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292 comments

could this be... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425709)

my first first post?

Re:could this be... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425720)

Congratulations!

Let's have a Goatse Link [goatse.cx] to celebrate!

FUCK YOU, MISTI! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425744)

Fuck you, Misti! [imagedump.com]

WHAT DOES THE GNAA HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THIS?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425750)

Why... this of course... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425852)

* Are you gay?
* Are you a nigger?
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Fist Sport! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425710)

Muslims should be denied the right to do business.

Urine (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425714)

What material is urine composed of?

Urine is normally composed of water and wasted products filtered form
the body. The kidney produces urine. The other main function of the
kidney is to regulate fluid balance in the body. It performs this
function by using a selective osmosis system. Basically, the way it
works is that electrolytes (dissolved salts like sodium, potassium,
calcium, carbonate, chloride) are pumped back into or out of urine and
blood so that in the end, just the right amounts of electrolyte and
water exit the kidney blood vein. The rest ends up in urine.
Interestingly, normal urine is sterile and has no bacteria.

Urine contains 95% water and 5% solids. More than 1000 different
mineral salts and compounds are estimated to be in urine. So far, our
scientific community knows of about 200 elements. Some substances are:
vitamins, amino acids, antibodies, enzymes, hormones, antigens,
interleukins, proteins, immunoglobulins, gastric secretory depressants,
tolergens, immunogens, uric acid, urea, proteoses, directin, H-11 (a
growth inhibitory factor in human cancer), and urokinase. Believe it or
not, scientists have know for years that urine is antibacterial,
anti-protozoal, anti-fungal, anti-viral, and anti-tuberculostatic!

No really! (5, Funny)

I Like Swords!!! (668399) | about 11 years ago | (#6425715)

"I'm working late tonight, don't wait up..."

"Oh really? Then how come your cell phone is in Joe's Tavern with your secretary's pager bobbing over your coordinates?"

"...*dialtone*..."

..err, I meant to say, cool!

Re:No really! (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425747)

+1 bobbing

Re:No really! (3, Funny)

bsharitt (580506) | about 11 years ago | (#6425758)

How many Slashdotters do you think have to worry about that?

Re:No really! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425848)

You're right pagers are so out of style. Besides would it really bob? Now cranial implants, those might cause some fun

Re:No really! (1)

56ker (566853) | about 11 years ago | (#6425958)

There are some married slashdotters.... take CmdrTaco as one example....

Re:No really! (5, Informative)

philj (13777) | about 11 years ago | (#6425926)

You laugh, but in England there's already a service that lets you locate mobile ("cell" in your 'Merkin lingo) phones without using GPS: http://www.fleetonline.net/ [fleetonline.net]

Love My GPS! (4, Interesting)

NetJunkie (56134) | about 11 years ago | (#6425717)

I have a Garmin GPS V and LOVE it. The turn-by-turn routing has been a huge help. We started looking to buy a house and would print out a ton of MLS listings. Without the GPS we'd have to spend a lot of time planning our route. With the GPS we just punch in the address of the next house and off we go. Very accurate.

Re:Love My GPS! (1, Funny)

product byproduct (628318) | about 11 years ago | (#6425748)

With the GPS we just punch in the address of the next house and off we go.

People like you are killing the taxicab industry.

Re:Love My GPS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425828)

People like you are killing the taxicab industry.

If anything is killing the taxicab industry, it's probably the smell.

Boy, I Wish GPS Was Around During WW2 (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425798)

Then perhaps the French would have stayed in France to fight!

It seems right around the time that Germany decided to waltz into Paris, the entire French army suddenly got "lost" and left the country. All they needed was GPS and they dould have found their way back and fought.

Oh well.

Re:Boy, I Wish GPS Was Around During WW2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425805)

They were too busy getting ready to spit on our troops after we liberated them (again)

Re:Boy, I Wish GPS Was Around During WW2 (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425883)

I am getting soooooo sick of the French bashing.

Look, if it hadn't been for France bailing your asses out 250 years ago, you'd have continued to have your "country" run by some unelected idiot called George whose only qualification to the job was that his father did it.

Thankfully the French were there to help you defeat King George III, and you avoided that situation.

Re:Boy, I Wish GPS Was Around During WW2 (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425933)

Look, if it hadn't been for France bailing your asses out 250 years ago, you'd have continued to have your "country" run by some unelected idiot called George whose only qualification to the job was that his father did it.

Hmmm.... let's look at today

unelected? check

idiot? check

called George? check

his father did it? check

Looks like we need France's help once again. LIBERATE US, FRANCE!

