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Plankton in the Clouds

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the pray-for-rain dept.

Space 84

An anonymous reader writes "NASA is reporting that the September 1997 Pacific hurricane, Nora, was able to deliver sea salt and plankton as far inland as Oklahoma. The tale-tell signs of prismatic light halos around cirrus clouds pointed to ice crystals with nucleated hexagons and sea-salted clouds. Various proposals have been made previously about such 'life in the clouds' proposals on other planets like Jupiter and Venus."

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84 comments

first post (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823625)

first post?

Intelligent life in Oklahoma... (4, Funny)

MosesJones (55544) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823628)


Is now only a few billion years of evolution away... :-)

Re:Intelligent life in Oklahoma... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823649)

...or a few billion nanoseconds depending on
what and whose time frame reference your are defining it from.

Please bring on more of these party plankton people with pretty phosphorous purple pixels :)

And Euro-trash will be next right? (-1, Troll)

BoomerSooner (308737) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824170)

Euro-trash living up to my expectation. Thanks.

Re:Intelligent life in Oklahoma... (1)

cybrpnk2 (579066) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824564)

...can evelve faster by checking out our earlier version of this story over on Sci-Fi Today [scifitoday.com] (and even leaving a comment or hello there!) and also by signing up for SFT headlines on their Slashdot home pages here [slashdot.org] .

Intelligent life in anywhere else? (2, Informative)

B2K3 (669124) | more than 11 years ago | (#5825279)

Okie Stereotypes [216.239.39.100] "Yes, I'm from the Sooner State, I tell them -- land of wheat fields, Indian reservations, TV evangelists, and country music; and who could forget the setting of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma: 'O-o-o-oklahoma, where the wind comes sweepin' down the plain.'

A state shaped like a kitchen utensil, as if the founders who drew the boundary lines had consigned it to serve as a perpetual building block of the Southwest, an essential part of the meal that no one sees, all glamour and strength hidden from view, what remains on the stove after servers carry away entrees on fancy china plates and lace napkins -- a part of the United States that everyone knows instinctively, but which few can place on a map."

By the way, there are more than 700 National Merit/Achievement/Hispanic Scholars at the University of Oklahoma. How does your state university compare?

He's Euro-Trash. (0, Troll)

BoomerSooner (308737) | more than 11 years ago | (#5825696)

Let's see, things common in Oklahoma, not in Europe:
1) Women shaving Pits, Legs (OK Yes, Euro No)
2) Correction for sorry ass crooked teeth (OK Yes, Euro No)
3) Hygiene, (aka Taking a shower, brushing teeth, using deodorant, etc) (OK Yes, Euro No)
4) High standard of living (OK Yes, Euro No) (I make over 180K/year that's about 110 pounds, doubtful the Euro-Trash makes that much, however since he is "so far evolved" I'm surprised)
5) Taxes that are equitable (OK Yes, Euro No)

I'd have to say overall Euro-trash is far behind in most areas. I wonder when they will "evolve".

Re:Intelligent life in anywhere else? (1)

Joe the Lesser (533425) | more than 11 years ago | (#5826233)

'You label me, I label you, and I dump the unforgiven.'-Metallica

slashdot does itself disservice (1)

andy666 (666062) | more than 11 years ago | (#5839836)

how can slashdot claim to want less trolling and flamebait and then mod that at 5 funny ?

First codex.lu post! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823637)

We really do hate [codex.lu] Linux!

Dupe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823657)

They have plakton in the sky AGAIN??

Who needs dogs and cats... (3, Funny)

MeanE (469971) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823663)

when you have sea salt and plankton.

Is it just plankton... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823664)

... or plankton in the sky with diamonds?

Re:Is it just plankton... (1)

cap'n foolsy (635911) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824679)

that sounds a bit too much like a twilight zone episode.

Is NASA really relevant?? (0, Insightful)

jkrise (535370) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823669)

Going by the no. of articles on Slashdot, one would think NASA is a huge, highly successful org., and one intent on extending the frontiers of technology. Cutting off all the chaff, I guess there's very little NASA's doing that's relevant. The hype built around them is not matched by anything they've turned out, over the last 3 decades.

Too much hype, too little advancement.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823687)

Hey man, *YOU* go to the moon, then i will listen to your opinions.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (-1)

johoho (192418) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823702)

you've never been to the moon, see this [iangoddard.net] or this [nasa.gov] .

Wiktor

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (0, Troll)

jkrise (535370) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823712)

" Hey man, *YOU* go to the moon, then i will listen to your opinions."

