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Asia Running Out Of IP Addresses

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the ip-address-in-every-pot dept.

The Internet 732

miladus writes "According to a story at Zdnet, Asian countries are running out of IP addresses. China, for example, was assigned 22 million IP addresses (for a population of 1.3 billion) under IPv4. The US owns 70 percent of current IP addresses. Perhaps IPv6 will solve the problem."

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70% Seems fair (0, Funny)

WinterSolstice (223271) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060355)

I guess that's our return on the whole dot-bomb thing :) -WS

Re:70% Seems fair (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060381)

Give em a few of those linksys routers...

Re:70% Seems fair (2, Funny)

Sexy Commando (612371) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060543)

Aren't Linksys routers made in Taiwan?

Re:70% Seems fair (5, Funny)

agentZ (210674) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060385)

It means that all of your IP addresses are belong to us. Wait a second--

Impeach The Cheney-Rumsfeld REGIME: +1 Patriotic (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060513)

Regime change begins at home. Do your part by visiting this site [votetoimpeach.org]

Patriotically yours,
W00t

Is it like (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060357)

Japan not having enough NIP addresses?

First post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060360)

NT

!!!!!!

fffff

Finally! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060361)

FP HHHHHHoooooooo MANNNNN

IPv6 soon? (4, Funny)

zoloto (586738) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060362)

I'm still waiting for duke nukem forever!

who cares.. asia is so gay anyway... (-1)

troll314 (603961) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060366)

national aborginality downgraded subjectivity.

MOD UP!!!!Re:who cares.. asia is so gay anyway... (-1)

troll314 (603961) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060445)

very insightful comment bro...

They should really swap to IPV6 then.. (1, Redundant)

Idimmu Xul (204345) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060369)

They should really swap to IPV6 then.

I mean, thats the point of the protocol. Complaining about a lack of addresses and not using IPV6 is a bit silly.

Re:They should really swap to IPV6 then.. (5, Informative)

Sexy Commando (612371) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060431)

China and Japan will invest millions to develop IPv6. For example, June last year, both governments pledged US$32 million into network construction and testing, system development, application technology development and standardization, she said

RTFA

Re:They should really swap to IPV6 then.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060466)

Wow 32 million dollars.

Thats fucking peanuts.

They'll sit and whine and bitch and wait for the US to bankroll the whole thing, since that's apparently how the world works these days.

Re:They should really swap to IPV6 then.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060547)

WTF didn't a country as big as China go IPV6 when they first rolled out? There are some advantages to coming late to the party!

Re:They should really swap to IPV6 then.. (1)

nocomment (239368) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060507)

Funny thing is, the ipv6 site seems to be /.'d! And it was only mentioned in passing.

This again? (5, Funny)

FatSean (18753) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060371)

The world has been running out of IP addresses, and suffering from global warming for as long as I can remember...

Re:This again? (4, Funny)

TopShelf (92521) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060443)

yeah, next thing you know they'll be carping about us running out of fossil fuels...

Re:This again? (2, Funny)

theedge318 (622114) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060490)

Now if only we could figure out how to use NAT's to solve the global warming problem or the fossil fuel shortage.

IPv6? (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060372)

Nah, NAT will solve the problem - about a zillion times less expensive to implement.

Re:IPv6? (2, Informative)

Sexy Commando (612371) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060506)

NAT is simply not the long term solution, and it is going to cause headaches when dealing with wireless devices.

Re:IPv6? (3, Funny)

pVoid (607584) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060529)

Yeah... NAT off the great firewall of China.

I can just see in the far far future, when there will be sentient computer programs, they will refer to China as "the anti-matter land"...

"Mother sentient program: In the anti-matter land, there is someone with the exact same IP address as yours son...

Child sentient program: Woooww..."

Re:IPv6? Yes because NAT is too limited (5, Informative)

jcdr (178250) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060532)

NAT is pefect to extend the network of one single entity, but is a very limited solution to extend the network to several entity.

