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Investigating Artificial Black Holes

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the like-ghost-busters dept.

Science 713

Robber Baron writes "I remember years ago watching a cartoon in which an inventor had managed to create 'portable holes.' Now along those lines, according to this story in the Christian Science Monitor, scientists are on the threshhold of developing the 'do-it-yourself black hole' (Well, no, it's not quite do-it yourself as you need a pretty large collider to pull it off.) They're hoping to use the new Large Hadron Collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research to create many tiny black holes and observe the Hawking Effect as they dissipate. Keep your shotgun handy though, as they are more than likely going to open up a portal into another dimension and all sorts of nasties are going to come pouring out."

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713 comments

jerking it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043834)

i know i didn't get first post. but niggers still = shit babies fuck you

Re:jerking it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043885)

yeah, i agree totally :-P

we're all gonna die! (5, Funny)

sweeney37 (325921) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043835)

Keep your shotgun handy though, as they are more than likely going to open up a portal into another dimension and all sorts of nasties are going to come pouring out.

dear lord, haven't we learned our lesson from Doom [idsoftware.com] , Stargate [stargate-sg1.com] and Half-Life [sierrastudios.com] ?!

science, it's done nothing but cause trouble.

Mike

Re:we're all gonna die! (1, Funny)

Albert Pussyjuice (675113) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043877)

Listen, it's our duty to open up the portal to Hell, we believe that the imps have weapons of mass destruction. Furthermore, those Battlefield 1942 guys have been receiving safe harbor from the residents of hell. That being said, we must wage war!

ANd if we're going to start learning "lessons" from video games and/or popular movies, well, we're in a heap of trouble that not even a double-barrelled shotgun can solve.

Re:we're all gonna die! (1)

pVoid (607584) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043882)

Or "Event Horizon" (the movie) for that matter...

</shivers>

Re:we're all gonna die! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043959)

My Obscure Reference Meter spiked as you posted that

excellent, Smithers! (4, Funny)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043901)

This will help us with our project.

Since the dawn of time, Man has yearned to destroy the Sun... :)

Dilbert (1)

donscarletti (569232) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043924)

Well, from what I have learned from dilbert, things that have the capibility to create artificial black holes make great excersise machines... remeber the gruntmaster?

Re:we're all gonna die! (1, Flamebait)

JDWTopGuy (209256) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043926)

Yeah, like slashdotters aren't paranoid enough.

That reminds me, where's my tinfoil hat?

Re:we're all gonna die! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043939)

Well, to nitpick, in Stargate everything happened when they went through the gate. As long as nobody walks into the artificial black hole, I think we'll be fine. :)

Re:we're all gonna die! (5, Funny)

EverDense (575518) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044047)

dear lord, haven't we learned our lesson from Doom, Stargate and Half-Life ?!

Yes, we have!

Press the console key and type "+GOD MODE".

Re:we're all gonna die! (1)

raider_red (156642) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044095)

Is anyone else watching Sci-fi tonight? They're rerunning the SG-1 episode where they open a gate to a planet that is falling into a black-hole. Needless to say, mayhem ensues. I think we need to make the guys who've proposed it watch that episode about 50 times.

Christian Science Monitor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043837)

What is that? Doesn't sound like a unbiased news source to me.

Re:Christian Science Monitor? (5, Informative)

NoData (9132) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043985)

Despite it's name, and the fact that it is, indeed, owned by Christian Scientists, the Christian Science Monitor is actually considered a reputable paper (scroll down for CSM) [hud.ac.uk] , with high-quality journalism. It has a more centrist or even liberal bent, not Christian right.

Re:Christian Science Monitor? (3, Informative)

skywire (469351) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044114)

The name of the Christian Science Monitor might lead those unfamiliar with it to think that it is a Christian news publication focused on science. Actually, it is a news organization associated withis a small religious group known as "Christian Science" (offically "The Church of Christ, Scientist"), which has very little in common with Christianity.

Things not to do on Earth (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043843)

1. Experiments to see if Earth can explode
2. Create artificial blackholes
3. ...
4. Profit!

Is this dangerous? (5, Interesting)

Sanity (1431) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043844)

I always thought that if a black hole existed on Earth there would be a risk that it would start to pull in the matter around it, exponentially increasing its own mass and eventually sucking in the entire planet.

