no inquiries about patrons in Santa Cruz. But the librarians here and the library board, which sets policies for the 10 branches, felt strongly about the matter nonetheless. Last month, Santa Cruz became one of the first library systems in the country to post warning signs about the Patriot Act at all of its checkout counters.

Today, the libraries went further and began distributing a handout to visitors that outlines objections to the enhanced F.B.I. powers and explains that the libraries were reviewing all records "to make sure that we really need every piece of data" about borrowers and Internet users.

Maurice J. Freedman, president of the American Library Association and director of the library system in Westchester, N.Y., said only a handful of libraries had posted signs or handed out literature about the Patriot Act. Warning signs are posted in the computer room at a library in Killington, Vt., and the library board in Skokie, Ill., recently voted to post signs, Mr. Freedman said.

Many other libraries, he said, including those in Westchester, decided that warnings might unnecessarily alarm patrons.

"There are people, especially older people who lived through the McCarthy era, who might be intimidated by this," he said. "As of right now, the odds are very great that there will be no search made of a person's records at public libraries, so I don't want to scare people away."

At the same time, though, thousands of libraries have joined the rush to destroy records.

A spokesman for the Justice Department said libraries were not breaking the law by destroying records, even at a faster pace. The spokesman, Mark Corallo, said it would be illegal only if a library destroyed records that had been subpoenaed by the F.B.I.

Ms. Turner, the library director here, said librarians did not want to help terrorists, but she said other values were at stake as well.

"I am more terrified of having my First Amendment rights to information and free speech infringed than I am by the kind of terrorist acts that have come down so far," Ms. Turner said.

Library officials here said the response to the warning signs had been overwhelmingly positive, and visitors interviewed today had nothing but praise. Several of them noted, however, that Santa Cruz was not necessarily a microcosm of America.

Santa Cruz is a community well known for its leftward leanings and progressive politics. Last fall, city officials allowed marijuana for medicinal purposes to be distributed from the steps of City Hall. The City Council also passed a resolution condemning the Patriot Act.

"That is the nice thing about living in this town," said Elizabeth Smith, a waitress, who dropped by the central library today to use the Internet. "They call something like this to our attention that is being ignored in so many other parts of the country."

For those who don't want to reg. (-1, Redundant)

burninginside (631942) | more than 11 years ago | (#5685994)

Librarians Use Shredder to Show Opposition to New F.B.I. Powers By DEAN E. MURPHY

ANTA CRUZ, Calif., April 4 -- The humming noise from a back room of the central library here today was the sound of Barbara Gail Snider, a librarian, at work. Her hands stuffed with wads of paper, Ms. Snider was feeding a small shredding machine mounted on a plastic wastebasket.

First to be sliced by the electronic teeth were several pink sheets with handwritten requests to the reference desk. One asked for the origin of the expression "to cost an arm and a leg." Another sought the address of a collection agency.

Next to go were the logs of people who had signed up to use the library's Internet computer stations. Bill L., Mike B., Rolando, Steve and Patrick were all shredded into white paper spaghetti.

"It used to be a librarian would be pictured with a book," said Ms. Snider, the branch manager, slightly exasperated as she hunched over the wastebasket. "Now it is a librarian with a shredder."

Actually, the shredder here is not new, but the rush to use it is. In the old days, staff members in the nine-branch Santa Cruz Public Library System would destroy discarded paperwork as time allowed, typically once a week.

But at a meeting of library officials last week, it was decided the materials should be shredded daily.

"The basic strategy now is to keep as little historical information as possible," said Anne M. Turner, director of the library system.

The move was part of a campaign by the Santa Cruz libraries to demonstrate their opposition to the Patriot Act, the law passed in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks that broadened the federal authorities' powers in fighting terrorism.

Among provisions that have angered librarians nationwide is one that allows the Federal Bureau of Investigation to review certain business records of people under suspicion, which has been interpreted to include the borrowing or purchase of books and the use of the Internet at libraries, bookstores and cafes.

