Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Australian Computer Museum Looking For Space

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the plaint dept.

Hardware 197

tqft writes "The Australian Computer Museum Society needs space. Basically they have nowhere to store their large collection of hardware. Can you help? Do you or your employer have the floor space they could use? Or should it all be trashed?"

cancel ×

197 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

um... (-1, Offtopic)

tha_mink (518151) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996926)

In SOVIET RUSSIA, space looks for YOU.

Re:um... (-1, Offtopic)

slarshdot (211836) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996933)

I got spare room in me shed :)

yes (-1, Redundant)

cybergeak (318482) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996929)

yes

Sure, give them to me... (4, Funny)

TheVoice900 (467327) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996930)

I think I might be able to fit a few more computers in to my bedroom. Bring 'em on I say!

Re:Sure, give them to me... (1)

sould (301844) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997021)

I think I might be able to fit a few more computers in to my bedroom. Bring 'em on I say!


Hmmmmmmmn, I'm going to take a punt & presume you're from Central Europe.


According to the Australian Postal Service's site [auspost.com.au] a 20kg parcel to zone 5 is going to cost minimum $AUD116 - I imagine they can buy a few months of storage for that.


Thanks for the offer tho'

Re:Sure, give them to me... (0)

Doomrat (615771) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997022)

+1 Informative?!

Re:Sure, give them to me... (0)

bananahammock (595781) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997043)

Now +3 Informative?! Slashdot moderation at its best - or should that be worst. Then again, with a bad karma, what would I know!

Re:Sure, give them to me... (1)

Black Copter Control (464012) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997174)

I woulda thought +1 funny.... but I don't have any moderation points, this week.

Re:Sure, give them to me... (1)

Doomrat (615771) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997297)

Funny would have been a sensible choice. I'm wondering if the Offtopics were fair. Not that I care THIS much... I'll just shurrup.

They can have as much as they want! (2, Funny)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996932)

Look up! It's all the space you could ever use!

Re:They can have as much as they want! (3, Funny)

Pseudonym (62607) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997028)

There's always under ground, near the Earth's core, where it's still warm. Live long enough, you might even see it...

i own a big space. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996934)

you can use my landfill in China but you must pay me $20 per item to haul this poisonous shit away to a country without stupid laws or status quo's against official bribes.

Well fuck me cobba stuff a roo up me arsehole! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996935)

Surfs up cunt, drink some fucken piss, and root till ya fucken chuck up!

Signed,
John Howard.

fp (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996936)

aussie aussie aussie

oi oi oi (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996942)

aarrghh...couldn't...resist

Re:oi oi oi (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996947)

aussie...

oi (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996981)

fist pist

aussie ... (-1)

count_sporkula (446625) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997257)








....

Re:aussie ... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997285)

...

...oi

Only if..... (5, Funny)

coday (628350) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996941)

I can use the hard drives to generate free electricity

Who gives a fuck about this shit. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996946)

10'000 manuals? They can stick 10,000 manuals up their fucking arseholes, COBBA!!!

Re:Who gives a fuck about this shit. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996959)

It's COBBER, Arseclown

Re:Who gives a fuck about this shit. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996969)

Arseclown??? Get fucked you Seppo cunt!

Re:Who gives a fuck about this shit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996994)

Seppo?? uhm... does Roy & HG ring a bell?

Re:Who gives a fuck about this shit. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997062)

Does sticking your own fist up your ARSEHOLE ring a bell, COBBAAAAAA?

Re:Who gives a fuck about this shit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997074)

Please don't post your personal hobbies to /.

I also have many crappy computers needing storage (4, Funny)

IvyMike (178408) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996955)

Let me in on the final solution, since I have quite a large amount of computer crap, including:

  • A fuzzy 17 inch monitor
  • An old Indigo2 computer sans hard drive (and more imporantly, sans hard drive bracket.)
  • A dual Pentium Pro 180, with 3 GB SCSI hard drive
  • An old AMD computer, processor type forgotten. (Probably about a 400 Mhz) something.
  • Some sort of IDE raid card
  • About 12 hard drives totaling 8 GB of storage

And that's just the stuff I can see without turning my head. And based on other stories/comments/etc., I KNOW I'm nowhere near the worst "collector" out there.

