Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Low-power FM Transmitters Banned in UK

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the getting-your-priorities-straight dept.

Media (Apple) 562

Acey writes "The BBC News is reporting that the Griffin iTrip falls foul of the UK Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949 (PDF). In short, the iTrip is an unlicensed FM transmitter and that's not allowed. The UK distributor, A M Micro, have pulled the iTrip. More ominously they warn that "Use of the iTrip in the UK therefore constitutes an offence and can lead to prosecution of the User". Guess that makes me an outlaw, because you'll have to pry my iTrip from my cold, dead hands."

cancel ×

562 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

THE KING IS ON HIS THRONE (-1)

(TK)Dessimat0r (668222) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587943)

-PENIS--PENIS--PENIS--PENIS-
P_______________________8..P
E__Bow down to the_____#~..E
N__Lord's penis_______8.',-N
I_____________________#',-.I
S__Jesus wants your__8',-..S
-__anus, and he_____#~',-..-
P__wants it NOW! ___8_',-..P
E__________________##',-',-E
N__An original_____8',-',";N
I__TrollKore(TM)_____##',-',";I
S__work of art.___8',-',";.S
-__By Dessimat0r ##',-',";.-
P________________8',-',";,.P
E_______________#'',-',";,.E
N______________8(',-',";,..N
I_____________#(',-',";,.,.I
S__________#8#8_',-',";,.,.S
-_________#',-.8',-',";,.,.-
P________8~',-..#',-',";,..P
E_______#'',-',";8_',-',";.E
N_____8=',-',";.+#+',-',";.N
I____#=',-',";,._8',-',";,.I
S___#=',-',";,..(#',-',";.8S
-__8(',-',CMDR,.(8',-',";s#-
P_8(',-',.TACO.";#',-',-s8_P
E_#z',-','WOZ',";8',-..s#__E
N_8_.,#',"ERE',";~#,..88___N
I_#.##',-,',',,";~8,8#____I
S_8##',-+~'',-',-~#'8______S
-_#.,..-',-',";.'=8#_______-
P_.8+_',-',";,.'88_________P
E___888',-',";~8___________E
N______8#888#88____________N
I__________________________I
S____.oO TrollKore Oo._____S
-_At the head of the game._-
P__________________________P
E___irc.freedomirc.net_____E
N_______#trollkore_________N
I__________________________I
S__________________________S
-PENIS--PENIS--PENIS--PENIS-

All you cock-loving fuckers out there, here is a special treat for you bastards, take a look at this knob. NOW SUCK IT, MOTHERFUCKERS!

You are not logged in. You can log in now using the Important Stuff: Please try to keep posts on topic. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account. Problems regarding accounts or comment posting should be sent to CowboyNeal the convenient form below, or Important Stuff: Please try to keep posts on topic. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account. Problems regarding accounts or comment posting should be sent to CowboyNeal

Sooo.. (5, Funny)

Locky (608008) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587944)

Any rewards for turning people in?

Re:Sooo.. (5, Funny)

muffen (321442) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587998)

Any rewards for turning people in?
I'm sure you meant to say: Any rewards for tuning people in? :)

3rd pr0st33Z (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6587946)

bite my ass, bitch.

Love Always,
News For Turds

regulation of the airwaves (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6587952)

sounds like they want to keep the air free of interference. Aren't there lots of pirate radio stations in England?

Re:regulation of the airwaves (5, Informative)

Liquorman (691815) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588073)

Pirate radio stations broadcast towards England from ships off shore, outside of English legal jurisdiction. Here is some historic info: http://www.offshoreradio.co.uk/spotday.htm

How will they enforce? (3, Interesting)

davisshaver (583015) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587953)

How exactly will they enforce this? Will it be like a second degree offence, like seat belts are in some US states?

Re:How will they enforce? (4, Informative)

ebcdic (39948) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587996)

No-one's ever going to be prosecuted for using one, any more than if you use wi-fi channel 12 in the USA. They just won't be for sale here.