In a survey sent to 1,500 libraries last fall by the Library Research Center at the University of Illinois, the staffs at 219 libraries said they had cooperated with law enforcement requests for information about patrons; staffs at 225 libraries said they had not.

Ms. Turner said the authorities had made no inquiries about patrons in Santa Cruz. But the librarians here and the library board, which sets policies for the 10 branches, felt strongly about the matter nonetheless. Last month, Santa Cruz became one of the first library systems in the country to post warning signs about the Patriot Act at all of its checkout counters.

Today, the libraries went further and began distributing a handout to visitors that outlines objections to the enhanced F.B.I. powers and explains that the libraries were reviewing all records "to make sure that we really need every piece of data" about borrowers and Internet users.

Maurice J. Freedman, president of the American Library Association and director of the library system in Westchester, N.Y., said only a handful of libraries had posted signs or handed out literature about the Patriot Act. Warning signs are posted in the computer room at a library in Killington, Vt., and the library board in Skokie, Ill., recently voted to post signs, Mr. Freedman said.

Many other libraries, he said, including those in Westchester, decided that warnings might unnecessarily alarm patrons.

"There are people, especially older people who lived through the McCarthy era, who might be intimidated by this," he said. "As of right now, the odds are very great that there will be no search made of a person's records at public libraries, so I don't want to scare people away."

At the same time, though, thousands of libraries have joined the rush to destroy records.

A spokesman for the Justice Department said libraries were not breaking the law by destroying records, even at a faster pace. The spokesman, Mark Corallo, said it would be illegal only if a library destroyed records that had been subpoenaed by the F.B.I.

Ms. Turner, the library director here, said librarians did not want to help terrorists, but she said other values were at stake as well.

"I am more terrified of having my First Amendment rights to information and free speech infringed than I am by the kind of terrorist acts that have come down so far," Ms. Turner said.

Library officials here said the response to the warning signs had been overwhelmingly positive, and visitors interviewed today had nothing but praise. Several of them noted, however, that Santa Cruz was not necessarily a microcosm of America.

Santa Cruz is a community well known for its leftward leanings and progressive politics. Last fall, city officials allowed marijuana for medicinal purposes to be distributed from the steps of City Hall. The City Council also passed a resolution condemning the Patriot Act.

"That is the nice thing about living in this town," said Elizabeth Smith, a waitress, who dropped by the central library today to use the Internet. "They call something like this to our attention that is being ignored in so many other parts of the country."Librarians Use Shredder to Show Opposition to New F.B.I. Powers By DEAN E. MURPHY

ANTA CRUZ, Calif., April 4 -- The humming noise from a back room of the central library here today was the sound of Barbara Gail Snider, a librarian, at work. Her hands stuffed with wads of paper, Ms. Snider was feeding a small shredding machine mounted on a plastic wastebasket.

First to be sliced by the electronic teeth were several pink sheets with handwritten requests to the reference desk. One asked for the origin of the expression "to cost an arm and a leg." Another sought the address of a collection agency.

Next to go were the logs of people who had signed up to use the library's Internet computer stations. Bill L., Mike B., Rolando, Steve and Patrick were all shredded into white paper spaghetti.

"It used to be a librarian would be pictured with a book," said Ms. Snider, the branch manager, slightly exasperated as she hunched over the wastebasket. "Now it is a librarian with a shredder."

Actually, the shredder here is not new, but the rush to use it is. In the old days, staff members in the nine-branch Santa Cruz Public Library System would destroy discarded paperwork as time allowed, typically once a week.

But at a meeting of library officials last week, it was decided the materials should be shredded daily.

"The basic strategy now is to keep as little historical information as possible," said Anne M. Turner, director of the library system.

The move was part of a campaign by the Santa Cruz libraries to demonstrate their opposition to the Patriot Act, the law passed in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks that broadened the federal authorities' powers in fighting terrorism.