Re:I also have many crappy computers needing stora (1)

femto (459605) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996961)

Yeah, but these guys sound as if they have a few mainframes as big as your house!

Re:I also have many crappy computers needing stora (2, Funny)

sk3tch (165010) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996995)

Quit tryin' to use Slashdot as your own personal eBay.... ....So, how much for that dual PPro? :)

Re:I also have many crappy computers needing stora (1)

tconnors (91126) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997057)

An old AMD computer, processor type forgotten. (Probably about a 400 Mhz) something.

Ugh. Old? So old you don't even remember?

Wow. That's not exactly a collection you have going on there. That would be ontop of my desk at home.

Re:I also have many crappy computers needing stora (1)

Kris_J (10111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997086)

An old Indigo2 computer sans hard drive (and more imporantly, sans hard drive bracket.)
I've got a Personal Iris like this. I was going to use it for a funky case mod, but everything in there works and I can't bring myself to strip it.

Re:I also have many crappy computers needing stora (5, Interesting)

skurk (78980) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997231)

IvyMike wrote:
  • A fuzzy 17 inch monitor
  • An old Indigo2 computer sans hard drive (and more imporantly, sans hard drive bracket.)
  • A dual Pentium Pro 180, with 3 GB SCSI hard drive
  • An old AMD computer, processor type forgotten. (Probably about a 400 Mhz) something.
  • Some sort of IDE raid card
  • About 12 hard drives totaling 8 GB of storage
When I was your age, we didn't have monitors. We used mom and dad's TV! The Indigo2 wasn't even planned at that point, dual CPU's and IDE disks were pure rocket science.

Since you call this fully useable equipment "old" (keep in mind, the stuff you mention make perfect *nix firewalls/servers), here's some of the stuff I've got at home, in my own personal little "museum" -- from the top of my head: Probably 100 kilograms of 8086 PCs, Oric-1, Apple ][, C64, Texas Instruments TI99/4A, lots of Amiga 500's, a few 68k Mac's, and lots of old game consoles (b&w ping pong).

Now that's the stuff that works. From the stuff that unfortunately doesn't work anymore, the list is too long. An example would be the extremly rare West PC 800, a "dual cpu" 6502/Z80 Apple][ clone made in Norway in the early eighties. It's so rare, I can't find any spare parts, nor info about it on the net. :(

Oh well.

Re:I also have many crappy computers needing stora (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997237)

pix?

Computers... (2, Funny)

Jacer (574383) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996956)

I'll store a few away, I've got some space right here on my desk. Don't happen to have any new 3.0+ghz boxes that need to be 'stored'?

Australian History? (5, Funny)

evilviper (135110) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996957)

Hmm, I suppose a "Computer Museum" (considering the speed of technology) would be the only type of museum Australia could really have...

I've heard the paintings in the Australian art museum are almost dry now.

Re:Australian History? (5, Informative)

mvdw (613057) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996980)

Yes, I know you are speaking in jest, but it just so happens that some of the oldest paintings known to exist are right here in Australia. 400 years for a Michaelangelo? Harumph, try 40,000+years (no, I did not accidentally type an extra '0') for some of the rock paintings in Kakadu.

Re:Australian History? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997046)

Please restrict the discussion to paintings by humans. Incomprehensible scrawl by sub-human
monkey people doesn't count. By your standards my cat's litter box would rank as "high art".

Re:Australian History? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997065)

it is in NY

Re:Australian History? (4, Informative)

sould (301844) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997056)


sigh...


I'm Australian and I'll bite.


The first Australian Computer: was developed in 1946 [csiro.au] - and one of only four in the world at the time.


If you really want to consider the speed of technology - check out how American Cell phone market penetration compares to Australian Cell phone market penetration

Quaint (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997087)

An American insulting Australia's lack of history? How fucking quaint!