Re:Boy, I Wish GPS Was Around During WW2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425968)

unelected? please explain. Either the fucking hole is punched or not. If you can't properly vote, then it doesn't count (And if THEY DID COUNT THE FUCKING BROKEN BALLOTS, HE STILL WOULD HAVE WON!).

God, its almost 2004. Think ahead, not in the past people.

Re:Love My GPS! (3, Informative)

thynk (653762) | about 11 years ago | (#6425812)

What you should of done was planned the route for all the houses at once, then fed that info into your palm/ppc/gps device, probably would of saved a few miles on your total route. Or maybe that's what you did and I misread it.

I've always wanted to do this for garage sales back when the technology was out of sight for prices. Now that it's cheap, I no longer do the garage sale circuit.

Re:Love My GPS! (1)

Eminor (455350) | about 11 years ago | (#6425963)

Ah yes. I remember, it was so much harder to look at a map and follow the road. What would we do without it?

ILLEGAL (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425728)

This type of GPS is ILLEGAL. If you use GPS you must YOU MUST PURCHASE GPS. We are going to see that this website is taken down immediately. We will log IP addresses of anyone who visits this site and we WILL find you and prosecute you to the maximum extent permissible under the LAW.

Why post anonymously then (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425761)

First of all it's not illegal, and it's free for anyone to use, since the governement decrypted the satellite signals a few years ago. Second, who is "we"? If you were some kind of legitamite business or agency, then why not give your agencys name? You make me laugh at your childish postings

Re:Why post anonymously then (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425813)

Thank you for your input. Your computer is broadcasting an IP address and it has been logged. Our SWAT team will be arriving to arrest you in short time.

Re:Why post anonymously then (5, Informative)

k_herald (317652) | about 11 years ago | (#6425838)

Not to shoot you down or anything but I work specifially with GPS. The GPS C/A code broadcast on L1 (1.57542 GHz) has never been encrypted. The military simply encoded ephemerides for the GPS satellites that were inprecise (this was called "Selective Ability") onto the L1 signal. This led to a user range error of ~30 meters. After this was turned off in 2001 the error went down to ~3 meters. There has always been the PPS ("Precise Positioning Service") P-code signal on the L2 frequency (1.22760 GHz). This is actually encrypted, and is what the military uses in its. Acurracy with this service can be in the range of centimeters (low dynamics case). Working with the L2 signal requires a security clearance and a bunch of goverment red-tape. In the next 10 years there is going to be an explosion of GPS tech. First off the EU is putting up Galileo, which will double the number of SV's orbiting the earth (more satellites in view = better positioning accuracy). Althought the signal structures are not the exact same, because they will be broadcasting at similar carrier frequencies designing a dual use receiver will be a piece of cake. Also GPS is being heavily upgraded. They are adding a third signal with M-code(L3), and adding C/A code on L2. There is also talk about increasing the signal strength, which is a great boon to indoor GPS and using the GPS signal for remote sensing applications. All in all it is a great industry to be in.

Re:Why post anonymously then (4, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | about 11 years ago | (#6425866)

which is a great boon to indoor GPS

Fantastic !! I will always be able to locate the TV remote no matter where it hides on me. Now wheres that fscking GPS receiver.....

Re:Why post anonymously then (1)

grennis (344262) | about 11 years ago | (#6425867)

Where do you work?

Re:Why post anonymously then (1)

k_herald (317652) | about 11 years ago | (#6425886)

NASA GSFC & Purdue University

Re:Why post anonymously then (1)

Ignominious Poltroon (654513) | about 11 years ago | (#6425940)

First off the EU is putting up Galileo, which will double the number of SV's orbiting the earth

I swear when I first read this, I thought it said it would double the number of SUV's orbiting the earth. I started to picture a bunch of Expeditions slowly spinning around in space (with the drivers inside talking on cell phones of course).

YHBT (0, Offtopic)

usotsuki (530037) | about 11 years ago | (#6425868)

YHL

HAND

-uso.

SLASHDOT IS GHEY (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425730)

Posted from the nero-online.org Troll Library [nero-online.org]

Following my work researching The Linux Gay Conspiracy, I am saddened to announced that I have discovered yet another orgy of perverted heterophobic values. My claim lies with the Slashdot mangement.

First, what kind of name is Slashdot? This is obviously a code word in the homosexual community for something perverted.
Slashdot is an anagram of LAD SHOTS, which refers to Slashdot's pedophile agenda and T ASS HOLD, which refers to some gay sexual posistion that Michael and CmdrTaco enjoy.