Among provisions that have angered librarians nationwide is one that allows the Federal Bureau of Investigation to review certain business records of people under suspicion, which has been interpreted to include the borrowing or purchase of books and the use of the Internet at libraries, bookstores and cafes.

In a survey sent to 1,500 libraries last fall by the Library Research Center at the University of Illinois, the staffs at 219 libraries said they had cooperated with law enforcement requests for information about patrons; staffs at 225 libraries said they had not.

Ms. Turner said the authorities had made no inquiries about patrons in Santa Cruz. But the librarians here and the library board, which sets policies for the 10 branches, felt strongly about the matter nonetheless. Last month, Santa Cruz became one of the first library systems in the country to post warning signs about the Patriot Act at all of its checkout counters.

Today, the libraries went further and began distributing a handout to visitors that outlines objections to the enhanced F.B.I. powers and explains that the libraries were reviewing all records "to make sure that we really need every piece of data" about borrowers and Internet users.

Maurice J. Freedman, president of the American Library Association and director of the library system in Westchester, N.Y., said only a handful of libraries had posted signs or handed out literature about the Patriot Act. Warning signs are posted in the computer room at a library in Killington, Vt., and the library board in Skokie, Ill., recently voted to post signs, Mr. Freedman said.

Many other libraries, he said, including those in Westchester, decided that warnings might unnecessarily alarm patrons.

"There are people, especially older people who lived through the McCarthy era, who might be intimidated by this," he said. "As of right now, the odds are very great that there will be no search made of a person's records at public libraries, so I don't want to scare people away."

At the same time, though, thousands of libraries have joined the rush to destroy records.

A spokesman for the Justice Department said libraries were not breaking the law by destroying records, even at a faster pace. The spokesman, Mark Corallo, said it would be illegal only if a library destroyed records that had been subpoenaed by the F.B.I.

Ms. Turner, the library director here, said librarians did not want to help terrorists, but she said other values were at stake as well.

"I am more terrified of having my First Amendment rights to information and free speech infringed than I am by the kind of terrorist acts that have come down so far," Ms. Turner said.

Library officials here said the response to the warning signs had been overwhelmingly positive, and visitors interviewed today had nothing but praise. Several of them noted, however, that Santa Cruz was not necessarily a microcosm of America.

Santa Cruz is a community well known for its leftward leanings and progressive politics. Last fall, city officials allowed marijuana for medicinal purposes to be distributed from the steps of City Hall. The City Council also passed a resolution condemning the Patriot Act.

"That is the nice thing about living in this town," said Elizabeth Smith, a waitress, who dropped by the central library today to use the Internet. "They call something like this to our attention that is being ignored in so many other parts of the country."

That's bad news or is it? (1, Insightful)

Mengoxon (303399) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686007)

Was it the film Se7en, I think, where the murder is caught because he is lending out certain books. And the police were able to find him that way?

I'm also for privacy but shouldn't we be able to search data if there is valid suspicion (obviously not if there is invalid suspicion).

Re:That's bad news or is it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686044)

Yeah.. But he had to kiss many asses and give much money/attention to many ppl before they gave him the informations needed to catch that murderer.

So, you see your theory is fucked. There seems to be a more important use of this data than finhding murderers (at least in that movie). Maybe, you should return to the real world, TV-Junkie!

Re:That's bad news or is it? (1)

Mengoxon (303399) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686135)

Hey! you! watch it. I did see that movie on DVD, not on TV.
Anyway, gotta get back and watch the Real World Las Vegas on MTV.