Re:How will they enforce? (5, Informative)

dontod (571749) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588120)

I'm in the UK and recently bought on of these. [merconnet.com] It's an almost identical product called an FM 'Linker' but basically you plug it into any headphone socket et voila you're a radio station.

They say the range is about 5M (therefore just for personal use) but it is well over 100 metres. So I'm waiting to get busted when I broadcast web radio stations around my house (and over a small portion of town).

Don

------
There's a 4:30 in the morning now?

Re:How will they enforce? (2, Informative)

Doctor7 (669966) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588145)

Sort of. What would actually happen is that if your device happened to be in range of someone's receiver and interfered with the channel they were trying to listen to, they could make a complaint and the equipment would be confiscated.

fp (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6587959)

michael is a fag

fp (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6587962)

fp biotch

slashdot's editors are facists (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6587965)

Why do you people put up with their buillshit?

What is it? (3, Informative)

muffen (321442) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587969)

For all you people (like myself) who had no idea what iTrip is/was, here's the link from googles cache [216.239.37.104] .

From the page: You are looking at the coolest iPod accessory in the world. The iTrip FM transmitter for the iPod can play your music through any FM radio in your car, at a party, wherever the mood strikes you - and you have a radio.

brief writeup (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588009)

They just had a review of the itip over at tubgirl tech archive [tubgirl.com]

Re:What is it? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588038)

and this wasn't contained in the link in the story? Are you feeding the trolls so that they don't have to RTFA?

The iTrip is an interesting gadget but no more so than any other device of its type (cell phone, CD player adapter, etc).

I had a friend with a 40GB portable MP3 player (about the same size as the iPod) that was quite a bit cheaper. I don't believe it had the option for an FM adapter taco like this, but takes it did have line out and in most recent the stereos have this (even in cars).

jesus, don't be an ASS.

Interface options (1, Interesting)

Blue Stone (582566) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587970)

How can someone with nothing but a CD player/radio in their car, listen to their iPod on their car stereo, except by using the iTrip?

Re:Interface options (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6587992)

Simple.. wire in an in-line (through the antenna) FM transmitter.. Since you are only transmitting on a private wire, vs public airwaves you are fine.

Re:Interface options (1)

iapetus (24050) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587995)

They can't (legally). Sucks to be them.

If they've got a tape player, they can use a suitable adapter, of course.

Re:Interface options (0, Offtopic)

Karamchand (607798) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588047)

Do you have any more information on how to do this exactly?
Thank you in advance!

Re:Interface options (2, Informative)

Raffaello (230287) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588134)

Buy a cassette adapter. Here's one for example:

XtremeMac's iPod Cassette Adapter [xtrememac.com]

Though any cassette adapter will work (there are many manufacturers).

Re:Interface options (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588014)

By using a device that modulates the signal onto the aerial cable rather than broadcasting. It will still appear as a station but will not contravene the laws of the land.

Re:Interface options (1)

tim_uk (123339) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588022)

Like this:

http://woodcompanyusa.com/comersus/store/comersu s_ viewItem.asp?idProduct=1090

Tim

Re:Interface options (1)

gh0ul (71352) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588055)

Hopefully your stereo has an "audio in" port? :/ if not i guess you'd be screwed.. Might consider upgrading the stereo equipment if possible to allow for that, many new ones come with an audio in, for stuff like xm satellite radio and such

Re:Interface options (1)

JohnTheFisherman (225485) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588140)

There are other FM transmitters, but you might consider using one of these [pie.net] . They fake the in-dash stereo's CD changer input into thinking it's there and playing CD 1 track 1. That selects the analog input, and you just hook anything up to it.

Well if that is the case (4, Interesting)

youngerpants (255314) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587974)

Walkie-talkies should be banned as their signals can be picked up by an FM receiver (at least my old action man ones could, although the range was about 3 metres)

Re:Well if that is the case (1)

thorgil (455385) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588000)

Yeah.. and CRT's too...

At least old non TCO-compilant ones...

Re:Well if that is the case (2, Informative)

Doctor7 (669966) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588074)

They are, if they use that part of the spectrum and are over a certain signal strength. I remember as a child that mail-ordering what were basically grey imports was the only way to get a set that would work more than a few metres apart.

