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Linux Rocket Blasts Off This Fall

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the fwooooooof dept.

Linux 327

HardcoreGamer writes "An Oregon amateur rocket group, the Portland State Aerospace Society, plans to launch a Linux-powered rocket weighing 12 pounds to 55,000 feet at a speed of Mach 3 in September, Wired News reports. The rocket's onboard computer is an AMD 586 processor and a Jumptec MOPS/520 PC/104+ board along with a power supply, a PCMCIA card carrier for an 802.11b card to transmit data to the ground, and a carrier board for a 128-MB CompactFlash card for long-term storage. The flight computer runs a stripped-down version of Debian Linux, with the 2.4.20 Linux kernel. The group will present a paper (HTML | PDF ) on the use of free software in rocketry at Usenix 2003. The real question is whether their network card will survive 10 seconds at 15 Gs!"

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So... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158460)

I guess this redefines the term "crash."

Re:So... (1)

packeteer (566398) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158505)

Actually i think it creates a reference between computers and rocketry for the word "crash".

Re:So... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158520)

you've got a space in your sig.

Re:So... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158583)

Nah, Columbia has that covered already.

Definitely on topic (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158463)

First post. Yay for me.

Re:Definitely on topic (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158486)

We're all very happy for you.

Re:Definitely on topic (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158555)

sorry, better luck next time though. These first posts can be really hard to get. But with luck and dedication, you too can join the ranks of FP losers, myself included.

NOT linux POWERED (5, Funny)

Richardsonke1 (612224) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158464)

plans to launch a Linux-powered rocket
I like linux as much as the next geek, but it is not linux powered. Maybe linux guided, but I don't think that linux is acutally causing it to move...

Re:NOT linux POWERED (5, Funny)

deadsaijinx* (637410) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158484)

yes, the rockets run off concentrated Geek (and therefore linux), a highly flammable substance, what with the high level of oil in the skin and all.

Re:NOT linux POWERED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158504)

Nice job, I was trying to figure out how to put it. If I had mod points, you would get one. -Posted AC due to OT'ness

Re:NOT linux POWERED (2, Funny)

tankdilla (652987) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158582)

Actually I think the rocket is powered by Open Source. Every time someone releases some new source code, the rocket goes higher and higher.

Re:NOT linux POWERED (1)

The Cydonian (603441) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158633)

not to mention body salts, human hair and a total lack of tan!

Re:NOT linux POWERED (5, Funny)

BWJones (18351) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158485)

So......wait. All those "Linux Powered" bumperstickers I've seen don't mean that the car is moving under the power of Linux? Awwww. And I thought Linux was really cool.

Re:NOT linux POWERED (1)

nukey56 (455639) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158514)

You underestimate the power of the force.

Sorry, had to do it.

Re:NOT linux POWERED (1)

bad_fx (493443) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158523)

You underestimate the power of the force.

I think what you meant is:
You underestimate the power of the (open) source. :-)

Re:NOT linux POWERED (2, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158526)

Indeed. Just wait until MS gets ahold of this idea and starts claiming Linux causes exothermic chemical reactions of a violent nature.

Obviously unsafe and a tool of terrorism that will virally infect your code. . . and then blow it up.

I'm dissapointed actually. I just printed out the kernel source code, rolled it up and stuffed it up the butt of an Estes rocket and, nothin'.

Maybe I should have printed it on flash paper.

KFG

Slashdot powered! (5, Funny)

LoztInSpace (593234) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158561)

MS are great. Linux is crap.
Now simply ride the flames that come out the back of that.....

Re:NOT linux POWERED - The obvious (-1, Redundant)

HardcoreGamer (672845) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158663)

Well, duh. I don't think I was gaving the /. crowd too much credit by assuming they're smart enough to parse the phrase correctly on their own, but in case I'm wrong... THE ROCKET IS POWERED BY COMBUSTIBLE FUEL! LINUX IS NOT A POWER SOURCE! For those refuse to believe that, try on one of these hats! [shmoo.com] ;)

Re:NOT linux POWERED - The obvious (1)

krumms (613921) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158702)

THE ROCKET IS POWERED BY COMBUSTIBLE FUEL! LINUX IS NOT A POWER SOURCE!

Through your usage of capital letters, I have become a wiser man.

Smart ass comments aside, I agree with your point. Obviously, they're using the meat of a penguin who - by the cruelty of his Geek master - was named 'Linux'.

Re:NOT linux POWERED (5, Funny)

bloxnet (637785) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158694)

Read the fscking article man. The damned rocket system includes an AMD proc. What do you think is providing the heat for fuel combustion???