Re:Quaint (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997094)

A non-American assuming the rest of the world is American? How fucking quaint!

Re:Quaint (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997167)

Previous posts by the parent poster would show American.

No assumption required.

Ah, Nicely done... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997164)

..Sir Troll!

I must say I find your sig particularly appropriate too. :-)

Australia Computer Museum Looking for Space (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996960)

... maybe they should ask an Astronomer

Anatomy of failure: What Killed FreeBSD (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996963)

The End of FreeBSD

[ed. note: in the following text, former FreeBSD developer Mike Smith gives his reasons for abandoning FreeBSD]

When I stood for election to the FreeBSD core team nearly two years ago, many of you will recall that it was after a long series of debates during which I maintained that too much organisation, too many rules and too much formality would be a bad thing for the project.

Today, as I read the latest discussions on the future of the FreeBSD project, I see the same problem; a few new faces and many of the old going over the same tired arguments and suggesting variations on the same worthless schemes. Frankly I'm sick of it.

FreeBSD used to be fun. It used to be about doing things the right way. It used to be something that you could sink your teeth into when the mundane chores of programming for a living got you down. It was something cool and exciting; a way to spend your spare time on an endeavour you loved that was at the same time wholesome and worthwhile.

It's not anymore. It's about bylaws and committees and reports and milestones, telling others what to do and doing what you're told. It's about who can rant the longest or shout the loudest or mislead the most people into a bloc in order to legitimise doing what they think is best. Individuals notwithstanding, the project as a whole has lost track of where it's going, and has instead become obsessed with process and mechanics.

So I'm leaving core. I don't want to feel like I should be "doing something" about a project that has lost interest in having something done for it. I don't have the energy to fight what has clearly become a losing battle; I have a life to live and a job to keep, and I won't achieve any of the goals I personally consider worthwhile if I remain obligated to care for the project.

Discussion

I'm sure that I've offended some people already; I'm sure that by the time I'm done here, I'll have offended more. If you feel a need to play to the crowd in your replies rather than make a sincere effort to address the problems I'm discussing here, please do us the courtesy of playing your politics openly.

From a technical perspective, the project faces a set of challenges that significantly outstrips our ability to deliver. Some of the resources that we need to address these challenges are tied up in the fruitless metadiscussions that have raged since we made the mistake of electing officers. Others have left in disgust, or been driven out by the culture of abuse and distraction that has grown up since then. More may well remain available to recruitment, but while the project is busy infighting our chances for successful outreach are sorely diminished.

There's no simple solution to this. For the project to move forward, one or the other of the warring philosophies must win out; either the project returns to its laid-back roots and gets on with the work, or it transforms into a super-organised engineering project and executes a brilliant plan to deliver what, ultimately, we all know we want.

Whatever path is chosen, whatever balance is struck, the choosing and the striking are the important parts. The current indecision and endless conflict are incompatible with any sort of progress.

Trying to dissect the above is far beyond the scope of any parting shot, no matter how distended. All I can really ask of you all is to let go of the minutiae for a moment and take a look at the big picture. What is the ultimate goal here? How can we get there with as little overhead as possible? How would you like to be treated by your fellow travellers?

Shouts

To the Slashdot "BSD is dying" crowd - big deal. Death is part of the cycle; take a look at your soft, pallid bodies and consider that right this very moment, parts of you are dying. See? It's not so bad.

To the bulk of the FreeBSD committerbase and the developer community at large - keep your eyes on the real goals. It's when you get distracted by the politickers that they sideline you. The tireless work that you perform keeping the system clean and building is what provides the platform for the obsessives and the prima donnas to have their moments in the sun. In the end, we need you all; in order to go forwards we must first avoid going backwards.

To the paranoid conspiracy theorists - yes, I work for Apple too. No, my resignation wasn't on Steve's direct orders, or in any way related to work I'm doing, may do, may not do, or indeed what was in the tea I had at lunchtime today. It's about real problems that the project faces, real problems that the project has brought upon itself. You can't escape them by inventing excuses about outside influence, the problem stems from within.

