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Internet Emulator

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the real-or-memorex dept.

The Internet 139

John3 writes "InternetNewsM is reporting that PlanetLab is getting closer to reality. According to this article, a consortium of universities (including Princeton) is launching a test-bed platform based on Red Hat Linux. This project is different than Internet2 or some of the other "alternate Internet" networks being developed, and seems to offer the most benefit to distributed computing projects rather than generic WAN/Internet communications."

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This has exsited for ages. (4, Funny)

Chris_Stankowitz (612232) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288330)

Its call AOL!

Har har har (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288782)

This place needs an injection of originality. MS Sucks! It's an AOL luser! Yuk yuk yuk

Internet emulator. You can do much more with that! If you're going to try that hard to get FP AND be "Funny" at least show something new.

But you did get modded up to the ceiling, so what do I know.

I thought it said Internet Explorer Emulator (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288341)

Because if you ever need to test in a different version than you have installed, it's a PIA. You have to use VMWare or something along those lines. Stupid Windows integration.

SIRIUS BLACK DEAD AT 34 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288343)

It's official: Netcraft confirms - Sirius Black dies at the end of Harry Potter and teh Order of the Phoenix. There weren't any more details except this quote from a Wikipedia article:

"A great skirmish begins, with the students versus the Death Eaters. Most are injured, and as they near defeat, many of the adult wizards appear to help them--including Sirius. During the ensuing battle, the glass sphere which holds the prophecy is shattered, and no one can hear it. Also, tragically, Sirius falls through an arch in the Department of Mysteries, which marks his end."

first post emulator! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288348)

with built in failing!

pie (-1)

Yr0 (224662) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288350)

i lie pie.
do you?

Re:pie (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288375)

sex is like a warm apple pie. Except for the worms.

I wonder how long (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288359)

until someone here at Slashdot makes a Beowulf cluster joke about this article.

Re:I wonder how long (1)

jared_hanson (514797) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288563)

I think that would have been you, at the exact instant you posted your comment.

REQ: Internet ROM (5, Funny)

generic-man (33649) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288370)

Please send me a copy of the Internet with which I can use this emulator. The preferred means is a station wagon full of DVD-R media.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (4, Funny)

TedCheshireAcad (311748) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288404)

Maybe you can download it from IRC? I don't know, I think they're still figuring out how to rip it.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (5, Funny)

Exiler (589908) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288435)

wget *

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (5, Interesting)

Surak (18578) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288505)

Interestingly enough, I typed "The Internet" into Google so I get the Google cache in case it got Slashdotted, but look what comes out at the top [google.com] . Weird huh? :)

Wait (1)

Exiler (589908) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288544)

You were trying tog et the google cache of the internet?

If we slashdot the INTERNET google should be the least of your worries.

well, no wonder... (1)

zogger (617870) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288555)

...no wonder you got some microsoft stuff, you spelled it wrong. Here, try this. [google.com]

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288567)

Sure is weird, what with microsoft internet explorer being the number 1 web browser. Wonder how they got so many links to a page with the word 'internet' on it? It just makes no sense!

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (3, Interesting)

the_consumer (547060) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288768)

You typed The Internet rather than "The Internet", which yields somewhat different results [google.com] .

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (5, Funny)

skaap (681715) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288850)

At least it's first result isnt Al Gore's homepage... :)

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (1)

tundog (445786) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288974)

I would have expected a link to this site [al-gore-2004.org]

M$ bought Al Gore (1)

waspleg (316038) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289241)

i thought that was common knowledge ;P

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (3, Funny)

SoSueMe (263478) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288585)

try this [66.68.82.57]

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (3, Informative)

Jeedo (624414) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288840)

actually it's (for the web, not the internet):

wget -rmpH http://directory.google.com

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288441)

LMAO I'm expecting to see someone post a .torrent file for this new internet any second now.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (4, Funny)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288452)

Please send me a copy of the Internet with which I can use this emulator. The preferred means is a station wagon full of DVD-R media.