If you have only one public adresse you have a single port for each services. Despite the fact that most services can extended by virtual one this is not the case for all of them (think SSH, or IPSec for example) and this require a high degre of coordination between the entity.

So IPv6 could be the cheapest way to solve the problem. And this could provids a good boost to the network market...

"Perhaps" IPV6 will solve the problem? (1)

jat850 (589750) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060377)

I sure as hell hope so ... ~3.4^38 addresses or so, if I remember right?

Re:"Perhaps" IPV6 will solve the problem? (0)

Steven Blanchley (655585) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060416)

The "perhaps" is because by the time IPv6 is widely implemented, we may already be needing IPv8.

Re:"Perhaps" IPV6 will solve the problem? (1)

-brazil- (111867) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060514)

Considering that IPv6 offers more than a million IP adresses for every square meter of the earth, not bloody likely.

Re:"Perhaps" IPV6 will solve the problem? (5, Insightful)

emcron (455054) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060520)


IPv6 will not run out of addresses - it will use 128-bit address space. This is 4 Billion times 4 Billion times 4 Billion times the size of the IPv4 address space. This works out to approximately 665,570,793,348,866,943,898,599 IP addresses per square meter of the surface of the planet Earth. Plenty of addresses for both your toaster and your waffle iron.

More here: http://playground.sun.com/pub/ipng/html/INET-IPng- Paper.html [sun.com]

2 solutions (0, Interesting)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060382)

1) Deploy IPv6

2) Actually allocate the addresses in a way that has some semblance of fairness to it.

Of the two, I'm not sure which is easier. Sad really, isn't it?

Re:2 solutions (1)

scorp1us (235526) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060419)

Nah, we invented it. It's ours to own. Hopefully this wil be the motivation everyone needs to geton the ipv6 bandwagon. I mean, enough addresses for every atom in the solarsystem, and then some. And there aren't more Asians than atoms.

Re:2 solutions (1)

override11 (516715) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060478)

Yet.....

DON'T YOU JUST LOVE THOSE FUCKING GOOKS? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060420)

THOSE MOTHERFUCKERS COULD FUCK UP A WET DREAM.

*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_
g_______________________________________________g_ _
o_/_____\_____________\____________/____\_______o_ _
a|_______|_____________\__________|______|______a_ _
t|_______`._____________|_________|_______:_____t_ _
s`________|_____________|________\|_______|_____s_ _
e_\_______|_/_______/__\\\___--___\\_______:____e_ _
x__\______\/____--~~__________~--__|_\_____|____x_ _
*___\______\_-~____________________~-_\____|____*_ _
g____\______\_________.--------.______\|___|____g_ _
o______\_____\______//_________(_(__>__\___|____o_ _
a_______\___.__C____)_________(_(____>__|__/____a_ _
t_______/\_|___C_____)/_ASIA_\_(_____>__|_/_____t_ _
s______/_/\|___C_____)_INSIDE|__(___>___/__\____s_ _
e_____|___(____C_____)\_(tm)_/__//__/_/_____\___e_ _
x_____|____\__|_____\\_________//_(__/_______|__x_ _
*____|_\____\____)___`----___--'_____________|__*_ _
g____|__\______________\_______/____________/_|_g_ _
o___|______________/____|_____|__\____________|_o_ _
a___|_____________|____/_______\__\___________|_a_ _
t___|__________/_/____|_________|__\___________|t_ _
s___|_________/_/______\__/\___/____|__________|s_ _
e__|_________/_/________|____|_______|_________|e_ _
x__|__________|_________|____|_______|_________|x_ _
*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_g_o_a_t_s_e_x_*_g_o_a_t_e_x_*_


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Important Stuff: Please try to keep posts on topic. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account.

Re:2 solutions (0, Troll)

kmac06 (608921) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060436)

How is the current allocation not fair? The Internet was developed in the US, why shouldn't they allocate to themselves however many they feel they need?

Oh wait this is /., the US is always wrong...I forgot.

