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'Pacemaker'-like GPS Device for Humans

CowboyNeal posted more than 10 years ago | from the here-i-am dept.

Privacy 348

LunarFox writes "Applied Digital Solutions has announced successful field trials of a prototype GPS device that can be implanted into humans. The device, which is internally rechargable, can wirelessly transmit location, movements and vital signs via the Internet, storing the info in a database. It's said to be the size of a pacemaker, but they intend to miniaturize it to one-tenth that size. You may recall this company as having designed the 'Digital Angel,' and 'Verichip,' a ricegrain-sized RFID chip like injectable pet tracking ID chips. This same company apparently made several denials in 2002 that their product(s) would be anything but externally worn. (like a wristwatch) Many other related links can be found at WorldNetDaily." On one hand the potential cool uses astound me, while the possibilty of abuse frightens me. A lot.

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348 comments

premier post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971037)

ce premier post est dedie au tas de merde qui dirige les tazunis !

Re:premier post (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971078)

les francais sont dans la place!!

-- Brought to you by the Open Trolls Movement (french division)

Re:premier post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971109)

Monsieur, vous me voyez fort aise de votre renfort.
Pensez-vous que ces mangeurs de biguemaques vont continuer à nous casser les esgourdes avec leur babil d'amibes-monosynaptiques ?

Dick Cheney (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971044)

He's already signed up!

You might call me paranoid... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971046)

But what makes you so sure devices like this haven't already been implanted in you since the day you were born?

Worth thinking about. A bit of hoopla about a product that comes to exist by a private company, and you can bet the military has had it for decades.

Re:You might call me paranoid... (5, Insightful)

L0k11 (617726) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971054)

i take it you've never had an x-ray of yourself

x-rays would tend to show if people had a GPS device with antennea implanted in them

Re:You might call me paranoid... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971074)

You can't be too sure. Many devices do not show up as completely x-ray opaque, and if placed in an appropriate position in the ends of major bones with well shaped antenna would be quite invisible to x-rays. Indeed they may be able to extract power from them. Also many people have tooth fillings which can be used to hide just about anything, not to mention the complexity of the skull bones around a nasal cavity. Do you know your own well enough to be certain of what it SHOULD look like?

Re:You might call me paranoid... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971149)

Also these could be implanted to the areas that are protected from x-rays.

For example near genitals.

Re:You might call me paranoid... (2, Informative)

VCAGuy (660954) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971186)

Many devices do not show up as completely x-ray opaque

True, but you'd be hard pressed to create an electronic device that would not show up in an MRI. Any metal at all would create field distortion--and the plastic parts of the device would show up in the field as different from surrounding tissue.

Also, I don't think these would be undetectable by PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scanners--they find everything, including that chewing gum you swallowed a few months ago...

Re:You might call me paranoid... (1)

Alain Williams (2972) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971077)

Oh, I've had x-rays and the doctors have told me what they saw - I don't have the training to distinguish one vague blob from another. Presumably if I did have one implanted the doctors would be disallowed to tell me - in much the same way as a system administrator (in the UK at least) is not allowed to tell someone that the police are monitoring their emails.

There are many that say ``If you don't want the police to know, you must be guilty of something.''

Re:You might call me paranoid... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971087)

I've had xrays of myself [debian.org] done and they look completely normal. What's the problem?

Re:You might call me paranoid... (3, Informative)

Eudial (590661) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971167)

Well, if you were to make it out of a thin, soft plastic material, and make the wires extremely thin, it wouldn't show up on x-ray. it would, however show up on ultrasound.

Paranoia and conspiracy (3, Funny)

jellyfish_green (605870) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971076)

Military? Are you saying the alien abductions and implants left in the abductees are connected to secret programs run by the US Military? Using timeshared UFO technology? That's ridiculous, Mulder.

someone post something (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971047)

I'm a moderator waiting to whack some trolls, post something damnit. FP someone!

Re:someone post something (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971212)

Hello. I am a troll. Please mod me and my lovely matrix down.
0 1 2
1 0 3
4 3 8

kidnapping of the future: (4, Funny)

lovebyte (81275) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971049)

1. kidnap victim
2. operate on victim to remove tracking device
3. ask ransom
etc..

Re:kidnapping of the future: (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971080)

4. Profit

Re:kidnapping of the future: (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971144)

Step 0: Use tracking device to locate potential target and analyse daily movement schedule...

