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Play GNU Chess On Your Scanner

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the time-on-hands dept.

Classic Games (Games) 157

leighklotz writes "Debian developer and Internet Mail Archive founder Jeff Breidenbach of PARC has made GlyphChess, a chess-playing copier using Python, GNU Chess and DataGlyphs attached to the bottom of the pieces. DataGlyphs are cool 2D barcodes made out of / and \ marks for ones and zeros that use the coding from CDs for error coding. If you don't happen to have a Xerox machine at home, it also works with SANE..."

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Checkmate! (-1, Troll)

gpinzone (531794) | more than 10 years ago | (#6060990)

I win!

fp (-1, Offtopic)

pair-a-noyd (594371) | more than 10 years ago | (#6060991)

W00t!!!

Fascinating. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6060994)

I bet Mr. Spock would love to play some 3D Chess with a Xerox machine.

Re:Fascinating. (0)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061253)

That would require a 3D printer. He can get one here. http://www.zcorp.com/

Linux Today: Munich goes with Open Source Softwar (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061547)

http://linuxtoday.com/infrastructure/2003052802126 NWDTPB [linuxtoday.com]

Please, read about the final decision of the city. It is official - 14000 computers move to Linux. Huge win for Open Source. The snowball starts rolling..

Award winning... (5, Funny)

Omicron32 (646469) | more than 10 years ago | (#6060999)

And the "Most pointless thing ever" award goes to...

CZ3C#M4T3, Y00 100Z3, 5UX0R! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061047)

Firstus postus, beeeeeotchae!
I am the owner of UNIX!
Bow down and worship my 'l33t c0d1ng 5ki115!





pleeeeeease?!!!




Mom said I could have first post!

Re:Award winning... (5, Interesting)

HornyBastard77 (667965) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061090)

Maybe not.

From the article:

Why

Like many fun hacks, GlyphChess has paid off in unexpected ways. First, testing DataGlyph software and algorithm changes is a lot more engaging. It is hard to get excited about 99.98% vs. 99.97% decode rates in testsuite #73, but if a rook disappears, well that is simply unacceptable! We've found GlyphChess an excellent diagnostic and quality assurance motivator that inspires rapid bug hunting and closure. Second, it turns out some of the software technology refined for GlyphChess is applicable to more boring, but commercially important domains. Finally, GlyphChess is a compelling demonstration vehicle for DataGlyph Toolkit technical capabilities, including our DataGlyph location routines, our ability to decode arbitrarily rotated DataGlyphs, and our very high tolerance of variation in scan resolutions and positioning. GlyphChess works and it works well.

We also gained valuable experience about DataGlyph application building.

Re:Award winning... (4, Funny)

swordboy (472941) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061328)

Maybe not.

This actually just jogged my hamster into "what if" mode...

Wouldn't it be really cool if the chess pieces used RFID chips to identify themselves to a board (not a scanner, but a real chess board). Said board could move the players around with magnets. It wouldn't be too complicated if you designed it properly. The board would have to be large enough for the players to move in between each other... Actually, on a somewhat more complicated level, make it small so the other players have to *move* out of the way when the computer takes a turn.

Not only would it be fun for hours, but you could probably start a psychic chess network and charge people to play chess with their dead grandmother's.

MOD PARENT DOWN AS PLAGIARIST (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061498)

Mean people suck.

Re:MOD PARENT DOWN AS PLAGIARIST (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061568)

No, nice people suck mean people.

Re:Award winning... (5, Funny)

curne (133623) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061118)

Nah, the Most-Pointless-Thing-Ever award still goes to inventor of the Helicopter Catapult Seat.
:-)

Re:Award winning... (4, Informative)

autocracy (192714) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061236)

Helicopters with eject seats do exist and work... Just cut the blades loose from the rotor right before loosing the seat.

Re:Award winning... (5, Interesting)

Idarubicin (579475) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061482)

A Russian company (Zvezda) developed helicopter ejection seats. They have been installed on Ka-50 helicopters. Here's a link [zvezda-npp.ru] .

On the same page you'll note that they also designed and tested an ejection system for Buran (Soviet Space Shuttle) cosmonauts.