The 'editors' of Slashdot, as they call themselves, are homosexual swingers with cleverly disguised nicknames.

CmdrTaco [slashdot.org] (aka "Rob" Malda) is the "head" honcho of Slashdot. Cmdr obviously refers to his desire to dominate over his gay partners, and Taco is obviously a sly reference to his colon. Update: It is well known that Taco claims to be married to Kate Fent. No one really believes that 'she' is actually his wife. We have proof that this 'she' is actually a he. It turns out that Kathleen Fent is an anagram of KHAN FELT EN ET. So this Kate of his is really Khan who "felt in it". I will not describe what that means as I am sure you can imagine yourself.

Michael Sims [izzy.net] , who goes as 'michael' on Slashdot, is a well known thug [spectacle.org] and advancer of homosexual agenda. His name is an anagram of ASS CHIME MIL which obviously refers to his desire to flaunt his lower organ.Update: It turns out that Michael Sims is also an anagram of ASS LICE, HMM, I?. That is so sick that words cannot describe the horror.

Father Randy "Pudge" O'Day [urbandictionary.com] is Slashdot's Mac propagandist. Macintosh computers are well known as the Gay computer due to their homosexual colors and stylings. An email exchange between 'Pudge' and Apple HQ have been leaked by a former Apple employee who converted to heterosexuality. These two emails (here [slashdot.org] and here [slashdot.org] ) have been repeatedly posted on Slashdot, but are quickly censored by Slashdot moderators who do not want the public to know about its agenda.Update form Subject Line Troll [slashdot.org] - it appears the O'Day is just a few letter changes away from I'm Gay and rhymes with O'Day. Is anyone surprised that Mr. Pudge is a fudge packing Mac hippie?

Simoniker [goatse.cx] , a recent addition to Slashdot has been uncovered as Mr. Goatse [goatse.cx] himself. Simoniker is a frequent poster to the Games section of Slashdot, obviously because he enjoies modded versions of Quake 3 and UT2K3 as a homosexual warrior who likes to 'overcome' his opponents with his exagerated sized love member. In addition, Simoniker is an anagram of KEN I RIM SO (Ken is probably his current boyfriend) and MEN I IRK SO (which refers to his frustratingly troubled gay relationships, probably due to his rather large asshole).Update from AC: I'M ON ERIK'S... "Eriks what? We can only imagine" -AC.

CowboyNeal [8m.com] . How could I forget him? CowboyNeal is Slashdot's Poll Editor. His rampant homosexuality is obvious. "Cowboy Kneel" is what his name actually means. His odd sexuality needs no further explanation.

Please reply with additional information, contributions, and corrections. I will include any additional information and credit you with it in my further releases of this report.

I think you missed one vital point.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425902)


What material is urine composed of?

Urine is normally composed of water and wasted products filtered form
the body. The kidney produces urine. The other main function of the
kidney is to regulate fluid balance in the body. It performs this
function by using a selective osmosis system. Basically, the way it
works is that electrolytes (dissolved salts like sodium, potassium,
calcium, carbonate, chloride) are pumped back into or out of urine and
blood so that in the end, just the right amounts of electrolyte and
water exit the kidney blood vein. The rest ends up in urine.
Interestingly, normal urine is sterile and has no bacteria.

Urine contains 95% water and 5% solids. More than 1000 different
mineral salts and compounds are estimated to be in urine. So far, our
scientific community knows of about 200 elements. Some substances are:
vitamins, amino acids, antibodies, enzymes, hormones, antigens,
interleukins, proteins, immunoglobulins, gastric secretory depressants,
tolergens, immunogens, uric acid, urea, proteoses, directin, H-11 (a
growth inhibitory factor in human cancer), and urokinase. Believe it or
not, scientists have know for years that urine is antibacterial,
anti-protozoal, anti-fungal, anti-viral, and anti-tuberculostatic!

SOMTHING YOU MISSED (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425920)

Kate Fent = FAT TEEN, K?

Kathleen Fent = KNEEL, THEN FAT

Just doing my part...

Re:SOMTHING YOU MISSED (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425966)

Kathleen Fent = THE KLAN FEETN'.

Disturbing.

Could Help SCO (4, Funny)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 11 years ago | (#6425736)

Maybe SCO can use GPS to locate *nix code in Linux. So far they sure don't seem to have found much of it otherwise.