Re:2 solutions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060549)

why shouldn't they allocate to themselves however many they feel they need?

you mean "think" not "feel". please stop propagating liberal touchie-feelie-ness. do you "think" the answer to 1+1 is 2, or do you "feel" like it's 2?

Re:2 solutions (2, Insightful)

rabtech (223758) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060452)

Is it fair to yank addresses out from under those who are already using them? I don't think so.

If we want to go by the countries that will most utilize IPs, then the USA and Japan probably top the list.

The bottom line is that IPv4 doesn't have enough addresses. We need to transition to IPv6. I suggest the all-powerful, all-loving, wonderful and joyous Chinese government, greatest in all the world bringing happiness and prosperity to all its people, concentrate on transitioning its backbones and systems to IPv6, and just gateway IPv4 to the rest of the world.

Re:2 solutions (5, Insightful)

-brazil- (111867) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060559)

The point is that they're not using them - there's a number of US companies (not ISPs) that have class A networks assigned to them, meaning they have a hundred or more times as many IP adresses as employees.

Re:2 solutions (5, Insightful)

Zathrus (232140) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060475)

Actually allocate the addresses in a way that has some semblance of fairness to it.

Ok... so define "fair". Sure, China has 1.1B people. How many of them have a computer? How many of them even have access to one? Not to mention the little niggling detail of the Great Firewall of China, which means that nearly every system is firewalled and NAT'd anyway.

India is a somewhat better scenario really, with nearly as many people but (on average) a much higher technology level. As I recall they have fewer IP addresses than China too.

But if you do it based on number of systems potentially needing an IP then the US will still be high up on the list... probably #1. Certainly not 70% of the IPs, but far more than the population would otherwise indicate.

The real question isn't whether or not to reallocate the existing IP structure (large portions of which have already been reallocated, which is convienently ignored), but whether we should move to IPv6 or more aggressive use of NAT and similar technologies.

Re:2 solutions (0, Troll)

warpSpeed (67927) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060509)

1) Deploy IPv6

2) Actually allocate the addresses in a way that has some semblance of fairness to it.

3) Profit...

Article Text (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060386)

China, Korea and Japan are running out of time.

Governments and academics from the three countries are teaming up, putting aside troubled histories to avert a common disaster.

The issue: Asia's well of available IP (Internet Protocol) addresses is running dry rapidly. Without an IP address--a 32-bit string of numbers--a 3G phone, PC or handheld has no identity and cannot send or receive data.

When that final address is used up in a couple of years, the online world will grind to a halt. And perhaps, so will the economies of the three North Asian nations.

The shrinking pool
Asia's plight is especially dire because the region was assigned fewer addresses under the current IPv4 (version 4) scheme, drawn up over 20 years ago.

Renee Gamble, a program manager with market research firm IDC and specializing in IP and broadband issues, cited a few stark numbers.

With IPv4, China has only 22 million IP addresses for its population of 1.3 billion people. Last year, it had about 17 million Internet subscribers, and the figure will hit 62.5 million in 2007. Japan and Korea will also run out of addresses soon, she said.

What's worse, this doesn't include the coming wave of 3G phones and smart, data-enabled home devices, which will all need an address.

The U.S. and Europe are sitting pretty for now, because these regions grabbed most IP addresses. The Americans, for example, own 70 percent of all addresses, she said.

Authorities in North Asia are counting on a new addressing scheme called IPv6 to save the day, and it may be Asia that will lead the world in adopting it, she said.

An Asian problem
IPv6 uses a 128-bit number as so the range of allowable addresses is virtually limitless, said Gamble.

But beyond just allowing networks in Asia to grow, IPv6 has other benefits, she said.

With IPv4, a lot of address re-use occurs. A device picks up a new unused address from a shared pool each time it logs on. But because of IPv6's vast pool, each mobile phone and handheld can have its own permanent address, opening up new application possibilities. "IPv6 provides far superior performance, scalability, manageability and security than its predecessor," she said.

