Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Roblimo posted more than 11 years ago | from the people-behind-the-stars dept.

Music 371

Bill Evans is one of those people in the music business who doesn't get a lot of public exposure, but keeps the wheels cranking behind the scenes. He's not just a musician and techie, but a publicist whose clients include Numavox Records artists Kerry Livgren and Michael Gleason as well as progressive rocker Neal Morse; he's produced (among many others) songs for the Burning Annie soundtrack and the Kansas Tribute Project. Naturally, since he makes his living in the music business, Bill is not 100% in favor of unrestricted filesharing. But what might work? And what might not? Let's find out what this music biz insider thinks -- one question per post, of course. Answers to the "Top 10" questions will be published soon after he gets them back to us.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Second First Post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723005)

For Durst, post.
Shoot me, Ghost!

HaH! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723046)

TwICe I haVe BeATen tEh GNAA!

Oh wait, that sounds perverted.

Oh well, The GNAA can SUCK IT!

What options are out there? (4, Interesting)

TopShelf (92521) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723010)

What do you see as the most promising means of maintaining the commercial tie between artist and audience, but in different form than today's "stone tablet", whereby a song or album is burned onto a CD with copy protection? What about enhancing other revenue streams, like fan clubs, for example?

Re:What options are out there? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723061)

Slashdot requires you to wait 2 minutes between each successful posting of a comment to allow everyone a fair chance at posting a comment.

It's been 1 minute since you last successfully posted a comment

Chances are, you're behind a firewall or proxy, or clicked the Back button to accidentally reuse a form. Please try again. If the problem persists, and all other options have been tried, contact the site administrator.

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
Second First Post (Score:-1, Offtopic)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723005)
For Durst, post.
Shoot me, Ghost!
[ Reply to This ]

HaH! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723046)
TwICe I haVe BeATen tEh GNAA!

Oh wait, that sounds perverted.

Oh well, The GNAA can SUCK IT!

[ Reply to This | Parent ]

What options are out there? (Score:4, Interesting)
by TopShelf (92521) * on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723010)
(http://freethepenguin.com/ | Last Journal: 2003.08.08 23:49)
What do you see as the most promising means of maintaining the commercial tie between artist and audience, but in different form than today's "stone tablet", whereby a song or album is burned onto a CD with copy protection? What about enhancing other revenue streams, like fan clubs, for example?
--

Bypass [amazon.com] the local monopolist
[ Reply to This ]

ummm... (Score:0, Troll)
by radiumhahn (631215) on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723011)
Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Honestly....why even ask?
[ Reply to This ]

another perfect cut! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723018)
Hi, kids.

Filesharing is cool.

Carry on.
[ Reply to This ]

marketing (Score:4, Interesting)
by cybercuzco (100904) on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723022)
(http://slashdot.org/journal.pl?op=lis t&uid=100904 | Last Journal: 2003.07.28 20:59)
Have you or anyone you know done any studies of the marketing effect of free music sharing? That is, how much has the free marketing that is a result of filesharing offsetting the potential lost sales?
--

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY:
Run around, scream and shout, breathe real hard till we all pass out.
[ Reply to This ]

YUO (Score:-1, Troll)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723027)
R TEH POOP
[ Reply to This ]

Re:YUO (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723041)
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
Second First Post (Score:-1, Offtopic)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723005)
For Durst, post.
Shoot me, Ghost!
[ Reply to This ]

What options are out there? (Score:3, Interesting)
by TopShelf (92521) * on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723010)
(http://freethepenguin.com/ | Last Journal: 2003.08.08 23:49)
What do you see as the most promising means of maintaining the commercial tie between artist and audience, but in different form than today's "stone tablet", whereby a song or album is burned onto a CD with copy protection? What about enhancing other revenue streams, like fan clubs, for example?
--

Bypass [amazon.com] the local monopolist
[ Reply to This ]

ummm... (Score:1)
by radiumhahn (631215) on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723011)
Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Honestly....why even ask?
[ Reply to This ]

another perfect cut! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723018)
Hi, kids.

Filesharing is cool.

Carry on.
[ Reply to This ]

marketing (Score:2)
by cybercuzco (100904) on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723022)
(http://slashdot.org/journal.pl?op=list&uid=100904 | Last Journal: 2003.07.28 20:59)
Have you or anyone you know done any studies of the marketing effect of free music sharing? That is, how much has the free marketing that is a result of filesharing offsetting the potential lost sales?
--

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY:
Run around, scream and shout, breathe real hard till we all pass out.
[ Reply to This ]

YUO (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723027)
R TEH POOP
[ Reply to This ]
[ Reply to This | Parent ]

how much (Score:2, Interesting)
by Tirel (692085) on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723028)
percent does the recording company take from sales profits?

do you think there's a future in online self-publishing?
[ Reply to This ]

Never heard of you. (Score:2)
by mkelley (411060) on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723029)
(http://www.mkelley.net/)
Who are you? And why should I care? I mean, it's one thing to be a music promoter, but are you known outside of your region?
--

m.kelley
life is like a freeway, if you don't look you could miss it.
[ Reply to This ]

Re:Never heard of you. (Score:1)
by mugnyte (203225) * on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723045)
(Last Journal: 2003.05.15 20:51)
Can't you do your own research on the guy? He's not expecting the Spanish Inquisition!
[ Reply to This | Parent ]

Erroneous Assumption? (Score:4, Interesting)
by smd4985 (203677) on 2003.08.18 18:04 (#6723038)
(http://www.susheeldaswani.com/)
"Nat urally, since he makes his living in the music business, Bill is not 100% in favor of unrestricted filesharing."

Is it really the case that making a living in the music business rules out unrestricted filesharing? Might not there exist alternate business models that are fair to the artist and the consumer? What about producing music makes it necessary that selling the music needs to be the primary money-maker?
--
smd4985
[ Reply to This ]

Well.. (Score:1, Interesting)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:04 (#6723039)
Have you ever/do you often use a P2P file sharing client, and what do you think of it?
[ Reply to This ]

Filesharing services from Apple, MS (Score:1)
by grasshoppa (657393) on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723044)
(Last Journal: 2003.05.01 0:57)
Where do you think we might have been now had the music labels come up with legal online song swapping? Do you think we would have ever heard of Napster?
[ Reply to This ]

ummm... (-1, Troll)

radiumhahn (631215) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723011)

Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Honestly....why even ask?