(+1, Underestimated)

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (1)

Surak (18578) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288460)

I dunno. I think you'd need at least a Ford Excursion full...but even then, where would the drive sit? :)

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (1)

SoSueMe (263478) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288494)

Stationwagon, SUV, what's the difference?
Except of course, $$$.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (1)

sweetooth (21075) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288600)

The excursion is about 3 times the size of most SUV's being that it is built upon the frame of a large truck, the F150 I believe. Hence there is a huge differance when talking about capacity.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (1)

_ph1ux_ (216706) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289274)

F350 - v10 triton.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (1)

sweetooth (21075) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289435)

Thanks, I knew it was on one of the FX50 frames. I guess it's the expedition that is on the F150 frame.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (4, Insightful)

maxume (22995) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288518)

Wouldn't it be cheaper to use a station wagon full of hard disks? The cost per GB on hard disks isn't that much higher than it is for DVD-R media, and if you bother to factor in the amount of time it would take to create the DVD-R's versus filling the harddrives, they might come in cheaper. Should be faster to read in to.

I know that some companies are offering thier GIS datasets on HD instead of cdr now, but they do charge a bit more. Backing up to cdr is pretty useless for 40 Gigs of data though. Ramble Ramble.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (5, Funny)

jared_hanson (514797) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288596)

And today, kids, we are going to learn a very important lesson. When someone makes a joke, you should laugh, rather than take it seriously and analyze its details.

Re:REQ: Internet ROM (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289858)

Did I get the joke? Yeah. Did I think it was worth a laugh? Not really. I chose to comment the way I did, because I thought the joke would have been funnier if it had made more sense.

WHAT??? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288371)

Your mom walks with a limp now. She passed the test for sure!

Is it just me... (4, Insightful)

Dthoma (593797) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288374)

...or was the article blurb just a bunch of buzzwords stuck together? I mean, each of the clauses in it on its own made sense but the whole blurb just seemed kind of incoherent. It's very thin on actual specifics; this sounds like it could just be more vapourware, unfortunately.

Re:Is it just me... (3, Funny)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288396)

that's what makes it an internet emulator

Re:Is it just me... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288431)

is it just me... ...or was that an incredibly flacid comment just to get your ego near the top of the page and not addressing any or the topics raised?

You're a good troll, Larry... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288432)

...but sometimes you're a bit of a douche. I'm just karma whoring so I can stockpile karma points in order to survive the massive karma hit and mass-foeing that would occur if I were to post a Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix spoiler. You gotta think ahead like me, Larry.

Re:Is it just me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288501)

So wait, the article IS the emulator?

Re:Is it just me... (1)

WTFmonkey (652603) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289283)

You're lucky. I read it as Internet Ejaculator the first time around.

Re:Is it just me... (4, Informative)

frieked (187664) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288422)

You're right to say that the blurb sounds like a bunch of buzzwords but this actually isn't vaporware...Planet-lab has actually got a lot of big sponsors (Intel, HP...) behind them and while I don't see this being used for the everyday internet user, Planetlab is the kind of thing corporations will find very useful for its distributed computing capabilities. It's still in its infant stages now but this definitely is a project with potential.

Re:Is it just me... (5, Funny)

TedCheshireAcad (311748) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288427)

Quiet.

They're enabling the empowerment and synergy of the new paradigm.

Re:Is it just me... (4, Informative)

John3 (85454) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288462)

It took a few readings of that article as well as a visit to the PlanetLab site for me to get an idea what they are trying to do. In simple terms, it looks like a network designed specifically for distributed computing projects like SETI@Home (as an example of a publicly accessible research project). Instead of relying on the Internet to link up your distributed machines, PlanetLab would be a closed high performance network that would allow the researchers to avoid the usual Internet traffic jams.

At least that's what it sounds like to me.

Re:Is it just me... (4, Informative)

angio (33504) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288541)

Close, but not quite. Planetlab is not a closed, high performance network. Rather, it's more of an overlay testbed: The machines reside on the Internet (companies that host nodes) and on the Internet2 (research universities). That's part of what's so cool about it - the machines reside all over the world (see the map on the planetlab website [planet-lab.org] - it's an accurate reflection of the location of the nodes). They have a lot of visibility into nooks and crannies on the Internet, and they're beginning to be deployed enough that there's often a planetlab node nearby, whereever in the network you are.