Re:kidnapping of the future: (1)

lovebyte (81275) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971218)

Step 0: Use tracking device to locate potential target and analyse daily movement schedule...

Good point. I'll add that to my business plan

Re:kidnapping of the future: (1)

GroovBird (209391) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971153)

Wouldn't they think of that? As in not making public if you have one of these?

Dave

You did it !!!! (1)

da5idnetlimit.com (410908) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971156)

4. Profit.

Gosh ! First time I see someone divulging his ultra confidential business plan on /.
Did you patent it first ? 8p

Now I'm waiting for the silly jokes...

btw a good solution to prevent this to work if implanted would be putting the kidnappee in one of those highly reflective emergency covers (the gold and silver ones)...

Also I can't begin to imagine what would have happened to me if my Mom had had access to this sort of tech 8(

Re:kidnapping of the future: (1)

gweihir (88907) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971161)


1. kidnap victim
2. operate on victim to remove tracking device
3. ask ransom
etc..


What I find very unsettling is the real 2.:

2. operate on victim to remove tracking device and bothcthis up horribly, killing the victim or crippling it for life..

Re:kidnapping of the future: (1)

nounderscores (246517) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971254)

Not really. What happens if all you have to do to kill the antenna/electronics is run the victim over a degaussing magnet a few times. Build up enough induced current to fry the circuits without messing up the victim too much.

Later you can extract the device at an expensive hospital and mail it back to the family with a video tape of the operation as "proof of life".

Also, as far as not advertising that someone is chipped, it wouldn't matter. All you have to do is x-ray the victim using Korean War technology and look for something that looks like shrapnel.

Now, implanting these bastards somewhere inoperable (like around the brain stem with a nice quantity of thermite wired to it as an anti-tamper measure) might deter such efforts. But it might also make the victim's encounters with those book check-out magnets at the local library more exciting.

Re:kidnapping of the future: (2, Funny)

mikerich (120257) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971182)

:) Ah but surely circumventing a person's security system will violate the DMCA? The kidnappers will quake at the thought! Best wishes, Mike.

Re:kidnapping of the future: (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971198)

Ya, they'll get more time for violating the DMCA than for kidnapping a person.

Re:kidnapping of the future: (4, Funny)

Harald74 (40901) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971255)

Alternative:

2. Wrap victim in aluminum foil

or

2. Keep victim indoors or inside a car where the GPS doesn't work

This device is not _that_ hard to foil...

Big Brother is watching!! (5, Insightful)

mharris007 (142886) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971050)

I'm not really into conspiracy theories, and generally not very paranoid; but this really makes you think of what "Big Brother" or anyone for that matter can do to track people.

I wonder what all the future applications of this device will be? I wonder if in the future they will require known convicted felons to wear these? Just think about all the scary applications such devices can be put to.

Re:Big Brother is watching!! (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971170)

The simplest use would be for people ordered not to go near some places (paedophiles near schools, stalkers near victims etc). In the case of the paedophiles, such orders are for life - an implant would be perfect in such a case.

I don't have a problem with convicted criminals being implanted, and their movements tracked for a certain amount of time, it'll reduce the prison populations and, hopefully, ensure convicts don't commit more crimes because theyd be found out easier. Deterring crime is far better than punishing the wrongdoer after the event.

Re:Big Brother is watching!! (4, Insightful)

mikerich (120257) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971192)

I don't have a problem with convicted criminals being implanted, and their movements tracked for a certain amount of time

There would be major ethical problems for most surgeons. It would go against their creed to operate on a person without their consent when the operation was not needed for a medical condition.

I think we should take some time to consider the implications of asking doctors and surgeons to perform such operations.

Besides, the first people to receive these implants should be politicians, oh and the entire staff at Digital Angel.

Best wishes,
Mike.

Re:Big Brother is watching!! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971277)

We already operate on the mentally ill without their informed consent. No-one seems too bothered about dosing schizophrenics with huge doses of drugs that might work to make their condition worse, even without their consent.

Re:Big Brother is watching!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971256)

I'm not really into conspiracy theories, and generally not very paranoid; but this really makes you think of what "Big Brother" or anyone for that matter can do to track people.