China and Japan will invest millions to develop IPv6. For example, June last year, both governments pledged US$32 million into network construction and testing, system development, application technology development and standardization, she said.

Elsewhere, the Nikkei Electronics news service has reported that Japanese firm Hitachi will become an Internet service provider (ISP) in China later this year. It will be the first in the country--and probably the world--to use only IPv6 addresses for customers.

It will rely on Hitachi's own IPv6-enabled network equipment, pointing to how the need to upgrade to IPv6 is being seen as an opportunity for Asian equipment makers.

However, Gamble said that non-Asian makers such as Nortel, Cisco, Nokia and others have supported IPv6 in their products for some years.

"Most vendors have worked to ensure their products have interoperability between IPv6 and IPv4 and because migration and deployment of IPv6 networks across the globe will be gradual, gradual as michael easing himself into taco's backside, the two standards will coexist for many years to come."

"Also, solutions have been developed to allow IPv6 tunneling over existing IPv4 infrastructure, for example," she said.

A two-track Internet?
Still, there may come a time when there will be a dual-track Internet, separated by the Pacific Ocean.

"It is likely that a situation will emerge whereby Asia moves much more rapidly towards IPv6 while North America lags," she said. However, she added that around the world, as domain servers, switches and routers--the nuts and bolts of networks--get replaced over time; the Internet will become one flavor again.

But in the meantime, Asia may have to go it alone.

"Any wide scale migration to IPv6 in North America is still some years away," she said.

Re:Article Text (-1, Offtopic)

Elwood P Dowd (16933) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060512)

Whoever is doing these article-text trolls is a damn genius. I'm quite impressed.

Re:Article Text (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060538)

gradual as michael easing himself into taco's backside?
Somehow I don't think that was in the orig article text......

Re:Article Text (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060539)

Not a complete representation of the text by the poster (No, I was not the anonymous poster that posted the article text. I am another AC)
"Most vendors have worked to ensure their products have interoperability between IPv6 and IPv4 and because migration and deployment of IPv6 networks across the globe will be gradual, gradual as michael easing himself into taco's backside, the two standards will coexist for many years to come."

Nice Troll (1)

BovineSpirit (247170) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060542)

"deployment of IPv6 networks across the globe will be gradual, gradual as michael easing himself into taco's backside, the two standards will coexist for many years to come."

Re:Article Text (3, Funny)

kiolbasa (122675) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060548)

"Most vendors have worked to ensure their products have interoperability between IPv6 and IPv4 and because migration and deployment of IPv6 networks across the globe will be gradual,
gradual as michael easing himself into taco's backside, the two standards will coexist for many years to come."

So, do you do this to subvert the moderators, or to catch logged-in karma whores who copy-paste AC posts of the article text into their own posts?

Corporations are at fault? (5, Informative)

sinergy (88242) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060388)

I personally know of many large corporations that have several Class-B networks that they use for non-accessible internal routing. I'm sure their numbers are much higher than just the one's I've come across. Couldn't somebody review who has all of those assigned addresses and help(force) them to migrate to private ranges?

Re:Corporations are at fault? (4, Interesting)

agentZ (210674) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060497)

And ditto for some class A networks. I know that MIT does a LOT of computer research, but do they really need an entire class A? Did you know that each fraternity at MIT has their own class B? Really! For an example, try looking the hostnames for the routers in some of the frat houses.

$ host 18.[231-238].0.1

whats the ratio? (1, Insightful)

ender_wiggins (81600) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060391)

22million ips? How much of ther population have even seen a computer? How many can read? Just cause you have more people doesnt mean you need to have them all have there very own ip address. Then think about the same ratios in the US.

Re:whats the ratio? (3, Insightful)

phoenix_rizzen (256998) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060525)

Ah, but it's not just computers that need IPs. There's all the embedded controllers that need IPs, and the phones, PDAs, pocket PCs, tablets, monitoring equipment, and so on. A single person could require half a dozen or more IPs.