To the politically obsessed - give it a break, if you can. No, the project isn't a lemonade stand anymore, but it's not a world-spanning corporate juggernaut either and some of the more grandiose visions going around are in need of a solid dose of reality. Keep it simple, stupid.

To the grandstanders, the prima donnas, and anyone that thinks that they can hold the project to ransom for their own agenda - give it a break, if you can. When the current core were elected, we took a conscious stand against vigorous sanctions, and some of you have exploited that. A new core is going to have to decide whether to repeat this mistake or get tough. I hope they learn from our errors.

Future

I started work on FreeBSD because it was fun. If I'm going to continue, it has to be fun again. There are things I still feel obligated to do, and with any luck I'll find the time to meet those obligations.

However I don't feel an obligation to get involved in the political mess the project is in right now. I tried, I burnt out. I don't feel that my efforts were worthwhile. So I won't be standing for election, I won't be shouting from the sidelines, and I probably won't vote in the next round of ballots.

You could say I'm packing up my toys. I'm not going home just yet, but I'm not going to play unless you can work out how to make the project somewhere fun to be again.

= Mike

--

To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. -- Theodore Roosevelt

1000 meters^2? (1)

insecuritiez (606865) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996965)

From the arical: If the Australian Computer Museum Society, based in Homebush, NSW, cannot find an angel with a spare 1000 square metres of warehouse space in the next six weeks, its computer collection may be crushed.
"If we can't find a benefactor willing to give us a home for a peppercorn rental, all this will have to go to SimsMetal," says David Hawley, president of the Australian Computer Museum Society. "And we need a new home within the next six weeks, because it is going to take us six months to move it all."


Sounds like they have way to much and 90% of it SHOULD be trashed. C'mon, that's more than 100,000 sqrFt. Can you imagine a WalMart filled with junk because thats what they are asking for.

Re:1000 meters^2? (1)

insecuritiez (606865) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996988)

For those of you doing the conversion 1000 meters^2 is only 10763.91 sqrFt. I dunno where that extra digit came from. I guess I should thought befor I wrote.

Re:1000 meters^2? (4, Funny)

radish (98371) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997275)

I guess I should thought befor I wrote

You're new here aren't you?

Re:1000 meters^2? (4, Informative)

jpt.d (444929) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997111)

Otherwise known as approximately 31.6 metres by 31.6 metres. Not that much.

Even if you hadn't slipped up on the conversion... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997283)

Computer history is still critical. What happens is that everybody throws the manuals away, throws the machines away, and then twenty years later some bright fellow looks at all the people who are still being crippled for life or killed by bomblets in Vietnam. He thinks about the ongoing efforts to clean the countryside up and has an idea. "Hey, don't we have records of approximately where we dropped those?" "Sure," somebody says, "they're on the tapes in vault A-217X."

Well, the bright fellow goes down to the vault, gets the tapes, and finds that many of them haven't crumbled. Problem is, he doesn't have a machine to read them, so first he has to build a new drive to read the tape, then he has to re-engineer the computer and OS that were used to make the tapes, then he has to figure out what the bombing codes on the tape stand for. This is real life, not a hypothetical.

So you never know what might help, or even save lives. It has all the value that recording any kind of history has. These people aren't just piling this stuff up in a room. That would indeed be collecting junk, since a dead computer is merely a metal curiousity. You can hardly learn anything comparing a computer from 1980 to one from today by gross phsyical examination. The goal is to keep the machines operational on a constant basis. We need to keep in contact with that history, and a country the size of Australia certainly should be able to support a museum as large as a Wal-mart, let alone the small actual size of this thing.

It's a little like scoffing at the idea that any library need ever be as large as the Library of Congress just because you don't need such a thing in your neighbourhood. A whole country may very well need one.

For those of you who want to know where it is. (4, Informative)

sould (301844) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996967)

It's in Sydney.

You find it buried on this page [terrigal.net.au] - looks like its currently at a self storage center in Sydney. (Near where the olympic village was).