Don't worry about it. Make sure your tin-foil hat fits snugly and you should be OK. I still find people following me from time to time. They don't think that I know that they know that I know they're following me so they're being very elusive. Sometimes it's a guy on a park bench reading a paper. Other times it's a delivery guy in a UPS uniform. They're very shifty, but if you're smart enough you'll be able to avoid these Big Brother agents.

Privacy.. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971052)

Please dont start with bloody 'my privacy is at risk posts' - every time something like this kind of topic comes up, all of the paranoia patrol come out to whinge.

BigBrother (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971053)

great. just what i always wanted. soon companies will make it manditory to where these devices in the offices. Then acces to areas could obviously be much easier(computer knows that one is at a door and checks to see if you are allowed in/out and then only unlocks) but they can also monitor you movements. eg how many smokebreaks you take, how long you stay at your desk etc.

Re:BigBrother (3, Interesting)

glesga_kiss (596639) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971269)

Where have you been for the last five years? Do you work in an office with key-less ID cards for access anywhere?

If you do, you already have this sort of thing. Sure, you need to hold the card 6 inches from the panel for it to open the door, however it can register the presence of a card over a much longer distance. So, that ID badge you already carry could be doing just this sort of thing. It all depends on how the system was configured.

But, this isn't all that new anyway. Mobile phones have been able to do similar things for quite some time. Take this high profile rape case [bbc.co.uk] in the UK, where a couple were cleared of criminal charges using mobile phone location evidence.

Hell, while we are talking about the complete loss of privacy in todays society, I might as well throw in this link [cryptome.org] to an official European Union report into the routine monitoring of the internet and telephone networks by Echelon [echelonwatch.org].

This new thing isn't anything to fear. You should be scared already.

this is gonna make a great plugin for Doom 3! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971057)

we're actually building a location based game you can play through a regular web browser right now, so i guess this tech will give us a bunch of NPCs?

- that guy

p.s.: first?

Boss' revenge? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971061)

Interesting how this is posted hours after How to Fake a Hard Day at the Office [/.] [slashdot.org]. Just when we thought we had outsmarted them...

Re:Boss' revenge? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971219)

Place the device in yer dog and take it to the office. You'll get a raise.

Re:Boss' revenge? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971270)

another AC wrote Place the device in yer dog and take it to the office. You'll get a raise.

What if your dog likes humping things?? Then the person filing sexual harrassment will have a semen stained garment and digital proof that "ÿou" were there at the time.

Extension (5, Funny)

cwernli (18353) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971066)

I'll take it, but only with an extension module: I want to run my own webserver inside myself. Must be a chilling experience to personally get DoSed.

Re:Extension (4, Funny)

JohnHegarty (453016) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971082)

Good idea. When you get that done put a link to it on slashdot.... it will be the first death by slashdotting

Hello people, wake up (4, Insightful)

override11 (516715) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971069)

All those folk with a cell phone?? You allready have one of these, no need to fret. Just have 3 base stations sent pings to your phone, triangulate position, and big brother will be there shortly. Oh, your phone is not turned on? Sok, no need for it to be on. This type of device continues to become more popular, and the amount of power that goes into the hands of people who control this is amazing. Just because its in the terms of service that they will not release this information, how much would it take for someone who REALLY wanted to find you to go see a low level tech @ the cell phone place, pay a bit of $$, and whamo get your exact position and heading. The age of privacy has been over for a long time, people are just waking up too it.

Re:Hello people, wake up (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971089)

. Oh, your phone is not turned on? Sok, no need for it to be on.

you are so full of shit you stink.

This is a bold-faced lie designed to only mislead.

Sorry mister know-nothing... but a modern cellphone (or any cellphone for that matter) DOES NOT RADIATE ANY RF ENERGY WHEN THEY ARE TURNED OFF.

sheesh, and no your TV is not watching you.

Man I cannot believe the complete freaks and nuts out here....

Re:Hello people, wake up (1)

override11 (516715) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971115)

They dont have to radiate energy, they just have to be in range of the tower. :P

http://100777.com/science/08.htm [100777.com]

And I really think that funky odor is your own denial

READ YOUR OWN ARTICLE! (4, Insightful)

RMH101 (636144) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971134)

"Mobile (Cell) phones send signals that can be tracked, even when they're on standby". Turn it off, no RF energy. Simple.
For fellow geeks with P800s, just put it in "flight mode" for the same effect.