Re:Award winning... (1)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061702)

Wow. You used the word "loosing" and it wasn't a grammatical error.

Amazing. :)

Re:Award winning... (1)

LinuxHam (52232) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061770)

I knew there's a reason you show up as friend, fan, and friend of a friend! :) (even though the PP did screw up, as yoosyual)

Re:Award winning... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061140)

To paraphrase Andy Rooney:

"You may think that going to all this bother doesn't make a whole lot of sense. But let me ask you this: What were you doing last week that was so important??"

Linux Today: Munich goes with Open Source Software (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061444)

Please, read about the final decision of the city. It is official - 14000 computers move to Linux. Huge win for Open Source. The snowball starts rolling...

Re:Award winning... (1)

Whyrph (620050) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061503)

But ..but . .imagine a Beowulf cluster of these!

This has to have something to do with linux (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061007)

otherwise none of you sweaty fucks would give a shit.

suck my cue cat

Chess playing copier? (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061020)


How do you undo a move, tear up the last page of paper?

Re:Chess playing copier? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061028)

There's no crying in baseball, and there's no undoing a move in chess.

Re:Chess playing copier? (4, Funny)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061295)

nah, just put dots between the \'s and /'s. Now you can /. (slash-dot) and ./ (dot-slash), or .\ (dot-backslash) or \. (backslash-dot) your opponent.

soar losers (5, Funny)

frieked (187664) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061033)

Do you get to send the winner a photocopy of your ass when you lose?

Re:soar losers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061126)

Actually, that would be a resignation.

Re:soar losers (2, Funny)

Go Aptran (634129) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061244)

Won't the winner wonder why he's getting a photocopy of two hairy loaves of bread?

homonym nazi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061380)

soar = to fly, glide
sore = painful, bitter

Soar? (1)

drwtsn32 (674346) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061384)

What's a soar loser? One that can fly?

And when you win (0)

Lane.exe (672783) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061034)

You can photocopy your ass and pretend you were mooning the loser!

[sound of crickets chirping]

Not funny, huh? Oh well. [shoots self]

Re:And when you win (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061351)

It was much funnier 15 seconds ago when frieked posted it.

Oh wait, you're dead.
*rummages through lane.exe's pockets*

Mod parent up funny! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061519)

Parent was actually funnier than grandparent.

Solomon-Reed Article text (slashdotted) (5, Informative)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061042)

The Ubiquitous Reed-Solomon Codes
by Barry A. Cipra

Reprinted from SIAM News, Volume 26-1, January 1993

In this so-called Age of Information, no one need be reminded of the importance not only of speed but also of accuracy in the storage, retrieval, and transmission of data. It's more than a question of "Garbage In, Garbage Out." Machines do make errors, and their non-man-made mistakes can turn otherwise flawless programming into worthless, even dangerous, trash. Just as architects design buildings that will remain standing even through an earthquake, their computer counterparts have come up with sophisticated techniques capable of counteracting the digital manifestations of Murphy's Law.
What many might be unaware of, though, is the significance, in all this modern technology, of a five-page paper that appeared in 1960 in the Journal of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. The paper, "Polynomial Codes over Certain Finite Fields," by Irving S. Reed and Gustave Solomon, then staff members at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory, introduced ideas that form the core of current error-correcting techniques for everything from computer hard disk drives to CD players. Reed-Solomon codes (plus a lot of engineering wizardry, of course) made possible the stunning pictures of the outer planets sent back by Voyager II. They make it possible to scratch a compact disc and still enjoy the music. And in the not-too-distant future, they will enable the profitmongers of cable television to squeeze more than 500 channels into their systems, making a vast wasteland vaster yet.

"When you talk about CD players and digital audio tape and now digital television, and various other digital imaging systems that are coming--all of those need Reed-Solomon [codes] as an integral part of the system," says Robert McEliece, a coding theorist in the electrical engineering department at Caltech.