Re:That's bad news or is it? (0)

JohnnySkidmarks (607274) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686082)

in that movie they already knew what they were looking for (a serial killer with a penchant for Dante). What the patriot act proposes is to be able to just troll [sic] through the reading habbits of all U.S. citizens in order to build cases against formerly anonymouos literate types. All this in order to preserve Freedom (Fries?). I'll stay in Canada where my government may be doing something evil like this but just won't tell me it is their right to do so or that it is for my own good. And so cannot build a whole new branch of government (like we need more) to do so like: the Office of Homeland Security

Re:That's bad news or is it? (2, Interesting)

Angry White Guy (521337) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686140)

How about cataloguing non-citizens?
How about Sheila Copps big database o' Stuff which had nothing to do with her branch of Government? It ain't so pretty here either.

From the G-man's website:

The Permanent Resident Card (PR Card) is a new, wallet-sized, plastic card. People who have completed the Canadian immigration process and have obtained permanent resident status, but are not Canadian citizens can apply for the Card. The Card replaces the IMM 1000 as the status document needed by Canadian permanent residents re-entering Canada on a commercial carrier (airplane, boat, train and bus) starting December 31, 2003.

Security features of the new PR Card will simplify the screening process of permanent residents when boarding a commercial carrier going to Canada. The Card also increases Canada's border security and improves the integrity of Canada's immigration process.

On June 28, 2002, CIC began to mail PR Cards to new permanent residents of Canada as part of the immigration process. People who are already in Canada with permanent resident status can apply for the new PR Card beginning October 15, 2002.

We are continually updating information about the PR Card on this Web site, so please visit often. If you do not find the information you are looking for, contact our Call Centre.

Re:That's bad news or is it? (2, Insightful)

no reason to be here (218628) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686124)

yes, but searching through library records is how many "Communists" were caught during the height of McCarthy-ism. And now that the gov't is interested in catching "terrorists," there are certain issues of privacy being raised again.

furthermore, though you might not have realized it, se7en was a movie. that means it is not real. now, if you could point me to real actual cases of serial killers, rapists, terroists, etc. being caught mainly on the basis of siezed library records, you might have a point.

Buy books with cash (1)

cyber_rigger (527103) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686010)

How does that get traced?

Re:Buy books with cash (1)

garcia (6573) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686027)

how about borrowing books without being tracked like it supposedly used to be?

Re:Buy books with cash (1)

Voytek (15888) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686042)

bookstore surveilance cameras, atm cameras/bank records

Re:Buy books with cash (1)

Phroggy (441) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686099)

How does that get traced?

Have you seen the price of books?

More Links! (5, Informative)

tiltowait (306189) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686012)

Patron privacy and the confidentiality of library records is a fundamental tenet of librarianship. We've been on this issue for a while now [dmoz.org] , but it's good to see it getting more popupar press.

Support the Freedom to Read Protection Act [bookweb.org] today!

Avoiding Homeland Security (1)

wsherman (154283) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686013)

I've been thinking I should be better informed about whether the kinds of chemical weapons that a country like Iraq could put together are really a threat to the United States but checking out a whole bunch of books on chemical weapons from a library seems like a good way to get a file with Homeland Security.

Um, its Sanata Cruz folks... (1)

wdavies (163941) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686016)

.. I had pictures of outraged librarians in glasses throwing of their chains... but no, apparently its just the good folks in Santa Cruz. I mean, I'm a liberal, but jeez, what happened to responsible journalism...

Winton

Um, it's not just Santa Cruz (2, Informative)

mattbot 5000 (645961) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686077)

Not to pull out a RTFA on you, but: In a survey sent to 1,500 libraries last fall by the Library Research Center at the University of Illinois, the staffs at 219 libraries said they had cooperated with law enforcement requests for information about patrons; staffs at 225 libraries said they had not. It looks like Santa Cruz is hardly the liberal exception to the rule this time around.

Re:Um, its Sanata Cruz folks... (4, Interesting)

NecrosisLabs (125672) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686088)

This is in libraries across the country. My wife is a Librarian at a College library in Chicago, and they expunge usage records after the books are checked back in explictily for the same purpose. The most insidious part of this is that it is a crime for a librarian to let someone know that their records have been requested... Check out librarian.net [librarian.net] for some good information and library activism.

