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Force Field. No, Really

jamie posted more than 11 years ago | from the GeV dept.

Science 434

tqft points out news of "a working force field, using plasma. Now to scale the sucker up." Here's the Brookhaven press release. I can think of so many uses for this.

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fr1st ps0t (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149027)

you're too slow.

An enormous breakthrough for parents (5, Funny)

artemis67 (93453) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149037)

Finally, a solution to the "Dad, he keeps touching me!" dilemma.

Re:An enormous breakthrough for parents (5, Funny)

CptChipJew (301983) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149058)

The one problem though, is that this device runs at about 15,000 Kelvin.

Wait, now that I think about it, that would really teach those damn kids to stop messing around.

Re:An enormous breakthrough for parents (4, Funny)

indros (211103) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149113)

Also probably a good first line of defense as birth control as well. Make sure the swimmers don't reach their destination!

Re:An enormous breakthrough for parents (0, Flamebait)

crux6rind (609204) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149120)

does that include solution for the "Dad,please stop touching me!" dilemma ?

Re:An enormous breakthrough for parents (1, Funny)

caino59 (313096) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149256)

actually, isn't that "father, please stop touching me!" ?

*clash of cymbals*

i'm goin to hell...

I've already seen a working force field (5, Funny)

Hogwash McFly (678207) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149038)

There was a guy down the street from me who was in a force field. Can't remember his name but he had a black and white striped shirt, white face paint and he didn't speak that much.

Re:I've already seen a working force field (0)

Spudley (171066) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149288)

black and white striped shirt, white face paint

You mean Beetlejuice? I didn't know he had a forcefield...?

Now what I need.. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149039)

are some borg implants so I can walk through the force field unaffected.

Uses? (4, Funny)

Surak (18578) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149043)

I can think of so many uses for this.

Like keeping PHBs out of the server room? ;)

Re:Uses? (5, Funny)

Smallphish (320591) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149094)

Just what I need in my server room. Another heat source at 15,000 Kelvin. . .

temperature vs. energy (5, Informative)

lingqi (577227) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149237)

i know you are trying to be funny, but realistically, the amount of energy a high-temperature "thing" contains can be a lot less than you think.

for example, some ions trapped by the earth's magnetic field goes up to some 14 MILLION kelvins (notice it's hotter than anywhere on, around, or inside the sun). However, as there are maybe one or two such high-temperature particles per cubic centimeter, you will still freeze to death standing (erm, floating) in the middle of it.

just a pedantic monday morning, i guess. I'll stop now.

Re:temperature vs. energy (1)

snkline (542610) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149289)

Umm, sorry but that doesn't make any sense to me. A particle can't have a temperature can it? I was under the impression that temperature was a measure of the average kinetic energy of a system, the individual particles of a system don't have a temperature. Of course I took one college physics class so it is a good possibility I am wrong.

am i reading this wrong (3, Funny)

Neophytus (642863) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149044)

or is all its blocking at the moment air? then again 14k kelvin might keep us out.

Re:am i reading this wrong (2, Insightful)

26199 (577806) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149176)

Yes...

But if it's blocking against atmospheric pressure (not quite sure on that one) then it's an impressive feat...

Re:am i reading this wrong (2, Interesting)

zackbar (649913) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149270)

Not really much pressure though.

I think it's mostly blocking stray molecules of air that get in from leaks until the leaks can be patched.

BUSH = RECESSION (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149045)



Bush is presiding over the highest unemployment rate in nine years.

If you like to stay unemployed, remember: Bush in 2004!

Re:BUSH = RECESSION (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149188)

Hmmm... that puts the previous unemployment high in 1995... right in the middle of the Clinton presidency, 1 year before he was to be re-elected. So by your logic, people wanted to be unemployed then too.

Protect your *nix (4, Funny)

Tukz (664339) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149048)

Finally a decent way to protect your *nix server
from physical contact!

Yipee!

*snicker*

Unnecessary (0, Funny)

MondoMor (262881) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149102)

The nerds standing near it and working on it will generate sufficient repulsive force to keep any "physical contact" impossible.

Voila! Free force field for the price of a shitty ThinkGeek T-shirt!

Whew.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149052)

Its so good to science making break-throughs in the "cool factor" dept. last thing I would want is any thing that can help makind in the near future and I know no one wants to solve that pesky old world hunger problem.

Blast... (5, Funny)

foxtrot (14140) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149053)

I asked the guy how he did it, but he won't tell me.