Re:Is it just me... (1)

John3 (85454) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288586)

Thanks...kind of like a widely distributed VPN.

Re:Is it just me... (2, Informative)

awtbfb (586638) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288546)


Instead of relying on the Internet to link up your distributed machines, PlanetLab would be a closed high performance network that would allow the researchers to avoid the usual Internet traffic jams.

Also known as a private LAN

Re:Is it just me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6289285)

"Also known as a private LAN"

LANs reside in your building. MANs reside in your city. If it goes outside the city, it's a WAN.

Re:Is it just me... (4, Insightful)

John3 (85454) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288548)

Doh...never mind. :-)

After yet another read of the article it looks like they are just building a mock-up Internet on which to test their distributed apps. This would allow them to see how their apps will perform when linked over the Internet rather than in a closed lab 100mb network environment.

This would help them avoid comments like "Gee, those data packets sure take a long time to get back to us" once they move their app to the real world outside the lab.

Re:Is it just me... (5, Informative)

angio (33504) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288511)

Article fluffy, planetlab not fluffy. For the moment, planetlab is primarily a research testbed. It has about 160 nodes deployed at 65 sites; these nodes are in use most of the time by a decently large group of researchers conducting internet measurement studies and research into distributed computation.

But - that's only part of the goal. Ultimately, I believe that the goal of Planetlab is to help transition these research technologies into deployed, useful services; so the network becomes more than just a research platform, it becomes the next DNS infrastructure, or the next Akamai, or the next Napster (ok, ok, don't sue!).

So, some of the examples the article cited are pretty illustrative. For example, the MIT Chord [mit.edu] project is a Distributed Hash Table. DHTs are a peer-to-peer storage/retrieval system that allow completely decentralized resource sharing between cooperating hosts. And so on, and so on. The hope of the PlanetLab folk is that some of these projects will become the foundation for the next Internet architecture, or internet middleware, or whatever it is you want to call it -- the next set of critical services that change the way we use the 'net.

But even before that, Planetlab is one heck of a useful research tool. There are several papers at this year's Sigcomm [acm.org] conference (big computer networking conference) that took their measurements using Planetlab. There are a number of other papers and projects in the pipeline that're using planetlab as their research testbed. The cool thing about planetlab is that it's now considerably larger than most prior testbeds, and has a lot more momentum for future growth. Full disclosure: I spend a part of my time working on planetlab, but this post is not any kind of official view, it's just my interpretation.-

Re:Is it just me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6289269)

"..or was the article blurb just a bunch of buzzwords stuck together?"

They built a private network, spread across several countries, with about 160 computers, so that they could test P2P apps on it. That would be pretty useful for testing stuff, if you can upload a program to loads of different computers, and test how they operate with internet-style delays etc.

standards and flexibility (4, Insightful)

loveandpeace (520766) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288387)

one of the things i find so interesting about PlanetLab is the way employing standards has actually increased the flexibility of the whole product. too often, standards are a primary ossifying force in technological development, especially when created after the fact; by coming up with a common platform and software package at the outset, and by having flexibility as one of the primary goals considered in development, standards will actally help ensure PlanetLab works as it was intended.

Shiny! (4, Insightful)

cultobill (72845) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288389)

I can't help but say that most CS/IT majors need this. I've seen too many people write apps (simple ones even) that relied on that ethernet connection that the dorms give, 10Mbit between machines. "Scale down? Who has less than a fast cable modem these days?"

Now they just need to break the schedulers on the machines, to make them randomly almost-starve a process to make sure it can cope with a slow machine.

Re:Shiny! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288703)

Now they just need to break the schedulers on the machines, to make them randomly almost-starve a process to make sure it can cope with a slow machine.
Or just use ReiserFS.

Here's my Internet Emulator (4, Funny)

jaylee7877 (665673) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288395)

#ping 127.0.0.1 #ftp 127.0.0.1 #lynx http://127.0.0.1 #nmap -O 127.0.0.1 Who needs Cable/DSL when you have connectivity to localhost, it's the fastest thing out there!