Haha (0)

Sir Haxalot (693401) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587976)

Guess that makes me an outlaw, because you'll have to pry my iTrip from my cold, dead hands.
/me prises your iTrip from your cold dead hands.

Government-controlled media (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6587979)

What do you expect from a country where the main media, BBC, is owned and controlled by the government, and nazis in vans prowl around and bust people for having TV's without paying a tribute?

Re:Government-controlled media (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588008)

Rather the government, than a fat fucking Australian.

Fat Australian? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588027)

Who is that? Homer McElroy?

Re:Government-controlled media (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588046)

License fees are a means of ensuring quality, ad-free television. I'd claw my eyes out if I lived in the US and had to watch your crap channels. Better democratic control than just being an outlet for corporations.

It's better when government controls the media. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588083)

" License fees are a means of ensuring quality, ad-free television"

Great way to put a spin on it. If in America, CBS managed to force everyone to pay CBS fees, they'd make the same claim.

" Better democratic control than just being an outlet for corporations."

Translation of socialist double-speak: "Better that the government decides than the viewers decide"

Re:It's better when government controls the media. (2, Informative)

blane.bramble (133160) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588161)

You would be correct if the BBC was the only game in town, but then we have a number of independant broadcasters as well. If you watch any of the BBC's output you will find the government has little to do with what the broadcast. In fact, if you are following the news at the moment over here, there is a major row going on between the government and the BBC over who said what over Weapons of Mass Destruction and the suicide of Dr. Kelly.

Re:It's better when government controls the media. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588195)

But you don't get any say whatsoever in what CBS airs. In the UK, voters elect MPs who *can* influence what the BBC considers worthwhile programming.

In the US, the only thing that will ever see network airtime is Lowest Common Denominator crap, that will satisfy advertisers.

In the UK, the people and their government have made a decision that TV ought to provide at least *some* non-commercial, worthwhile programming.

It's no accident that much of our PBS lineup has historically been taken straight from BBC productions.

Re:Government-controlled media (4, Interesting)

rsidd (6328) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588127)

I'd claw my eyes out if I lived in the US and had to watch your crap channels.


Indeed. I live in the US, I don't own a TV (CNN and Faux News? No thanks). I get much of my news from the BBC's website. Government-controlled? Is that why Blair and Alistair Campbell and friends are so upset with them lately?

Re:Government-controlled media (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588141)

I'd claw my eyes out if I lived in the US and had to watch your crap channels.

Yeah.. heaven forbid you had something to watch besides guys dressed in drag. The commercials do suck, but not nearly as bad as UK programming.

Re:Government-controlled media (1)

thorgil (455385) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588050)


Works the same in sweden, and it works good too.
Imagine, watching good TV without brainwashing commercials every ten minutes.

Re:Government-controlled media (5, Interesting)

turgid (580780) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588070)

and nazis in vans prowl around and bust people for having TV's without paying a tribute?

This is no exaggeration. I had no TV for 6 years and those gits hounded me relentlessly. They kept sending me threatening letters warning of a possible 1000 fine for not having a TV license even though I didn't have a TV. They made me sign a form declaring that I had no TV set, which I did, and then they sent me another one, and another one, and I phoned them and told them and then they sent and inspector to my house!

When I moved house, they started sending the letters again, which I signed and returned. A week or two later a poster went up on the billboard across the road saying "3 addresses at Himalayan Way do not have Television Licenses. We know who they are."

I was so tempted to go out with a can of paint and write "At least one of them has no TV set" but I didn't. A year later I bought a TV and a damned license. Now I spend too much time as a TV zombie and not enough time writing code.

Television is a powerful opiate and population control machanism. I admire people who can control it. I'm succumbing again.

Re:Government-controlled media (1)

Draoi (99421) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588163)

FWIW, I had the exact same problem here in Ireland. Harrassment ad infinitum. You have to *prove* you have no TV. Geez.

Television is a powerful opiate and population control machanism. I admire people who can control it. I'm succumbing again.