I assume this won't happen, but can anyone explain why?

Re:Is this dangerous? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043852)

Because you suck. Dick. A lot.

Re:Is this dangerous? (4, Informative)

Libor Vanek (248963) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043911)

Just very short'n'simple - even such a massive accelator and/or collidator doesn't gain so much energy as most of the cosmic radiation rays. So - everything you can simulate there happens every day on the whole planet (but because you can't predict when and where you are unable to study it)

Re:Is this dangerous? (1)

lnoble (471291) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043917)

I had the same thought. It is my assumtion that most of what we know about black holes is based on generally accepted theory, and whatever imaging we have of them in their natural environment.

Not having real close hand observation however of their behavior and make-up, seems to me to be a little bit risky. Why don't we wait until we know what all the effects of this will be, before destroying the planet.

Would also be a good idea not to let Bush get his hands on this tech either. He's trying to bring back tactical nukes now, this will just put too many ideas into his tiny little brain.

Re:Is this dangerous? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043983)

If our theories are wrong, then we can't know what all the effects of this will be, unless we do the experiment.

Re:Is this dangerous? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043918)

A very small (Planck-scale) black hole evaporates too quickly for that to happen.

Re:Is this dangerous? (4, Interesting)

jericho4.0 (565125) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043938)

Top of my head, possibly wrong answer; Blackholes slowly evaporate over time, due to the Hawking Effect. As a hole loses mass, the effect goes faster. The amount of mass used in these experiments will result in a hole that evaporates in a tiny fraction of a second. In that short a span, there is not enough time to pull in enough mass to stop the evaporation.

I still would not like to know the exact time of this experiment :-).

Re:Is this dangerous? (4, Interesting)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043986)

But lets say a miny blackhole was formed on the edge of the accelerator. With more mass it would not evaporate quickly enough. Eventually within seconds would suck up the earth itself. By now it will be too big to evaporate because of the increase in mass.

The hawking effect is only theory is in fact if your wrong we all perish. Sounds too risky for me.

Re:Is this dangerous? (4, Funny)

pVoid (607584) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043950)

Well, a black hole is just a critical amount of mass inside a critical diameter.

It's like taking an apple, or if you want, the biggest freighter on earth, and compressing it to a microscopic size...

The biggest freighter on earth isn't heavy enough to attract stuff around it... so the black hole it forms won't be either.

Now that being said, I don't know how they intend to "stabilize" the black holes... because as you noticed, anything that touches it *will* be sucked into it, so what comes to my mind is a black hole the size of an atom free falling all the way to the core of the earth, and starting to consume everything that touches it until it eats up everything...

And then we die. End of story.

Re:Is this dangerous? (1)

Verteiron (224042) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043969)

You should read "Hyperion" by Dan Simmons. Or "The Hole Man", a short story by Larry Niven.

OT (1)

E_elven (600520) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044089)

You should read "Hyperion" by Dan Simmons.


You should actually read the entire series (4 books.) Best literature on earth.

Re:Is this dangerous? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Freak (16973) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043958)

I assume this won't happen, but can anyone explain why?

Yes. Read the article before posting, that's how. <rolleyes>


Because they are creating black holes smaller than the size of a proton, that lasts a fraction of a second. Since it's created in a vacuum, it dissipates before it has time to suck anything nearby in.

Re:Is this dangerous? (5, Informative)

frovingslosh (582462) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043973)

The reference to the Hawkings Effect is the key. Steve H. has a well accepted theory that black holes leak. The smaller they are the faster they leak. (It's basically a quantum effect, if the black hole is low enough mass the singularity is close enough to the event horizon to let some matter tunnel out and escape. The event horizon shrinks further until the black hole evaporates.) If all goes right the holes we could create with our limited technology couldn't last long enough to cause any problems. This of course is all just theory, if he's wrong there will be hell to pay.

Re:Is this dangerous? (1, Flamebait)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044109)

"If all goes right the holes we could create with our limited technology couldn't last long enough to cause any problems. This of course is all just theory, if he's wrong there will be hell to pay"

Yes, If all goes right.....