Re:ummm... (2, Informative)

radiumhahn (631215) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723118)

It's not a troll. Its a valid question.

He is going to take one of two stances:

1) He likes file sharing but there needs to be a way to protect digital rights so record companies can make money.

2) He is againt file sharing.

At the end of this exercise what is he going to bring to the table?

I guess I was unaware of the ask a question so long as it's a sugar coated fluffy soft pitch of a question policy.

Slashdot (Score: -1, Censorship)

another perfect cut! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723018)

Hi, kids.

Filesharing is cool.

Carry on.

marketing (5, Interesting)

cybercuzco (100904) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723022)

Have you or anyone you know done any studies of the marketing effect of free music sharing? That is, how much has the free marketing that is a result of filesharing offsetting the potential lost sales?

Re:marketing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723076)

How do you put a dollar amount on someone who never bought or never will buy music?

Re:marketing (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723080)

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
Second First Post (Score:-1, Offtopic)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723005)
For Durst, post.
Shoot me, Ghost!
[ Reply to This ]

HaH! (Score:-1, Troll)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723046)
TwICe I haVe BeATen tEh GNAA!

Oh wait, that sounds perverted.

Oh well, The GNAA can SUCK IT!

[ Reply to This | Parent ]

What options are out there? (Score:5, Interesting)
by TopShelf (92521) * on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723010)
(http://freethepenguin.com/ | Last Journal: 2003.08.08 23:49)
What do you see as the most promising means of maintaining the commercial tie between artist and audience, but in different form than today's "stone tablet", whereby a song or album is burned onto a CD with copy protection? What about enhancing other revenue streams, like fan clubs, for example?
--

Bypass [amazon.com] the local monopolist
[ Reply to This ]

Re:What options are out there? (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:07 (#6723061)
Slashdot requires you to wait 2 minutes between each successful posting of a comment to allow everyone a fair chance at posting a comment.

It's been 1 minute since you last successfully posted a comment

Chances are, you're behind a firewall or proxy, or clicked the Back button to accidentally reuse a form. Please try again. If the problem persists, and all other options have been tried, contact the site administrator.

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
Second First Post (Score:-1, Offtopic)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723005)
For Durst, post.
Shoot me, Ghost!
[ Reply to This ]

HaH! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723046)
TwICe I haVe BeATen tEh GNAA!

Oh wait, that sounds perverted.

Oh well, The GNAA can SUCK IT!

[ Reply to This | Parent ]

What options are out there? (Score:4, Interesting)
by TopShelf (92521) * on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723010)
(http://freethepenguin.com/ | Last Journal: 2003.08.08 23:49)
What do you see as the most promising means of maintaining the commercial tie between artist and audience, but in different form than today's "stone tablet", whereby a song or album is burned onto a CD with copy protection? What about enhancing other revenue streams, like fan clubs, for example?
--

Bypass [amazon.com] the local monopolist
[ Reply to This ]

ummm... (Score:0, Troll)
by radiumhahn (631215) on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723011)
Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Honestly....why even ask?
[ Reply to This ]

another perfect cut! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723018)
Hi, kids.

Filesharing is cool.

Carry on.
[ Reply to This ]

marketing (Score:4, Interesting)
by cybercuzco (100904) on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723022)
(http://slashdot.org/journal.pl?op=lis t&uid=100904 | Last Journal: 2003.07.28 20:59)
Have you or anyone you know done any studies of the marketing effect of free music sharing? That is, how much has the free marketing that is a result of filesharing offsetting the potential lost sales?
--

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY:
Run around, scream and shout, breathe real hard till we all pass out.
[ Reply to This ]

YUO (Score:-1, Troll)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723027)
R TEH POOP
[ Reply to This ]

Re:YUO (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723041)
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
Second First Post (Score:-1, Offtopic)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723005)
For Durst, post.
Shoot me, Ghost!
[ Reply to This ]

What options are out there? (Score:3, Interesting)
by TopShelf (92521) * on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723010)
(http://freethepenguin.com/ | Last Journal: 2003.08.08 23:49)
What do you see as the most promising means of maintaining the commercial tie between artist and audience, but in different form than today's "stone tablet", whereby a song or album is burned onto a CD with copy protection? What about enhancing other revenue streams, like fan clubs, for example?
--

Bypass [amazon.com] the local monopolist
[ Reply to This ]

ummm... (Score:1)
by radiumhahn (631215) on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723011)
Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Honestly....why even ask?
[ Reply to This ]

another perfect cut! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723018)
Hi, kids.

Read the rest of this comment...
[ Reply to This | Parent ]

ummm... (Score:0, Troll)
by radiumhahn (631215) on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723011)
Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Honestly....why even ask?
[ Reply to This ]

another perfect cut! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723018)
Hi, kids.

Filesharing is cool.

Carry on.
[ Reply to This ]

marketing (Score:4, Interesting)
by cybercuzco (100904) on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723022)
(http://slashdot.org/journal.pl?op=lis t&uid=100904 | Last Journal: 2003.07.28 20:59)
Have you or anyone you know done any studies of the marketing effect of free music sharing? That is, how much has the free marketing that is a result of filesharing offsetting the potential lost sales?
--

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY:
Run around, scream and shout, breathe real hard till we all pass out.
[ Reply to This ]

YUO (Score:-1, Troll)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723027)
R TEH POOP
[ Reply to This ]

Re:YUO (Score:-1, Troll)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723041)
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
Second First Post (Score:-1, Offtopic)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723005)
For Durst, post.
Shoot me, Ghost!
[ Reply to This ]

What options are out there? (Score:3, Interesting)
by TopShelf (92521) * on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723010)
(http://freethepenguin.com/ | Last Journal: 2003.08.08 23:49)
What do you see as the most promising means of maintaining the commercial tie between artist and audience, but in different form than today's "stone tablet", whereby a song or album is burned onto a CD with copy protection? What about enhancing other revenue streams, like fan clubs, for example?
--

Bypass [amazon.com] the local monopolist
[ Reply to This ]

ummm... (Score:1)
by radiumhahn (631215) on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723011)
Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Honestly....why even ask?
[ Reply to This ]

another perfect cut! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723018)
Hi, kids.

Filesharing is cool.