I used to be into fireworks and... (5, Interesting)

Visaris (553352) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686021)

I used to be into fireworks and explosives when I was a kid (Well, not too long ago; since I've found computers). I was always making little "bombs" and firecrackers and smokebombs, etc. It was really interesting to me. My dad even showed me some of the chemistry behind it.
Then one day I saw the coolest book in the library! It was all about how to make black powder and colored sparks and pipe bombs and it just kept going! I was so excited! Now... I'm afraid to check it out. I start checking out books on explosives and the feds could show up at my door! Am I paranoid? Maybe... but I think things have gone a little too far here. So a kid wants to make a pipe bomb. So what. When my dad was a kid, he'd blow holes in the ground for the fun of it. On his dad's own 100 acre farm. I'm a terrorist! yay!

Re:I used to be into fireworks and... (4, Insightful)

Eric Ass Raymond (662593) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686105)

I start checking out books on explosives and the feds could show up at my door!

So? You don't have to talk to them. If you choose to talk to them, tell them exactly what you said in your post. You are interested in chemistry and explosives and so was your father. "Since when was will to learn chemistry a cause for federal investigation?"

Don't be confrontational or start spouting shit about your rights and they'll go away.

Personally I'm so sick of the "padded safe world" the soccer moms and their friends want to create at the expense of the freedom to learn. Every time a kid blows himself up with a self-made explosive, you see his parents screaming about how the internet/books/movies made him do it. It's like the stupidity and carelessness on the part of the kid and bad parenting had nothing to do with it. And the society goes along with it. "They are the victims and we can't really put any blame on them then."

Watch out its the Librarians... (1)

MosesJones (55544) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686023)


Now I just bet everyone in Washington is just crapping themselves, those Librarians, they've always been the biggest threat to any goverment.

I mean what are they going to do, refuse to lend people books, or start an active "it overdue" campaign against representatives ?

What is needed here is something to galvanise the seperate groups under one banner.

Freedom once again needs a Martin Luther King.

Librarians (4, Insightful)

luzrek (570886) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686029)

Librarians' main purpose is to provide information in a free and fair way. On top of that they are extremely well organized. It doesn't supprise me that libraries have adopted polices which violate the spirit of the patriot act, but I'ld be very supprised if they actually break the law.

Librarians are also the ultimate beurocrats. Where I went to college, the library shared some of its physical space with the administration on a supposedly temporary basis. Much later tha administration moved its high-level offices to another building, but wanted to keep its basic functions in the library. The librarians produced a 30+ year old document showing that the administration was supposed to completely move out once X number of square feet became avalible in another building. The administration was forced to give back the space in the library.

Re:Librarians (1)

Loki_1929 (550940) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686103)

"The librarians produced a 30+ year old document showing that the administration was supposed to completely move out once X number of square feet became avalible in another building. The administration was forced to give back the space in the library."

Hence proving that libraries are the only well-functioning beurocracies.

nuts nuts (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686032)


wesdfgsdgfd was dying and she left me for the preacher across the street and they humped a dog and they went bowling. yesterday i waent to the store and bought some lettuce and tomatoes but she lost some weight and lost some weight.
sdfgdsgfdss and she left aresdfg
sdfgsdgdsfdfgdsfgfd

&middot


&middot


&middot

&middot

&middot


&middot

&middot
&middot

as
&middot

asd
&middot

dfgsdfg


dfgsdgsdgdsdfgdfsgd wesdfgsdgfd was dying and she left me for the preacher across the street and they humped a dog and they went bowling. yesterday i waent to the store and bought some lettuce and tomatoes but she lost some weight and lost some weight.


sdgfsdfd

sdgdsgfdsfgfdsg





adfgadfgsd

sgf

dafgsdf
sdf







wesdfgsdgfd was dying and she left me for the preacher across the street and they humped a dog and they went bowling. yesterday i waent to the store and bought some lettuce and tomatoes but she lost some weight and lost some weight.