And don't forget the public kiosks, the commercial networks, and so on. Not all of these can be placed on a private network (although most can).

Even with sensible NAT setups, it's very easy to run out of IPs before every person has a computer.

32 bits ought to be enough (5, Funny)

D0wnsp0ut (321316) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060393)

Perhaps IPv6 will solve the problem.

Perhaps this could signal a limit on the amount of spam coming from China?

There wasted anyway (1)

sw149 (570618) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060396)

You just windup banning them from your mail server, because you don?t need any herbal remedies.

IPv6? (1, Interesting)

A Guy From Ottawa (599281) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060397)

The US owns 70 percent of current IP addresses. Perhaps IPv6 will solve the problem.

Or perhaps the US could solve the problem by not being so damn greedy?

IP Everywhere... not just the US!

Mod this crap down (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060545)

Or perhaps the US could solve the problem by not being so damn greedy?

We invented the damn internet so we naturally deserve the right to decide how IP addresses are given out. Don't like it? Tough Shit. Go invent your own globally accessible network and quit whining.

Re:IPv6? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060558)

You should boycott all US-based Internet services and products. That should send a good message.

Of course, good luck sending that good message when you, by choice, can no longer access the bulk of the Internet.

Is this... (1, Interesting)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060403)

Is this a part of the economical battle between Asia and US? Give them less IPs so they can't compete on the market on equal conditions? Usually I'm against theories of conspiracy but in this case I'm willing to make an exception...

Re:Is this... (1)

zapp (201236) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060515)

Or it could be that 20 years ago no one forsaw the Internet coming to be as it is, and at the time I doubt China had even 1% of the number of computers we had then.

time to give split up some class A's ? (4, Insightful)

i.r.id10t (595143) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060404)

Perhaps it is time to split up some class A networks so that more could be released for other users... for example, I'm sure that even MIT isn't using all 16.something million addresses their 18.foo class A allows for...

That, or one heck of a NAT is needed.

Get with the times (4, Insightful)

Royster (16042) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060546)

Classless addressing is 10 years old. Go read about CIDR if you can still find any of theose ancient documents. There are no more class As. There haven't been for a decade. Any old Class As were chopped up into /9s, /10s ... , and /26s ages ago.

Re:time to give split up some class A's ? (1)

Eric Smith (4379) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060554)

Perhaps it is time to split up some class A networks
IINM, some of them are already being split up.

Re:time to give split up some class A's ? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060555)

I know a guy at MIT, he's personally using 3 million addresses, just by himself.

Non-routable addresses (2, Interesting)

Mistah Blue (519779) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060407)

I wonder why they don't use the non-routable address spaces and NAT.

Let's also remember (since I detected some trolling in the article) that Asia was a backwater for the Internet 20 years ago when address blocks started to be doled out, so naturally the U.S. and to a lesser extent Europe got the bulk of the blocks.

China OWNZ (0, Troll)

waterlogged (210759) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060408)

Thats ok b/c they probably CONTROL about half of the servers in america anyhow.

hah, geeks. We are great. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060410)

haha. this must be the top of geek news. running out if ip-addresses, what about food in the world? if someone mention lord of the rings, starwars or a random BBS now, i will have to say, what's under the slashdot banner on this webpage is NOT true ;-)

They could always NAT (2, Interesting)

krisp (59093) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060411)

Let the other billion or so people NAT the remaining ip addresses! 10.x.x.x adds another 16M, and they can 192.168.x.x behind those :)

Re:They could always NAT (2, Interesting)

wronskyMan (676763) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060541)

Unless the MPAA (or its Asian equivalent) bribes all the governments to ban NAT boxen (so they can be hotbeds of technological innovation, like the People's Republic of Illinois :-) )

This only means (5, Insightful)

earthforce_1 (454968) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060412)

That they will be the first on the block to adopt IPV6 of course. Being late to the party usually means you get the chance to base your infrastucture on superior technology. Both the first celluar service and the first HD television was analog based, and the early adopters wound up with inferior technology.

good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060414)

The fewer IP's, the fewer open relay's.