Dude, it's time to kill your TV! [turnoffyourtv.com]

Re:Government-controlled media (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588187)

what ... the hell ... is a TV license?

your govt is on crack.

Re:Government-controlled media (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588190)

Television is a powerful opiate and population control machanism. I admire people who can control it. I'm succumbing again.

I sit here, replying.. after refreshing Slashdot for the last 20 minutes waiting for new stories to appear.. wondering what is this "Television" you speak of. Ahh, anything to drown out the cruel reality. Let me be, lord.. let me be.

Re:Government-controlled media (3, Funny)

nick_davison (217681) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588199)

A conversation a friend of mine who lived in W1 (Very central London) recounted having:

"Sir, do you have a TV license?"
"Nope."
"Do you have a TV?"
"Nope."
"We detected a TV from our van, inside your property."
"No you didn't. Must be a mistake."
"Sir, I can hear the EastEnder's theme coming from inside your appartment."
"You must be imagining it."
"Sir, if we need to, we can get a warrant to enter the premises and be back within the hour."
"No you can't."
"Yes we can Sir, the courts look very favorably upon our requests."
"They look even less favorably upon giving search warrants to enter property belonging to the Queen."
"Oh. Well... You really should get a license."

The joys of the royal family owning half the best properties in the city.

Re:Government-controlled media (4, Insightful)

Malc (1751) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588085)

Why is this marked as informative? It shows gross ignorance. The BBC is independent of the government via mandate. In fact, the BBC seems to institutionally take the stance when reporting the news that anything from the government must wrong, irrespective of whether they're left, right or centre. The BBC isn't owned, or controlled or funded by the government. The only possible hold the government has is over the renewing of the BBC's license (is the right term?), which is generally valid for longer than the maximum length of time the current government can sit before they have to call a general election.

Your gross ignorance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588116)

" Why is this marked as informative? It shows gross ignorance. The BBC is independent of the government via mandate."

Yet, the government is the one that pays its $$$$, and controls the mandates too.

" The BBC isn't owned, or controlled or funded by the government."

Yes it is. If it weren't, the government would not be forcing a single sole to pay license fees to it.

Neuros? (3, Interesting)

tuffy (10202) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587980)

What about the Neuros' built-in low-power FM transmitting capability? Are those illegal to use in the UK also? It all seems a bit excessive to me, considering the tiny range.

Re:Neuros? (4, Interesting)

MikeCamel (6264) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588033)

Yes, it is illegal, and not just in the UK - this is quite common in Europe, I believe. If you look at the Neuros [neurosaudio.com] forum pages, you'll see that they're intending to disable broadcast capability. They may well do this in firmware.

Eclectic Micro Stations (4, Interesting)

niko9 (315647) | more than 11 years ago | (#6587988)

This could/can be the begining of eclectic microstations. You can tune into a 24/7 iTrip at work/your building/bus stop etc., instead of listening to one of big conglomerate boring stations.

My other sig is an ambulance!

Legacy (2, Interesting)

JRSiebz (691639) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588002)

Some early/mid 90's cars with cd players added in the trunk broadcast on like channel 88. something, which is what the user tunes to, to listen to cds.
(This is before 6 cd changers in-dash existed)

This is the same thing. Would these be illegal in the UK too?

Over cautious distributor? (1)

Linker3000 (626634) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588004)

There's **SO** many places where you can BUY FM bugs in the UK despite the fact that to USE them is illegal, and the position on radio scanners and traffic speed detectors is pretty much the same -- yet you don't read about the suppliers being prosecuted day in day out, so I guess AM Micro is being a tad over-cautious.