Boot guidance system, wait 15 miutes, heat exhaust ignites fuel.

Oh damn, your still right...it's an AMD powered rocket. Sad attempt at humor ruined...aborting!

Right on! (2, Funny)

Rhinobird (151521) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158709)

I was about to ask what the specific impulse of Linux was and if it changed from Intel to AMD to PowerPC. And if NASA knows about it. Heh...Imagine a Beowulf BOOSTER of those.

Bad idea (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158466)

Do you really want to have to pay royalties to SCO on your rocket? There are high-quality commercial embedded OS's without much clearly defined IP rights, and no such liability issues, and I think its a good idea to go with the Gartner recommendation and avoid the potential legal issues with Linux for the time being.

Re:Bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158563)

As Linux reaches for the stars picture SCO as the red stapler dude Milton... Excuse me...Ahhh Umm you didn't pay me yet for the code to do that... Right? uhhh mmm... I don't want to go to the basement... I am going to burn the rocket...

Re:Bad idea (1)

HeX86 (536126) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158622)

If they made me pay SCO the royalties on the linux code, I'd go ahead. But then I'd let the rocket crash and collect money from SCO for the rocket because their code sucked and it crashed the rocket.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158471)

All good cosmonauts get first post!!!

I had to say it... (2, Funny)

Huxley_Dunsany (659554) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158474)

Imagine a Beo- aah, forget it.... :-) Huxley PS please don't hurt me...

Linux is nopw a terrorist tool! (3, Funny)

Melibeus (94008) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158476)

and of course this will just encourage those rascally terrorist who want to build nasty rocketses and blow us all to smithereens. Since now they won't have to pay those pesky licence fees for operating systems for their WMDs.

Re:Linux is nopw a terrorist tool! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158499)

nasty rocketses? Are those anything like nasty goatses?

Re:Linux is nopw a terrorist tool! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158517)

Well, if you're talking about the giver rather than the receiver, yes, sort of.

No, it has to be windows (1)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158510)

No, terrorists have to use Windows for their Weapons of Mass Destruction. Then, they only have to invoke a BSOD.

it's the... (1)

zogger (617870) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158608)

prrreecccioussssss pppproppulsion corporation, y-e-s-s-s-s-s-s-s

Not so fast (0, Offtopic)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158477)

SCO will probably try to knock it out of the sky with an anti-rocket missle, using a MS-built engine.

Re:Not so fast (3, Funny)

aaaurgh (455697) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158496)

"...MS-built engine"

It'll never get off the ground - too much bloat!

Re:Not so fast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158522)

Which, of course, GPFs mid-flight giving Eugene a user experience to remember.

Re:Not so fast (1, Funny)

exspecto (513607) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158547)

What a sight that would be. A rocket with butterfly wings.

hybrid jokes... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158490)

1. In Soviet Russia, SCO joke posts you!
2. ???
3. Profit!

Re:hybrid jokes... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158518)

wow, hybrid jokes really suck

802.11b? (4, Interesting)

DarkAurora (324657) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158491)

802.11b for data transmission to the ground? I know my 802.11b network doesn't have a range of 55,000 feet.

Re:802.11b? (5, Informative)

ktakki (64573) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158534)

I was wondering about that, too. But the site [pdx.edu] states that they're allowed to boost the power legally if it's operated by a licensed Ham radio operator (under FCC Part 97 rules).

Cringely got something like 10Km with a Pringles can, so I expect someone with more of a clue can push that to 55,000'.

k.

Re:802.11b? (4, Informative)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158572)

http://www.computerworld.com/mobiletopics/mobile/s tory/0,10801,75830,00.html

Someone's done a 72-mile link.

The hard part is that you either have to track the rocket with a directional antenna, or try to make everything work with a non-directional antenna. The 72-mile link was from one fixed point to another using mid-size parabolic antennas.

Re:802.11b? (5, Funny)

badboy_tw2002 (524611) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158574)

Cringely got something like 10Km with a Pringles can, so I expect someone with more of a clue can push that to 55,000'.

I'm sorry, but whats a clue can and why is it better than pringles?

;) Thats how I read it the first time anyways...

Re:802.11b? (1)

WhaDaYaKnow (563683) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158609)

Cringely got something like 10Km with a Pringles can

Then again, Cringely never bothered to disclose exactly how he accomplished [oreillynet.com] this 'fantastic' feat.