"I could super-impose an RF signal on the telephone line that would "jump" or "short" out the hook switch on the phone effectively creating an off-hook condition" has precisely bog-all to do with modern GSM digital handsets.

Also, any site with a cute .gif button mentioning "The Ark of the Covenant: against Satan New World Order" probably isn't exactly a technical journal, dig?

Re:READ YOUR OWN ARTICLE! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971210)

It only has to receive information. The rest is software: The phone could wait for a trigger before it sends a beacon. Besides, the network caches the last known log-in information in order to avoid having to ping the whole network when a call for that specific cellphone arrives. As long as a cellphone stays within a cell, it only notifies the network of its presence every few hours (sending consumes much more power than receiving). In between these notifications, the phone could just as well be destroyed physically without influencing the passive location information. Only if you want to make sure that the surveillance object hasn't moved, you have to force the phone to transmit something, and for that it has to be in standby mode, not off. A "hidden standby" would consume energy, maybe not as much as real standby if it came online only every ten minutes or so, but still more than completely off.

ah I know a guy who can do that ;) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971125)

I know a friend of a friend who has this ability. Have seen proof shown me once only with police software, and presumeably somesort of network access (??). Sounds like bs, and looked like it.

Yet proof was definate - we both waited months while he built up a number of people to prove it to, at same time to cut down chance of getting caught. Our positions of our turned-on mobiles at the time were all correct, though mine was predictable anyway (at work).

However, bear it in mind even if you don't belive this (I wouldn't), there's always the police :p

Re:ah I know a guy who can do that ;) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971245)

The German cellphone network provider O2 (formerly known as Viag Interkom) offers this service to all their customers. They can locate their own cellphone through a web interface [genion.de] (page is in German, the service is called "handyfinder", "handy" is the German pseudo-English word for cellphone).

Re:Hello people, wake up (1)

heli0 (659560) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971128)

You can read about the FCC regulations regarding that here: Enhanced 911 [fcc.gov]

Cell phone carriers need to be able to pinpoint the location of a call immediately by December 31, 2005.

This approach is being used ... (4, Interesting)

zonix (592337) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971143)

Just have 3 base stations sent pings to your phone, triangulate position, and big brother will be there shortly.

This approach is actually being used by some telephone companies here in Denmark. They can track you, and when you're at home they'll give you a low minute rate.

z

Re:This approach is being used ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971183)

There's no triangulation involved, just the location of the BTS and the direction of its sector antenna. Some phones can be programmed to avoid certain BTSes. This can be used to connect to your "home" BTS even though a BTS which is outside your home zone (that's what O2-Germany calls it) would give better signal quality. With triangulation this wouldn't work. Consequentially, home zones in areas with low BTS density are larger than in cities for example. This also means that you can strategically place the center of your home zone to increase the number of BTSes/sectors which must belong to your homezone (the circle with the minimum radius of the homezone touches the most desirable sectors in a voronoi diagram of the sector antennas' coverage).

Re:Hello people, wake up (1)

IsThisNickTaken (555227) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971206)

Yes, that would give them the position of my cell phone. If I am going somewhere I don't want people knowing about, I leave my cell phone at home. This is obviously easier to do with a cell phone than an implanted chip.

Also, if you have Sprint PCS like I do you don't have much to worry about in many places. I can't get a good enough signal to use the phone in many places, so I really doubt they know where I am. :)

What happens? (5, Insightful)

jkrise (535370) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971075)

when the US may reduce non-military GPS accuracy?

http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=03/03/19/0340 24 7&mode=nested&tid=126&tid=103

The potential for abuse is more terrifying, really.

Tracking people (0, Redundant)

stevenp (610846) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971081)


1. Victim enters hospital for medical treatment
2. Tracking device is implanted "accidently"
3. Track victim
4. ???
5. Profit!!!

Who will be the first one to sell the tracking info database to an advertisement company?

Forget about cookies, the "body" will be tracked. With an accurate map it is easy to gain enormous information about the life of the person.

Missing the boat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971262)

You guys are missing the great potential of a device like this- Sex Offenders, Murderes and such would have one of these implanted and presto- no more missing fugatives and chester molesters.