Carry on.
[ Reply to This ]

marketing (Score:2)
by cybercuzco (100904) on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723022)
(http://slashdot.org/journal.pl?op=list&uid=100904 | Last Journal: 2003.07.28 20:59)
Have you or anyone you know done any studies of the marketing effect of free music sharing? That is, how much has the free marketing that is a result of filesharing offsetting the potential lost sales?
--

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY:
Run around, scream and shout, breathe real hard till we all pass out.
[ Reply to This ]

YUO (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723027)
R TEH POOP
[ Reply to This ]
[ Reply to This | Parent ]

how much (Score:2, Interesting)
by Tirel (692085) on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723028)
percent does the recording company take from sales profits?

do you think there's a future in online self-publishing?
[ Reply to This ]

Never heard of you. (Score:1, Offtopic)
by mkelley (411060) on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723029)
(http://www.mkelley.net/)
Who are you? And why should I care? I mean, it's one thing to be a music promoter, but are you known outside of your region?
--

m.kelley
life is like a freeway, if you don't look you could miss it.
[ Reply to This ]

Re:Never heard of you. (Score:1)
by mugnyte (203225) * on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723045)
(Last Journal: 2003.05.15 20:51)
Can't you do your own research on the guy? He's not expecting the Spanish Inquisition!
[ Reply to This | Parent ]

Erroneous Assumption? (Score:4, Interesting)
by smd4985 (203677) on 2003.08.18 18:04 (#6723038)
(http://www.susheeldaswani.com/)
"Nat urally, since he makes his living in the music business, Bill is not 100% in favor of unrestricted filesharing."

Is it really the case that making a living in the music business rules out unrestricted filesharing? Might not there exist alternate business models that are fair to the artist and the consumer? What about producing music makes it necessary that selling the music needs to be the primary money-maker?
--
smd4985
[ Reply to This ]

Well.. (Score:0, Redundant)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:04 (#6723039)
Have you ever/do you often use a P2P file sharing client, and what do you think of it?
[ Reply to This ]

Filesharing services from Apple, MS (Score:2, Interesting)
by grasshoppa (657393) on 2003.08.18 18:05 (#6723044)
(Last Journal: 2003.05.01 0:57)
Where do you think we might have been now had the music labels come up with legal online song swapping? Do you think we would have ever heard of Napster?
[ Reply to This ]

Should we change copyright? (Score:3, Interesting)
by Planesdragon (210349) on 2003.08.18 18:06 (#6723049)
(http://www.castlesteelstone.com/ | Last Journal: 2003.07.12 20:53)
The concept of copyright was concieved of way back in "ye olden days" to restrict who could and could not print books; it also conveniently allowed an author to control who profits from their works. We adapted the second cause here in the USA, and have since extended copyright to just about any form of creative expression.

But, copyright is still a control of making a copy, which is getting to be almost farcical in a world where most creative output can be easily and near-freely copied.

Do you think that it would be a good idea to alter copyright so that, instead of selling pubslihers a right to copy works, artists sell consumers the right to have a copy of a work, however that they want to get it and however many redundant copies they want?

(Let's just ignore the privacy and feasability problems for the moment; statistics and security can probably fix them to be "good enough.")
--
stupidity is not a religion...
[ Reply to This ]

huh? (Score:0, Offtopic)
by CGP314 (672613) on 2003.08.18 18:06 (#6723052)
(http://www.colingregorypalmer.net/lon don | Last Journal: 2003.08.17 12:16)
keeps the wheels cranking behind the scenes

Was that supposed to be...

'keeps the whips cracking'

or

'keeps the gears cranking'

or

'keeps the wheels greased'?

Mixed metaphors hurt my head.
--
Colin's American Weblog in London [colingregorypalmer.net]
[ Reply to This ]

Suing listeners? (Score:2, Interesting)
by miroth (611718) on 2003.08.18 18:07 (#6723060)
(http://www.mikeroth.org/)
Do you think anything productive can emerge from the RIAA suing its user base? Do you think it will actually result in people listening to more music legally?
[ Reply to This ]

Re:marketing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723156)

"That is, how much has the free marketing that is a result of filesharing offsetting the potential lost sales? "

Uh..I think it's the same as the free marketing Microsoft get when a new version of Windows is launched.

"Hey, you hear about Windows 2003 server?"
"Yeah, I got a copy here"
"Can I borrow it for 5 mins?"
"Sure..here you go."
"Sweet."

YUO (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723027)

R TEH POOP

Re:YUO (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723041)

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
Second First Post (Score:-1, Offtopic)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723005)
For Durst, post.
Shoot me, Ghost!
[ Reply to This ]

What options are out there? (Score:3, Interesting)
by TopShelf (92521) * on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723010)
(http://freethepenguin.com/ | Last Journal: 2003.08.08 23:49)
What do you see as the most promising means of maintaining the commercial tie between artist and audience, but in different form than today's "stone tablet", whereby a song or album is burned onto a CD with copy protection? What about enhancing other revenue streams, like fan clubs, for example?
--

Bypass [amazon.com] the local monopolist
[ Reply to This ]

ummm... (Score:1)
by radiumhahn (631215) on 2003.08.18 18:01 (#6723011)
Ask a Music Producer/Publicist About Filesharing and the RIAA

Honestly....why even ask?
[ Reply to This ]

another perfect cut! (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723018)
Hi, kids.

Filesharing is cool.

Carry on.
[ Reply to This ]

marketing (Score:2)
by cybercuzco (100904) on 2003.08.18 18:02 (#6723022)
(http://slashdot.org/journal.pl?op=lis t&uid=100904 | Last Journal: 2003.07.28 20:59)
Have you or anyone you know done any studies of the marketing effect of free music sharing? That is, how much has the free marketing that is a result of filesharing offsetting the potential lost sales?
--

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY:
Run around, scream and shout, breathe real hard till we all pass out.
[ Reply to This ]

YUO (Score:0)
by Anonymous Coward on 2003.08.18 18:03 (#6723027)
R TEH POOP
[ Reply to This ]

how much (3, Interesting)

Tirel (692085) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723028)

percent does the recording company take from sales profits?

do you think there's a future in online self-publishing?

Re:how much (2, Informative)

BrynM (217883) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723191)

"how much percent does the recording company take from sales profits?"
That's actually determined contract by contract and is a question of how much of a percentage the artist gets (the royalty). The artist portion is usually small (usually 7% to 15% of the final sale margin - 15% being estabalished superstar status).