Re:802.11b? (2, Interesting)

tqft (619476) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158679)


I seem to remember lots of people saying what use ham radio -
http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=03/06/09/103425 4&mode=thread&tid=137

If you got a ham licence how far could you listen to your music from your home server with a LEGAL power boost

Re:802.11b? (1)

arcadum (528303) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158549)

I thought the same thing.

Re:802.11b? (2, Funny)

korielgraculus (591914) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158554)

You should see the rope full of repeaters that it has to drag behind it!

Re:802.11b? (3, Insightful)

barawn (25691) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158565)

2 things - first, they're not operating in the unlicensed mode - they're using a licensed Ham operator, so they can boost the power.

Second, they've got clear line of sight (um, unless they plan on launching the thing in the middle of the woods) so you don't lose any signal strength going through things, so you've only got 1/r^2 to deal with. It's a distance, hell yes, but a good enough antenna on both ends will do fine. The only problem with that is that only the ground has a pointable antenna, so here's hoping they've got plenty of link margin.

Re:802.11b? (1)

gotacap (663393) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158692)

Actually its interference that causes the signal to degrade so quickly here, plus of course there's the boosting of signal for the project with a high powered amp, but straight up should be pretty decent LOS in the first place. once you get far enough, there's not even much atomospheric interferance.

Establishing link at 55,000 feet? (4, Funny)

psoriac (81188) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158493)

I think the real question is will the pringles can survive 15 g's for 10 seconds?

Re:Establishing link at 55,000 feet? (1)

deadsaijinx* (637410) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158506)

and what about the mountain dew? it's already under high levels of pressure.

This just in... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158495)

Slashdot editor reads 12 hour old news from wired.com.

Software (5, Interesting)

fname (199759) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158498)

Well, let's see how the software does; it's notoriously difficult [slashdot.org] to design rocket software.

But, I gather the greatest stresses will be on the computer hardware, as 10 G's will put a meaningful load on the parts, not to mention vibrational loads. And rockets are difficult to begin with. Here's hoping it works.

Re:Software (5, Funny)

Zork the Almighty (599344) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158530)

kernel_panic() : This is a one way trip ! Aaaaaaa !

hardware reliability (2, Interesting)

albeit unknown (136964) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158553)

10g is not a lot of acceleration for electronics, as long as large components are securely fastened (even with tie-wraps), and there are no moving parts.

The only non-solid-state parts on the design are the connectors, which can handle hundreds or thousands of g's of acceleration without "bouncing" on the pins.

PC-104 is designed for high-stress applications such as this.

Re:Software (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158704)

Actually, despite all the hype, rocket science isn't really all that tough.

WiFi (1, Redundant)

Alpha_Nerd (565637) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158502)

I want a wifi card with that range!

Re:WiFi (1)

Lank (19922) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158539)

Well, considering the rocket will never really be blocked by anything (i.e. it will never be outside of "line of sight"), everything should work out well. Still, though, I'm not sure if any wireless card has a range of 50,000+ feet!

Re:WiFi (0, Redundant)

deadsaijinx* (637410) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158625)

they boost the power. now to be modded redundant. oh well

why would you use a pre k6 amd proc (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158503)

didn't those 586s have no math co procs?

Re:why would you use a pre k6 amd proc (1)

arcadum (528303) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158560)

my AMD 486DX4-120 has a math coproc and I think it is a required part of any 486+ class proc.

Re:why would you use a pre k6 amd proc (1)

korielgraculus (591914) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158666)

If I remember correctly, the difference between the 486SX and 486DX (at least Intel versions) was the fact that the DX had the math co-processor, while the SX didn't.

Re:why would you use a pre k6 amd proc (1)

temojen (678985) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158659)

No.

Wow (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158512)



No matter how fast you've hand tuned your kernel, Linux at Mach 3 is fast as shit.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158674)

... shit travelling at Mach 3 of course.

Remind me not to go near _that_ monkey pen.

Trouble? (5, Funny)

Dumbush (676200) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158519)

Bush: linux can be use to launch rocket? The very thing that terrorist lacks? It's free and distributed widely on the Internet? We got a problem here Ashcroft: not only that, but its source code is not encrypted, anyone could store a copy in their compueter. Bush: Then I'm assuming that even if we EMP all the computers, the source might still be stored somewhere as a printed copy? Ashcroft: I'm afraid so. I always have a problem tainting uses of technology Bush: then let's ban printers as well, that will buy you sometime.