Why post an Auscentric article like this to a USian site is beyond me, but for those interested, the map is here [whereis.com.au]

I could tell you why (1)

donscarletti (569232) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997023)

Because there are Australian readers that come to Slashdot. Australians such as me, who lives in sydney, and is about to go to Homebush with a cordless drill and a slimjim to "volenteer" to "store" the excess exibits in his garage. But probably they would just take up too much space and he would be forced to porn them for five bucks.

And anyway, there seems to be quite a few Australian readers/posters/self rightious slashdot zealots (just kidding). So in that case, I better get moving before they beat me to it.

Re:For those of you who want to know where it is. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997109)

Why post an Auscentric article like this to a USian site is beyond me

Fuck you, you little Aussie karma whore! We get irellevant USian news, views and culture (USian? We ain't in Kuro5hin anymore, Toto) constantly rammed down our throats, why not ram a little Aussie geek-lovin' down theirs for once?


Beowulf! Grits! Goatse! Yeah!

Government (2, Insightful)

POds (241854) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996973)

This is a great cause for the government to step in, wouldnt you agree? I love knowing about the past computers, how they were concieved, what happened that brought us here. I suspect the next generation would be just as curious. To loose this would be a total disaster.

If they can not find something, the goverment should find something for them, even if its temporary, until the find somewhere permeant!!

Re:Government (1)

scotartt (671253) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997016)

you are talking about the australian government here. they are profligate with the porkbarrelling but if it involves anything that is NOT from IN or ON the ground, i.e. if you can't plant it, grow it or dig it up, they wouldn't have a clue how to best to support it, nor be inclined. 'computers - thems fer intelectuals hur hur hur' says the prime minister.

I can help them! (1)

Lord_Slepnir (585350) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996976)

Look up, preferably when you're outside.

What??? (4, Funny)

djupedal (584558) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996979)

You're asking me?

I have a house full of old computers and typewriters and terminals...and then there is stuff in storage and more stuff at friends and relatives houses...you're on your own. And don't look for someone to buy it as scrap...they'll spend their time trying to get you to take more junk off their hands.

Museum....is that what you call it? That's rich...very funny. I tried that line years ago, and no one fell for it then, so I think you need to face up to the fact that you have a lot of junk...just like everyone else.

Tell them.. (1)

marcushnk (90744) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996983)

To look up.. its past all that blue stuff.. :-P

Australian Computer Museum is Dying (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996984)

When I stood for election to the Australian Computer Museum core team nearly two years ago, many of you will recall that it was after a long series of debates during which I maintained that too much organisation, too many rules and too much formality would be a bad thing for the project.

Today, as I read the latest discussions on the future of the Australian Computer Museum project, I see the same problem; a few new faces and many of the old going over the same tired arguments and suggesting variations on the same worthless schemes. Frankly I'm sick of it.
Australian Computer Museum used to be fun. It used to be about doing things the right way. It used to be something that you could sink your teeth into when the mundane chores of programming for a living got you down. It was something cool and exciting; a way to spend your spare time on an endeavour you loved that was at the same time wholesome and worthwhile.

It's not anymore. It's about bylaws and committees and reports and milestones, telling others what to do and doing what you're told. It's about who can rant the longest or shout the loudest or mislead the most people into a bloc in order to legitimise doing what they think is best. Individuals notwithstanding, the project as a whole has lost track of where it's going, and has instead become obsessed with process and mechanics.

So I'm leaving core. I don't want to feel like I should be "doing something" about a project that has lost interest in having something done for it. I don't have the energy to fight what has clearly become a losing battle; I have a life to live and a job to keep, and I won't achieve any of the goals I personally consider worthwhile if I remain obligated to care for the project.

Re:Australian Computer Museum is Dying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997281)

Wahay! +2 Informative for a /s/FreeBSD/Australian Computer Museum/ troll.