You don't want to violate the terms of the GPS. (2, Insightful)

Ignominious Poltroon (654513) | about 11 years ago | (#6425879)

That's "GNU Public Slayings".

color moving map 12 channel magellan GPS less $199 (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425737)

search ebay for the visor prism, - color palm handspring unit - $150 with shipping - used - 65000 colors

nice organizer with handspring expansion slot
--------------------
staples, etc. - handspring unit GPS magellan - 12 channel - $49 - new on clearance - software for moving map, location, speed, etc.

-------
this unit with good mapping software for $29 rivals dedicated color moving map GPS units costing thousands.

----

get the spint phone module from ebay for $20 for the visor handspring and now it is a phone too.

Re:color moving map 12 channel magellan GPS less $ (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425917)

SPAM much?

Now we're modding spam up?! My faith in intelligent moderators is now validated.

MOD DOWN BLATANT SPAM (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425947)

I dont give a shit if you have a GPS for sale. We do not need to start a trend of Spam on Slashdot. Its bad enough as it is with trolls an all.

Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (5, Insightful)

Thinkit3 (671998) | about 11 years ago | (#6425741)

Comparable to DirectTV (see slashdot article about them). The signals would be scrambled unless you paid $9.99 per month for a "license fee". They could use the stupidest encryption around, and anybody who broke it would be put in jail and fined. Scramblin it for a military purpose makes sense, but scrambling it to protect "intellectual property" is just stupid. Unit cost for one more person to use it is zero. Like America's Army game, an example of good use of government to keep things sane. A libertarian might argue for donation-based entities, but either way it gets done.

Re:Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (3, Insightful)

stratjakt (596332) | about 11 years ago | (#6425801)

And if a corporation had set it up, they would have shouldered a huge installation cost that they'd then have to make back.

But instead the government just spends our tax money so people can look for buried garbage in the woods.

How much of the 1/3rd of my salary the feds take funds this? I'm thinking 9.99 a month sounds pretty nice. It's only free for mooching foreign nations who do nothing but whine about it.

Re:Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425894)

The article says GPS cost about $9 billion over 30 years to field. The average US population over the past 30 years has been about 250 million (more now, less in 1970), or 1/4 billion. So that's about $36 per person, or about a dollar per American per year, not adjusted for inflation.

Much as people love to whine about government waste, you've got to hand it to them--GPS has been a good deal for all of us.

Re:Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425945)

"So that's about $36 per person"

Too bad 45% of people over 18 pay no federal income tax, and another 24.7% are under 18, so only about 35% of Americans are actually paying federal income taxes. So it is more like $100 for us, and $0 for everyone else.

$5000 GPS recievers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425825)

Someone has a bug up their ass about commercial entities.

"Comparable to DirectTV (see slashdot article about them). The signals would be scrambled unless you paid $9.99 per month for a "license fee". "

As compared to the US military who could have simply sayed no to commercial usage...

"They could use the stupidest encryption around, and anybody who broke it would be put in jail and fined. Scramblin it for a military purpose makes sense, but scrambling it to protect "intellectual property" is just stupid. "

and then throwing your ass in Leavenworth because you broke the encryption, and gave away plans to "enemy combatents".

"Unit cost for one more person to use it is zero. Like America's Army game, an example of good use of government to keep things sane. "

Unless they said no to commercial usage then you'd have to sing a different tune about how the evil government wouldn't let you do what you wanted with the signal you "paid for" with your tax money.

BTW Even with the government saying yes to commercial use. It was commercialism that brought the cost down enough, we all can have a "/." story about it.

Re:Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (2, Interesting)

MBCook (132727) | about 11 years ago | (#6425832)

While your analogy has some merit, it's important to remember that DirecTV doesn't have any content of their own. They resell other people's content. As such, there is something to be stolen. If you steal DirecTV you're not hurting DirecTV. You're hurting them, and Showtime, and Starz, and Cinemax, and Blockbuster (who does all the PPV movies) and countless others who only get revenue through selling subscriptions (you could argue that it would actually BENEFIT the commerical networks like ABC, CBS, NBC, HGTV, Discovery, etc since they are showing more commercials). DirecTV is best thought of as a middle man, not the origionator of the service.

That said, I think things would end up as they are eventually. Look at cellphones. It used to cost a fortune to make a local call, but it's gotten cheaper to the point of being nearly free. Long distance used to be horrendus, but it's to the point where it's nearly free. Since the infrastructure is there, they can just sell "access units" (phones, or in your case GPS recievers) and they still make money (since maintainc is nearly free, or at least is for GPS). So while it would have taken a while, things would have gotten to this point eventually. It's the natural conclusion of things (or at least it seems to be to me).

Re:Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (1)

swv3752 (187722) | about 11 years ago | (#6425877)

It is not theft as there is no tangible property involved. It might be a contract violation or copyright infringement. It is debateable how wrong it is to intercept the signals with your own equipement.