Hasn't anyone explained to him the wonders of open force?

-JDF

Torps (2, Funny)

izto (56957) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149055)

Yes, but can it stop plasma torps? what about phasers?? :-)

Oil-rich nations should buy these (-1, Troll)

Marijuana al-Shehi (609113) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149057)

To keep the yanks out!

Strange Room Temperature (-1, Funny)

leeroybrown (624767) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149061)

>the plasma reaches a temperature of 15,000 degrees
>Kelvin (about 50 times greater than room temperature)

I'd hate to see the "Room Temperature" the guy who wrote that lives in.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (3, Informative)

BabyDave (575083) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149109)

Room temperature is around 290 Kelvin (about 25 degrees Celsius, or 77 Fahrenheit). Remember, 0 Kelvin is absolute zero - -273.something degrees C.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (4, Informative)

BlueTooth (102363) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149124)

15,000 / 50 = 300 kelvin

300 kelvin = 26.85 C = 80.33 F
[Temperature Conversion Page [nasa.gov] ]

So, about 50 times room temp.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (5, Informative)

aug24 (38229) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149130)

Huh?

15,000 over 50 is 300.

300 Kelvin is about 26 Celcius, 80 Fahrenheit.

Does that help?

J.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (0)

zackbar (649913) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149306)

80 degrees Fahrenheit! Ye gods, where is the humanity!

I gotta have the a/c on to at least a max of 75!

So, would that be 53 times room temp or what?

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1)

Zarhan (415465) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149132)

I'd hate to see the "Room Temperature" the guy who wrote that lives in.

Umm. 15000 K /50 = 300 K.

300 K - 273,15 = 26,85 degrees Celcius, about 80 Fahrenheit. A bit warm, but nothing extreme..

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1)

tranZent (224631) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149135)

Don't mix your temperature scales!

The factor 50 is correct, given room temperature of about 295 Kelvin.

295 x 50 = 14750

Re:Strange Room Temperature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149136)

Why? 300K is pretty damn near a normal room temp...

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1)

lynnroth (213826) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149137)

~80F isn't so bad....

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1)

3waygeek (58990) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149138)

That room temperature is 300 K (about 27 degrees C, 80 degrees F). A bit warm by US standards, but not unbearable.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (2, Informative)

PhxBlue (562201) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149146)

It's not as bad as you think - 300K = 27C = about 77F.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1)

NETHED (258016) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149148)

15,000/50=300

273.15K = 0C
300K = 27C
27C = 81F

It is a bit warm for room temperature, but its not that bad. Its well within a football field or LOC error.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (0, Redundant)

(startx) (37027) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149149)

>>the plasma reaches a temperature of 15,000 degrees
>>Kelvin (about 50 times greater than room temperature)

>I'd hate to see the "Room Temperature" the guy who wrote that lives in

That's in Kelvin. Did you convert to celcius, then to farhenhiet?

( ( 15000 / 50 ) - 273 ) * ( 9 / 5 ) ) + 32 = 80.6 degrees Farhenhiet. That's about what the temp in my room sits at when all of my machines are humming along.....

Re:Strange Room Temperature (2, Funny)

Baron_Yam (643147) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149208)

Silly Americans... still converting to Fahrenheit. ;)

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1)

Chuq (8564) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149151)

300 degrees kelvin sounds pretty much like room temperature to me, as it would be in most of the inhabited world!

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1, Redundant)

allanj (151784) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149154)

Using entry-level physics and math, 15000K/50 yields 300K - roughly 27 Celcius. What's to hate about 27 degrees Celcius? Maybe the guy wrote it on his Athlon powered desktop PC?


How did parent get modded Funny?

Re:Strange Room Temperature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149160)

30C is approximately 300K
and
300K * 50 = 15000 K

What's your point?

Do we remember our basic units? (1)

kiwimate (458274) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149161)

Ahem...Kelvin exists on the same scale as Celsius but 273.15 degrees lower (unless my memory of high-school physics is even hazier than I care to admit).

15,000 / 50 = 300
300 - 273.15 = 26.85

Or approximately 27 degrees Celsius.

Now, I would concur with anyone who might argue this is rather misleading to the average reader, accustomed as we are to Celsius and Fahrenheit. If you translate it to Celsius, then

15,000 - 273 = 14,727
14,727 / 27 = 545.4 recurring

Which means in Celsius it's about 545 times greater than room temperature.