Re:Australian Computer Museum is Dying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997296)

I am honoured - loved the modding:)

funny

interesting

troll

interesting

wish they'd make up their minds

May I propose a cardasian question? (4, Interesting)

lingqi (577227) | more than 11 years ago | (#5996991)

Why are humans soooo interested to keep all the old stuff around? I mean, being human I do realize that there are value in history - but am I the only one who thinks that some of this history can be re-created?

This can't be said about ecosystem because that's something we don't, and may not ever fully understand - so it is beneficial to keep species around because they can have potentially very important uses, but old computer hardware are stuff that was created by humans in the first place, so - despite some token items, why do we keep it all instead of dedicating resources to creating new and better stuff?

It's like a child who builds some lego creation but would not tear it down even though his current abilities in making lego based stuff are so much more advanced.

and, this question I think was asked on DS9, by who I forget - but certainly a Cardasian.

Re:May I propose a cardasian question? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5996998)

Is cardasian a cromulent word?

Re:May I propose a cardasian question? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997009)

Actually, its scrimtupulous.

Re:May I propose a cardasian question? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997053)

then why hasn't it been verstiglified?

Re:May I propose a cardasian question? (1)

Kris_J (10111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997048)

Try emulating a Commodore SID chip on a PC and you'll get your answer.

Re:May I propose a cardasian question? (1)

RollingThunder (88952) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997067)

That's not an answer - emulating that hardware is only an issue because you want to keep something around. In your example, it's the software you want to keep, but his question still stands.

Why?

Re:May I propose a cardasian question? (5, Insightful)

ruprechtjones (545762) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997135)

Why are humans soooo interested to keep all the old stuff around?

Because it has historical value. It's a trail of where we've been, that's all. Yes it's all sentimental, but keeping at least one example (and not a warehouse-full of the same samples) allows students to see where we've been, and how we got to where we are now. Even if it's acedemic, learning the incatracies of the C-64 hardware now in 2003 will help somebody follow the path to 64-bit programming in a step-by-step fashion. I still want to pick up a Vic-20 from some pawn shop just so's I can start following what the hell all these slash-dotters are talking about, but I understand the process of evolution. Hopefully this is still applicable.

Re:May I propose a cardasian question? (1)

ruprechtjones (545762) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997144)

Okay I know it's a stretch from the Vic-20 to 64-bit, but you get my point. Start from A, end up at Z through process learning.

Re:May I propose a cardasian question? (1)

Zakabog (603757) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997221)

It's about the history and importance of these items at the time of their creation. Why do we keep the Declaration of Independance so well preserved? Because it was a very historic document and was very important at the time.

When a kid creates a lego creation and feels it's important enough to keep then it must have been very good at the time of creation and has a story to go along with it. When they're 10 years older they can look back and say "Wow I've improved a whole lot" or maybe they'll think back to the time they created it and say "Wow I remember when I made this I just got my first lego set, it was during christmas..." and they'll connect some old memories to it.

Kind of like my old website which is on waybackmachine.org, I look at it every so often and think I haven't changed much in the time and I'm even suprised that I came up with such a good site at the time.

And the old computers help us remember how far we've come in such a short time, I have computers from '95 that are so bad compared to the machines of today and it reminds me how my knowledge of computers has changed. I used to own a 66MHz 486 DX2 with a 256 MB hard drive and 4 megs of ram that I bought for like $3,000. Now for $3,000 I can get a 3 GHz P4 with a gig of ram, a 20" flatscreen monitor, two 160 gig hard drives and an ATI Radeon 9500.

Dupes (3, Interesting)

whereiswaldo (459052) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997004)

Get rid of the duplicates, or at least keep no more than two of a kind (hey, it worked for Noah). The magazines and crap can either be recycled or take the choice ones only (and scan them in).

Once you have the collection down to a more manageable size, then ask for help. Storing loads of junk at someone else's expense is a little much to ask.

Or, have a yard sale and give the shit away. At least _someone_ might enjoy it. A Beowulf cluster of junk collectors, if you will. Cost: zero.

Re:Dupes (5, Funny)

Pseudonym (62607) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997037)

Get rid of the duplicates [...]