Never heard of you. (-1, Troll)

mkelley (411060) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723029)

Who are you? And why should I care? I mean, it's one thing to be a music promoter, but are you known outside of your region?

Re:Never heard of you. (1)

mugnyte (203225) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723045)

Can't you do your own research on the guy? He's not expecting the Spanish Inquisition!

Re:Never heard of you. (2, Funny)

rokzy (687636) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723126)

NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition! Our chief weapon is surprise...surprise and fear...fear and surprise.... Our two weapons are fear and surprise...and ruthless efficiency.... Our *three* weapons are fear, surprise, and ruthless efficiency...and an almost fanatical devotion to the Pope.... Our *four*...no... *Amongst* our weapons.... Amongst our weaponry...are such elements as fear, surprise.... I'll come in again.

Re:Never heard of you. (2, Funny)

avalys (221114) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723071)

I can answer that for him:

"Who are you? And why should I care? I mean, it's one thing to be a nerd who reads Slashdot all day, but are you known outside of your parent's house?"

Re:Never heard of you. (1)

mkelley (411060) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723311)

Sorry, not a linux geek here. Just get sick of having people posted online as someone great. Wow, you mean you're going for a PhD...let me kiss your feet. Nothing but sheep here online. Just follow your masters, jackass.

Erroneous Assumption? (4, Interesting)

smd4985 (203677) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723038)

"Naturally, since he makes his living in the music business, Bill is not 100% in favor of unrestricted filesharing."

Is it really the case that making a living in the music business rules out unrestricted filesharing? Might not there exist alternate business models that are fair to the artist and the consumer? What about producing music makes it necessary that selling the music needs to be the primary money-maker?

Re:Erroneous Assumption? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723176)

what about letting arists make money from live performances only? cut out the record companies entirely.

Re:Erroneous Assumption? (1)

csimicah (592121) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723207)

Might not there exist alternate business models that are fair to the artist and the consumer?

One would presume that these models would involve -some- form of restriction.

Well.. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723039)

Have you ever/do you often use a P2P file sharing client, and what do you think of it?

Filesharing services from Apple, MS (5, Interesting)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723044)

Where do you think we might have been now had the music labels come up with legal online song swapping? Do you think we would have ever heard of Napster?

Should we change copyright? (5, Interesting)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723049)

The concept of copyright was concieved of way back in "ye olden days" to restrict who could and could not print books; it also conveniently allowed an author to control who profits from their works. We adapted the second cause here in the USA, and have since extended copyright to just about any form of creative expression.

But, copyright is still a control of making a copy, which is getting to be almost farcical in a world where most creative output can be easily and near-freely copied.

Do you think that it would be a good idea to alter copyright so that, instead of selling pubslihers a right to copy works, artists sell consumers the right to have a copy of a work, however that they want to get it and however many redundant copies they want?

(Let's just ignore the privacy and feasability problems for the moment; statistics and security can probably fix them to be "good enough.")

Re:Should we change copyright? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723131)

Copyright law is already written in a way that would allow that. Please read up some more on copyright law before posting questions like this.

Re:Should we change copyright? (2, Insightful)

BrynM (217883) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723221)

Changing copyright is exactly what these large companies are trying to do through lobbying, petitioning and legal action. They just don't have any of the comsumer's interest in mind while they are doing it.

huh? (1, Funny)

CGP314 (672613) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723052)

keeps the wheels cranking behind the scenes

Was that supposed to be...

'keeps the whips cracking'

or

'keeps the gears cranking'

or

'keeps the wheels greased'?

Mixed metaphors hurt my head.

Re:huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723086)

I think it means He keeps cranking it as the wheels of the RIAA crush the puny consumer

If that were my job, I'd get a hard on every time somebody took the rights away from the consumer and turned them into a mindless drone filled with nothing but vapidity and disposable income.

Suing listeners? (5, Interesting)

miroth (611718) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723060)

Do you think anything productive can emerge from the RIAA suing its user base? Do you think it will actually result in people listening to more music legally?

The RIAA's claims (3, Interesting)

mydigitalself (472203) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723070)

The RIAA continue to claim that file sharing is impacting CD sales. They do this by showing the decline of CD sales in recent years. I found some interesting quotes from an article recently:
According to the RIAA, CD sales dropped by 10% in 2001 and a further 6.8% last year, largely because of file sharing.

The IFPI's Commercial Music Piracy 2003 report, produced in early July, reveals pirate CD sales rose 14% in 2002 and exceeded one billion units for the first time.


My maths therefore concludes that if you deducted the 14% piracy, then CD sales have actually RISEN by around 7% over the last year! Do the RIAA actually know why their figures are falling (pirate cds/crap music...) - or do they choose to blame it all on peer to peer networks?

Re:The RIAA's claims (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723138)

I find it ironic that you attack them on math issues when subsequently you assume that 14 % of sold pirate CD's equals 14 % of sold legal CD's

Re:The RIAA's claims (1)

flappinbooger (574405) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723154)

Yes, that is a distinction I would like to be made clear to **AA et. al. Piracy is when something is copied and SOLD. P2P is not piracy, nothing is being sold. Of course, there is the problem, for some, that ... nothing is being sold... But that's not my point.

Umm... lower price point? (3, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723181)

My maths therefore concludes that if you deducted the 14% piracy, then CD sales have actually RISEN by around 7% over the last year! Do the RIAA actually know why their figures are falling (pirate cds/crap music...) - or do they choose to blame it all on peer to peer networks?

Of course pirate CDs increase the total *volume* of music around - do you really think people could afford the kazillions of dollars of "free" mp3s (or at a fraction of the cost at a pirate shop) at retail price? Their argument is that pirate sales (which earn neither them nor the artist anything) are replacing normal CD sales, thus lowering their profits.

Kjella

Re:The RIAA's claims (3, Informative)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723213)

My maths therefore concludes that if you deducted the 14% piracy, then CD sales have actually RISEN by around 7% over the last year!

Your maths are wrong (unless you're basing it on more numbers than you're presenting here.) You're trying to equate [percentage of CD sales] with [percentage of pirate CD sales], two values which aren't equivalent. Trying to add/subtract them like you're doing just leads to nonsense statistics (in this case, the "actually risen by 7% number.")