Re:Trouble? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158532)

lol, that's some funny shit. mod this bastard up

Continued (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158550)

Bush: Ah good. Time. I need some more of that. Recently I haven't found much time to pick my nose on camera, accidentally swear at journalists on live microphones, invent new rules of english grammar/pronunciation, and repeatedly demonstrate my ignorance of foreign cultures and the names of foreign heads of state. Seems like this "terra-ism" thing has gotten everyone to forget about all that.

Re:Trouble? (1)

maphe (531845) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158687)

I think you are overestimating Bush's deductive reasoning skills.

Ours is bigger. (3, Interesting)

Boatman (127445) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158521)

Ours [byu.edu] is bigger [lunkwill.org] .

Re:Ours is bigger. (1)

navigationboy (680197) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158714)

Ah, but does size matter? Or brains? You decide ;) http://avionics.psas.pdx.edu/ http://psas.pdx.edu/psas/Current_project/INS/INS_H ome.html

apt-get in space? (1)

frankmu (68782) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158524)

how fast will the rocket be able to do "apt-get dist-upgrade"?

Embellishment (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158531)

Wow, Linux gets more and more elaborate every day! An OS can provide the thrust for rocket engines and then some!

Can I get it to do my dishes and laundry for me too?

Re:Embellishment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158546)

technically, you can program your comp to do practically anything manual. Take the linux based bar-tender a while back.

IANARS but... (1, Interesting)

tankdilla (652987) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158540)

I wouldn't be suprised to hear that rockets had been guided by linux all along. If I were involved in the launch of a rocket, i'd just like to know that the system is going to hold up and not get a bsod, freeze up, or just reboot while in flight. I mean if this is the first of its kind, that's an accomplishment. Kudos to the Linux rocket scientists. But we all know Linux is a pretty reliable OS and I would've been more suprised to hear that it didn't work.

But as previously posted, what OS has been guiding rockets? Wind-SCO-s?

Re:IANARS but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158558)

My guess would be custom assembled firmware of some kind, maybe with instructions from the ground sent from UNIX machines.

Re:IANARS but... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158562)

IANARS

haha hey fuckstick.. Does it take that much energy to type fattie ?

Re:IANARS but... (2, Informative)

canadiangoose (606308) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158588)

I would expect that the guidance systems for most rockets built in recent years would use a real-time OS like QNX or Chorus, not Linux.

Re:IANARS but... (5, Informative)

AllenChristopher (679129) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158595)

For the longest time the software was written by hand from the metal up. You can't afford to have one bug in space code. It could cost half a billion dollars. Every routine was coded three different ways, and three systems ran separately. If they ever disagreed you knew you had a problem. So while you have an OS of sorts, it's the Shuttle OS, and nothing else. After all, there are a thousand assumptions that OS developers make that a space programmer has to choose him or herself. In Linux, the coder is always saying "this amount of precision is ok," but for a rocket the amount of precision needed is very well known, and incredibly demanding at all levels. For a hobbyist group, linux is one thing, but if you want to put something in geosynchronous orbit indefinitely...

Re:IANARS but... (1)

deadsaijinx* (637410) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158634)

rockets are older than linux. therefore, i would be very suprised. especially since rockets are older than personal computers. yep, making it hard to intsall linux where no comp is present. I'm guessing their own private firmware. yeah, that sounds good.

Re:IANARS but... (5, Interesting)

WhaDaYaKnow (563683) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158654)

But as previously posted, what OS has been guiding rockets? Wind-SCO-s?

Uhm, nope. You know there _are_ other OSs out there besides Windows and Linux. Sure, a post like that makes for good Karma, but for crying out loud, what is the exact value of your post?!

I will tell you which OSs have been running stuff like this; real-time, embedded OSs, such as VxWorks, QNX and all the others. Until recently linux SUCKED ASS for real-time applications. I don't think even Torvalds would mind me saying so. It just wasn't designed that way. There have been major improvements lately, which are all very promissing, but for applications that really demand real-timeness, probably very few people (in their right frame of mind, no offense) would choose Linux.

Re:IANARS but... (5, Insightful)

temojen (678985) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158705)

Not only did Linux "Suck Ass" for doing hard realtime, most of the architectures that it runs on do as well. For tasks of this nature, unpredictabilities like cache misses can be deadly, so you want much of the critical control features to run on as simple an architecture as possible.

PIC or MC68hc11 are good candidates, anything more complex than an 8080 probably isn't.

If it's controlling thrust vectoring, control surfaces, or fuel valves, I sure wouldn't want an OS like Linux, Windows, HPUX, Solaris, etc with multitasking and/or VM.