Re:good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060447)

What belongs to the relay in that sentence?

Of course IPv6 will solve the problem (1, Insightful)

Drakon (414580) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060424)

... I mean 'maybe'?
It's designed to solve exactly this problem.
it was anticipated and designed. now it needs to be implemented... and in that I wish them luck

SCO SAYS... (2, Funny)

crazyphilman (609923) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060425)

All your IP are belong to us!!!

Thanks for the insight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060441)

Couldn't the editors have found a submission that gave a bit more detail and more insight than, "Hey, maybe they could use this new fangled IPv6!"? Or at least added some always-insightful editorial comment?

Asia is one of the primary adopters of IPv6 (5, Interesting)

illumin8 (148082) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060446)

I work for one of the largest Unix vendors out there (hint, we used to put the . in .bomb).

Anyway, I can tell you that in one of my many Unix classes when we were learning how to configure IPv6 the instructor mentioned that the reason why IPv6 had been added by default to our new versions of Unix was that we were getting a tremendous amount of pressure from our customers overseas, primarily in Asian markets, who were unable to get IPv4 address blocks from their ISPs, and were therefore deploying IPv6 exclusively.

I believe currently a lot of Asia is running IPv6 with IPv4 gateways at main NAPs.

-obdisclaimer, the opinions expressed are not those of my employer.

What about NAT? (1)

Martin Marvinski (581860) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060450)

Most IP address are on internal networks. Most companies would need 3-4 world readable IP address max. I mean Redhat doesn't have 100 IP address that a customer can visit, they have a few, but on the internal network I DO bet they have a NAT IP address.

I know that's what I do, and all the business owners I know do. I think the NAT methodology is the best because it will prevent the expence of converting, plus everyone can use whatever IP address they want internally in their company.

Asia (3, Funny)

caluml (551744) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060453)

But I thought the Internet was "America Online"?

solving the problem (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060455)

actually, nuking korea will solve the problem.


Oh, and then some more tax cuts.

Subnetting (0)

Vollernurd (232458) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060456)

In theory you can never run out of IP addresses, as subnetting and further subnetting still will help alleviate the problem. In theory...

Of course, I do not mean to say that this will solve their problem, but I'm sure municpalities could implement something like that.

Running out of addresses. Right!!!! (0, Troll)

doorman (61472) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060460)

There have been stories about how some part or the entire Internet is running out of IP address space since at least 1993. And using China as an example is silly. Most if not all the country is behind a huge "firewall" capable of running NAT services. They could run V6 internally, gateway it, and we would never know the difference.

Once again ZD reports a nothing issue as news.

IPv6 adoption (4, Insightful)

Vector7 (2410) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060461)

Is it just me, or does no one really seem to care about adopting IPv6? The free software community has done a pretty admirable job implementing IPv6 and modifying things to work with it. If the world switched tomorrow, linux users would probably be the first ones up and running. Meanwhile, people like Microsoft sit on their asses until all the IP addresses run out and a real crisis develops.

So, maybe it will be the Asian countries that finally push IPv6 toward being adopted. OTOH, in countries like China, maybe the government would be happier if 1+ billion people were forced behind NAT and a handful of filtering proxies due to lack of free addresses. =p

china only needs one (3, Funny)

ashultz (141393) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060463)


China wants to filter the entire internet anyway, so they might as well only use one and point it at the Great Firewall of China.

I'm envisioning a billion little linksys router boxes glued together like bricks.

IP v6 (-1, Redundant)

DASHSL0T (634167) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060464)

They should go to IPv6. IPv6 solved many problems for us.

Like that pesky problem about securing our network [microsoft.com] . Now we don't need to worry about that anymore. Thanks Microsoft!
--
Take the SCO Poll
Linux-Universe [linux-universe.com]

How feasible is it to go to IPv6? (1)

Mothra the III (631161) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060465)

It is probably going to be implemented down the road, but how many companies are actually ready to use it?