Re:The RIAA's claims (3, Interesting)

Tropator (548577) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723244)

Maybe this article [bbc.co.uk] is worth mentioning (quote):

Record sales for 'cheap' albums

A record number of albums were sold in the UK in the last year because they are now cheaper than ever, industry figures have revealed.

More than 228 million albums were sold in the 12 months from June 2002 - up 3% on the previous year - according to the British Phonographic Industry (BPI).


Declining record sales huh, where?

Re:The RIAA's claims (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723339)

Your math is wrong. CD piracy != CD sales.

Go Away (-1, Troll)

kfort (1132) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723079)

We don't need people like Bill Evans. We need artists connected directly with their fans. Lets keep the money hungry label execs out of it.

Mod up if you agree.

Re:Go Away (2, Insightful)

CashCarSTAR (548853) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723091)

I disagree. The producer is an integral part of the music process. A lot of the time the producer/mixer adds just as much to the sound as the artists themselves.

Re:Go Away (1)

kfort (1132) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723157)

What the fuck dude. He's not a producer. Kansas Tribute Album? Some soundtrack that hasn't come out? I'm not against producers I'm against 'publicists'. This guy is not a real producer.

How about... (5, Interesting)

nizo (81281) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723085)

Do you feel threatened by a technology that would allow artists to sell their music directly to consumers and potentially make your job and many other such jobs obsolete, saving said consumers quite a bit of $$$ as well as paying said artists quite a bit of extra $$$ and allowing these artists to retain full rights to their own creations?

He shouldn't (4, Interesting)

jcsehak (559709) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723331)

Many musicians don't even know how to check their email, much less run Pro Tools. Also, as a producer, his job can't be replaced by a computer. To get a good sound, you still have to use a good studio and hire trained engineers.

Then, after the CD is finished, you can try to use technology to bypass traditional marketing, but right now, it's a joke. Selling your music directly isn't a problem for anyone. Marketing your music, that's the rub. Fancy as the internet is, the most effective way to sell music is to force-feed it to the people directly, through radio and MTV. That's not gonna change for a long time.

Share! (5, Funny)

CGP314 (672613) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723087)

What's your username on Kazaa?

I know it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723205)

It is munkeyspanker21@Kazaa.

The Real Problem (0)

airrage (514164) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723095)

It seems to me the genie is already out of the bottle, so to speak, and that somehow the music industry is trying to put it back in with lawsuits, DMCA, threats, etc.

How can you even remotely hope to somehow rein in the internet? Aren't you already fucked?

Subscription models (5, Interesting)

mydigitalself (472203) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723102)

If there was a mechanism to subscribe to music for a flat monthly rate, how do you think this would work along the lines of:

1) Who would you subscribe to? Would you have to subscribe to EMI/BMG/Sony one-by-one, or would there be a number (or one?) blanket subscription for varying genres or labels?
2) How would money be disitributed? By the number of times tracks have been listened to/downloaded?

Opinion of the RIAA and its Tactics? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723116)

So many people outside the RIAA have a negative opinion of the RIAA, primarily because of its stance against file sharing and certainly as a result of its tactics to discourage filesharing. As someone on the inside of the music industry, what is your opinion of the RIAA? Is it a necessary evil that really does help artists? What do you think of its tactics with regards to filesharing?

RIAA logic (5, Interesting)

Tet (2721) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723124)

With album sales reaching an all time high [thisislondon.co.uk] (at least here in the UK -- I assume the US is similar), why does the RIAA keep insisting that online music is killing the industry? I personally download music from the net as a taster to see which CDs I should buy. I appreciate that there are some who do it purely to avoid having to spend the money, but the evidence seems to show that it's not a big enough problem to be hurting the industry. Do you think that this situation will continue, or will the balance swing towards more people avoiding buying music that they can download for free?

Re:RIAA logic (3, Interesting)

greenius (300851) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723301)

Same story also reported on BBC News [bbc.co.uk]

This seems to support the view that declining sales may be due more to the high costs of CDs than to file sharing... ie. lower the price and sales go up.

Ask the music industry about filesharing... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723125)

isn't that like asking Sauron about his feelings on freedom in Middle Earth?

Where does the RIAA Buy it's Evil? (4, Funny)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723137)

No, really, it's a serious business question.

-- Bill Gates
Microsoft

Re:Where does the RIAA Buy it's Evil? (4, Funny)

BrynM (217883) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723280)

They siphon off the excess evil that is in each artist's Deal With The Devil [bmwfilms.com] contract. They then refine the evil to a more pure and usable form. The Devil can always be relied upon for spilling extra evil on his contracts with artists.

old vs new (5, Interesting)

koekepeer (197127) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723153)

People tend to complain a lot about the profit margins in the music industry, and use this as an argument to not buy CD's but download them. Furthermore, a lot of people complain that copying their collection is just fair use, and they feel restricted in their rights by the recent developments in DRM. Without the music industry however we wouldn't have CDs to rip, or DRM protected tracks to download ;)

We (consumer and industry) obviously need each other.

So my question is:
Can you think of (a) profitable business model(s) that would *not* use DRM?

Where does the money go? (5, Insightful)

stames (692349) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723155)

I'm a big advocate of the prosperity of music artists, especially small-time ones. I go to a lot of concerts. I like to buy indie music direct from the band. I generally try to avoid buying music from big-name production houses because I'm sick of all the gratuitous and pervasive advertisements and endorsements that come along with it.

That being said, my question is (and I hope you can even answer this): when I lay down my $15 for a CD, where does that money go? How much goes directly to the artist? The producers? Publicists and people in your position? Record company CEOs? Charities? Etc etc.

Basically I'm concerned that if I fork over $15 because I really like the music, I think that a big portion of that should go directly to the artists themselves, but in reality $14.95 is ending up making CEOs wallets fatter.

--j

Re:Where does the money go? (3, Informative)

iapetus (24050) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723192)

Just in case this one doesn't get answered, here's one answer [wordworx.co.nz] .

Reform (5, Interesting)

chrisgeleven (514645) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723164)

Does the music industry need some type of reform, especially in the area of contracts and artist rights?

Buy before you try - Try before buy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723166)

Why don't you just share your music and hope people will pay through donation.
If every file were signed by the author and there was an easy way to pay (rightclick on a file-pay) and authenticate i would buy more music (and maps and c64 demos and shortstorys and software).