Fun? (4, Funny)

chefbb (691732) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588006)

Seems excessive, but if you lived in an apartment complex, you could have some serious fun with one of these things broadcasting to the station your neighbor happens to be listening to. :)

Re:Fun? (4, Funny)

The Jonas (623192) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588128)

In the 1980's Radio Shack [radioshack.com] used to sell an FM transmitter that you could wire into your car radio. The range was good enough to transmit from vehicle-to-vehicle. We were in high school at the time and the number of radio stations in town were limited. Therefore, if we were lucky enough to be on the road within a couple of car lengths from someone we knew we could broadcast an obnoxious message through their radio if we guessed what station they were listening to. The girls did not seem to appreciate our unauthorized transmissions. ;)

not that useful (1)

mblase (200735) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588183)

I don't own one, but my brother does; IIRC, the iTrip can broadcast on one of four FM frequencies: 89.1, 89.3, 89.5, or 89.7. This is because frequencies that low are usually only taken by local college/community stations, and most commercial stations use a frequency from 90.1 on up.

I wonder if the RIAA.... (0, Flamebait)

JessLeah (625838) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588010)

...could have anything to do with this? They are rapidly setting themselves up as 'audio-fascists', and are probably afraid that such devices would be hacked (e.g. provided with a more powerful amplifier and a bigger antenna) and thus become an unlicensed (and hence NON-MONEY-MAKING) FM station...

It seems like the RIAA want to enforce a situation where ONLY "approved", tribute-paying stations have ANY sort of FM transmitter equipment.

Pirate Radio (-1, Offtopic)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588048)

You can't transmit freely with a high powered trasmitter according to the FCC without a license.

Re:Pirate Radio (2, Insightful)

JessLeah (625838) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588168)

This has nothing to DO with the FCC. We're talking about the UK here.

Re:Pirate Radio (1)

jokell82 (536447) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588170)

And we all know the FCC has a lot of power over in the UK... ;)

1949 (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588018)

This law was written in 1949! Probably to stop people from setting up unlicensed radio stations (ie. commercial FM). These devices didn't exist!

Er - ah - hm (5, Funny)

Dark Paladin (116525) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588024)

On the one side, I can understand the Governments position:

Thou Shalt Not have Unlicensed Radio Transmitters.

This is important, because if just anybody set up shop, soon the radio waves would be a mess of people just putting stuff out, and nobody could hear the station they wanted too - just the one with the biggest pen- ah, broadcast antennae.

On the other hand, I think the range of this thing is - what - 10 to 30 feet? Watch out, Britian! Those pirate radios will be able to be heard from the other room! Anarchy and chaos as Julie tries to dance to Nsync while Dad's got his iPod broadcasting the Spice Girls in the other room! Mum - you'd best be keeping that "Black Mages" heavy metal to yourself!

This seems more like an issue of someone in beurocracy[SIC] getting a bug up their ass and not using common sense more than anything else.

nutty limeys (3, Funny)

nanojath (265940) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588025)

So, like, is a Mr. Microphone illegal in the U.K.? And did I just date myself by mentioning Mr. Microphone?

Re:nutty limeys (1)

blane.bramble (133160) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588088)

If it broadcasts over the 88Mhz-108MHz FM band, then yes it would be - this is a licensed airband for radio stations, and is regulated to ensure decent seperation between individual stations. It is currently considered to be "full" with no space for further stations.

Re:nutty limeys (0)

Microsift (223381) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588104)

Yes and Yes

Re:nutty limeys (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588130)

This is just a case of things taking ages to catch up in the UK. It seems to be driven a complete lack of any knowledge of technology by anyone in a position to change current laws. Unfortunately this seems to be the reason that everything takes so long to move on, and it isn't going to change soon. I mean, one of the people in change of what we see on TV is blind. I'm all for equal opportunities, but I can't think that there are better things they could be doing.

Re:nutty limeys (2, Insightful)

sammy baby (14909) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588135)

I have fond memories of Mr. Microphone ads. Especially when the kid crusing around in the car with his friend says, "I'll see you girls later," as if he was some kind of pre-pubescent stud.

(For those of you who were too young / don't remember, Mr. Microphone was a kids toy which attached a cheap mic to a low power radio transmitter, so you could talk and pick it up through your car radio.)

But to answer your question - yeah, I'm pretty sure it would be illegal. Although I don't remember if it used an FM or an AM signal.

doubt it (3, Insightful)

nomadic (141991) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588031)

-Guess that makes me an outlaw, because you'll have to pry my iTrip from my cold, dead hands.