Why? Because digital information, virtually by definition, consists of strings of "bits"--0s and 1s--and a physical device, no matter how capably manufactured, may occasionally confuse the two. Voyager II, for example, was transmitting data at incredibly low power--barely a whisper--over tens of millions of miles. Disk drives pack data so densely that a read/write head can (almost) be excused if it can't tell where one bit stops and the next one (or zero) begins. Careful engineering can reduce the error rate to what may sound like a negligible level--the industry standard for hard disk drives is 1 in 10 billion--but given the volume of information processing done these days, that "negligible" level is an invitation to daily disaster. Error-correcting codes are a kind of safety net--mathematical insurance against the vagaries of an imperfect material world.

The key to error correction is redundancy. Indeed, the simplest error-correcting code is simply to repeat everything several times. If, for example, you anticipate no more than one error to occur in transmission, then repeating each bit three times and using "majority vote" at the receiving end will guarantee that the message is heard correctly (e.g., 111 000 011 111 will be correctly heard as 1011). In general, n errors can be compensated for by repeating things 2n + 1 times.

But that kind of brute-force error correction would defeat the purpose of high-speed, high-density information processing. One would prefer an approach that adds only a few extra bits to a given message. Of course, as Mick Jagger reminds us, you can't always get what you want--but if you try, sometimes, you just might find you get what you need. The success of Reed-Solomon codes bears that out.

In 1960, the theory of error-correcting codes was only about a decade old. The basic theory of reliable digital communication had been set forth by Claude Shannon in the late 1940s. At the same time, Richard Hamming introduced an elegant approach to single-error correction and double-error detection. Through the 1950s, a number of researchers began experimenting with a variety of error-correcting codes. But with their SIAM journal paper, McEliece says, Reed and Solomon "hit the jackpot."

The payoff was a coding system based on groups of bits--such as bytes--rather than individual 0s and 1s. That feature makes Reed-Solomon codes particularly good at dealing with "bursts" of errors: Six consecutive bit errors, for example, can affect at most two bytes. Thus, even a double-error-correction version of a Reed-Solomon code can provide a comfortable safety factor. (Current implementations of Reed-Solomon codes in CD technology are able to cope with error bursts as long as 4000 consecutive bits.)

Mathematically, Reed-Solomon codes are based on the arithmetic of finite fields. Indeed, the 1960 paper begins by defining a code as "a mapping from a vector space of dimension m over a finite field K into a vector space of higher dimension over the same field." Starting from a "message" (a_0, a_1, . . ., a_{m-1}), where each a_k is an element of the field K, a Reed-Solomon code produces (P(0), P(g), P(g^2), . . ., P(g^{N-1})), where N is the number of elements in K, g is a generator of the (cyclic) group of nonzero elements in K, and P(x) is the polynomial a_0 + a_1x + . . . + a_{m-1} x^{m-1}. If N is greater than m, then the values of P overdetermine the polynomial, and the properties of finite fields guarantee that the coefficients of P--i.e., the original message--can be recovered from any m of the values.

Conceptually, the Reed-Solomon code specifies a polynomial by "plotting" a large number of points. And just as the eye can recognize and correct for a couple of "bad" points in what is otherwise clearly a smooth parabola, the Reed-Solomon code can spot incorrect values of P and still recover the original message. A modicum of combinatorial reasoning (and a bit of linear algebra) establishes that this approach can cope with up to s errors, as long as m, the message length, is strictly less than N - 2s.

In today's byte-sized world, for example, it might make sense to let K be the field of degree 8 over Z_2, so that each element of K corresponds to a single byte (in computerese, there are four bits to a nibble and two nibbles to a byte). In that case, N = 2^8 = 256, and hence messages up to 251 bytes long can be recovered even if two errors occur in transmitting the values P(0), P(g), . . ., P(g^{255}). That's a lot better than the 1255 bytes required by the say-everything-five-times approach.

Despite their advantages, Reed-Solomon codes did not go into use immediately--they had to wait for the hardware technology to catch up. "In 1960, there was no such thing as fast digital electronics"--at least not by today's standards, says McEliece. The Reed-Solomon paper "suggested some nice ways to process data, but nobody knew if it was practical or not, and in 1960 it probably wasn't practical."