About your second comment, it cost $10 bucks for cable, my cable bill is over $35 for the same service. Come again about the natural evolution is to become cheaper.

Failed Econ 101 & Common sense. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425919)

"It is not theft as there is no tangible property involved. "

Yet in both cases you benifit without the exchange of money to those who make something worth "borrowing". Funny how life works.

"About your second comment, it cost $10 bucks for cable, my cable bill is over $35 for the same service. Come again about the natural evolution is to become cheaper."

Another failed student of Econ 101. It's natural behaviour is to gravitate to whatever people are willing to pay for it. Don't want to pay $35/month then don't. Enough do that and the price drops. Simple as that.

Re:Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425956)

Also, don't forget that cable companies are near monopolies in most areas, and as such don't always follow the rules of free economies.

Also, don't forget that it may only cost $10 to lay the cable or whatever, but that's a onetime fee (with slight maintence) and one cable carries the signal for many many people for the vast majority of it's length.

If you're going to try to rationalize free cable to everyone else (which is a sign of guilt), you could at least try something that hodls a tiny bit of water (like "I only watch 2% of the channels, so why sould I pay for 100% of them?").

Troll.

--MBCook - parrent of parrent

Re:Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425885)

you could argue that it would actually BENEFIT the commerical networks like ABC, CBS, NBC, HGTV, Discovery, etc since they are showing more commercials

They set their ad rates based on neilsen ratings. I don't think the people who steal cable are represented in those ratings.

Re:Imagine if GPS were made by a corporation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425937)

That's what I was thinking. Like I say, you "could argue." --MBCook, parrent of parrent

Someone Help US??? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425742)

Can someone send the US some GPS coordinates for iraqi WMD's, they seem to have misplaced their coordinates.

Re:Someone Help US??? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425777)

It wouldn't help because there are still Bathe party loyalists using GPS jammers they bought from, uuh, Trinidad and Tobago. Yeah, that's the ticket. I knew you smart guys would understand.

-Rummy

Re:Someone Help US??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425888)

They're Russian, actually, if you read the news.

Re:Someone Help US??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425811)


haha so i lied , fooled you all !
now if you will excuse me i must get back to making sure my family for generations to come never has to work again...ever

oh wait you already did that for me

regards
G.W Bush

Great (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425751)

So all these evil invading aliens have to do is kill the GPS satellites first and a great deal of our cockroach businesses come to a halt.

Is business really ready? (3, Interesting)

Demodian (658895) | about 11 years ago | (#6425753)

We worked on a turn-key project over a year ago (before matters got screwed by an acquisition), and one aspect of the product was to track GPS position and record it every so often with a few other real-time parameters, such as speed, direction, and average MPH. The project completed the first product phase of deployment, but actually using the GPS data (while recording WAS working) was slated for phase 2. Unfortunately, I think the whole thing got mothballed because the company receiving the product was not technically inclined one bit. Such a waste of effort. It would have helped cut their yearly expenses down a lot.

And your point?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425927)

Score: -1, No content

Dumb-ass moderators today

I hope they don't run over the barn ... (3, Insightful)

basho3 (660338) | about 11 years ago | (#6425755)

As a long-time sailor, I have heard more stories than I can count about vessels lost or damaged because skippers entered bad coordinates for a buoy or harbor entrance. Are rogue tractors next?

"For the moment, they've managed to resist the hottest new GPS tool: tractors that steer themselves. The price is still too high, but the idea is appealing, because with an auto-steer tractor, they would be able to work at night."

Re:I hope they don't run over the barn ... (2, Insightful)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about 11 years ago | (#6425773)

Better yet what part of GPS is jammable do people not understand? A ship is pretty safe it has a big margin of error. Now it's nice to use GPS to guide things what happens when the kid down the road starts messing up the system. Yes you can have a good inertial guidance as backup potentialy a good referance correction (DOT uses them plant a GPS on a known fixed point and tranmit how much it's off moment to moment to get sub centimeter accuracy)

Re:I hope they don't run over the barn ... (1)

stratjakt (596332) | about 11 years ago | (#6425781)

Well you have a simple failsafe that stops the tractor if it loses contact, or recieves irrational geodata.

Re:I hope they don't run over the barn ... (5, Informative)

Realistic_Dragon (655151) | about 11 years ago | (#6425815)

I think you are refering to DGPS?

Conventional civillian GPS (which is not the same as Military GPS, even with SA turned off as it is now) is accurate to typically ~10m. You can enhance that a long way by doing phase matching as well as code matching - survey GPS devices can get down to a few cms (for a price!).