Proving once again that, yes, consistency in measurement units isn't just a Martha Stewart good thing, it should be the law!

omfg (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149221)

this guy makes one mistake, and there are like 15 people saying THE EXACT SAME THING, come on people, if 5 people have already said what you are about to say, try this: DONT SAY IT

Re:Strange Room Temperature (0, Redundant)

Bishop923 (109840) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149167)

Actually that does come out to around room temp:
15,000 / 50 = 300 Kelvin

Kelvin starts at absolute zero using equivalent units to Celsius so...
Absolute zero in C = -273
-273 + 300 = 27 degrees C

in Fahrenheit that comes out to 80.6 degrees F, a little on the warm side but not bad.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1, Redundant)

foxtrot (14140) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149183)

>the plasma reaches a temperature of 15,000 degrees
>Kelvin (about 50 times greater than room temperature)

I'd hate to see the "Room Temperature" the guy who wrote that lives in.


That'd be 300 degrees kelvin.

That's 300 - 273.15 = 26.85 degrees centigrade.

For those of you who can't do the conversion in your head, that's 80.33 degrees fahrenheit. Just means his roommates won't let him turn on the air conditioner 'cause of the power bill...
-JDF

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1)

yess (678141) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149230)

Well. Room temperature is a little more than 20 C. [I use metric system, You insensitive clod!] That's just below 300K. (0 C == 273.15K) 15000K is actually about 50 times more, than 300K. Hm. I don't see your point.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (1)

leeroybrown (624767) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149231)

I'm fully aware that 0 Kelvin is absolute zero (- 273 Celcius) calibrated off the triple point of water (0.01 Celcius), blah, blah.

I just found it funny that one article failed to clarify it.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149269)

uh huh, right.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149301)

Actually, no, you said "I'd hate to see this guy's room temperature"... you didn't know how to do a kelvin conversion, and now you were caught as a non-geek. Just apologize, or at least make up a better excuse. I.E. I was drunk.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149239)

Hehe, you must be embarrased, at this time I write this, there were 15 different replies correcting you.

But then, I guess the last 14 of them should feel even worse.

Re:Strange Room Temperature (2, Funny)

mothrathegreat (542532) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149244)

I think he probably got the general message after the first 10 people told him he is crap at maths ;)

Force fields have existed for ages (4, Funny)

fredrikj (629833) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149063)

Just read here [straightdope.com]

best link today (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149104)

orfl

The Brookhaven Press Release (2, Informative)

Adam Rightmann (609216) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149064)

Good people, I have copied the Brookhave Press Release below, in case of Slashdotting of the server, of just in case you with to save our goverment a few nickels in bandwidth cost, nickels that might be better used to spread freedom, and democracy throughout the world.

Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab Scientists Invent a Plasma Valve

UPTON, NY â" Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use. The new device, called a plasma valve, was developed through research funded by DOEâ(TM)s Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Science.

In synchrotron light sources, other particle accelerators, and various other scientific instruments, where plasma valves can be put to use, a vacuum allows very high-energy electron beams to circulate in rings for hours. These electron beams interact with magnetic fields to generate x-rays, ultraviolet light, and other forms of radiation that travel unimpeded through beam lines used for experiments. When the vacuum is breached, air moves in with great force, the electron beam loses confinement, and its energy is deposited on vacuum walls. The faster the breach can be contained, the less damage there will be to the ring, beam lines, and the experiments that use those beam lines.

The need for a fast valve at Argonneâ(TM)s Advanced Photon Source led Argonne engineers to explore the potential use of plasma arcs previously developed for electron welding guns. The Argonne team â" Sushil Sharma, John Noonan, Elbio Rotela, and Ali Khounsary â" joined Ady Hershcovitch from Brookhaven to develop the plasma valve.

Hershcovitch explained the advantages of the plasma valve: "Unlike traditional valves, a plasma valve has no moving parts, does not require much maintenance, and establishes a vacuum-air separation much faster. Also, it is completely nondestructive. In contrast, existing ultra-fast valves and shutters can cause damage to machinery when triggered."

When activated, the plasma valve is composed of an ionized gas, or a gas with charged particles confined by electric and magnetic fields, that fills an airtight aperture. When the plasma reaches certain temperature and density parameters, it separates atmospheric pressure from a vacuum, which must be devoid of pressure.