But technology did catch up, and numerous researchers began to work on implementing the codes. One of the key individuals was Elwyn Berlekamp, a professor of electrical engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, who invented an efficient algorithm for decoding the Reed-Solomon code. Berlekamp's algorithm was used by Voyager II and is the basis for decoding in CD players. Many other bells and whistles (some of fundamental theoretic significance) have also been added. Compact discs, for example, use a version called cross-interleaved Reed-Solomon code, or CIRC.

Reed, now a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Southern California, is still working on problems in coding theory. Solomon, recently retired from the Hughes Aircraft Company, consults for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Reed was among the first to recognize the significance of abstract algebra as the basis for error-correcting codes.

"In hindsight it seems obvious," he told SIAM News. However, he added, "coding theory was not a subject when we published that paper." The two authors knew they had a nice result; they didn't know what impact the paper would have. Three decades later, the impact is clear. The vast array of applications, both current and pending, has settled the question of the practicality and significance of Reed-Solomon codes. "It's clear they're practical, because everybody's using them now," says Berlekamp. Billions of dollars in modern technology depend on ideas that stem from Reed and Solomon's original work. In short, says McEliece, "it's been an extraordinarily influential paper."

(Barry A. Cipra is a mathematician and writer based in Northfield, Minnesota. Rob Malda is a fat linux zealot with no marketable skills from Potipsco, New York)

patents (1)

nyet (19118) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061114)

an amusing side note: do a patent search [firstgov.gov] on Reed Solomon

Re:patents (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061138)

Yeah, and these are all hardware devices that implement various algorithms to create/decode reed solomon codes.

These patents seem fine to me. Reed Solomon is just a math paper. Building a little chip to put the theory to use is an invention.

actually, that was my point.. (1)

nyet (19118) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061322)

reed solomon the METHOD was not patented (nor should it be) but if that paper had been published later, code that implemented it most CERTAINLY would have been patented..

Re:Solomon-Reed Article text (slashdotted) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061139)

(Barry A. Cipra is a mathematician and writer based in Northfield, Minnesota.
Rob Malda is a fat linux zealot with no marketable skills from Potipsco, New York)
*cough*

Analog Chess (5, Funny)

OmniVector (569062) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061049)

Amazingly enough, it's possible to play chess using these strange "pieces" and a "board." Although the idea is novel i suppose.

Re:Analog Chess (2, Funny)

toxcspdrmn (471013) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061535)

What's more, there's a two player version available.

Re:Analog Chess (4, Funny)

Captain Large Face (559804) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061675)

Ah-ha! You have made a beginner's mistake there! You have failed to take into account the cardinal rule of the S.A.M. (Slashdot Audience Member). That is, when faced with an opportunity to socialise -- to use your example, play chess against a human opponent -- one must first try to find if the same opportunity can be synthesised by a non-human, and should that be possible and have more than one option, to take the option of the greatest complexity.

Wow! (1, Troll)

tomakaan (673394) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061056)

It never ceases to amaze me what worthless (but cool) things people come up with when they have time on their hands and technology to waste. Don't you all work!!

Misleading (3, Insightful)

binaryDigit (557647) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061060)

Heck, I thought that they programmed one of their advanced copiers to play chess. Not just simply using it as a hohum input device. I agree it is a cool way to test their glyphs, but not very interesting beyond that. The thought of programming your scanner/copier in python scratches that nerdy itch much nicer.

Google U.S. Puzzle Championship (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061074)


Google U.S. Puzzle Championship

For all those of you who use Google search [google.com] everyday but missed out the fact that currently, Google is running Google U.S. Puzzle Championship [google.com] , a national online competition to identify America's most logical minds.

Two winners receive slots on the US Puzzle Team and all expense paid trips to the Netherlands for the World Puzzle Championship in October. The top 25 finishers receive prizes as well as the satisfaction of knowing that what they know is well, pretty remarkable.

There's no entry fee. No special equipment is required. And the questions don't favor a specific cultural background. To get a feel for what you'll be up against, try the puzzles on this page [google.com] . Solve them and you may find a slot for you in Google's engineering department (they love logical thinkers)....

Their web server (5, Funny)

dereklam (621517) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061082)

Clearly, they're running their web server from the copier, too. Paper jam!