DGPS works on the basis that for each satellite in the area the error arriving at two units within a couple of hundred miles is roughly the same. (Extra delay is caused by things like atmospheric conditions.) You put one reciever on a known point, and calculate the error for each satellite you can see. You then send all of the calculated corrections to the roaming reciever so it can remove the error in the signals it's getting before it calculates it's position. This is considerably cheaper than using a survey grade GPS, as well as faster, but unlike a survey grade GPS you need to have set up a nearby DGPS transmitter first. The (FAA?) have done this around US airports I believe, to allow autolanding systems to double check against DGPS data as well as ILS beacons.

It's worth noting that to be able to use DGPS it's _not_ enough to calculate the error in your _position_ and transmit the correction to that as the roaming unit may be using different satellites to you - you have to transmit the error on each satellite signal. Some Garmin units let you extract this data using an undocumented API.

Re:I hope they don't run over the barn ... (1)

PPGMD (679725) | about 11 years ago | (#6425836)

WAAS was just "officially" turned on by the FAA, its accurate enough to replace the CAT I approach in the FAA's eyes, it's accurate enough for me.

Another good feature that WAAS brings with it, is it has a way of transmitting if it detects irregularities in the GPS signal, and the WAAS satellites can be used as back up GPS satellites.

Re:I hope they don't run over the barn ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425953)

"what happens when the kid down the road starts messing up the system."

Any links to the technology required to do blocking on that scale?

Re:I hope they don't run over the barn ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425934)

When you are on land it is pretty easy to see where you are traveling. These are $$$millions pieces of equipment we are talking about, many with air condition, CD, etc.. I am sure that if they are riding around at night they have some decent flood lights projecting from the front, and at 5.5-6mph you can't accidentally get too far off course.

When I can track my own stolen car (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425759)



without paying an outrageous monthly fee akin to protection money, or calling a company to do it for me for a fee, then gps will have arrived for me.

One stolen car, recovered by my family, not police.
One van, stolen twice, recovered by my family twice, not police.
One 4x4, stolen, never recovered, $10,000 loss, insurance settlement was a joke after months of haggling and threatening to sue.

Re:When I can track my own stolen car (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425774)

Sounds like your problems have more to do with your low class upbringing and peers, to have had a vehicle stolen four times.

Or maybe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425817)



I just lived in one of the highest car theft regions of the nation, in a middle to upper middle class neighborhood. I believe for a few or more years, it was number one in the nation.

I not aware of too many neighborhoods in the US where the average one and two family houses run in the neighborhood of $450,000 to $750,000 with individual houses on some streets running $1,000,000+ for a one family, and where a three bedroom apartment rents for $2,000+ a month in what is considered a suburban area.

Very nice post though. Why don't you log on, and stand behind your words?

And since you seem to have dificulty with reading comprehension, let's go over it again. One van, one car, one 4x4. And they were vehicles worth stealing, or they wouldn't have been stolen.

Re:Or maybe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425876)

Why dont you log in and stand behind YOUR WORDS? Hypocrite.

Quite possibly... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425915)



I don't have an account?

Unlike most of the posters here I would guess?

And probably unlike the guy bringing class warfare into a gps statement/observation/wish?

290 comment limit per day is enough for 29 usable ip addresses, with 10 per for ac's, don't you think?

Geocaching (5, Interesting)

IwannaCoke (140329) | about 11 years ago | (#6425760)

My father and I use GPS receivers as often as possible. We are both Geocachers [geocaching.com] .

For those of you that don't know what Geocaching is, here is a quote from the geocaching.com FAQ:

"What is Geocaching?

Geocaching is an entertaining adventure game for gps users. Participating in a cache hunt is a good way to take advantage of the wonderful features and capability of a gps unit. The basic idea is to have individuals and organizations set up caches all over the world and share the locations of these caches on the internet. GPS users can then use the location coordinates to find the caches. Once found, a cache may provide the visitor with a wide variety of rewards. All the visitor is asked to do is if they get something they should try to leave something for the cache. "

Re:Geocaching (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425769)

You're litterbugs with little beeping gizmos.

"oh no i love nature so when i leave a plastic tub full of garbage in the woods its symbolic of my love for nature, not littering".

YOU MAKE ME SICK

Re:Geocaching (0, Troll)

Fiveeight (610936) | about 11 years ago | (#6425792)

You're [a troll] with a [net connection]

"Oh no, I love [SlashDot], so when I leave a [post] full of garbage on the site, it's symbolic of my love for [discussion], not [trolling]".