Is it really all about control? (5, Interesting)

smack.addict (116174) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723169)

I have always felt that the piracy argument is really a red herring for the record companies. What I believe they really fear from online distribution of music is losing control over the marketing of new music. In other words, under the current model in which there are few channels for large-scale exposure to new music, a record company can concentrate their marketing dollars on a few key artists.

Online distribution undermines this model and forces the record companies to spend more marketing dollars as a percentage of revenue. The success of iTunes seems to support this. While it is successful in terms of the # of songs sold, no handful of artists dominates its sales as with traditional channels.

So my question comes in a couple of parts. First, is all of this stuttering towards an online distribution system really more about control? If so, given that the iTunes experiment seems to bear out the thesis that online distribution costs them in control, how will we ever get to online music distribution that is equitable for everyone involved instead of one weighted towards big record companies or towards music pirates?

Changing the way contracts are written (1)

djrosen (265939) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723172)

Is it feasable to pay the artist up front for the work much like most other professions so that the artist is not dependant upon royalties?

This way the artist concentrates on making good music that people want to listen to and so the PR/Production companies/Publisicts are held to the candle for publishing garbage.

This way the loss isnt incurred by the artist but rather by people just trying to make money on Quantity rather than Quality.

Cure cancer by killing the patient (4, Interesting)

Choco-man (256940) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723175)

Why does the entertainment industry seemingly ignore large scale pirates who are making money off of selling copies and obviously detracting from sales, and instead target hoards of college kids who have no money to pay the court costs/settlement, and are not profiting at your industries expense? Don't such actions largely result in a bitter taste in your consumers mouth, leaving them less inclined to either halt actions which the industry deems inappropriate, or less apt to embrace alternative solutions put forth by the industry?

Ultimate game plan? (2, Interesting)

mao che minh (611166) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723184)

How does the music industry intend on ultimately dealing with music theft? Are you relying on the prolonged use of litigation against individual thieves to spread fear through the general populace, or do you intend on lobbying for legislation that will aid you in your fight against the thieves?

Get The Lead Out (0)

g_goblin (631117) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723185)

With the ability of today's Media Players, why hasn't the industry come up with the ability to download the whole album on a trial basis?

If you want to keep the album, you pay the full price of a regular CD. Otherwise it is either locked or deletes itself.

Re:Get The Lead Out (1)

rzbx (236929) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723326)

That is all about DRM and related technologies and they are already working on it. Problem is, well, I'll be writing for atleast 10 minutes explaining the problems. So I suggest you do a search for "DRM problem" or something like that.

P2P vs. Radio (5, Interesting)

CashCarSTAR (548853) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723190)

Considering the consolidations in the radio industry, and the hostility against webradio, People such as myself find no place other than P2P to turn to for new music. In your mind, what is the best potential copyright-friendly solution to the problem of a lack of venues for new (and classic) music exploration?

the future (4, Interesting)

McAddress (673660) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723206)

Do services such as the iTunes Music Store [apple.com] , Buy Music [buymusic.com] really represent the future of music like Steve Jobs and Scott Blum would like us to believe, or are they just another way to deliver music along with CD's, cassetes, and the radio?

Do you consider this stealing? (2, Insightful)

BrianUofR (143023) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723210)

If I download an mp3 off a file-sharing network, that's stealing. Because I'm not going to buy the album now, and that's a tangible loss of revenue for the record label. Lost revenue = stealing.

But what if I had no intention of ever buying the album. In other words, the probablity of revenue from me from that album was exactly zero. Then I download the tracks off kazaa. How am I hurting the label? How am I stealing?

The labels imply that the Opportunity Cost of an "illegal" download is buying the album. What if it's not?

Financial Impact? (5, Interesting)

Gothic_Walrus (692125) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723211)

It has oftentimes been claimed by the RIAA that the sharing of MP3s online has led to a decline in CD sales. Others have claimed that the decline is due to the practice of pirating CDs or the lack of "good" music. In any case, all have agreed that sales of CDs have fallen.

In your opinion, what do you feel has caused the greatest financial impact to the music industry? If the answer is not "file sharing," then what is the industry doing to combat the problem?

RIAA is a dying monopol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723212)

Selling bad music isn't a business model anymore.

Thanks to modern technology people can listen to music that isn't played on MTV anymore and music that isn't sold in the front rows anymore.

Given this people figured out that "popular music" gets worse every year and refuse to buy new shit.

Options (2, Interesting)

Snaller (147050) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723215)

I doubt you agree with those who find Copyright basically amoral, but how do you feel about developing new business models instead of bullheadedly sticking to the old ones(as the music industry seems to be doing). Once the movie industry angrily fought the video recorder (the US supreme court almost outlawed it), then someone woke up and started selling prerecorded tapes and the industry made a bundle. Now we can see, in Europe at least, the the music industry is making a fortune selling ringtones to mobile phones (in Europe you pay to call someone, not to recieve a call so just about everybody from 7 to 90 has one) - Spock believes there are always possiblities - do you agree?

Can it be stopped? (1)

Capt_Troy (60831) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723216)

do you think that the music/movie industry will ever be able to stop the digital piracy of their content?

If so, how? If not then how will they survive as online trading becomes more prolific.

Troy.

A few questions (1)

MImeKillEr (445828) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723217)

1. Who determines the value of each 'pirated' work?

2. Doesn't anyon realized that allowing people to listen to tracks of music they wouldn't otherwise be exposed to *prior to purchase* is a good thing and will actually lead to increased sales?

3. Has anyone discussed the idea of dropping prices of CDs in hopes of curtailing the 'rampant level of piracy'?

Union of Musicians instead of labels? (1)

prime_implicant (654819) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723223)

Would it be viable to create a union or a label for musicians that will represent them on sites that sell music online? I'm assuming that such label would pass almost all profits to musicians, minus administrative cost. I think the current system of five (or so?) major labels is unworkable, because they seem very uncooperative about licensing songs to others.

artists profit more from CD or from concerts (0)

forinti (680633) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723234)

What percentage of artists make more money from CD sales than from concerts?

our goverment will fix RIAA's problems... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723236)

1) satisfy RIAA
2) satisfy MPAA
3) steal oil
4) ...
5) supply electricity to the "fellow citizens"

getting the word out (1)

OfficerNoGun (686128) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723238)

I've always viewed my mp3 experiences as getting "getting the word out" on bands. Most of the stuff I download is from smaller bands on smaller labels (which has the added benefit that I would be a very unlikely RIAA target). To me the downloading of an entire album with no intent to re-imburse the band is kinda stealing, and im not really intrested as online music as anythign other than marketing. Do you think that the labels could stand to release some free music (singles, etc) as marketing tools? My thinking has always been give a little music away, if I like it I'm buying the CD, and im probably going to come to your concert (but then again the indie nature of the music leads its self to 10$ cds and 10$ shows).