Re:Here's my Internet Emulator (3, Funny)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288419)

I don't want to know what your "sex emulator" involves!

KADH IEJIWE KASD HAND (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288512)

n/t

Re:Here's my Internet Emulator (1)

arnie_apesacrappin (200185) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289213)

Probably the exact same thing that yours involves.

Re:Here's my Internet Emulator (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288429)

It may be fast but you really need to sort out all those beastiality pics on your ftp and web daemons.

Re:Here's my Internet Emulator (1)

Fiveeight (610936) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288534)

Do you use a firewall and encryption? Or do you trust this "localhost" guy?

Re:Here's my Internet Emulator (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6289067)

my ping is 1 sec late every three times, so no internet emulating for me?

No need to read the article, I have the answer: (0, Troll)

T40 Dude (668317) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288397)

YES, they use Linux

Idea!! (1)

Obscenity (661594) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288399)

ohh oohh, and next they'll have the "Internet on DVD!!!" Yeah, only 20k per month, with 100k DVD's per month, cancel anytime! In other words, there is no replacement for the internet, nothing can really beat it. Except you know.. maby the internet on DVD, for long car rides through nevada?

Lemmie guess... (4, Funny)

Matey-O (518004) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288400)

SOMEBODY'S been watching a little too much Matrix lately.

What does it do? (2, Interesting)

phorm (591458) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288416)

So, are they looking at an infastructure/physical situation test, a protocol test, or perhaps both?

While I'd expect the test system to make at least some use of existing infastructure, but perhaps they'll find something to replace the current TCP/IP protocol, or something more towards IPV6.

It will be interesting to see the evolution of the internet in such as way. The content has changed but much of the mechanism behind it is still rooted in legacy. I wonder if this is intended to be a full switchover or just an upgrade.

Oh, and I wonder if private entities (such as myself) can also participate to test it out...?

Re:What does it do? (1)

Meat Blaster (578650) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288503)

Per your last question, probably not. I was looking through the site and as an individual user you've got to be affiliated with an organization that is on the PlanetLab network. They unhelpfully mention that you can achieve this by persuading your organization to join.

Apple's New Product. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288420)

NEWS BULITIN - Cupertino, CA

Rumors came to an end today. In a press conference, Steve Jobs announced the new Apple user input/output device. The device, called COCK(R), it is a radical shift in human interaction devices. COCK(R)'s enhanced as it also contains feedback support.

Basically COCK(R) looks like a shaft with two balls at the end. A user places the shaft into their mouth and keeps the balls pointed towards the monitor. There are sensors on the balls that track the motion of the COCK(R) in relation to the monitor. The user must look at the area on the screen to move the mouse. Thrusting of the shaft results in click actions. Additional functions may be provided by mapping licking and coddling the balls.

Since the device is used by one's mouth, bio-metric security can easily be used on OS X. COCK(R) has a built sampling device which can match saliva to specific users on the computer. As such, the user will have access based on their spit.

Feedback exists in several forms. First the shaft may increase in size to better fit the user's mouth. This usually takes a couple of minutes. There is also the ability to give the user a slight shock given error conditions on the computer. Additionally, in severe error states, a milky substance will be emitted from the COCK(R) to signify an error condition to the user.

Questions at the press release signified mixed opinions on COCK(R). There seems to be resistance to using such a device in the non-Macintosh community. Steve Jobs acknowledged this problem. As such, the current mice will still be available when purchasing Macintoshes. Currently Apple is marketing towards current users of their platform. "Product testing showed us that long-term Mac users were most willing to use COCK," Jobs stated.

Despite resistance, Apple does not feel it will hurt their sales, only increase them. Jobs said "We at Apple hope that COCK will be as important as our switch to G3 based computers. As such, our marketing staff are fully committed to convincing every one that COCK is the best."

Now that Steve Jobs released COCK(R) onto the world, he hopes sales will increase steadily. One mac fan stated "COCK is the best IO device in the world. Even the milky error substance tastes great!" Apple's stock has not significantly dropped or rose. However, Apple's online store estimates that sales of COCK(R) will rise in the next two weeks.