This is freaking me out.

Re:Is this dangerous? (2, Informative)

sexecutioner (597887) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044008)

Yes, I think so.

While blackholes do indeed "consume" matter, they also radiate energy (which via Einstein's E=mc^2 is the same stuff).

To understand Hawking radiation, image looking very closely at the event horizon of the blackhole. Everything on one side is doomed to be sucked in, while on the other, there is a chance it can escape.

Due to the massive gravitational field particles are being torn apart and there is a lot of energy floating around. This high energy region causes particle/anti-particle pairs to be created (a story for another day) and if one ends up on the wrong side then the other can escape and radiate energy away from the blackhole.

So there you go. The idea is that if the mini blackhole is made right, the little beastie will radiate away all its energy and disappear, rather than consume the entire world.

Re:Is this dangerous? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6044099)

Hawking describes this in his black holes lecture. The object is too small to start the self perpetuating gorging of matter. It would consume *some* matter, but quickly thereafter would dissipate from all the mass/energy loss.

Aside (5, Insightful)

mindstrm (20013) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044107)

from all the other reasons, it's because a black hole doens't have any magic "sucking powers"

Beyond the event horizon, it acts as any other massive body.

A black hole the same size mass as the sun would be much smaller, but at our distance from it, gravity would be the same, so the earth would continue to orbit...

That kind of thing.

So would a little black hole be dangerous? Sure.. you have to have a way to keep it in place, with electric fields or whatever... but other than that... it's not really a big issue.
Beyond it's event horizon, a black hole is just another massive object.

Next time, Read the Story FIRST! (5, Informative)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044108)

From the article.

"But wait", I hear you say, "Has anyone considered that creating artificial black holes might not be the best idea?" The idea of creating black holes in the laboratory has to give one pause. I mean, how can anyone resist the urge to imagine future headlines like "Artificial Black Hole Escapes Laboratory, Eats Chicago" or some such thing? In reality, there is no risk posed by creating artificial black holes, at least not in the manner planned with the LHC. The black holes produced at CERN will be millions of times smaller than the nucleus of an atom; too small to swallow much of anything. And they'll only live for a tiny fraction of a second, too short a time to swallow anything around them even if they wanted to. If it makes you feel any more comfortable, we're pretty sure that if the LHC can produce black holes, then so can cosmic rays, high-energy particles that smash into our atmosphere every day. There are probably a few tiny black holes forming and dying far above you right now. So I think we should all relax, fire up the Large Hadron Collider, and get ready for a view of the universe that we've never seen before.

What if (4, Insightful)

JohnFluxx (413620) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043845)

What if hawking was wrong, and hawking radiation doesn't kill them off?
Then how are we going to stop them from eating us all?

Re:What if (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043951)

If theory is wrong and they don't evaporate quickly, then theory is probably also wrong and they won't form in the first place.

Re:What if (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043960)

What if hawking was wrong, and hawking radiation doesn't kill them off?

Sue Hawking, duh.

Re:What if (1)

grungy (634468) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043968)

What if hawking was wrong, and hawking radiation doesn't kill them off?

In that case I say we petition Caimbridge to revoke his Lucasian Professor of Mathematics chair!

(er, seriously, this does seem like a scary experiment.)

Re:What if (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043979)

>> What if hawking was wrong, and hawking radiation doesn't kill them off? Then how are we going to stop them from eating us all?

Seriously, dude, you worry too much.

Re:What if (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6044020)

What if hawking was wrong, and hawking radiation doesn't kill them off? Then how are we going to stop them from eating us all?

Any life forms that are stupid enough to try to create black holes on their own planet deserve what they get.

Doom IV? (1)

ViXX0r (188100) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043853)

Keep your shotgun handy though, as they are more than likely going to open up a portal into another dimension and all sorts of nasties are going to come pouring out.

Is this the precursor to the next latest-greatest ID FPS hit?

Re:Doom IV? no - HALFLIFE!!! (1)

rock_climbing_guy (630276) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044024)

I believe that the first weapon we get in that adventure is not a shotgun - It's a crowbar. That game had some creepy aliens.