Paper Jam (5, Funny)

ArchStanton (153295) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061157)

"PC Load Letter"? WTF does that mean?

Re:Paper Jam (1)

Captain Large Face (559804) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061719)

Hehe. Just got a mental picture of the scene where Michael "Why should I change my name? He's the one that sucks" Bolton utterly destroys the printer. Excellent [imdb.com] . :)

Just great! (4, Funny)

Eberlin (570874) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061085)

A new and innovative way to get my arse whipped by a computer. As if losing umpteen times on the standard chessboard wasn't enough.

It's a cheap trick! (4, Funny)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061086)

He's hosting the page on his own system so he can rob the computer player of precious cycles!

It's all a ploy to give him an unfair advantage over GNU Chess!

No one wants you here (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061168)

Go back to France.

Re:No one wants you here (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061282)

he already is in france

Re:No one wants you here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061293)

"A little bit about myself: I'm Tom Darby. I'm currently living in Baltimore with my lovely wife, Miranda. I graduated from Carleton College last millenium and spent a year living and working in Paris. I enjoy hacking, reading, skating, film, and a whole mess of other things."

Re:No one wants you here (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061347)

go back to france

Re:It's a cheap trick! (1)

Tyler Eaves (344284) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061720)

Actually that is my one complaint about GNU Chess. As a novice, it would be nice to actually have a snowballs chance in a warm room. Even in Easy, it's a question of WHEN I lose, not if.

Is there anything like Slashdot only good? (-1, Offtopic)

nzyank (623627) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061088)

Someplace you can get useful info and useful *pertinent* submissions actually submitted? This article is crap and a waste of time. Please don't mod this offtopic. And who better to judge than me? I've been following this site for years under different guises.

Re:Is there anything like Slashdot only good? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061119)

If you enjoy bland groupthink from 15-year-old whiny Libertarian lawyer wannabes, I would recommend Kuro5hin [kuro5hin.org] .

Re:Is there anything like Slashdot only good? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061174)

There's a wealth of insight and useful information outside.

You know, where people are.

Re:Is there anything like Slashdot only good? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061186)

Please shut the fuck up. This idea is incredibly cool, and if you don't like it, disable stories from the Games, Entertainment, and "It's Funny, Laugh"

Games with hardware (1)

DJ Rubbie (621940) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061095)

Running a game using a scanner is more sensible than using a printer. Game of Life in Postscript [slashdot.org] .

talk about a long time to play (2, Insightful)

chadamir (665725) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061096)

I think it would be much more productive and fun to scan your butt and draw a face on it. On a much more serious note, chess already can take upwards of 2 hours to play, especially if you're playing one of those super careful people. Playing it like this would have to be a weekend event. It is an interesting technical feat though, but really provides no advancement for current technology. I sat here for 5 minutes trying to think how it might help further a current idea or help people with disabilities, but it doesn't -- at all. The purpopse of new technology should be to do things quicker/cheaper. When technology becomes more advanced and provides less functionality, we might as well bundle it with windows.

Jeff Breidenbach (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061105)

I'm more impressed by his handmade LCD stand.

Wow! (3, Funny)

lostchicken (226656) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061112)

We've /.ed PARC. They must still be using an Alto to host the site.

Picture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061113)

If I remember right, the picture used as an example at the DataGlyph website has a story associated with it. It is the picture with a woman wearing a hat in front of a mirror.

Does anyone know the story behind it?

Re:Picture (2, Informative)

easychord (671421) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061263)

Here you go. [cmu.edu]

first.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061145)

First "this guy is a LOSER" post!

Or is that, GNU/loser?

other uses for the brand gnu eyecon0meter(gpl) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061148)

that's right, when you're done playing with yourself, ucann take a moment to cypher out whois going to be the victims of the hollowcost planned buy the Godless greed/fear based corepirate payper liesense softwar gangster nazis from upon the pacific crest annex of capitollist hill?

Go RMS (-1, Flamebait)

McAddress (673660) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061151)

I am sure that this was the last remaining wall between having free software and tyranny.