YOU MAKE ME [YAWN]

Re:Geocaching (5, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | about 11 years ago | (#6425819)

Just as a word of warning for inexperienced geo cachers there are a few things you should not put in your cache or the results might not be quite what you intended (unless you like being visited by lots of military grade explosive)
  1. Weapons of mass destruction
  2. Plans for gas centrifuge machines
  3. Middle aged paunchy men answering to the name Saddam
  4. Middle aged bearded men answering to the name Osama
  5. Any music recordings for which you cannot prove ownership
  6. Modded X-Boxes
  7. MS Source code

Re:Geocaching (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425967)

Geocaching is an entertaining adventure game? Man, you need a life. I love using GPS when sailing or flying, but the chances of me walking around using GPS to find stuff that has been placed for me to try and find is just ridiculus. GPS is a great tool, but geocaching is not an "adventure" game...

wardriving and computer security (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425763)

Wardriving is a perfect example of how GPS has changed the way we look at computer security, especially where wireless LANs are concerned.

Check out wifimaps.com [wifimaps.com] to see if your wlan has been scanned.

Cell Phones (0)

Alan Holman (607935) | about 11 years ago | (#6425764)

I saw a headline about a GPS service for cell-phones; a cool toy! I read more, and was disillusioned by "for emergency purposes only." Turns out, the GPS information is only seen by emergency persons if you call 911. Sucks, eh?

Re:Cell Phones (0, Redundant)

thynk (653762) | about 11 years ago | (#6425796)

It's there for 911 calls, but most of the ones I have seen allow you to access the GPS data without having to dial it. YMMV.

Re:Cell Phones (3, Interesting)

MBCook (132727) | about 11 years ago | (#6425863)

I would think most cellphones are (or at least will be) this way. GPS is something that is already there (due to the E911 thing), so why not make it available to the cellphone users so they can use it and you can claim it as a feature and say "our phone is better because theirs doesn't let you see where you are with our IntelliGPS HyperLocater technology." If it's not common now, I think it will be. I for one would prefer to buy a phone that would let me see the GPS data over one that wouldn't, all else being equal. Wouldn't you?

Re:Cell Phones (3, Informative)

squiggleslash (241428) | about 11 years ago | (#6425935)

FWIW, what cellphones use is generally not GPS, but good old fashioned triangulation. Which, interestingly, means it's probably more accurate than GPS too.

Question (4, Interesting)

thomas536 (464403) | about 11 years ago | (#6425767)

Can someone enlighten me as to why a farmer driving a tractor would need to know their location to a 1' accuracy?

Re:Question (5, Informative)

randyest (589159) | about 11 years ago | (#6425775)

so he can drive over the same tracks in his wheat field every year (I'm not kidding, read the fine article) and compress as little of his soil as possible

Re:Question (1)

thomas536 (464403) | about 11 years ago | (#6425782)

If it was a year to year problem that they're attempting to solve, it still doesn't make sense to me, as they will plow up the whole field at then end of the season anyway.

Re:Question (2, Informative)

randyest (589159) | about 11 years ago | (#6425837)

Regardless, the machines are heavy. They compress the soil that the wheels drive over. Roots grow less quickly in compacted soil. Driving anywhere each year (or whatever the crop change period is) will eventually compact large chunks of field which will have to be tilled/aerated before re-planting. Driving on the same tracks (more or less) every time minimized this.

Hope that helps.

Re:Question-Seeing eye tractor. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425845)

"Driving on the same tracks (more or less) every time minimized this. "

And as a former farmer you don't need GPS to do this. Also we can drive at night just fine.

Re:Question (1)

Peyna (14792) | about 11 years ago | (#6425864)

Ever heard of 'no-till'? Not everyone tills the soil after harversting each year.

Re:Question (2, Informative)

thmitch (24244) | about 11 years ago | (#6425873)

Actually not all farmers plow up the whole fields now days with the various low tillage systems being used. My brother does what is called ridge tilling and only plows between the ridges where the corn or beens are planted. This reduces the amount of plowing and intern reduces the amount of soil erosion.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425787)

If a tractor can be guided with such fine precision... who needs a farmer to do it?

Re:Question (1)

stratjakt (596332) | about 11 years ago | (#6425789)

As expensive as that equipment is to run and maintain, and as thin as profit margins in farming are, it behooves any good farmer to harvest/plant/whatever as precisely as possible. Some of those combines will use more fuel in an afternoon than your car will all month.

Going over the same path twice costs too much, and could damage crops if he was fertilizing or something like that that doesnt give you the visual feedback on where you've been (like mowing).