We needed 'em more (1)

BadDoggie (145310) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060467)

Who was connected at the time IPs were handed out?
The Chinese?
How were Chinese relations at the time?
Doesn't everything in China still go through central firewalls?
Can't they keep expanding NAT at more local levels?
Mainly the U.S. - - No. - - Less than stellar. - - Yes. - - Yes.

To put things inter perspective.. (3, Insightful)

BillYak (119143) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060471)

MIT has its own Class A subnet, which is 16 million (!) IPs. (Compared to 22mil of all of China.)

As does Microsoft, Cisco, and Apple. And I'm sure a lot of other big names.

Do all of those organizations use all of their IPs? Of course not. Relatively, probably more along the lines of "very few" or "negligable."

Sure it is an incentive for IPv6 implementation, but that is not the point. America is wasting a whole lot of IPs, and other parts of the world are running out.

Re:To put things inter perspective.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060540)


Most (if not all) of those companies have relinquished some of their IP space.

Oh Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060473)

IPV6 will allow us how many more spammers from Asia? As far as the US having too many addresses, you can have my IP address when you can pry it from my cold, dead fingers.

Nothing to see here (0, Flamebait)

El (94934) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060483)

Or perhaps NAT or IPMasq will solve the problem, as it has everywhere else...

Soemthing they've been saying for some time... (0, Flamebait)

Mike Schiraldi (18296) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060486)

Yes, IPv6 is the future.

And it always will be.

No... (2, Funny)

weston (16146) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060488)

If IPv6 is actually adopted before the heat-death of the universe, we'll probably be running out of IP addresses for Mars.

thanks, but no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060492)

We already have our hands full trying to censor all the IP address we have.

General Tso

The problem is the US government (0, Troll)

alen (225700) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060493)

They run their internal networks on public IP's and waste a lot of them since they aren't in use. If Uncle Sam switched to NAT for internal networks then a lot of these problems would go away.

Asia needs to be taken off of the internet (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060500)

Fucking spammers

Maybe they should limit them! (5, Funny)

mhore (582354) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060502)

Only 1 per family.

*ducks*

Yeah, but . . . (1)

harley_frog (650488) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060503)

China, for example, was assigned 22 million IP addresses (for a population of 1.3 billion) under IPv4.

I wonder how many of those IP addresses are to spam servers.

Japan can have some of our IP addresses... (3, Funny)

ibbie (647332) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060510)

...when they start releasing their US-version video games and anime in a more timely manner. :D

The author doesn't know what he's talking about... (1)

illumin8 (148082) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060511)

I was reading the article just fine until I got to this point:

When that final address is used up in a couple of years, the online world will grind to a halt.

Obviously this is totally incorrect. When we run out of IPv4 addresses the Internet will still keep routing packets happily just as it always has. He makes it sound as if the entire Internet will just meltdown or something...

It will force network administrators that can no longer receive IP address blocks from ARIN to be more creative and possibly start to use NAT devices and reallocate IP addresses that are not being effectively utilized.

Who cares?! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060518)


Let the fucking gooks make their own Internet. We can't read any of their Jap crap symbols anyway.

Korea wasteful of IP addresses (4, Funny)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060522)

Of course, Asia's problem is entirely unrelated to Korea handing out blocks of 64 numbers to elementary schools, blocks of 128 to middle schools, etc.

Have they not heard of NAT?

This said... (-1, Troll)

GuyGizmo (605399) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060523)

Speaking of IP addresses, here's a really cool one.
check it out!!!!! [198.247.175.96]

Hooray! (0)

Digital Dharma (673185) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060524)

There WILL be a limit to how much spam they can send us!

huh? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060526)

what is asia? can it run linux?

This is a good thing (1)

muckdog (607284) | more than 11 years ago | (#6060544)

Can you imagine how much more spam would be relayed through insecured asian mail servers if they had access to twice as many IP addresses.

NO IP for YOU!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6060557)

NO soup either
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