What've we learnt after going to the moon? It's thrilling, terrific, giant leap blah blah, but what else? Have we learnt ANYTHING about the moon, which we couldn't have done, sitting here? The weight of the moon? Chemical composition? Life on the moon?

What about the space shuttle experiments? Zero ravity, zero pressure experiments.. anything useful out there? Very little, IMO.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823788)

maybe, but would you have gps ? weather satellites ? Hubble ? Vegetables in little bags, that taste fresh until 2099 ? ...

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823900)

I suspect it is more about the ability to get ON the moon, than it is about actually getting there

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (4, Informative)

orac2 (88688) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824477)

Have we learnt ANYTHING about the moon, which we couldn't have done, sitting here?

Absolutely. Here's one shining example -- the so-called genesis rock, a piece of anorthosite which formed part of the moon's priomordial crust, was a critical piece in unlocking the moon's early history.

It was recoverd by the crew of Apollo 15, the first of the J-missions, where the objectives focused on science and not just seeing if the Apollo hardware worked (e.g. landing on 11, precision landing on 12).

This crew had been trained as pretty good field geologists by the legendary Lee Silver. Without their eye for geological context this rock would probably never have been spotted, and certainly not had it's recovery site as well characterised.
Even geologists who had been previously opposed to the manned missions to the moon acknowledged the value of their contribution, and those of Apollo 16 and 17.

To quote geologist Dale Jackson, who said at the time: "Did you see those guys today? They got up there on the side of that mountain and found that bolder and they sampled the soil around the rock, and then they knocked a piece off it, and then they rolled it over and got some of the soil underneath it! Why, they did everything but fuck that rock!"

If you think this material could have been recovered by, say, remotely controlled machine, well, I invite you to place the best robot and robot team you can find in the Arizona desert and match them up against a single geology grad student and search for, say, fossils, for a day.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (1)

duckpoopy (585203) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824611)

Don't forget Tang and that delicious freeze-dried astronaut ice cream. The space race accelerated the development of these and many other novelty snacks.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5825030)

Tang is an example of NASA-related advertising success, not development. Look up the creation of Tang.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (1)

Jerf (17166) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824628)

If you're willing to have an open mind, I'd check out stuff like [google.com] this [nasa.gov] .

Most estimates I've seen have the space program paying for itself in the long-run, you just don't see it because the money doesn't show up as income on NASA's budget sheets.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5825628)

What we learned after going to the Moon is that we could abandon it.

Nobody predicted that.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (1)

Pike65 (454932) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823715)

Yeah, even Slashdot appear to have realised we're losing interest since they're so desparate they seem to have made the Space icon 1x1 on the front page . . .

"Aiee! I just clicked on a Space story by accident!"
"Don't move, I'll get the disinfectant!"

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (1)

p00ya (579445) | more than 11 years ago | (#5826196)

they seem to have made the Space icon 1x1 on the front page . . .


the icon is 73x59 for me..

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823758)

You don't need a hurricane, neither NASA to
have stuff going in the sky,
I have seen a large stem of a plant flying at
2000m (6500ft).
It was taken there only with air convection.

Re:Is NASA really relevant?? (1)

barakn (641218) | more than 11 years ago | (#5829783)

And you got to 2000m by flapping your arms....

one word easily refutes your claim (1)

andy666 (666062) | more than 11 years ago | (#5839850)

TANG

Dead or alive? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823670)

Scientists were surprised to find what appeared to be frozen plankton in some cirrus crystals collected by research aircraft over Oklahoma, far from the Pacific Ocean.

So they found some dead plankton. I'd be much more impressed about the connection with Venus if they were still alive while in the clouds some how.

Re:Dead or alive? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823694)

So the plankton died - big deal. There's plenty of microorganisms that wouldn't have.

Re:Dead or alive? (-1)

AlabamaMike (657318) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823697)

Scientists were surprised to find what appeared to be frozen plankton .... But they weren't surprised to find a dupe post on a popular news website entitled Slashdot. Can anyone say Content Management? -A.M.

I wonder (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823672)

Is there life in the rings around Uranus?

Yes - For all intensive purposes he's the best! (1)

andy666 (666062) | more than 11 years ago | (#5839895)

some klingons !

Thank god no horrible spongebob references. (2, Funny)

Crasoum (618885) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823679)

Means I can be the first to get the crabby patty recipe

Moon rainbows (5, Interesting)

ojQj (657924) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823693)

A few years ago, in Houston I saw a pale rainbow around the almost-full moon at night. It was a very cold night for Houston (below freezing), but since it was Houston, the humidity in the air was very high. Someone explained to me that the rainbow was because the humidity in the air was frozen into ice crystals which then had special refractory properties.