Old music of lower commercial value? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723239)

I joined the Apple Music Store. I presently possess about a hundred or so .MP3 files downloaded from Napster/AudioGalaxy/Kazaa/Limewire.

I decided to see how many of these files were available legally from the Apple store, out of at least two motives: curiosity about the effectiveness of corporate-driven, rather than fan-driven music distribution, and a genuine intention of replacing my unpaid-for files with paid-for versions.

It turns out that almost none of the files I'd downloaded were available through the Music Store.

The reason is simple. I am interested in all sorts of old stuff (20's, 30's, 40's, 50's) and weird stuff (novelty records, things like Bernard Cribbins 'Ole in the Ground, etc.)

When fans share files, it makes available almost the entire history of recorded music.

When music companies sell files, the range of what's available is much, much smaller. For example, when it comes to popular music of the fifties, most of what's available on the Apple site comes from one companies single series of CD's entitled "so-and-so's 16 most requested songs."

How do you set up a fair system that pays artists but still allows for the continued preservation and availability of items that are so old or unpopular that their commercial value is very, very small?

How can you avoid the "dog-in-the-manger" phenomenon of companies that will neither make material available nor give permission to others to make them available?

iTunes vs. BuyMusic (5, Interesting)

mblase (200735) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723242)

The iTunes Music Store has what's generally considered the most sensible approach to DRM: share with no more than three computers on the same subnet, burn to no more than 10 CDs without changing your playlist, and make this apply to every downloadable song. In contrast, BuyMusic.com has much more restrictive DRM and they change with every song. In your opinion, do either of these stores have DRM "done right"?

More business for you? (4, Interesting)

GreenCrackBaby (203293) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723245)

I have a friend who also has his own music studio and has worked with some pretty amazing talent. In talking about the current state of the music industry, he has two interesting observations:

1. The music industry is impacted negatively by file sharing, at least at some level.

2. That his studio is most certainly not harmed by filesharing, but in fact is seeing a rather large increase in business as more bands try to get a decent polish on their work so they can get their MP3s out there.

Do you think this is just annecdotal, or true for most music studios?

Commercial Services? (1)

Gothic_Walrus (692125) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723260)

What do you think about commercial music downloading services, such as Apple's iTunes service? Will they still be successful in five years? Are they fair to the artists and the labels? Is it really fair to restrict use of what has been legally paid for (such as only being able to listen to it on a PC or burn the file three times), as earlier services have done?

Record CD sales? (5, Interesting)

perly-king-69 (580000) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723265)

Here in the UK that CD album sales are at an all time high with a 12% rise in sales this year.

Would you like to comment on that, given that

i) there are no similar RIAA anti-piracy actions being taken here,

ii) average prices have fallen to below the psychologically important 10 barrier?

Transfer of rights? (2, Interesting)

jcsehak (559709) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723267)

Right now, it's commonplace that a person or entity can own the rights to a song, even though they took no part in its creation (Michael Jackson owning the Beatles songs, Columbia owning Robert Johnson's tracks, etc.). Is there a good reason why the music community stands for this, because I can't think of one.

Wouldn't it be better for all music creators if an artist got 100% of the song rights, and split the recording rights with the label, 50/50; and this was mandated by law, and couldn't be signed away? Am I missing something? I would think that artists would be banding together in droves for this cause.

question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723272)

do you believe that file sharing actually helps to advertise music? as in letting fans listen to a song or songs downloaded from kazaa to see if they actually like it or not. Do you believe that the record industry's drakonian business plan to copy protect all music cd's will help sales or criple them?

Resistance is Futile (1)

curtoid (415759) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723277)

It's fairly easy to gauge that this latest generation of "consumers" are not satisfied with the previous generation's mindset, and, as a result are cynical with regard to "producers" that do not actually "produce", but seem to take advantage of their monopoly position and leverage it against both the artists _and_ the listeners to make the most money. Like a swarm of bees that can drive away a bear, this generation will most likely not slow down, nor stop tearing at the adversary until the value received (i.e. Listening enjoyment) is higher than price paid (Cents/Track). This is the basis of a market economy - get used to it.

When will the model adapt to the market? (e.g. $0.01 per listen, or $0.25 for permanent storage)

A). 2 Years
B). 5 Years
C). 10 Years
D). None of the Above (Everyone will be in jail)

Would prices really drop if there was no pirating? (4, Insightful)

hardaker (32597) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723278)

One of the things that major media distribution companies (including music, video, games, etc) argue is that the only reason the prices are so high on media is that piracy of their product makes the prices go up. Many, however, are not convienced of this argument and think the prices would likely stay the same and the profits of the company would be the only thing affected (which is what I think annoys most of the users of the world: that the cost is so high when production costs are so low). Do you have a feel for whether on at least whether the music industry really would lower the prices on all its media if the piracy came to a sudden end, or do you think the prices would just stay the same?

If you ask me, Progressive Rock... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723284)

...protects itself against file sharing. Anyone old enough to remember a Kansas concert is too busy changing their colostomy bag to work a computer.

Different models? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723296)

Recently I talked to a guy who sets up websites for independent musicians. He said all his clients love filesharing, encourage their fans to share their music, and are making a lot of money selling CDs to those fans. Some of them used to have major-label contracts and were barely scraping by.

Question 1: Is there any awareness in the industry that artists are waking up to a better deal with a new business model?

Question 2: Have you ever looked into the Street Performer Protocol [firstmonday.dk] ?