Don't underestimate the wrath of Librarians! (1)

linuxology (54357) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686033)

Harper/Collins was going to "pulp" Michael Moores book "Stupid White Men" due to the "politcal environment" of the US after 9/11.

It was the librarians that unleashed their collective wrath upon H/C to make sure that it was seen!

Good for them to attack this damn un-American law of cowards.

Stand up and be counted (4, Interesting)

Mattygfunk1 (596840) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686037)

It's great that groups make a consious effort to fight against these laws. Privacy laws (or no privacy laws in this case) are generally not understood by the general public. If you want your privacy you _must_ take a stand to protect it, and make others aware of why you are protecting it.

Even a few hours ago I was informed by a telemarketer that the conversation would be recorded for quality assurance puposes, and asking for my consent. I declined and she seemed shocked, as if she had never heard somebody say no to it. She even followed up with "why not?", to which I explained briefly the privacy implications if I had chosen to do so.

She said that she would note that I hadn't consented so the tape wouldn't be listened to. So, of course, the recording was made anyway because that was "standard practice". _______
cheap web site hosting [cheap-web-...ing.com.au] for those on a budget

Troll-Kore r00lz you all (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686038)

- TROLL-KORE FOREVER
- I hate you, I hate your country, and I hate your face!
___
/ | \
|_____| #TROLLKORE
/|||||\ IRC.FREENODE.NET
| o /\O |
| UUUUU |
\_____/
| | LOOK AT MY SHINY BELL,
| | AND MY HUMPED BACK!
| 8 | - Prince of Knobstradamus
|S S|
/8S8S8\
|8S8S8S8|
|S8S8S8S|
\__/__/

The Pretzel is mightier than the Sword (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686039)

Dubya is the most powerful man on earth. Yet, a tiny piece of pastry is stronger than him!

This says it all: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686041)


From the artical:

"There are people, especially older people who lived through the McCarthy era, who might be intimidated by this," he said. "As of right now, the odds are very great that there will be no search made of a person's records at public libraries, so I don't want to scare people away."

Only in tags... (0, Troll)

SwansonMarpalum (521840) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686046)

What's to prevent someone from cutting the tag out of the garment and tossing the chip after purchasing it? (Or for the thieves it's intended to stop, before stealing it?) I cut all the tags out of my clothing anyways as they irritate me and I see absolutely no benefit to keeping them in.

Re:Only in tags... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686128)

ummm... wrong article...

The librarians here are, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686049)

But the IT department head here can't wait to get patted on the head by Big Brother. Watch how you use the public machines at TADL [tcnet.org] , y'all.

Accept No Imitationz, we are the best! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686053)

- TROLL-KORE FOREVER
- I hate you, I hate your country, and I hate your face!
___
/ | \
|_____| #TROLLKORE
/|||||\ IRC.FREENODE.NET
| o /\O |
| UUUUU |
\_____/
| | LOOK AT MY SHINY BELL,
| | AND MY HUMPED BACK!
| 8 | - Prince of Knobstradamus
|S S|
/8S8S8\
|8S8S8S8|
|S8S8S8S|
\__/__/

Twilight Zone reference (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686057)

Remember the Twilight Zone episode where a librarian is being put on trial and ultimately is sentenced to death because he is "obsolete"? Well, that has actually come to pass. Librarians are obsolete, there is absolutely NO reason for their existence. In fact an argument could be made that libraries themselves are obsolete. In any event, these librarians need to get a real job, or face execution. I'll gladly put a bullet in each of their skulls.

This could be a VERY good thing (for me) (3, Funny)

Treebeard the Ent (638978) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686068)

"The basic strategy now is to keep as little historical information as possible," said Anne M. Turner, director of the library system.