I don't mind Big Brother watching, so long as he's watching out for my children...

get a jump on those who would abuse it (3, Insightful)

wwest4 (183559) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971085)

...and advocate laws (or enforcement of existing laws) that prohibit violations of privacy. then you could take advantage of the benefits at your risk and discretion e.g. like a cell phone... you can turn it off or drive out of range if you don't want to be reached.


Captain Picard: Computer, where is Commander Data?
Computer: Lieutenant Commander Data is no longer aboard the Enterprise.

Re:get a jump on those who would abuse it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971258)

Or just use the GPS receiver and don't (re)transmit the location data. GPS receivers are passive devices, they don't need to transmit anything to find the current location. How about a "sixth sense" GPS? Do humans have spare (or obsolete) nerves lying around somewhere which could be used for this?

I remember Dec. 1999.... (2, Insightful)

jkrise (535370) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971091)

We were frantically patching our beloved systems for Y2K compatibility crap, faithfully taking backups and all - the most frequently asked qn. was:
Will this work on Jan 1st 2000?

After a while, things got so paranoid, and my boss wondered innocently:
Are you sure we'll be alive on Jan 1st? Our hearts and brains are Y2K OK?

Made us all laugh then.. but if these GPS pacemakers were around, we wouldn't have been laughing surely.

I remember Nov 30 1999.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971141)

...when we kicked the ass of the WTO. You can bet those bastards will support laws that force people to have tracking implants in the future.

You've got to wonder... (4, Interesting)

gusnz (455113) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971094)

...how the company sees this in terms of immediate practical applications.

I could understand if this was one of those long-sighted DARPA projects that hails from an unlimited budget and a mandate to invent, but a company like this has shareholders to whom they must justify their actions. So what's the immediate market for this device? Even with the "War On Terrah" progressing at a rapid pace, I can't see implanted GPS's being compulsory anytime soon.

So who's got ideas for the potential use/market for these devices? Paranoid parents wanting to know their children's location at all times? A replacement for medic-alert type bracelets or similar? I somehow can't see this returning on its initial investment in terms of sales, given the risks associated with anaesthetics/implantation in non-subcutaneous tissues weighed against such a trivial funcionality gain.

Website?? (1)

CausticWindow (632215) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971100)

Apart from the terrible Flash thingie on the frontpage, something else struck me with this website.

Top left corner. Happy white couple. Take a look at the lower right corner.. a dog, a chinese boy and a black boy. Where I come from, likening chinese and blacks with dogs are racist.

Re:Website?? (1)

Jellybob (597204) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971123)

As is just about everything else on earth.

At some point you need to step back and use your brain to work out if something was intended to be racist, or if it's just a photo for publicity.

And anyway... isn't it racist to call him a "black" boy... shouldn't he be afro-caribean?

Re:Website?? (1)

Inda (580031) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971273)

A black man walks into a pub with a parrot on his shoulder. The barman says "Where did you get that?" and the parrot replies "Africa".

Is that racist or funny?

My friend next to me laughed...

I want more proof of racism (4, Insightful)

MyNameIsFred (543994) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971152)

...Where I come from, likening chinese and blacks with dogs are racist...

I would like a little more proof that this was intended to be racist. The obvious intent is to identify tracking children and pets as a use.

One of the major problems I have with accusations of racism is that behavior frequently is assumed to be racist without any investigation. To illustrate, a few years ago a news program covered racial sensitivity training that a resturant chain was ungoing as part of a court settlement. Cashiers were told to always place the change in the hand of the customer, never on the counter. Because many blacks interpret putting the money on the counter as meaning "you don't want to touch them." This hit me directly, because I have a habit of putting it on the counter regardless of whether the person is white, black, or other. Mainly because I found it easier. So the question becomes how many people thought I was racist, for doing something that I do to everyone. My futher thought is, I want more proof that things are racist before believing so. Racism exists, but not every innocent act is racist.

Re:I want more proof of racism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971225)

The obvious intent is to identify tracking children and pets as a use.
If by `children' you mean `slave children,' racist.

I've been chipped for decades... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971105)

The CIA implanted a chip to read my mind 20 years ago. The only bad thing is whenever I'm near a microwave my skull starts vibrating showtunes :)

Re:I've been chipped for decades... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971126)

AC writes:
whenever I'm near a microwave my skull starts vibrating showtunes
Hmmm, microwave? That's a euphemism for Michael's dick, I suppose.