Re:Apple's New Product. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288497)

I wonder how long the Jobfather and friends have been sitting on this innovation???

Not sure what they're talking about (1)

Elpacoloco (69306) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288430)

Sounds like they're discussing Internet2, but they definately haven't talked to the experts.

Incidentally, I find most laymen's concept of the internet very funny.

They tend to get about 60 to 90% of the concept....

Re:Not sure what they're talking about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288817)

Are you trying to sound intelligent? Like you know stuff that other people don't?
Doesn't work so well when you spell definitely wrong.
Oh, wait... this is Slashdot. Mod this man +5 Informative!!

This just in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288434)

Slashdot has killed a planet. Expect alien invasion.

Oh please... (4, Funny)

Geekenstein (199041) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288449)

That's nothing. I just invented an internet emulator emulator. Beat that!

Re:Oh please... (1)

Exiler (589908) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288574)

I got it to run under cygwin under wine.

Re:Oh please... (1)

BabyDave (575083) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288635)

Looks a bit messy, but it seems to work ...
class Emulator{
public static void main(String[] args){
String sillyClaim="I've invented an internet";
for(;;){
sillyClaim +=" emulator";
System.out.println(sillyClaim);
}}}

When will it be "real"... (3, Insightful)

SoSueMe (263478) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288455)

...and allow the public to join the project?
Different than the Internet 2 project or even Grid computing, the group says the most obvious benefit is that network services installed on PlanetLab experience all of the behaviors of the real Internet where the only thing predictable is unpredictability (latency, bandwidth, paths taken).

If you want to emulate all the behaviors of the real internet, you need to welcome the hackers. crackers and script kiddies, not to mention the "moms".

Forget about the AOLers, we don't need 'em.

Re:When will it be "real"... (1)

puckhead (241973) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288630)

And pr0n. Lotsa pr0n.

Did someone say Internet Emulator? (5, Funny)

wiggys (621350) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288498)

Check this out! [b3ta.com]

Re:Did someone say Internet Emulator? (1)

realdpk (116490) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288665)

A roughly blank page that has a link suggesting we should buy a t-shirt or mug to "support the cause"? Yeah that does sound like the Internet - low content, high merchandising.

Re:Did someone say Internet Emulator? (1)

wiggys (621350) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288743)

Yes but you got the content for free, didn't you?

I doubt you'd have been willing to PAY for the experience (like you do with the real one).

Re:Did someone say Internet Emulator? (1)

MonkeyBoyo (630427) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288795)

I got nothing interesting under Netscape (aka Mozilla) but when I gave the url to IE there was a game to play.

Re:Did someone say Internet Emulator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6289571)

yo dude just played the game and got 601
anybody beat that?

A meta-testbed (3, Funny)

MonkeyBoyo (630427) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288521)

A Planet Lab page [planet-lab.org] says:
PlanetLab also serves as a meta testbed on which multiple, more narrowly-defined virtual testbeds can be deployed. That is, if we generalize the notion of a service to include what might traditionally be thought of as a testbed, then multiple virtual testbeds can be deployed on PlanetLab.
Any time a discussion starts to use the word meta you know you have achieved buzzword satori and can stop reading.

Anything you can do I can do meta. I can do anything meta than you.

How long . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288568)