Based on this article, I have to ask: Could saltwater have been a better explanation for this beautiful phenomenon? Does anybody here know?

Re:Moon rainbows (4, Informative)

trikberg (621893) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823807)

It was probably a halo. I've never seen one around the moon, but they do occasionally appear around the sun if it's cold enough. I guess the conditions in Finland are a little different from Houston.

Google for sun halo [google.com] gives 155 000 hits compared to 91 000 for moon halo [google.com] , so halos around the moon are apperently not entirely uncommon. On this page [nasa.gov] is a neat picture of a sun halo, and a short explanation of the phenomenon.

Re:Moon rainbows (4, Informative)

CraigoFL (201165) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824363)

No idea what saltwater would do, but in Western Canada (where I'm originally from) we could see these things all the time (both around the sun and the moon) when the weather got cold enough. They're commonly called "sundogs"; the technical term is "parhelia".

Some links:

http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answer s/970207e.html [nasa.gov]
http://www.geocities.com/~kcdreher/sundogs.html [geocities.com]

They may be pretty, but they'd be easier to appreciate if they didn't signify that it's freakin' cold outside :-/

Re:Moon rainbows (1)

aaarrrgggh (9205) | more than 11 years ago | (#5826157)

It isn't just cold weather; I've seen them in San Francisco and Thailand both. Don't know what the cause is...

Re:Moon rainbows (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5829456)

It's caused by stratospheric ice crystals.

life (5, Insightful)

prmths (325452) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823701)

life as we know it is possible anywhere there is water. At this point, simple life forms like algea and bacteria on an extra-terrestrial world wouldn't excite me more than a "that's damn cool" type reaction. I'm to the point now that I'd expect there to be simple life on some of the other worlds in our solar system. I'd be a lot more surprised of all the planets and moons around us were completely dead. Now if they found concrete proof of extinct complex organisms on mars, or a sea full of life on Europa, It'd be a very exciting day. Jupiter's natural radiation could heat Europa's innards enough for life to thrive. Some say that the amount of radiation from jupiter would kill everything off; but life has a tendency to find a way to overcome obstacles. After all, despite all our efforts, spammers exist, trolls keep posting and the Saddams of the world keep on having their way.

Europa (0)

dj_paulgibbs (619622) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823728)

Attempt no landings there!

Re:Europa (1)

prmths (325452) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823733)

Jupiter hasn't erupted into a brown dwarf yet; so it's ok. :D

Re:Europa (1, Funny)

kinnell (607819) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823780)

Give it another 7 years ;-)

Re:life (2, Interesting)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823861)

The big deal is that it would cause all the religious people to freak out, and they would have to rewrite their religion in a major way. I'm not naive enough to believe it would be the end of religion, they've adapted before in the face of overwhelming evidence that they were wrong.

Re:life (2, Offtopic)

prmths (325452) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823991)

religion does seem like it'd have a cow. After all there are people out there who still belive the earth is flat and we're riding through the universe on the back of a turtle.
Personally I couldnt care less about the religious people anymore.. I've lived in the bible belt for so long i'm immune to some of the residents' 'blind faith'. Blind faith has always bothered me to no end. Even when I was a naive kid of 5 or 6. I believed what my parents told me to believe; but i didnt like it. None of it made any sense to me. After a while, i honestly believed that all the religious stories were just that... something to tell to kids so that they wouldn't bug you about all the 'why' questions. It wasn't until I was working on my associate's degree in a biology class when i realized.... people actually believe all those fairy tales they've been force-fed during their childhood. These people actually honestly believe that they're right and the 80-90+% of the rest of the world is wrong. That revelation made me lose faith about 99.99%

Re:life (1)

b-baggins (610215) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824795)

That's OK. Some day you'll realize you aren't half as smart as you think you are, and don't have a tenth of the world figured out the way you think you do.

Well, that of course assumes your ego gets out of the way, so maybe I'm exercising a little too much blind faith here as well.

Re:life (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5825909)

Oh come on -- he isn't asserting that he's smarter than anyone else; he's simply saying that he questions things before blindly believing them. Big difference.

Try not to belittle others for not blindly believing something. Skepticism is a good thing.

Re:life (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5825185)

Faith isn't about facts. Your real education hasn't begun.