No, it would just take a uniformed constable. Let's not overestimate ourselves here.

Those things suck anyway (1)

Fideaux! (44069) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588039)

I've tried a few such devices for hooking my MP3 player to my car, and they all sucked. Interference, bad tuning, low power etc.

Just suck it up and either get a head unit with AUX inputs (usually a headphone jack on the front) or get the neat doodad that allows you to use the inputs for the trunk-mounted CD changer that you don't use any more since you bought your iPod. Google PIE and AUX for distributors of those boxes.

Very Cool (2, Interesting)

diorio (244324) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588052)

GriffinTech should be paying for this spot because I never heard of this thing and I just plopped down my credit card! $35 + Shipping. It is the coolest thing around. I can't wait to use this....no more wires plugging into a tape deck!

Re:Very Cool (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588137)

Wow , these kind of things have been available for over 15 years now. I cant believe that you haven't heard of them until now.

Ha ha apple faggots will resort to glory holes (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588054)

Dear Apple,

I am a homosexual. I bought an Apple computer because of its well earned reputation for being "the" gay computer. Since I have become an Apple owner, I have been exposed to a whole new world of gay friends. It is really a pleasure to meet and compute with other homos such as myself. I plan on using my new Apple computer as a way to entice and recruit young schoolboys into the homosexual lifestyle; it would be so helpful if you could produce more software which would appeal to young boys. Thanks in advance.

with much gayness,

Father Randy "Pudge" O'Day, S.J.

But how do they open garage doors in the UK? (0, Offtopic)

Hairy_Potter (219096) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588057)

And how do they use their X10 stuff?

Re:But how do they open garage doors in the UK? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588124)

Only rich ponces have automatic door openers. Anyway, haven't you been to Britain? You'll find virtually every road in residential areas are half blocked by cars parked in every which way possible. No need for automatic garage doors.

Re:But how do they open garage doors in the UK? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588157)

There's still a place in Devon where you can't get cars into the town and have to get everywhere by donkey. I kid you not. It's called Clovelly.

Perhaps this can be the leverage needed... (0, Flamebait)

gaudior (113467) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588063)

... to overthrow the BBC Monopoly on broadcasting in Britain. This has to be a throwback to the kind of thinking that led to licenses to own radios and televisions, and the Gestapo-like radio detector vans. As bad as the FCC has been, on occasion, it has never been as draconian as the British governments stranglehold on the airwaves.

Re:Perhaps this can be the leverage needed... (1)

erroneous (158367) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588109)

The BBC does not have a monopoloy on broadcasting in Britain.

Re:Perhaps this can be the leverage needed... (1)

brokenvoice (595329) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588177)

Balls: then we'd get the sham that passes for mass media in the US. It's bad enough we have to put up with the crap pumped out by Channel 5, ITV and Sky.

The BBC is about as trustworthy as broadcast journalism can get.

OT but reminds me of .... (3, Interesting)

tetranz (446973) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588064)

Many years ago I remember reading a British electronics hobbyist magazine which had an article on how to build a metal detector. There was a warning that before using it you needed to go to a government office and get a pipe finders license.

Time to update the law... (3, Insightful)

Xentax (201517) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588072)

It seems like the legislature, the broadcasters, and the consumers, ought to be able to work out an exception provision to the existing laws.

Specifically, they ought to allow unlicensed transmitters below a certain output power (anyone know what the iTrip's broadcast power is?).

I mean, the spectrum licensees have a vested and understable interest in keeping their airwaves free of interference, but I don't think low-power transmissions like these had been envisioned when the law was codefied (receivers were a wee bit less sensitive and precise in 1949, methinks).

Xentax

Heston (1)

TrippTDF (513419) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588079)

You'll have to pry my iTrip from my cold, dead hands.

Whatever you say, Charlie

Re:Heston (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588159)

We're talking about a transmitter with a 10-20 foot range, not a fully automatic .50 caliber machine gun. Please get a clue and/or sense of scale. kthxbye.