When a vacuum is breached, a plasma arc is ignited in less than one nanosecond inside the plasma valve. The valve's outer structure is comprised of a hollow, water-cooled copper cylinder located between three cathodes and a hollow anode ring at the opposite end of the cylinder.

At 15,000 degrees Celsius (27,032 degrees Fahrenheit), the plasma valve is about 50 times hotter than room temperature when measured in degrees Kelvin. This intense heat makes the ionized atoms and molecules move around and collide with air molecules so rapidly that the ions block any air molecules that might pass through the plasma valve.

Researchers from around the world study a wide variety of materials at light sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne and the National Synchrotron Light Source at

Brookhaven. For example, they use their bright beams of light to examine the minute details of computer chips to make more efficient computers, decipher the structures of viruses to work on developing new pharmaceuticals, investigate magnetic materials to make better recording devices, and study corrosion to develop new methods for its prevention.

Harping on the temperature thing one more time (2, Insightful)

Cappy Red (576737) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149278)

At 15,000 degrees Celsius (27,032 degrees Fahrenheit), the plasma valve is about 50 times hotter than room temperature when measured in degrees Kelvin.

I want to say something about this, but the sentence makes my brain hurt, and not in a good way.

So... converting temperatures to Kelvin makes them lower? It may be that I'm too far removed from my math and science classes, but... well, come to think of it, I never learned it that way.

Sheesh, they didn't even say "in Kelvins." "Degrees Kelvin" indeed... amateurs...


*honk*

Luke (-1, Offtopic)

WesG (589258) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149065)

Use the Force Luke!

(sorry couldn't resist)

Re:Luke (0)

dj_paulgibbs (619622) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149118)

The forks! The forks!

Re:Luke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149174)

i felt your presents ...

how about mix-up ? (1)

MenAtWork (614753) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149072)

What if the electrically charged particles collide with the plasma particles does it mean just loss of energy ? or can it also portend a weakening plasma field !! does plasma particles affect the charge on the accelerating particles ?

Re:how about mix-up ? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149165)

bounce bounce bounce

Well well (0, Funny)

madmarcel (610409) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149076)

Phah! Primitives!
Using my portable force-field
I managed to block all the trolls
and hence...I got first post :P

(It also blocks noxious ga^H^Hodours - much appreciated by my other half ;)

But ehh...(I probably misread this...)

Unfortunately it appears this new forcefield technology only works in very hot conditions
- 50x room temperature :o

Now all we need is heat-and-flame-resistant people...

Re:Well well (1)

LordYUK (552359) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149234)

" Phah! Primitives!
Using my portable force-field
I managed to block all the trolls
and hence...I got first post :P"

Ahh, the only thing sadder than a stupid post is the moron who screams "first post" 30 posts in... ::sigh::

Now wheres MY force field?

Translation (-1, Funny)

eternity0 (678550) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149077)

Can someone translate this to 'english' please?

Re:Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149210)

They say they take this Slurm(tm) thing from the Slurm(tm) Factory(c) produced by the Ompa Lompas(c), and they heat it up very much you see. Very much, like 50 times the air in your room. And when it gets that hot, these Slurm(tm)-particles start to freak out and dance around you see. And they dance so wild are are so happy, that if any air-particles where to come and join them, they would just push them away and say "your not welcome here! go make your own air-dancedot, air-commies!"

Re:Translation (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149276)

When playing with partical accelerators and bad things happen, you get a big boom. They found a way to fix that.

Re:Translation (0)

InvaderSkooge (615857) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149294)

"Look, we made a force field! Don't we rock?"

You're welcome.

Force field (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149079)

It would take a force field to keep me away from Jamie, our only female slashdot editor! She is beautiful!

Re:Force field (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149103)

pics pls.

K, thanx.

Lower the Cone of Silence. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149081)

Ummm chief... why is the open/close switch outside the cone?

Spam? (5, Funny)

955301 (209856) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149082)

They use the word plasma so many times in the last sentence of the first link, that for some strange reason (closely related to my sense of humor, I'm sure), I'm reminded of Monty Python and Spam:

A much faster, more complex version of a previously introduced "spam window" (see New Scientist, 12 April 2003), the spam valve is the latest example of novel uses of spam for particle-beam applications; other recent ones include spam acceleration of antimatter (Update 634), a spam lens (Update 508), and spam deflection of high-energy beams (Update 540).

Niiieeeeeeeeeeeeee!

Re:Spam? (1)

Baron_911 (664953) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149212)

Baked Beans are off!!!