Re:life (2, Insightful)

master control progr (654310) | more than 11 years ago | (#5826562)

This is not flamebait. Religions don't have a very good track record when it comes to accepting new discoveries that contradict them. Besides, this view is fairly common among those of us who choose to think for ourselves... FWIW, although I was raised in church, I started tuning out uber-religious people after a "good christian" woman called me a fairly nasty name over a debate about whether dinosaurs had really existed. Her view was since they were not mentioned explicitly in the Bible, they never existed, and there was no chance she was wrong about it (science be damned!). Whatever.

BTW, blind faith in your religion is not only a problem in the South. For example, does any rational Muslim really believe that Allah condones the killing of Jews... or Catholics vs. Protestants in Ireland...

Re:life (1, Offtopic)

Zaak (46001) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824412)

The big deal is that it would cause all the religious people to freak out, and they would have to rewrite their religion in a major way.

You're painting with an awfully big brush there. I don't know of many religions where "life only exists on earth" is a major doctrine.

I'm sure there are some people for whom it is a strongly held belief, but for each one of those there are many more who do not have a strong belief either way, and even quite a few for whom the discovery of life on other planets would be a validation of their faith.

May I suggest that you take a class on the religions of the world? I think you would find it an informative experience.

TTFN

Re:life (1)

sketerpot (454020) | more than 11 years ago | (#5825450)

Well, not all the religious people---but quite a few of them. There are some people who have certain religious beliefs but don't seem to really believe them. I don't know; I gave up trying to understand that years ago.

Re:life (0)

atarian (168920) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823930)


Whore's keep a whorin'
Junkies keep scorein'
Ain't no use in praying,
That's the way it's staying baby.

Re:life (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823983)

As to the radiation, just remember; The area immediately around chernobyl is still full of plants and the squirrel population is reported to be thriving and pretty much normal.

Re:life (1)

naasking (94116) | more than 11 years ago | (#5827133)

Jupiter's natural radiation could heat Europa's innards enough for life to thrive.

I do not think it has anything to do with radiation from Jupiter (since any radiation would simply be reflection from the Sun), but instead the heat is caused by the intense gravitational tidal forces from Jupiter (similar to the tidal effect of the moon on Earth). Gravity is constantly compressing and altering the shape of Europa and this friction causes it to heat up to the point where liquid water can exist (under the surface at least). The same effect between the Earth, the Sun and the moon contributes to the high core temperatures of the Earth (I believe).

Jumping the Gun? (3, Insightful)

tanveer1979 (530624) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823746)

I guess the guys being too hopeful. Even if it is micro-biological life, it needs some time to form out of basic building blocks.

Up in the clouds the conditions are too violent and volatile and material transfer is past, so life may land up there, but it is difficult for it to develop from there, unless the whole cloud is made of primodial soup, like the depths of jupiter where there is thich murky cloud where scientists think life is possible.

But life forming in clouds like venus has, sorry i dont bite.

Yet more exciting! (3, Funny)

sn0wcrash (223995) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823752)

There have been reports of dogs, people and farm animals to name a few in the clouds during several tornados! This must say alot about the possibility of life on Jupiter!!!

Re:Yet more exciting! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5824884)

It also is relevant to the survivability of witches on Jupiter.

Re:Yet more exciting! (1)

metlin (258108) | more than 11 years ago | (#5825316)


It pains me to note that you've put people in the same category as dogs and farm animals :p

Re:Yet more exciting! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5836274)

Same category, as in, being carried by a tornado?

Oh, you were joking. Ha ha.

Raining fish.... (0)

s10god (409764) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823784)

How about when a twister sucks up a pond full of fish and rains it on a city somewhere else...

moron working yOURselves to debt (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823806)

how long is it until we're all billyonerrors again?

shuks, first y'all need a job, seeing as the phonIE payper liesense hostage ransom stock markup (& all its .conmissions) scamsters are on the run/under indictment. doesn't leave as many options dough.

here's a flash: once the dark daze of softwar gangsters has finished deepending into coolapps, the hole payper liesense bullshipping industrIE is going to open up. don't hold your breath though.

lookout bullow. consult with yOUR creator frequently regarding which activities are guaranteed tickets to DOWn bullow.

fuddles, & the georgewellians, give US ALL a bad name. put that on your resume.

That sounds like a horrible Beatles song (4, Funny)

Rhinobird (151521) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823812)

Plankton in the sky with algea?

I seem to remember someone finding spiders and vaious bacteria way up before, and as soon as they brought them back down to eath they came back alive. Curse my bad memory.

Re:That sounds like a horrible Beatles song (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823840)

Plankton in the sky with algea?

Or "Plankton super ice cube in the sky" by the Beat... er, Oasis.