No problems for politicians... (1, Funny)

jkrise (535370) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971111)

After all. this is a Device for Humans right... those with a Heart, we amy add. Probably exempts members of the R*AA as well :-)

Inject it into criminals (1)

HanzoSan (251665) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971116)

perfect for ex-cons and people under house arrest

Re:Inject it into criminals (1)

epicstruggle (311178) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971181)

This is exactly the sort of thing I could go along with. How about putting a tracking device on every prisoner while they are incarcerated. Should make sure that there are no more jail breaks.

Under the age of 16(whatever the age a minor is in your country) track them for safety. Remove them after they reach a certain age.

Convicted pedophiles/sex offenders could also be tracked so as to help police/community keep them away from children (see above paragraph). Ability to see how close to kids they get.

I have very few problems with tracking the location of certain people. I cant see a day where we all have them so am not to worried about it yet.

later,

Mapping (3, Interesting)

GreggyBUIUC (262370) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971118)

Of course, obvious privacy comments aside, this would be interesting in coordination with this old slashdot article [slashdot.org] which called for real time map generation by having volunteers wear GPS devices. A system like this would be allow planners to construct reliable road and interstate systems based on actual volume of traffic instead of estimates.

Am I the only one.. (1, Funny)

varjag (415848) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971133)

..who misread the topic as 'Peacemaker'-like GPS device?

Come to think of it, a Colt-shaped GPS reciever would look impressive..

Re:Am I the only one.. (1)

Esion Modnar (632431) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971285)

..who misread the topic as 'Peacemaker'-like GPS device?

Yeah, some people might think that, but it really seems more like something the Skarrans would use.

Great. Now I have to line my whole suit with tinfoil, not just my hat.

After reading the article... (5, Insightful)

Daemonic (575884) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971147)

The induction-based power-recharging method... functions without requiring any physical connection between the power source and the implant.

So they're not going to be implanting these while you're not looking, unless they can also talk you into recharging it yourself later.

The overall ickiness of having something inserted, plus of course the overtones of nazi tatoos will stop this being mandatory for a very very long time.

It's the biometric id cards/credit cards/mobile phones that'll be the really useful peasant-tracking devices. They don't need RFID implants.

Besides - there'd only be a market in back-street surgeons/hackers to take them out again. This wouldn't be a terribly effective way of tracking criminal types (it would be fine for ordinary citizens of course, but then they're easy enough to find at the moment anyway).

Eeep! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971150)

How long till they make it mandatory?
Will your doctor install it at your next checkup?

Will military and government jobs require you to have one?

This is Big Brother, Sister, Mother, Father, and the rest of the whole Freaking 1984 family!

Brought to you by... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971160)

The Orwellian World Improvement Project and the Aldous Huxley Association For World Advancement

Uh... High-Risk Countries??? (3, Interesting)

samdu (114873) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971171)

From the site

the Company announced that it was accelerating development of PLD in response to demand from high-risk countries and other potential customers.


What the hell is a "high-risk" country and why would they want such device?

Re:Uh... High-Risk Countries??? (1)

Daemonic (575884) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971236)

Yeah, that boggled my mind for a minute there too. I think it stems from their declared target market, to which they offer a:
full range of "personal safeguard technologies" that enhance personal safety, security and peace of mind.
So if you're travelling to a country with a history of kidnapping rich foreigners, you might want one.

Re:Uh... High-Risk Countries??? (2, Funny)

Ripplet (591094) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971261)

>What the hell is a "high-risk" country
America of course! After all, if a third world two bit one camel country like Iraq is a serious threat, so is half of the rest of the world.
And don't forget the French!

Does this mean... (1, Funny)

Eudial (590661) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971176)

... that in the future you'll have to mumify yourself in copper wires / sit in a copper cage every time you wank?

perfect for stopping terrorism! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971209)

Just inject all Arab males coming into the United States with these puppies. After all, everyone knows that all terrorists are arabs.

Via the internet! (2, Interesting)

the bluebrain (443451) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971226)

From the writeup:
  • [...] can wirelessly transmit location, movements and vital signs via the Internet, storing the info in a database.
Sorry, but that sounds like one of these post-modern patent applications. "Via the internet" ... wooo-hoo!
I hardly think anyone's building a device a tenth of the size of a pacemaker that will continuously transmit "ASL"-data (or whatever) to a satellite, or even the cell phone network. Bluetooth, WLAN, whatever, yea, but I don't expect to see anyone being tracked across the Austalian outback with one of these anytime soon.