Lousy Vikings...

Dont try this at home (1, Insightful)

cybercuzco (100904) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149084)

Yes, its a working force-field, unfortunately it uses a 15,000 degree plasma in the process. If you tried this in say a jail cell, you would fairly quickly cook the occupant. And if you could get around that, if the occupant touched the field, his finger would cease to exist. Not to mention that it can only be created when surrounded by a magnet, so star trek "shields" are still a long way off.

Re:Dont try this at home (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149228)

Tell me, how would one be fast enough to actully touche the plasma?

Re:Dont try this at home (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149308)

If you tried this in say a jail cell, you would fairly quickly cook the occupant. ... if the occupant touched the field, his finger would cease to exist...

Still, i'll take the plasma field over the 6'5" grinning black man with the jar of vaseline in his left hand and 10" in his right.

Some cool benefits (1, Interesting)

Iron Monkey543 (676232) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149096)

COuld be used on spacecraft. Less weight!! (unless equipment used to produce the barrier is heavy)

Clean decapitation. You lower a loop onto a person until it levels his neck. Turn on the plasma field, and it chops his head off? I wonder if this can be used to cut trees as well! Cut anything!

Re:Some cool benefits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149140)

I think that at 15,000 Kelvin, there would be nothing clean about a decapitation. I'm pretty sure that it would cut down trees by instant incineration as well.

RTFA!

Re:Some cool benefits (0)

Deathlizard (115856) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149214)

I guess if you wanted a small Portable Sun to fly around in space you could, considering it's 15000K when it's active.

it be interesting if it could be refined for use in Spaceship propulsion, or to extend the life of a reaction in current fusion reactors.

Reason to use this? (0, Insightful)

tuluvas (679950) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149119)

Can you guys think of any reason to use this? I sure cant! probably expensive too. Sorry if its answered in the artical , i just barely skimmed it.

Re:Reason to use this? (0, Funny)

nomadic (141991) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149217)

Can you guys think of any reason to use this? I sure cant! probably expensive too. Sorry if its answered in the artical , i just barely skimmed it.

Don't apologize, you did well. If you had actually read the full article in-depth, we would have had to confiscate your slashdot id.

Re:Reason to use this? (1)

Revenge013 (679793) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149317)

The US military [wired.com] has been investing in force field technology. Their apparent application is to serve as a sort of protection against explosives. It also seems to me that a plasma field would serve as protection to objects that are normally weakened when passing through pressure differences - assuming that the pressure within a plasma force field is consistent.

Get it right, pimple faced sci fi losers (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149129)

It's a volume of superhot gas, not a "force field"

The article sucks. (4, Insightful)

Mac Degger (576336) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149177)

I love the idea, and the science around it, but the article sucks! No pics, diagrams or any actual detail on the way the thing works. I'm sick of this kind of 'it works because of herbs!' reporting; it's way too simple for any inquiring mind and because of that it's non-informative.

A shame, 'cause I'd be interested in the practical implementation of this valve system. And I want pretty movies and/or pictures, of course :)

It's a BULLETIN (4, Informative)

devphil (51341) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149322)


It's supposed to be short. That's the whole point of the online AIP: short summaries of articles.

Why the poster linked to it instead of to a full published article, I don't know. Perhaps a full published writeup hasn't been made yet. Perhaps the poster thought that short sound bites are all that the /. crowd has attention for.

Plasma jargon (4, Informative)

buckhead_buddy (186384) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149198)

To keep all of the vampires and blood drive workers* from getting too anxious, the plasma this article refers to is not a component of blood (medical jargon). This other plasma (physics jargon) is matter that has been charged with so much energy it begins exhibiting characteristics of a liquid rather than a gas.

*After seeing some of the workers running our corporate guilt-a-thon, I suspect this may be redundant.

Just two issues... (1)

ShadowKatmandu (606400) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149201)

All they need to do is cool it down by a factor of 50 and make it transparent, then regular windows are a thing of the past. The fact that one side is supposed to be a vacuum and the high heat is basically what makes it work is beside the point. Meow.

What this could be used for (2, Insightful)

1stflight (48795) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149207)

Since this does a great job at separating air, and a vacuum, this has great applications in space.
Think launch bays that really can be opened up to have a shuttle pass though, and leave the air inside the bay intact.
Yes, this idea has a lot of promise.