DataGlyphs are proprietary (5, Informative)

Larthallor (623891) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061166)

DataGlyph techology is patented by the Xerox corporation. The DataGlyph toolkit is a binary only library that you must license to include with your "product". Despite the use of Python and GNU Chess in this example, I doubt very much that DataGlyphs are going to be of much use to the open source community.

Here's some flamebait. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061193)

GNU Chess lets most modern computers play a full game of chess. It has a plain terminal interface

So did my commodore. Hurray for GNU.

misleading title (3, Insightful)

magarity (164372) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061214)

It seems from reading the article that the copier does NOT play chess. The copier inputs the positions into the computer, which then plays chess.

While you can buy pressure sensitive boards to attach to the computer, these are pretty expensive. It's a lot easier to play chess on a real board instead of the screen. Notice that when grandmasters play computers there is a person who runs the computer and moves the pieces. So overall, this is a pretty cool hack if you happen to be a serious chess player who also has a sufficient copier already sitting around.

Concerning cool uses of a scanner... (3, Funny)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061222)

We're setting up a PC. Some hdd conflict, won't boot. CD drive broken, doesn't work. Floppy drive okay but not a single bootable floppy around. Let's see what it provides more, maybe some network boot... I look through BIOS options. Oh well, SCSI. What do we have attached to SCSI? A scanner?! Hey, come on, get a pencil and write some startup code on that sheet of paper, maybe we'll succeed booting it from the scanner! ;)

Big deal (5, Funny)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061227)

I can run Duke Nukem on a Cue Cat.

2d barcodes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061230)

Hmmm how many 3d barcodes have you seen then?

Play Go instead . (0, Troll)

Thinkit3 (671998) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061240)

It's far better. You can't be a nerd without playing Go.

Re:Play Go instead . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061266)

But you also can't be a computer and play Go right. It loses all the meaning of the game...

Wouldn't you prefer a nice game of chess? (5, Funny)

MarkGriz (520778) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061276)

No, let's play global thermonuclear war.

Listen (1)

djupedal (584558) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061277)

...how that Xerox LeGrande Full Color DocumentCentre 5600C copier (serial number removed) got into my home is none of your business.

For Sale: Collector's Edition Replica U.S. $100.00 bills from the early 1980's - for private display only. Packs of 50 go for just $299.95 (no checks). Sale price good thru 7/4/03.

How about you GNU hippies create something useful? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061281)

I think getting Lunix on the desktop is a lot more important than jerking off onto a scanner.

This is the problem with Linux (-1, Troll)

FatAssBastard (530195) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061291)

You have all these (admittedly talented) programmers spending all this time on worthless projects when they should be spending time on something worthwhile, like a consistent user interface, easy OS install, or a decent media player.

Until the Linux Community learns this very important lesson, Linux will continue to be relegated to second class citizen status to superior OS's like Windows XP or MacOS X.

Re:This is the problem with Linux (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061371)

<quote>when they should be spending time on something worthwhile, like a consistent user interface, easy OS install, or a decent media player.</quote>

Let's look at these in order:

  1. consistent user interface: KDE's been pretty consistent, even while adding features. Can't say the same for the beast from Redmond.
  2. easy OS install: Linux: 3 cds' a few clicks, enter a couple of pieces of info - result - ready-to work box w. all sorts of included software. Mickey$oft - install cd, lots of swapping of app cds ... zzzzzZZZZZ!
  3. movies downloaded w. bittorrent - all formats play out of the box on xine. WinXP - download codec. try. download another codec. try. uninstall first codec. try again. repeat every third movie. Give up.
Nice troll, I've gotta admit :-)

Re:This is the problem with Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061582)

WinXP - download codec. try. download another codec. try. uninstall first codec. try again. repeat every third movie. Give up.

What a fuckin idiot.

Re:This is the problem with Linux (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061652)

Nice troll, I've gotta admit :-)

Got you, didn't he? And you even posted twice, including your post below.

YHBT
HAND

Re:This is the problem with Linux (4, Funny)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061393)

<quote> You have all these (admittedly talented) programmers spending all this time on worthless projects</quote>

... like Microsoft BOB? Clippy? DOS 4.0? Windows Millenium? IIS? (Well, maybe they weren't so talented after all).

Re:This is the problem with Linux (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061418)

You are a idiot.