You're new around here, aren't you?

Re:Dupes (3, Interesting)

jpkunst (612360) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997099)

Get rid of the duplicates, or at least keep no more than two of a kind

The problem with that is that if you want to keep an ancient computer in working order you need a source for parts. If you throw all the duplicates away it's much harder to repair your only working machine if it breaks.

JP

large collection of hardware??? (1)

canning (228134) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997005)

Why store it? Use it to power a few small Aussie towns!
See last article [slashdot.org] .

What the troll? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997007)

Who is the freakin' troll-moderator modding one-word replies as 'Insightful'? Where are the meta-mods?

Which is better -- Debian or Gentoo? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997010)

The curator of the Australian Computer Museum gave a talk at our last LUG meeting recently. He said in no uncertain terms that Debian sucked. He told us that the whole Australian Computer Museum had switched to Gentoo because is so much better than Debian.

I realize that the Australian Computer Museum is but one data point. So I was wondering, is it true what everyone is saying -- that Debian sucks and Gentoo rocks?

How bout take it all to the outback? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997026)

I saw a show on television which claimed that some parts of the outback don't get measurable rainfall for years at a time. Why not haul all this stuff to the outback and throw a tarp over it? I read that 95% of Australia is empty desert so this seems like the perfect solution. Old mines are a good bet too. Salt mines are very popular with folks who want to store stuff.

You people have no clue what so ever (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997031)

Most of the suggestions so far are "Bring 'em on!" and dump it in a landfill. Sigh, moderators on crack.

In case of the normal computer museums I've seen we're not talking about your average PC or even an Apple 2. Sure, I have ~30 computers in storage and most of the space goes for big VAXen and PDPs but normal museums have huge mainframes, like IBM 360s and like.

It is history worth preserving and a magnificent history at that. Think of all the IBMs, DEC-machines (KL-11 anyone ?), Crays, Burroughs machines and even old tube/relay-based number crunchers.

You ignorant twats can't appreciate anything older than a Amd Athlon.

Last I checked... (2, Funny)

Kethinov (636034) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997032)

... there was plenty of space in the outback...

Shouldn't be a problem (5, Insightful)

LoztInSpace (593234) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997035)

This is Australia for god's sake!! If you can't find a spare 1000 m^2 in Australia you really are not looking very hard! How about doing something like that airplane park out in Nevada? Build a shed, cover it with Kangaroo repellant, stick everything in there and deal with it later.
And they can take the antique POS I use at work there when they do it.

Why such a large collection? (2, Interesting)

VTS (673706) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997038)

They should pick out the significant stuff or things that introduced some new technology and get rid of the rest!

I don't go asking others to store all the stuff that I have around the house, if I want to recover some space then I sort through it and throw the useless stuff out... but that takes some effort so I don't do it very often, maybe they are as lazy as me?

Dick Smith? (1)

Kris_J (10111) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997090)

Dick Smith is supposed to like rescuing things. There's contact details on this page [dicksmithfoods.com.au] -- anyone got a fax they can use for personal business such that they can fire off a heads-up?

Psst! Over Here! (1)

LongJohnStewartMill (645597) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997100)

There's lots of space over here in Canada... Just change the name and you've got yourself a deal. =)

The space is less than 20% of a football field (1)

pete_contact11 (626708) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997105)

A standard football (American) field is 57,564 square feet. These people need only 10,764 square feet. Thats only 18.7%!!!! Are you serious that this group of geeks can't scrounge up the cash to get this much warehouse space?!?! Sounds like they're not trying very hard - I rent about 6,000 square feet for $1,500 a month.

Its hardware isn't it (0)

I don't want to spen (638810) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997108)

Try Mitre 10, or Bunnings Warehouse. (For non-Australians, they are hardware stores...)

Publicity trick (1)

romit_icarus (613431) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997127)

There are thousands of institutions - universities, government offices etc - all over the world that have had this problem and moved on. What's so special about this?