Re:What this could be used for (1, Funny)

MondoMor (262881) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149266)

Think launch bays that really can be opened up to have a shuttle pass though, and leave the air inside the bay intact.
...while incinerating the shuttle and its passengers as they pass through the shield! That's GENIUS!

Re:What this could be used for (1)

1stflight (48795) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149287)

It's not that hot, and from the article I was assuming only th field itself was hot, not it's surroundings

RTFA: NOT, NOT, NOT a "force field" (5, Funny)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149213)

1) It's a "plasma valve". Not a force (ie magnetic or something ethereal), the magnetic "force" confines the plasma.

2) The plasma valve is INSIDE a copper container.

If you think this is a "force field" then you might also be interested in the "ray gun" in your television tube.

An interesting story nonetheless, spoiled only by the fatuous ignorance of the submitter and editor.

Finally! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149232)

Now - at last - I can keep the homosexuals from hitting on me when I'm spending time at the local Barnes & Noble...MINDING MY OWN BUSINESS.

It's already obsolete (3, Funny)

jdfox (74524) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149235)

Because I brought my DINOSAUR! [scifiscripts.com] Who EATS force field dogs!

Hehehe what?? (1)

SuperDuG (134989) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149258)

I can think of so many uses for this.

I can think of one user for this. Making a space that cannot be crossed. Sorta like a wall really only has one purpose.

Just playinwitcha, this is a cool concept.

Force? Sounds familiar......... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149262)

Palpatine disbanded the senate during the Galactic Civil War, citing the Rebellion as an emergency situation that required direct intervention. He formally handed over power to regional governors and sector moffs -- roles these power-hungry officials had already been enjoying for years under his rule. To ensure control over the populace, the Empire dismantled the galaxy-spanning HoloNet. With this public forum of information exchange now in the hands of the military, the Emperor was able to funnel the immense taxation revenue required to keep the HoloNet active into building his war machine. Furthermore, Imperial control of free information ensured that only the New Order agenda propagated throughout the galaxy, and dissenting voices were all but silenced. Immense corporations aided and abetted the Empire's rise, in exchange for unprecedented freedom of operation. Many of these companies were nationalized -- Imperialized -- in the process, resulting in a huge influx of capital resources for the Empire. sorry. too much ashcroft and $$oft. brain no longer functional. quote stolen from starwars.com in case you didnt already know that.

It's not "degrees Kelvin"!! (2, Insightful)

arvindn (542080) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149265)

the plasma reaches a temperature of 15,000 degrees Kelvin

First, its degrees only when it is Fahrenheit or Centigrade, which are not absolute units. Second, its Kelvins, damn it! (at least when it is more than 1K). People have no problem with Joules, Newtons, Pascals etc which are all people's names, why is Kelvins so different??

[I haven't done any physics after high school, so if I'm wrong correct me.]

15,000 kelvins are 50 times room temp? (0, Informative)

mnmn (145599) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149271)


15,000 is a lot more than 50 times room temp. Assuming the room temperature is 26 degrees, thats 26+275 degrees above absolute zero, around 300 kelvins. I think the writer meant 500 times room temperature. I dont think plasma is 1500 kelvins.

Not a Star Trek Style Force Field (5, Interesting)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149273)

This thing is for use in sci-tech research only, for creating air tight vacums. It can't be used to protect / encase eevryday objects. For example, I quote:

At 15,000 degrees Celsius (27,032 degrees Fahrenheit), the plasma valve is about 50 times hotter than room temperature when measured in degrees Kelvin. This intense heat makes the ionized atoms and molecules move around and collide with air molecules so rapidly that the ions block any air molecules that might pass through the plasma valve.

In short, don't expect this force field to be in use at your neighborhood brig / jail anytime soon :) A really cool advancement though.

plasma windows? (1, Funny)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149304)

We'll have it ported to Linux in no time.

Too bad.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6149313)

It ONLY works inside special equipment where there are concentrated, high power, elector/magnetic, fields to direct the plasma. Also, this is only stopping AIR from gettin in. Saying this is a force field is like saying that I have surrounded myself with a "force field" when I submerge myself in water, it stops air from getting to be, but I would not want to take my chances with a speeding bullet...How about we change the title on this one ?

Flying cars next? (0, Funny)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149316)

Install this as ground FX on my car, can I levitate finally?

A contractor here has a working force field (0)

SkreamNet (610802) | more than 11 years ago | (#6149319)

Man he stinks. Can't be within 10 feet of him.
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