Whats more, your posts show that you have absolutely no experience with windows (here's a tip, media player automatically downloads codecs as needed), and no idea how to use a windows machine - one can assume you're another wannabe know-nothing who talks too fucking much and couldnt set the time on a VCR let alone contribute anything to the CS world.

Please die and go wherever fat sweaty linux fucks go after their bloated carcasses rot.

Re:This is the problem with Linux (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061508)

millennium has two n's in there

Webster.com (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061626)

...is your friend [m-w.com] , especially when you can't spell.

MOD PARENT UP!! (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061597)

I've been saying this for years, but no one seems to listen!

Archeologic Implications... (4, Funny)

Tsali (594389) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061335)

So all those glyphs from the Egyptians was really some sort of primitive multiple-player shoot-em up game?

Finally! (4, Funny)

zsazsa (141679) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061372)

Finally, after more than 30 years and being spun off of Xerox, PARC finally comes up with a product involving copiers. And it's absolutely useless.

Re:Finally! (1)

Larthallor (623891) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061504)

It's funny because it's true!

Playing chess on your scanner (2, Funny)

Alomex (148003) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061386)

In a scale from 0 to Geek, he get's a 100.

Re:Playing chess on your scanner (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061676)

"Arithmetic according to C: float x = 3.14159; float y = 1/2 * x; Value of y? zero. "

0.5 * x;

yeah.

Re:Playing chess on your scanner (1)

pete-classic (75983) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061779)

Arithmetic according to C: float x = 3.14159; float y = 1/2 * x; Value of y? zero.


I don't understand the problem.

Do you contend that strong typing is inherently wrong? Or that Cs default casting should be better at guessing what you mean? Or what?

-Peter

Games on your scanner (1)

b1t r0t (216468) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061387)

I tried playing GnuGo on my scanner, but the glass broke when I slammed the stone down. Oops.

Re:Games on your scanner (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061620)

How about nude Twister!

Warning do not use this program ! (-1, Troll)

Krapangor (533950) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061399)

Due to the viral GNU GPL license everything you put on the scanner becomes open source if you use this program.
The main GNU leaders [stallman.org] believe the intellectual property has no justification [nature.com] and must therefore turned into open source at any possibility.
Furthermore it's very likely that SCO [sco.com] will claim ownership of everything you scanned (this includes your wife and cat) due to the Unix IP violations in the Linux kernel.

Great New Science needs a name. (1)

jabbadabbadoo (599681) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061400)

Glyphology?

Yeah...but what would be REALLY cool... (2, Interesting)

taradfong (311185) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061415)

...would be if a controllable electromagnet was attached to the scan head. Then, the scanner could actually move the pieces around too. You'd have to do some 'move blocking pieces into a holding area temporarily' stuff, but that would make the project even more fun, no?

Webcam would be better, and Go instead of chess! (2, Interesting)

Wesley Everest (446824) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061459)

Now what I've been envisioning is a setup where you aim a webcam down at a Go board, and it automagically figures out the full board position as you go. After the game is done, you have a record of the game in the digital SGF format so you can step through and analyze the game.

Some more details -- the software would constantly grab images of the board and process them in realtime. It should be able to use the redundancy to correct for errors and also to know when a move is done (since you'll move your hand away from the board for at least a dozen frames or so, even if you play fast). The board is a nice regular rectangle, and pieces are black and white circles -- even at an odd angle, it should be easy to determine the full board position.

I feel confident I could do it, but it would take me tens of hours of coding/testing, and I don't have the time, but I bet someone would love to do this for a senior project and opensource the code... please... :)

Resources (0, Offtopic)

blogeasy (674237) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061461)

Is this an appropriate use of resources?

Can you imagine.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6061512)

A Beowulf cluster of these badboys?

Beer, it's not just for breakfast anymore!

A ha! (0, Offtopic)

BLiP2 (54296) | more than 10 years ago | (#6061714)

"DataGlyphs have been used in several Xerox products ... Applications may include document management, fraud prevention, inventory tracking, ID cards, parts marking or product tagging.

So thats how all this watermarking technology on copy machines to catch counterfeiters works...
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