. . . before the IDSA issues a C&D, since emulators are illegal?

~~~

PlanetLab network behavior (3, Funny)

seekohler (264712) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288584)

From their homepage:
"
... network services deployed on PlanetLab experience all of the behaviors of the real Internet where the only thing predictable is unpredictability (latency, bandwidth, paths taken)."
So... they Slashdot themselves?

I did RTFA (3, Insightful)

Ricin (236107) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288615)

up until the 3rd paragraph (emphasis mine):

''[The Web is] so successful and so many people depend on it, it's become impossible to go to the core of the Internet and make radical changes to introduce the kind of new services we see people wanting to deploy,'' Princeton University scientist and Intel Research member Larry Peterson said during a conference call to the press.

How are changes so "radical" that it needs a newly designed system to merely do development and testing ever going to able to be gradually introduced into the "core of the Internet"?

Won't fly IMHO.

Change the Internet... to what? (3, Interesting)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289788)

I agree with other posters that the article seems high in fluff and low in content (understandable, since anything else would be a technical paper, not an article). But the things that stood out for me when I read the article were the part mentioned in the parent ("go to the core of the Internet and make radical changes"), and this:

"This is about pooling resources and to build out the infrastructure, but in the end this about lowering the barrier to entry to developing on the Internet," Peterson said.

"Lowering the barrier?" My goodness, my 12-year-old daughter could be designing Flash-enabled websites if she weren't so busy on AIM. What "barrier" are they talking about? I'd almost suggest we need higher "barriers" to keep out the "wELCOM tO MY wEBSIGHTE" kiddies.

Now read that last sentence again.

Maybe I'm letting paranoia run loose, but there are more than a few folks in industry that would also like to keep those kiddies off the 'net, raise the bar, have an Internet that is "more useful everyday," as Bill would say. The net effect, though, is to remove the internet [aolsucks.org] gadflies [toronto.edu] that make the 'net such a democratizing medium.

The web's success isn't due to the Microsofts and the AOLs -- it's the little guys like me [dixie-chicks.com] and you [texturedigital.com] who rub the fat cats the wrong way.

With "high-tech companies... key to the project's success" (and Intel and HP specifically mentioned), I'm afraid their goal is to make the 'net better for those high-tech companies... and to leave the rest of the masses out of the "New Internet".

But maybe I'm just being paranoid.

Hmmm . .this makes me think . .. (1)

vizualizr (462581) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288641)

Science imitating science imitating life?

Internet Emulator (5, Funny)

athakur999 (44340) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288705)

I tried out this "Internet Emulator", went the emulated Google page, and tried searching for "naked pictures of Carrie Ann Moss" and did not get a single hit.

If this thing can't even emulate the most basic function of the Internet, I don't know how it's gonna succeed.

Re:Internet Emulator (1)

JoeD (12073) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288837)

That's because you misspelled "Carrie-Anne Moss".

In other news (4, Funny)

Lane.exe (672783) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288719)

Al Gore sues for IP infringment.

What? Not funny anymore? Guess I'll go hang myself then.

Different, but better? (1)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288771)

Then again, I suppose there are many different flaws in the existing internet, enough to warrant different solutions... ;)

No batteries included (0, Redundant)

sporty (27564) | more than 11 years ago | (#6288802)

Does it include a politician reminding us of his contribution to the creation of it?

Re:No batteries included (1)

djeaux (620938) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289232)

Why would anybody want to emulate a politician?

Re:No batteries included (1)

BigBadBri (595126) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289798)

Why would anybody want to emulate a politician?

Because it's easier than the Turing test.

Example code:

while(true){
produceRandomQuote(false);
}

See - simple.

I thought you said Internet Explorer Emulator (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6288820)

And was having difficulty thinking why anyone in their right mind would ever want to emulate Internet Explorer.

Who wants to "Emulate" the Internet? (2, Funny)

James Littiebrant (622596) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289014)

...I'll just download it onto my new G5 with a few more hard drives...

Woah... (0, Offtopic)

dafoomie (521507) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289077)

They got the internet on computers now?

Internet Emulator? (2, Funny)

wo1verin3 (473094) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289162)

Does someone know where I can download roms?

Internet2 misconception (4, Informative)

finkployd (12902) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289242)

As usual, someone is confusing Internet2 with Abilene [internet2.edu] Which is Internet2's high speed network. Abilene is just a part of what Internet2 does. If you ask me (and I know you didn't), Internet2's middleware [internet2.edu] stuff is much more interesting and ground breaking than a silly high speed network. Check out Shibboleth if you want to know where the Liberty Alliance got pretty much all their ideas :)

Finkployd

Which version? (1)

mistermund (605799) | more than 11 years ago | (#6289490)

The PlanetLab software is based on the most current release of Red Hat

Which version? With the rate of integer jumps in Redhat's latest releases, is it that likely we'll see 10.0 before this article's life expectency is up the next few days?
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