Re:That sounds like a horrible Beatles song (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5824099)

way up?

BEWARE - CREATION TOOK EIGHT DAYS (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5823865)

Could .. other .. life thrive up above the clouds, too, perhaps?

OOOOOklahoma! (4, Funny)

Joe the Lesser (533425) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823867)

Where the plankton comes sweeping down the plains!!!

Fossiles in the mountains? (-1)

Eric Ass Raymond (662593) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823884)

It just occurred to me that wouldn't this, not the sea level changes, explain fossiles found high in modern day mountains?

English as second language? (2, Funny)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 11 years ago | (#5823955)

I always kind of thought the term was tell-tale.

I guess once the FAA gets word of this, they'll require algae impact testing on airliner windshields .

Re:English as second language? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5830251)

It's sad when I think about it & realize that they just might do that. They regulate everything else they can think of... :)

Star Control II was right... (2, Funny)

BondHeadGuy (529371) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824045)

...about those Slylandro gas bags. Don't ask them about their glowy bits!

not before my coffee (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5824092)

prismatic light halos around cirrus clouds pointed to ice crystals with nucleated hexagons and sea-salted clouds

right. run that by me again?

Re:not before my coffee (1)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824974)

prismatic light halos around cirrus clouds pointed to ice crystals with nucleated hexagons and sea-salted clouds

right. run that by me again?

It's perfectly clear.
There was a rainbow-colored arrow pointing at ice crystals on honeycomb, with a side serving of salted mashed potatoes.

Maybe you should order from the kiddie menu. Want some fried immature avian reproductive cells on dehydrated ground grass seed paste?

They must be in heaven (2, Funny)

mnmn (145599) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824155)


Hey this plankton came from cloud No 9, came with a tiny harp.

A good book... (3, Informative)

binner1 (516856) | more than 11 years ago | (#5824629)

If you find this concept interesting, and enjoy Sci-Fi, try the book Wheelers [amazon.com] by Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen. It's a neat book that fleshes out this concept in intricate detail. I picked it up in a clearance sale at my local book store, and was glad of the purchase!

-Ben

Salty Plankton? Underaccomplished. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5825047)

That's nothing when compared to dropping piles of seagulls on Utah.

The Sun, The Genome and The Internet (3, Interesting)

shancock (89482) | more than 11 years ago | (#5825198)

by Freeman Dyson talks about this in his wonderful book published in 1999. Specifically he talks about the chances of finding lifeforms on Mars and Europa (a satellite of Jupiter). He suggests looking into the space around Europa instead of on the surface for "freeze dried fish".

From the final chapter: "Every time there is a major impact on Europa, a vast quantity of water will be splashed from the ocean into the space around Jupiter. The water will partly evaporate and partly condense into snow. Any creatures living in the water not too close to the impact (meteor impacts) will have a chance of being splashed intact into space with the water and quickly freeze dried."

I'm not sure if this book has been reviewed in slashdot, but it deserves another shot since so much here is relevant especially after the last shuttle disaster. Dyson is dead on track here.

evidence of marine life where there was none? (0)

jerel (112066) | more than 11 years ago | (#5827711)

I've read before about how fish and tadpoles and even frogs "rain from the heavens" in some places, and it's clear that this happens. This article could bring into question some of the "evidence" that archeologists find that they claim points to an area being underwater. If enough fish and frogs and now plankton rain down in an area over time, and this stuff sort of piles up, how would they be able to tell if there was really marine life there, or if is simply an artifact of this weird kind of rain that is filled with this sh.. er... stuff? And what about tornadoes and hurricans and such that can carry mountains of this kind of debris??

Impact on other sciences ? (1)

Dave21212 (256924) | more than 11 years ago | (#5829207)


IAJAP, I am just a programmer, but

If this living material is present at that level, do we think it can precipitate out ? and if so, what impact do you think this would have on projects that analyse the minute traces of life in remote areas [sciencenews.org] ? Actually, what impact might that have on umbrella sales ??? ;)

Anything else in the clouds? (1)

nytes (231372) | more than 11 years ago | (#5830760)

How long until we all get to move to the Smoke Ring?

Your an idiot (1)

foodpie79 (669146) | more than 11 years ago | (#5834840)

plankton that was picked up by a hurricane out of the water, died and didn't originate there is a hell of alot different than life that developes in the clouds. I would thinkl that someone who knows how to type and use a computer would be smart enough to realize this but hey, maybe I've overestimated the inteligence required to do those kinds of things.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5839975)

the plankton in the clouds put you!!
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