Smells like some sneaky PR work by the museum ;)

1400 Smith St. (4, Funny)

NeoMoose (626691) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997134)

1400 Smith St in Houston, TX. Enron's headquarters is a gigantic 50-story building and is only using about 10 of those floors now.

That's 40 floors of free space.

Mirror (3, Funny)

dd22 (674583) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997176)


Mirror here [all2true.org]

Re:Mirror (0, Redundant)

Beauty_is_the_Enemy (672346) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997198)

If that mirror is down, try this one [llbean.com] .

My other half makes me throw all my junk out (1)

simoncrute (468690) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997197)

My other half makes me throw all my junk out, I don't see why this place should be any different !!

Re:My other half makes me throw all my junk out (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997246)

You're pussy whipped, boy. Pussy whipped. [bluevalleys.com]

Should it be trashed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997210)

Well it depends on whether it's running anything by Microsoft or not.

computer museum? (0, Redundant)

Shooter6947 (148693) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997238)

Gee, a computer museum? That sounds like my basement. Maybe I can charge admission and get a tax writeoff!

Make a museum and a business out of it all.... (1)

westyvw (653833) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997259)

Make a museum of course, but they need to look at the computers as some sort of resource not just a junk pile.

Take the best pieces and display them. Take the rest and sell the componants to someone who could use them, OR:

Other museums might be interested in a purchase.

Rumor has it that early chips used gold in the manufacture and I have seen on the net people offering to pay for old chips.

Ebay is known to sell documentation and boxes for more then the computer itself is worth.

Old databases may need to be read, that only old hardware can do.

Clusters of old computers can do work such as folding@home, and the museum could offer visiters do donate a small amount to be listed as supporters of a mass computing system to cure disease.

A cluster could also be made to offer businesses some cheap run time for app testing.

Whats the speed of a PDP11 (1)

baryon351 (626717) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997261)

OK this is only barely on topic, and maybe I'm just lazy or something - each time I've went looking around online to find the speed of a PDP11 I can't find an answer that fits in with my perception of computer 'speed'. Maybe I'm too young, or thinking in terms of new machines too much.

So for anyone who's been there done that, used one (or some, or them) what equivalent speed do they have to a current machine? C64 speed? early 386 speed? a tenth of a commodore 64? or were they an entire range that ran everything from half a hertz to blinding fast.

I feel I should be googling this but there's so much other cool archaic stuff I've always been distracted in the past.

Re:Whats the speed of a PDP11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#5997272)

Whats the speed of a PDP11

Laden or unladen?

Another take on it... (1)

afrop (181815) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997290)

While most of the responses to this sort of thing tend towards "Trash the junk" or "You want to see old computers, check out my basement", I think there's a couple distinct reasons to help endeavors like this and maintain what we have left of previous generations of computers and associated documentation.

To begin with, I could quote maxims about "Those who forget the past..." but I'm not that interested in the future consequences so much as understanding the present. A good example of this is a piece of history that's still with us that many people are already aware of: "dumping core." That's not terribly obscure, and is largely a jargon kind of thing. But what about using "!" to mean "not"? What about other semi-arbitrary parts of programming language semantics? Where did that come from and why? What about word sizes? Sure, most things are in powers of 2 now, but has it always been that way? No. Why not? We're constantly dragging bits of the past around with us, often long after it has stopped making sense to do so. Historical computers are important in that regard, as studying them helps us realize why we do things the way we do them.

That being said, it seems like there isn't much in their collection that is unreplaceable from other collections. However, I think that the reduced availability of these machines for study and experimentation would be a bad thing.

What about an Apple Store? (0, Flamebait)

oingoboingo (179159) | more than 11 years ago | (#5997301)

Apple doesn't seem to have trouble devoting thousands of square metres of floor space to obsolete machines in their retail outlets. Maybe they can take some of the Museum's pieces. They'd just need to be careful that potential G4 tower customers didn't accidently buy the dusty old Atari 1040ST exhibit

[can't believe it's not butter voice]
"I can't believe it's not a G4!!!"

Thankyou.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>