I hope they do this at my library... then they won't have a leg to stand on for those 5 books and 2 videos I have had out since August, 2000... since they couldn't tell me what they were, how am I to know whether or not I took them out... This could be the best policy ever!!! Any chance of Blockbuster adopting this policy?

Look at Troll-Kore, king of the trollz (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686073)

- TROLL-KORE FOREVER
- I hate you, I hate your country, and I hate your face!
___
/ | \
|_____| #TROLLKORE
/|||||\ IRC.FREENODE.NET
| o /\O |
| UUUUU |
\_____/
| | LOOK AT MY SHINY BELL,
| | AND MY HUMPED BACK!
| 8 | - Prince of Knobstradamus
|S S|
/8S8S8\
|8S8S8S8|
|S8S8S8S|
\__/__/

anonymous borrowing scheme (2, Interesting)

cemcnulty (225472) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686080)

I've been thinking about how libraries could allow the anonymous borrowing of books, while still ensuring that the proper book is returned when it's due.

I would do it by using some combination of details about the book, like ISBN, page numbers, etc to create a UID for the book when it is checked out, and then when it is returned perform the same calculation to make sure it is the same book.

The important thing would be to make sure there existed nowhere a database of books and their IDs.

Is this flawed in some way? It seems like it would be pretty easy to implement, and the library themselves wouldn't know what book the borrower had.

-C

Troll-Kore 0wnz j00 all!!!!111111 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686093)

- TROLL-KORE FOREVER
- I hate you, I hate your country, and I hate your face!
___
/ | \
|_____| #TROLLKORE
/|||||\ IRC.FREENODE.NET
| o /\O |
| UUUUU |
\_____/
| | LOOK AT MY SHINY BELL,
| | AND MY HUMPED BACK!
| 8 | - Prince of Knobstradamus
|S S|
/8S8S8\
|8S8S8S8|
|S8S8S8S|
\__/__/

Trll-Kore are kings and monarchs (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686108)

- TROLL-KORE FOREVER
- I hate you, I hate your country, and I hate your face!
___
/ | \
|_____| #TROLLKORE
/|||||\ -IRC.FREENODE.NET-
| o /\O |
| UUUUU |
\_____/
| | LOOK AT MY SHINY BELL,
| | AND MY HUMPED BACK!
| 8 | - Prince of Knobstradamus
|S S|
/8S8S8\
|8S8S8S8|
|S8S8S8S|
\__/__/

Troll-Kore hates you, your country, and your face (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686117)

- TROLL-KORE FOREVER
- I hate you, I hate your country, and I hate your face!
___
/ | \
|_____| #TROLLKORE
/|||||\ IRC.FREENODE.NET
| o /\O |
| UUUUU |
\_____/
| | LOOK AT MY SHINY BELL,
| | AND MY HUMPED BACK!
| 8 | - Prince of Knobstradamus
|S S|
/8S8S8\
|8S8S8S8|
|S8S8S8S|
\__/__/

Taco sucks men's knobs, then licks their mastabatory juices off

What about bookstores? (2, Interesting)

Eric Ass Raymond (662593) | more than 11 years ago | (#5686132)

What does Patriot Act say about bookstores and online bookstores [amazon.com] in particular.

If I search for books about nuclear weapons, nuclear technology and guns, am I going to get flagged for it.

moron misleading titles (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5686139)

is it US against 'them'? or US against us? both you say? that's georgewellian?

can murderers use anonymous email accounts, establishable at public libraries, to communicate their evil intents? you can bet your .asp they can.

do we (ALL of us) need to be aware of/act on this fraility? right again.

where it all falls askew (remember him?), is all of the additional spywear(tm) funnelling(tm) ?pr? MiSinformation feechurns billed into the hypenosys(tm), that equates to ill eagle restraint of trade, etc.... now that's scary.

lookout bullow. as always, check with yOUR creator as to the validity of any presentation, no matter how many times it is MiSrepresented to you/us. thank you very much.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>