Erm (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043854)

WTF? Einstein proved this was impossible with Lamarck's theorum like 50 years ago. Stupid slashdot morons.

Re:Erm (1)

raider_red (156642) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044113)

If you're going to throw that out, would you care to explain to those of us who aren't quantum mechanics experts what Lamarck's theorum is, you stupid socially inept person.

Gordon, (5, Funny)

Phosphor3k (542747) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043855)

You are late. They were expecting you in the test chamber ten minutes ago. Suit up and proceed there immediately.

Re:Gordon, (1, Troll)

Eros (6631) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044039)

This sounds familiar, would you mind spelling out what it is in reference to?

Thanks

Re:Gordon, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6044057)

Half Life. I don't know if your post was serious or not, but there it is anyway =)

~Berj

It was Wile E Coyote (5, Informative)

Enraged_jawa (641736) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043862)

I remember years ago watching a cartoon in which an inventor had managed to create 'portable holes.

That was Wile E. Coyote in the Roadrunner, first introduced in the 1952 cartoon "Beep Beep".

I think the Acme corporation has the patent on them, along with Jet powered Roller Skates, Coyote-sized Slingshots, Dehydrated Boulders, Do-It-Yourself Tornadoes, spring-loaded Boxing Gloves, dropping Anvils from Tightropes, Jet-propelled Pogo sticks and Unicycles, and Fake Railroad Crossings.

Re:It was Wile E Coyote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043891)

think the Acme corporation has the patent on them, along with Jet powered Roller Skates ...

DAMN!!!

Heh... (4, Funny)

Faust7 (314817) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043936)

Imagine if Acme had ever made an operating system.

*rubs chin*

Naw, couldn't be...

Yeah (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6044105)

It's called Lunix

Suck it bitches!

Re:It was Wile E Coyote (1)

Shishio (540577) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043940)

Good call on the quick Acme identification.

I seem to remember something about portable holes in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?" too, but it's been so long since I last saw it.

Re:It was Wile E Coyote (1)

teks0r (622346) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044015)

He may also have been referring to an episode of Spider-Man (the newer cartoon version) which featured a scientist researching black holes and the like. He also gained the ability to move the holes around at will and even named himself "The Spot."

Re:It was Wile E Coyote (5, Interesting)

antiquark (87200) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044022)

The thing that always stuck me about Wile E Coyote's plans is that occasionally he would have a brilliant plan, but something would go wrong, the rope would come loose, or the buckle would break.

Then he's move onto the next plan.

I'd be yelling at the TV, "Try it again! It's a good bloody plan!"

The other amusing thing about this is I keep seeing the same situation in real life. Someone would try one thing, it would go wrong, and they'd decide it was obviously a bad idea, whereas thats not necessarily the case.

I remember that cartoon (2, Informative)

vagn (2168) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044045)

The guy made holes like he was
making pancakes. And he said
"portable hole" in a funny voice.
And he wore a bowler.

imagine the possibilities ... (1)

DataShark (25965) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043868)

multidimensional worlds ... parallel universes , trevelling *faster* than ligth (assuming average velocity and a non uniform density universe) we 're already prepared ... what is ipv6 for ?

Nothing new... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043873)

my ex always told me that she was like a black hole... attracting all type of shit... I guess I wasn't enough of a shit, so I managed to escape. :)

Re:Nothing new... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043896)

did her poop flow backwards? and if so, was it actually her poop or just poop that had been deposited previously and flowed backwards through the pipes and back into her body by way of the anus?

inquisitive minds want to know.

Boooooom (3, Interesting)

frenztech (302220) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043899)

So...

a) How long does it take one of these micro blackholes to decay. and...

b) Are they positive that a blackhole will just decay nicely. The big bang only took one particle supposedly, so...what happens when a blackhole pulls in upon itself? Boom?

Re:Boooooom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6044117)

At ~10 TeV, it shouldn't last more than 10^-27 seconds.

When a black hole evaporates, it can't release any more energy than the mass-energy it started out with... which, in this case, is very small. (It's not accurate, by the way, to say that the Big Bang was "an exploding particle".)