Just the 802.11 card? I'd worry about the rest! (3, Interesting)

barawn (25691) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158551)

Heck, I'd worry about the CF card. I doubt it's a hard disk (of the spinny-type) as the paper states, as that'd crash on either liftoff or chute deployment. I'd bet it's a flash-type, just like a simple camera memory card. And then I'd wonder whether it'd survive too. Many of them have altitude restrictions (though I seriously doubt they're for real - it's probably a "don't use this in an airline design!" warning) as well. Remember to put some sort of retaining mechanism on the CF slot. Wouldn't want the card pulling out on liftoff, now would you. :)

Yipes. High-altitude, high stress stuff is always a pain (which is why aerospace companies make so much money designing things).

It'll definitely be cool to see if this works. The paper's a little light on details of the design (for certain things - like the actual construction or parts choices - for other things it seems pretty detailed).

Re:Just the 802.11 card? I'd worry about the rest! (2, Funny)

babyrat (314371) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158641)

I can't comment on the whole rocket thing, but I can attest to the fact that a compact flash card can survive a trip through the washing machine, including the spin cycle.


The pics that were on it were still there when it was through...didn't put it in the dryer though. Unfortunately the pics were not dirty to begin with, so I can't say whether or not they were cleaned in the whole process.


What kind of G's does a Kenmore produce?



Cheers,

Babyrat

Re:Just the 802.11 card? I'd worry about the rest! (1)

PPGMD (679725) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158708)

Compact flash cards are pretty durable, I wouldn't be worrying about the G Forces.

Still there is a questions of how well it will operate in the cold at 55,000 ft.

I'm glad to see... (5, Funny)

bad_fx (493443) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158556)

...that my design documents aren't the only ones that look like this [wired.com] .

A helpful hint: (3, Funny)

Bowie J. Poag (16898) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158566)



Aim for Redmond, guys.

So what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158578)

So it's guided by Linux software, who cares? Is /. so enamored with Linux that it hypes anything that uses Linux even if it doesn't do anything else special? The rocket itself isn't a technological leap. But put Linux on it and gee... it's the best thing since sliced bread.

Re:So what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158603)

Coming soon:

Linux powered bread slicers!

Linux in space? (1, Funny)

Arctic Dragon (647151) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158580)

Linux: light years ahead of Windows. Literaly!

Will never fly... (5, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158602)

As others have pointed out, it is not *linux* powered. But now thanks to Ashcroft and his straight man, bin Laden - anyone using model rocket fuel is considered a terrorist threat [scifitoday.com] . So, not only is not linux powered, it probably won't be powered at all.

Re:Will never fly... (1)

HardcoreGamer (672845) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158715)

That was my first reaction too. Seems like the kind of thing that homeland (or should that be homeLAN?) security types would see as a potential problem. As for not being Linux-powered (as in fuelled), isn't that obvious? [slashdot.org]

source code? (1)

Eythian (552130) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158617)

Assuming that this rocket finds aliens, is there a way for them to get the source code? Abduct the developers, perhaps?

huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158623)

"and a carrier board for a 128-MB CompactFlash card for long-term storage."

Call me an english troll, but considering this rocket only goes to 55000 ft - why would they use the term "long term storage"? Has quality on storage media gotten so bad that "long term storage" is measured in minutes!? :)

They should (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158628)

They should direct it at SCO headquarters.

Here goes... (1)

ruprechtjones (545762) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158640)

Imagine a beowulf cluster of these! No no, hear me out! If we get 16 of these together, according to my math, we could reach the moon in 129.6 minutes! Take that, NASA! Okay sorry, I'm going now.

Linux Powered or AMD Powered? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158681)

Sure the OS may be a version of Linux, but the really interesting part is that they've found a way to harness all of that heat from the AMD to get the rocket that far up!

Talk about potential for burn up on reentry though. :)

rockerts are greate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158695)

but can it run teh netbsd?

interesting (1)

Vej (199488) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158701)

If this is just a standard stripped debian distro, then there is no patch/special RT linux version running. This seems to be a one-run, let it fly kind of setup.

Not something for extended type, geosyncronous/etc flights like someone else mentioned. I think you'll need something with a tad more precision and "predicability" for more intense missions.

I'm not saying you'll need to re-write something like lynxos or any other rt unix based system...but standard debian might not cut it?

Just a thought.

Sorry, I couldn't resist... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6158707)

Image a beowulf cluster of these.

Humor Attempt of the Day. (4, Funny)

The Cydonian (603441) | more than 11 years ago | (#6158711)

Aww c'mon, they've only Linux. Not as if installing Linux is rocket-science...

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