Filesize/Quality per price (2, Interesting)

BirksNCap (53917) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723313)

What of the possibility of music downloads based on quality? I offer as a suggestion that if someone wants to purchase, for instance, a FLAC copy of a song, in lossless compression, at say, 80 cents per song [ making most average albums at around 8-10 dollars, a price point that has worked well to stimulate demand in the past ]... but someone else might only want an OGG or MP3 in a lesser quality [ lossy compression = lower quality! ], at perhaps say, 192 bitrate, for approximately 40 cents a track. If we're only getting a percentage of the bits, why are consumers asked to pay roughly the same as for professionally mastered audio data? A typical MP3 or OGG is roughly 1/4 to 1/10 the size of the original audio file, meaning 75-90% of the data has been discarded, yet the price for downloads on for-pay systems is such that consumers pay for the full price of the full quality file. We're in effect paying for bits we didn't receive and cannot reproduce with accuracy! I would advocate a system in which the price per track was directly related to the quality of the track downloaded. This would encourage more try before you buy, and even give a bone to the RIAA's member firms in terms of SOME compensation for their tracks? Why haven't we heard any type of investigation or interest by the RIAA firms in this type of system? Thanks for your time!

I think I speak for most of uswhen I say... (1)

Cinnamon (15309) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723314)

He's publicized what?
He's produced who?
He's worked on what soundtracks?

Am I the only one who's heard of none of these entities besides Ogg and Clark U? (And I'm not even sure I've heard of the latter.)

No offense to the guy, he's probably quite smart. But his credentials don't seem particularly impressive on the subject of RIAA experience.

Goin against the /. grain (1)

Hethcox (555232) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723316)

To my mind the music industry is between a rock, filesharing, and a hard place, the expense of developing large commercially successful artists. All of the 'solutions' I hear about (subscriptions, pay-by-the-song, etc.) indicate a larger number of smaller acts producing individual songs instead of albums.

This might generate acceptable revenue, but revenue growth is unlikely.

My question is: Am I full of it?

Followup question: How beholden are the RIAA companies to retail record stores? Are they willing to endorse a large-scale online distribution system that will largely end traditional record stores?

Your new roles (2, Interesting)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723318)

As a producer, I'm guessing you use p2p to nab some songs that may be in the back or your head and that you would like to duplicate the 'feel' of aspects of a certain producer's style. How has p2p affected your production style? Has it helped solidify ideas, or bogged you down with distractions?

...AND...

I am currently in the process of removing my music from buymusic.com [slashdot.org] , who acquired it and is selling it illegally. What resources do independent artists have when fighting against the very industry that professes to protect musicians? Is copyright infrigement a one way street leading straight to the bank for large companies?

As a publicist, do you see distribution via p2p as a growing trend for your more/less established artists? I notice that the link to Neil's site only provides small samples of music. Do you encourage making entire songs available at low bitrate samples? Does p2p make this a moot point?

RIAA pay cuts, maybe? (1)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723319)

With the RIAA's heavy-handed behavior and random lawsuits, a lot of people who engage in music swapping tend to take on a Robin Hood/Boston Tea Party philosophy about what they're doing. They take from the rich, and give to the poor - and don't feel bad about it either since everyone knows that the artists make about a nickel of that $13 you shell out for a CD, and the RIAA uses the rest to line their pockets, maintain their near-monopoly, hire lawyers and lobby congress.

So as a possible remedy, do you think the RIAA brass would be willing to take pay cuts and fork over a better percentage to the artists/producers in order to beat that image?

If file swappers actually felt like they were bilking the artists they love, it'd be a different matter.

Weaselmancer

My question is (1)

Muttonhead (109583) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723321)

Say, who cut your hair?

Why won't artists support thte alternatives (3, Interesting)

Albanach (527650) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723330)

Alternatives to file sharing such as the subscription based Rhapsody and non subscription based I-Tunes are offering quality music for an almost reasonable fee and artists receive royalties. Why is it that some of the biggest names in music who, by definition are hit the hardest by file sharing, won't allow their music to be available via these new distribution methods?

Real Questions (1)

Soluxx (545237) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723332)

Who the hell are Numavox Records and Neal Morse? What the hell is the Burning Annie soundtrack and the Kansas Tribute Project? Am I the only person who hasn't heard of these things? I'm going to take a little leap here and say that I doubt that anyone will be downloading songs from any of the aforementioned companies, artists, or cd's. In that case, what does this guy have to lose from file sharing and why should we even be asking him questions about it?

Does the music industry believe in laissez-faire? (2, Insightful)

sh4d0wb0x3r (601377) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723334)

Do you believe that the recent lobbying efforts by the music industry are (1) an honest attempt to stop what they believe is only a criminal action or (2) an anti-capitalistic market intervention, designed to prevent competitors from entering into the online-music market before they exist? If (1), how do you believe the industry would respond to legislation which required (a) open content formats; and (b) guaranteed full-quality fair-use personal copies; if (2), how do you explain this dichotomy, and why should we as consumers tolerate it?

Non P2P Filesharing (1)

Perl-Pusher (555592) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723335)

The RIAA claim they are losing sales because of filesharing. My two teenage daughter don't buy as many CD's as they used to. That is 100% because I've stopped giving them the money for them. In this economy I can't afford the luxury of letting them buy music every month. I also won't allow P2P filesharing on our computer. But I've seen filesharing still going on. Through direct file transfers via aol instant messenger and email attachments. Kids are ripping CD's and have found that they don't need P2P file sharing. I've been told they sync their ipods to their friends computers. I have a mac and have purchased a few songs legally, but the price should be about half of what it is. That would definately sell more titles. My question is : There are almost an infinite number of ways to share files that don't involve p2p networks, do the RIAA , artist etc. actually believe they can stop filesharing?

I was wondering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723337)

doesn't it hurt having your head up your ass?

LIBERTY: Where's are the Lines (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6723338)

to be drawn for Artists rights to profit from an on-going enterprise between the Plumber's supplying tubing for the distribution of his art and Consumer's liberty to peacefully enjoy the Art and not the plumbing?

-Rex Riley

'Fair use' rights (2, Interesting)

llamaluvr (575102) | more than 11 years ago | (#6723340)

What exactly are our rights when we purchase a CD? Can I make unlimited backup copies of the media for personal use? Are the copies really allowed to be digital, or only analog? Am I allowed to be using the original and the backup at the same time?

This hypothetical situation has always bugged me: Say I purchase a CD, rip it to my hard drive, and then put it on my MP3 player. I take the MP3 player with me and listen to that music in the car, while (unbeknownst to me) my brother listens to the copy of the music on the computer. Are we breaking the law?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?