Whoa... (4, Funny)

praxim (117485) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043900)

Please tell me I'm not the only one to read that as "Large Hardon Collider."

It must be the Slashdot->Goatse.cx->Giver thing. I need to get out more.

grilfriends hole is much nicer (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043907)

got ya

Obligatory Event Horizon reference (3, Funny)

Faust7 (314817) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043910)

Motto over the European Center for Nuclear Research:

"Liberate tutemet ex inferis."

No wonder the Christian Science Monitor picked this one up. ;)

Wow! (1)

embedded_C (653649) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043935)

If scientists could do this, and black holes can be used as wormholes, then maybe we can travel time?

What would be worse, a gray goo scenario gone bad in the laboratory, or a home-made black hole gone bad?

I choose the black hole.

Have you ever read Hyperion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043937)

This reminds me of the book Hyperion by Dan Simmons. In Hyperion, a black hole ends up falling into the center of the Earth.

Hey atleast our training will pay off... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043945)

Think about it this might be the event that all geeks around the world have been training for their entire lives. I say let the demons come, we'll put up one hell of a fight

Doesn't this seem dangerous (2, Insightful)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043946)

I believe this was the reason the brookhaven institute in Long Island was shutdown.

This could easily wipe out every living life form on Earth. Why? just for some stupid experiment.

Maybe the reason why seti has not found any alien life forms is because they run experiments like this and wipe themselves out.

We should not play with the fabric of time and space.

Re:Doesn't this seem dangerous (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043994)

Brookhaven has been shut down? It looks open to me. http://www.bnl.gov/

Re:Doesn't this seem dangerous (2, Informative)

UrGeek (577204) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044110)

First, the Brookhaven National Laboratoy is NOT shutdown - see http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/about_BNL.htm). They are also doing heavy ion collider research, attempting to create a quark-gluon plasma and they have published a paper on why it will NOT create black holes or open the fabic of space and time and destory the earth. If I am wrong, please post the URL of the announcement - I missed it.

But this news that CERN might create black holes IS distrubing. Even if they do have a short, short half-life - what happens of the unexpected happens and one makes it beyond it's containment vacuum to the wall and starts sucking metal. It grows and becomes stable and aquires enough mass to drop to the ground. It will not stop. It will suck matter, grow, and drop to the center of the planet and bounce around like a marble in a hot var of butter. Then it will settle down and devour the earth, releasing massive amounts of energy as it sucks up the nickel, iron, and maybe uranium at the center. The core will probably protect us from the radiation....while it lasts. We will probably all die in volcanos and earthquakes as the planet is compressed and the mantle collapses. We will be all long gone before the event horizon is exposed.

Yep, this really sounds like something that should be done beyond the orbit of Mars. Maybe Pluto.

No, stop him! (1)

jsse (254124) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043948)

I remember years ago a scientist warned about the dangerous in performing atom accelerator experiments, which might lead to total disaster. I forgot the details but move along this line, someone might create a mishandled black hole and all of a sudden we suck into a tiny dot. Then we might hear something like that:

"Hey, who tell hell could tell me what's going on?"
(a voice from 5 nano-meter away)"Sorry, I dropped the black hole on the ground...."

Re:No, stop him! (4, Insightful)

spike hay (534165) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044009)

I remember years ago a scientist warned about the dangerous in performing atom accelerator experiments, which might lead to total disaster. I forgot the details but move along this line, someone might create a mishandled black hole and all of a sudden we suck into a tiny dot. Then we might hear something like that:


Actually, the scientist is completely wrong. There are much higher energy reactions going on naturally with cosmic rays and such. Quantum black holes, wormholes, etc are created all of the time. And destroyed just as quickly.

Cartoon (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6043956)

Someone above mentioned Acme Co. for creating this, but I also clearly remember seeing this done in a Pink Panther cartoon when I was quite young.

At least they can't patent it, as there is clearly a lot of prior art. :)

After reading this (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043988)

This should be enough to pop off numerous tiny black holes, with masses of just a few hundred protons. Black holes of this size will evaporate almost instantly, their existence detectable only by dying bursts of Hawking radiation.