For the uninformed. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588080)

Not very surprising, the WTA covers all FM and AM transmitters, the only exceptions being those licensed for public bands (such as PMR446, 2.4GHz for low-range CCTV monitors and wifi, 49MHz baby monitors and any 27MHz gear rated at below 50mW (ie radio control transmitters)). Everything else requires a license. HAM Radio requires an annual license fee, as does C27/81-CB28/94 (CB Radio on 27MHz (is this still covered under licensing? Last I heard they were abolishing 27/81 in favor of the newer banding. Answers on a postcard...) and 28MHz Euro bands); you can even be charged under the WTA for building and using a crystal AM transmitter (lots of hobby electronic kits have schematics and parts for building these, and they have a range of only twenty FEET!)

I understand a little bit, but sheesh. (1)

dodell (83471) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588081)

I mean, can't they ratify laws to allow low power FM devices access? The transmission radius of the device is a meer 10 to 30 feet. Indeed, it runs off an extremely low power input and wouldn't have the power to transmit very far anyway. I'd be surprise if it *COULD* interfere with other cars' radios.

I think it'd be simpler and more economically beneficial to ratify the law to allow LPFM devices on the market. They're obviously allowed in the USA. Indeed, take a look at the 300-in-1 electronics kits from Radio Shack, which allow one to build one's own LPFM transmitter.

I just checked the specs - there's not going to be any frequency drift (it has a PLL) and complies to FCC specifications. Granted these are US specifications...

I simply don't see the point in denying a market for a neat (and harmless) transmitter.

I'm not even sure that it's possible to boost the power on these devices to expand the transmission radius -- this would likely cause a need for circuit redesign. Those are my thoughts, anyway. IANAEE.

Re:I understand a little bit, but sheesh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6588186)

You provide the research to prove this. Then find people to start writing to their local MPs and whichever cabinet minister is responsible. That's how it works in a democracy.

UK is the only coutry limits use of the FM band. (2, Informative)

nexusone (470558) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588082)

According to reports, two other countries - Austria and Iceland - have also stopped sales of the iTrip because of problems with radio frequencies.

I remember building FM/AM transmitters as teen, cool to be my own DJ...America still home of the free!!!

Time to Support the Black Market (1)

chia_monkey (593501) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588084)

Geeze, just think about it. I don't know the laws in the surrounding (ok, nearby) nations, but think of the black market for these now. An easy 500% price increase to anyone selling one. Remember when blue jeans were going for $500 or so in the USSR? So will this create a nasty black market for a simple, innocent device or will it force the legislators to review the law?

Will they try and confiscate my ... (4, Funny)

burgburgburg (574866) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588087)

Mr. Microphone?!?

How will I pick up the chicks? How will I karoake? How will I LIVE?!?!?!

My guess ... (1)

Draoi (99421) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588092)

... is they're afraid that folks will unwittingly broadcast their music. If you're stuck on the motorway/freeway, the dude in the car next to you could potentially tune into your iPod.*sigh*

In short; more paranoia from the music regulatory authorities. A couple of milliwatts of power - an iTrip probably has less range than the average infra-red remote control.

I'm patiently waiting for them to begin outlawing that part of the electromagnetic spectrum ... :-/

Paranoid nonsense (2, Insightful)

ebcdic (39948) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588166)

All countries regulate use of the wireless spectrum. It's just that in Britain the exemptions for low-power devices don't happen to cover this kind of device, unlike the USA apparently. Nothing to do with the music industry at all.

Low powered FM (4, Interesting)

56ker (566853) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588094)

The FM range 88 - 108 MHz has been used for wireless microphones for ages - how are these Griffin Itrips any different?

banned: iTrip and how many others? (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588103)

Isn't the iTrip just like any of the dozens of other low power FM transmitters on the market today? I recall using one years ago with my JVC DiscMan, and I know they were around even back to the handheld cassette player days, for playing those on your car stereo. I've personally got an iRock for my pod for road trips.

The USA has a limit (what is it, 10mW?) that anything running under that transmit strength doesn't have to be licensed because it's too weak to cause interferance. My iRock has a range of about 15 feet from my truck, on an empty station. I sometimes have to switch its channel though because even sitting on my dash, 2 feet from my antenna, it can still be overpowered by local radio stations along my route. I don't see how the UK's equivelant of the FCC seriously considers this any kind of hazard.