Re:Question (2, Informative)

thmitch (24244) | about 11 years ago | (#6425842)

My brother, who farms in Iowa, has been using GPS for a couple of years now. One use of GPS is he when he harvests the combine uses the GPS to map out the yields in small areas of the field instead of just knowing the yield for the whole field. Using this info and soils tests he can determine what areas have good amounts of nutrients and what areas do not. The next summer when he plants he feeds this info into the equipment and with the GPS it automatically adjusts the amount of fertilizer that each part of the field needs. Modern farming involes more high tech then many people realize and one the main reasons US farmers out produce any other farmers in the world.

Re:Question (2, Informative)

heli0 (659560) | about 11 years ago | (#6425912)

Agricultural GPS uses

Yield Monitoring

Chemical Application History

Developing fertilizer application plans

Tracking Soil Analysis Results

Identification of "problem areas" on fields

Finding the best locations for equipment

Profit /Loss charts by field

Boy, I Wish GPS Was Around During WW2 (-1, Flamebait)

tealover (187148) | about 11 years ago | (#6425776)

Then perhaps the French would have stayed in France to fight!

It seems right around the time that Germany decided to waltz into Paris, the entire French army suddenly got "lost" and left the country. All they needed was GPS and they dould have found their way back and fought.

Oh well.

Privacy ignored ***again*** (4, Interesting)

Goonie (8651) | about 11 years ago | (#6425809)

The mind boggles. How many people are going to accept a system that lets their insurance company track everywhere they drive? Yes, I'm surely more obsessive about this kind of thing than Joe Average, but surely you don't have to be a privacy nut to have some issues with this.

Re:Privacy ignored ***again*** (3, Insightful)

MBCook (132727) | about 11 years ago | (#6425859)

This will be market drivin, I think. There are some, probably a great many people who wouldn't mind this a bit if it caused their insurance rates to plummet. Everything is a tradeoff, and this is one that many people will be willing to take.

There are many people who, like you, would be too worried about the big-brother aspect and would want different insurance. These people would flock to insurance companies that work like those today and would be covered.

The only real problem would be if the government were to regulate that all insurace MUST function this was, but seeing as how this is the US (if you're not in the US, I don't know what will happen), you'll be fine. Here in the US just find other people like you (it shouldn't be to hard to find others who don't want to be locked into the system, or believe that people shouldn't have to be locked into it whether they personally like it or not) to be able to elect new people to abolish the rule.

I really don't think you have too much to worry about.

Re:Privacy ignored ***again*** (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6425897)

GPS itself CAN NOT send out ANY information. Another layer of technology and computer systems is needed for that. The additional technology would need to be a radio transponder or maybe a cellular-based system.

Re:Privacy ignored ***again*** (1)

sebmol (217013) | about 11 years ago | (#6425951)

Thank you. And here I was afraid thinking that I'm the only who thought of this as a prviacy problem.

How technology really evolves... (4, Insightful)

toupsie (88295) | about 11 years ago | (#6425889)

Ever notice that human technological evolution closely mirrors our desire to more efficiently kill our neighbor? Or at least take his stuff for less than the cost of taking his stuff. GPS is a major advance for economical, global force projection. Instead of a squadron of big, lumbering, gas guzzling bombers, you need one little black jet to hit a target. Kill more, spend less. With most military technological advances, they have civilian applications. GPS is a shining example. My favorite is the computer. It was first built to help calculate military equations so mankind could kick his fellow mankind in the ass faster.

What will ever happen to human progress if we start all being nice to each other?

Worth noting? (2, Funny)

pixelgeek (676892) | about 11 years ago | (#6425890)

Also worth noting is how GPS, like computers, wasn't adopted overnight, but rather over time as applications were found.

I hate to sound pessimistic but since when is something this glaringly obvious considered "worth noting"?

Or maybe, given the topic, my pessimistic little note should be restated to ask how accurate would your GPS unit have to be to measure the size of the rock you'd have to be living under to not know that GPS wasn't adopted overnight?

Goodness. I'm starting to sound as biter as those people who post about the newsworthiness of new articles.

GPS works well for locating stuff you bury (4, Interesting)

doormat (63648) | about 11 years ago | (#6425922)

Like utility infrastructure. I work at a water company, and before a contractor burries pipeline, we use RTK (realtime kinematic) GPS to record its location down to 0.04' (or 1cm). So when line locators need to mark facilities its much more accurate. Normal GPS isnt that accurate, but we use base stations and radios to send correction data in real time out to the GPS collection devices.
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