I had a vision of the experiment going disasterously wrong and instantly consuming the earth. Scene then cuts to a couple of very nervous scientist standing before a very pissed God saying 'Ah your Supreme beingness what actually happened was we miscalculated slightly and then some diet coke was spilled on the control panel and...'

oh man... (-1, Offtopic)

djupedal (584558) | more than 10 years ago | (#6043991)

you guys are just begging for goatsex links with this...you know that don't you...ouch.

Sunshine in my pocket,
Moonbeams in my hand.

Black holes in my briefcase,
I'm such a happy, virtual man!

My girlfriend... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6044003)

My girlfriend has a portable hole...and she's *not* afraid to use it.

Old News (5, Funny)

Boglin (517490) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044011)

These scientist want to study structure which anything can enter, but nothing can leave? /dev/null

this is insane (1, Insightful)

lingqi (577227) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044031)

why? because we don't even KNOW if there are such things as blackholes. evidence only remotely suggest that there are very dense bodies that has a diameter smaller than event horizon for our universe, but if they are singularities or not, that's questionable.

in another words, we don't know if the space really contract into a singularity - because for one, a singularity causes all kinds of problems for all kinds of theories.

Just a few monthes ago people were expressing immense interest in gravistars (I forgot the name) where instead of collapsing completely into a singularity, after the neutron stage the space being crushed will exhibit strong force outward (due to some quantum mechanics thing) where it would balance out into a "shell" or somesuch - though the shell diameter is still smaller than the event horizon.

IF the above turned out to be true, though - no blackbody radiation (as the radiation will gets trapped onto the shell) and no dissipation, which means the end of earth, etc.

Even if they are really singularities, if they emit black-body radiation is merely a theory by hawkings. We simply don't know if regular laws of phisics holds up at singularity level (that's the reason we call them a singularity, after all).

Man... I know nobel prize is a million bux and all, but risking the entire human race on it seems kinda sketchy.

I never thought there are real "mad scientist" types out there. I guess I got proven wrong on this.

Re:this is insane (3, Informative)

Capt'n Hector (650760) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044085)

hawking radiation is not blackbody radiation. Hawking radiation comes from the spontaneous creation of particle pairs very close to the event horizon. Before they are able to annihilate each other, one is pulled in, and the other one escapes. I guess radiation isn't the right name for it, but that's what it's called.

However you are correct in that we have no idea if Hawking radiation even exists. If it did, we would observe GRBs of a specific type, yet we haven't. I think we should look for these GRBs some more before we start cooking up black holes.

Oh dear. (0, Flamebait)

E_elven (600520) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044054)

Yet another example of our dear scientists considering the 'can I' instead of 'should I'.

Patching up black holes (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6044058)

Like so [fark.com]

In all seriousness (5, Insightful)

xihr (556141) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044074)

Natural cosmic ray (probably created by supernovae or hypernovae) are far more energetic than any puny little collision we can muster. Concerns about doing something bad because of our particle collider experiences is unwarranted; if something bad were potentially laying in wait, it would have already been sprung billions of years ago from cosmic rays events. The most energetic cosmic ray -- consisting of a single proton -- had the kinetic energy of a hard-thrown fastball.

It is not really that bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6044100)

While I don't have the links handy, I do recall hearing about this at least a year ago. The hypothesis goes that if much of the force of gravity is confined into other dimensions all curled up on each other, then when you collide two particles with enough energy, they would enter a regime where that gravity could affect them, and immediatly collaps down into a black hole with the mass of the two particles. Such a hole would evaporate immediatly by Hawking radiation and be observed as a spray of random elementry particles. And if the hypothesis is correct but Hawking was wrong, we are screwed anyway, because the relevant energies hit the planet quite frequently in the form of cosmic rays, creating mini-black holes in the upper atmosphere all the time. If they didn't decay, then they are somewhere inside the earth even now.

What if... (1)

VTS (673706) | more than 10 years ago | (#6044102)

...one of these physics experiments (not necessarily this one) just vaporises the earth? Its not like they understand everything yet so how can they be sure its safe?
Maybe it works just like they think it will or maybe they will create an artificial big-bang or something.

Or am I just too damn paranoid?
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