I understand different countries will have different regulations etc., but is this a case of the UK completely banning any such devices, or is it just a case of Apple neglecting to get a license for the iTrip in the UK, and the UK deciding to make an example of 'zero tolerance' of their airwave laws?

XM Radio (0, Interesting)

PhiberKut (9428) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588106)

Certain models of the XM Radio use a small FM transmitter to send the audio to the car's stereo system. Are XM radio's illegal in the UK?

More barriers to market entry (3, Interesting)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588108)

Why the fuss over low power FM? Because it allows anyone to become a broadcaster or content creator. By raising the specter of 'interference', broadcasters and others can FUD the legislatures into banning enabling technologies like this.

How would they catch you? (0, Redundant)

Kuad (529006) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588125)

At last count, there were already ~80 pirate radio stations in the Greater London area alone. The authorities are obviously not having a lot of luck shutting down illegal transmitters. Just order one from the States and stop worrying about it, for heaven's sakes!

Acceptable unlawful behavior? Give me a break (2, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588126)

"Use of the iTrip in the UK therefore constitutes an offence and can lead to prosecution of the User". Guess that makes me an outlaw, because you'll have to pry my iTrip from my cold, dead hands."

This view seems to becoming more prevalent. An illegal action or device is banned or otherwise action taken against, and people just ignore it because it doesnt suit them. This device is illegal, and it hasnt even just been made illegal, its been illegal for a good number of decades, so under what premise do you think you should be allowed to continue using it? I bet you will be crying foul if you get caught!

Yes this device is low powered, but that doesnt matter. Under the aformentioned act, it is illegal, and if you want to use one, then please speak to your local MP! Do not start ignoring laws that inconvienince you, as this is where anarchy starts to creep in.

I can hear the cries for compensation for these now useless devices already, either from the UK government or the company that sold them. I dont think you should get a refund or compensation from either source, as they are covered under an already existing law, and you should have checked the legality of these items before you purchased.

Your best course of action now, to recover your costs? Ebay the suckers i think.

Re:Acceptable unlawful behavior? Give me a break (1)

user32.ExitWindowsEx (250475) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588138)

Haven't you ever heard of the concept of civil disobedience?

Sooo.. (-1)

(TK)Dessimat0r (668222) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588129)

Any rewards for turning people in..?

Re:Sooo.. (-1)

(TK2)Dessimat0r (669581) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588194)

Any rewards for turning people in? I'm sure you meant to say: Any rewards for tuning people in? :)

No news here (5, Insightful)

erroneous (158367) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588155)

The UK has *not* just passed a new law banning the iTrip specifically or deliberately, as half the posters on slashdot seem to believe.

The distributors of the iTrip, having taken legal advice, have decided that use of the iTrip probably constitutes a breach of an old law about FM broadcasting and have therefore chosen not to distribute it here.

Nothing has actually changed and British police are not about to start hunting down people with suspicious bulges on the top of their iPods.

I-trip kicks ass! (1)

nxs212 (303580) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588164)

It's really cool and broadcasts a LOT farther than it says in the manual - it supposed to only broadcast within 10 feet but when we went camping, it was transmitting w/o any problems up to 60 feet. We had two cars' stereos tuned to the same station and playing music ranging from old-school rap to Skinny Puppy and other weird stuff. People who were walking by were very confused.
Has anyone tried this in heavy, slow traffic?

Ju,ping the band wagon... (1)

MoeMoe (659154) | more than 11 years ago | (#6588203)

Knowing the RIAA, they will most likely follow suit... We wouldn't want anyone thinking they have become 'softies' would we? Honestly, I don't see the problem here, since it seems that this transmitter/jammer is of low power consumption, it is reasonable to assume that it's transmission properties could not spread to far from the source of the Jammer itself... Not to say the RIAA won't want in on this as well. After all, they have the image of 'Big Brother' to uphold...
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?