As for the plus side:
Finally - a rational use for that aluminium foil beanie. Now *that's* newsForNerds/stuffThatMatters.

Ummmm..... (1, Funny)

thynk (653762) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971244)

The device, which is internally rechargable

What does internal rechargable mean? You don't have to take it out to recharge it? Where do you plug in the power cord at night? ::shudder as goatse image jumpes into head::

can wirelessly transmit location, movements and vital signs

User number 4859932 has had 8 orgasms while sitting in front of computer. Net logs show massive pr0n downloads during same time frame.

Could also be used to track the movements of a spouse/SO if you think something is up. "Honey are you sure you worked a double shift yesterday and you were not at the strip club for 6 hours before going to a stippers house and had sex? - Well, ok - as long as your sure."

Re:Ummmm..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#5971290)

Probably recharges induction-style kinda like a lot of electric toothbrushes (I know the Sonicare brush is like this). If you've got a coil in your charger and a similarly tuned coil in the device, you can have a transformer even if there's a little material in the way.

All Americans... (0)

Karem Lore (649920) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971252)

George W. Bush invoked a little known (and recently added) law that allows him to enforce the implanting of digital GPS devices into each new-born as matter of procedure. His argument for this is that it will enable him and his government to track terrorists...

In a related article, media and advertising companies are lobbying GWB to allow them access to the data from such devices to allow them to change wall-mounted adverts to reflect the person that is walking past them...

In more related material, B. Gates has implemented a functionality into windows that allow it to confirm that the person using the computer is a licensed user.

"Eventually", a spokeperson for the whitehouse starts,"we will own the arses of everyone."

Karem

Hmm, DRM for people. (3, Insightful)

MrFenty (579353) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971264)

I can see a two-tier society of the future where you have the "official" class of people who (not only being owned by MS, the government, RIAA, whoever you want to pick on this week) are willing to submit to having this sort of personal DRM so that law enforcement and other agencies know where they are; and also an underclass of people who refuse this "treatment", and as such as denied access to various funky services, perhaps only getting the most basic of social services.

Submit to the chip, join The Club - or live on the outside. Very scary.

Cashless Society / 666 (2, Insightful)

dochood (614876) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971281)

It has probably been posted on Slashdot before (and been thoroughly pooh-poohed), but "Digital Angel" sounds an awful lot like the "Digital Demon" mentioned in Revelation chapter 13, the "Mark of the Beast" (666). In Rev. 13, everyone is required to get a mark before they can buy or sell.

It seems odd that John would come up with the idea that you would have to have a mark (I'm told it means "etching, as with a needle" in the Greek, but I'm sure some Greek-speaking-geek here can probably shoot that down if it isn't correct) to buy and sell. I'm sure he was thinking of it as a tatoo that they would merely look at, before allowing you to use your cash. He probably wasn't thinking of a "cashless society", but I've often heard people talk about the benefits of a cashless society (thwart drug-dealers, kidnappers, extortion rings, etc). Supposedly, we'd all start with a "debit card" arrangement. But they could be stolen or forged. An implanted chip would be harder to fake.

As a starting point to mandatory chipping, I've heard people suggest that you would chip criminals, aliens, and of course, "the scum of the earth".... gun owners! If you want to own a gun, you must get a tracking chip! Small price to pay for a "privilege" that the government lets you have...

I'm not saying that D.A. would be the Mark, just that it sounds hauntingly familiar... that similar technology could be used for that purpose.

So most readers here probably don't read or believe the Bible, but if you see it happen someday..... think about it.

dochood

Fortress (1)

EvilMike (640266) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971283)

The first thing that comes to my mind is prisoner control, like in Fortress. A GPS device, a receiver and a small amount of explosive....

health chip + GPS = better insurance packages (1)

romit_icarus (613431) | more than 10 years ago | (#5971284)

I once read about how inserting GPS and chips in cars can be used to better understand the risk of a car/driver leading to a personalised and dynamic insurance premium. This compares to the current model where the companies take an average view of the demographic (weighed by age etc), so even though I might have put my car in the garage all year, I still have to pay for the insurance.

Why can't the same be applied to medical/life/personal insurance given all these fancy tracking tools?

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