Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Standard Brewing For PC Card Replacement 'Newcard'

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the standard-flux dept.

Technology 187

winston_pr writes "The details on the successor to the PC Card is starting to take form with details being given in this article at Nikkei Japan. The standard is scheduled to be finalized in 2003, while the first PCs with NEWCARD slots are expected to ship in the second half of 2004. Will this mean the end of all these crazy SD-card connection based peripherals?"

cancel ×

187 comments

3rsd (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744202)

3rd pr0st33Z biatch!

Love Always,
News For Turds

Re:3rsd (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744546)

3rd pr0st33Z-You Fail It
1st post-It Fails You
???????
Profit

ALAN COX IS OFF TEH SPOKE!!!~`1 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744208)

STANDARD REPLACEMENT FOR WOMEN (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744209)

standard replacement for women on this site:

linux

(lol)

Meet the Newcard... (3, Funny)

baywulf (214371) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744216)

same as the old.

Re:Meet the Newcard... (3, Funny)

Dr Caleb (121505) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744242)

same as the old

and pray we don't get fooled again..

Where's the DRM? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744554)

I specifically requested hardware DRM!
Bicches! Give the customer what we want!

Re:Meet the Newcard... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744364)

fyi: lyrics [lyricsdomain.com] where this (modified) quote is from. ("Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.")

Re:Meet the Newcard... (0)

NakedChick (699757) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744373)

Is that, like from a song or something? I don't recognize it. But then, what do I know? I'm just a naked chick.

Re:Meet the Newcard... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744418)

Heh, I got my post in 1 minute before yours - I was wondering the same thing and did a bit of research =)

~Berj

Re:Meet the Newcard... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744540)

You can't be for real, right?

NuBus? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744510)

Remember NuBus? For Mac, which now use PCI, it's the OldBus.

Summary! (5, Funny)

RumpRoast (635348) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744224)

In new computers, things will be smaller and faster.

Thanks!

Big PC - small cards. (0)

Channard (693317) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744337)

Or more likely, with Newcard, you will have smaller and sleeker card peripherals which no one will appreciate due to them being a standard big PC case. This is hardly big news unless someone can sweep the board with a standard smaller PC - perhaps around the size of a PS2. And make it cheap enough to be adopted by the mass market.

Re:Big PC - small cards. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744409)

A small form factor PC? What would you want one of those for? [mini-itx.com]

Re:Big PC - small cards. (2, Interesting)

Trigun (685027) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744450)

That really is the purpose of the newcard. Plug and play peripherals which can plug in on the desktop, while the rest of the PC is located under the desktop.

From the article:The concept for the NEWCARD Console, an external peripheral allowing expansion cards to be swapped in and out easily, was also shown. The idea is to have only the display, keyboard, mouse and NEWCARD Console on the desktop, with the PC main unit made as small as possible and stored under the desk or otherwise out of the way.

Re:Big PC - small cards. (0)

Channard (693317) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744653)

That really is the purpose of the newcard. Plug and play peripherals which can plug in on the desktop, while the rest of the PC is located under the desktop.

Yes, but the big PC still has to sit somewhere - and it's still taking up a lot of room somewhere. It's a nice idea - which sounds rather like having a USB hub on your desk - but the PC could still do with a bigger - or rather smaller - revolution.

Re:Summary! (4, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744555)

In new computers, things will be smaller and faster.

No...

In summary you will now have to ditch all your old grotty cards to get *NEW* cards! New Mobo, new cards, full employment, a chicken in every garage, etc. And you thought you actually had choice in these things?

Further summarized...

All your base are belong to us!

Yes, this means crap like WinModems which may be the only choice for the new standard paint buyers further into a corner, as manufacturers could give a care less as they try to compete in a highly commoditized market.

Whee.

those crazy japs (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744226)

I'm waiting for their new standard - tentacle peripherals. They fit in any opening.

Text of Article: (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744231)

Technology Analysis: NEWCARD Standard to Replace PC Cards
Standardization for the NEWCARD, hailed as the successor to PC Cards, is almost complete at the PCMCIA. The first PCs with NEWCARD slots are expected in the second half of 2004.

Most notebook personal computers come with slots for PC Cards, and the consumer is quite familiar with them. The standardization process for the NEWCARD (development codename), the successor to PC Cards, is well under way. NEWCARD offers key advantages in terms of faster speed and smaller size. The interface technology has been changed from the prior Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) technology to PCI Express, achieving a peak data transfer rate of 250 Mbyte/s in one direction, or a total of 500 Mbyte/s two-way. This is about four times faster than the peak performance of existing 32-bit PC Cards with CardBus technology. It will be available in two shapes, with the smaller measuring only 34mm wide, 75mm long and 5mm thick. The per-card mounting area is about half that of current PC Cards.

The Personal Computer Memory Card Interface Association (PCMCIA) is writing the standard jointly with standard bodies like the Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA). Involved are major PC manufacturers like Dell Computer Corp of the US and Hewlett-Packard Co (HP) of the US; and of course Intel Corp of the US and Microsoft Corp of the US. The standard is scheduled to be finalized in 2003, while the first PCs with NEWCARD slots are expected to ship in the second half of 2004, when volume production of PCI Express integrated circuits (IC) begins.

PC Cards Lack Speed

While PC central processing unit (CPU) clock frequencies are rising along with the speeds of peripheral technologies like PCI Express and Gigabit Ethernet, the PC Card hasn't evolved since 1995, when the 32-bit CardBus standard was adopted. Work began on the NEWCARD standard when, as PCMCIA chairman Bradley Saunders of Intel said, "We recognized that the PC Card standard wouldn't be able to handle developing applications smoothly unless we took action."

Expansion cards like the PC Card and NEWCARD play vital roles in incorporating new functions into PCs. They make it possible for PC manufacturers to avoid the risk entailed in implementing new functions, because they can make a better-informed decision after watching PC Card sales for a while (Fig 1). A number of functions that are standard in PCs today, like analog modems and Ethernet, were once available as PC Cards.

The interfaces that PCs are likely to offer over the next few years include 1-Gbit Ethernet, which is dropping rapidly in price, and ultra wideband (UWB), still being developed to handle data transfer rates from several hundred Mbit/s to several Gbit/s.

NEWCARD media is expected to make possible compact, easy-to-carry hard disk drives (HDD), too, taking advantage of that high-speed throughput at 250 Mbyte/s one-way. The data transfer rate for the PC Card ATA Interface standard PC Card storage applications peaks out at 66 Mbyte/s. If a compact HDD can be directly connected to PCI Express via NEWCARD, then high-speed data transfer will be possible. (Table 1)

Smaller Designs Wanted

The small size is another attractive feature of the NEWCARD, and directly reflects the shrinking size of the PC itself.

As mentioned above, NEWCARD card equipping space is much smaller than current PC Cards. This is to allow two NEWCARD slots to be placed next to each other on a notebook PC, for example, because the new and thinner notebook designs are too thin to allow slots to be stacked vertically.

US PC manufacturers promoting NEWCARD hope to use the new media in desktop machines as well as notebooks. Chuck Stancil, Personal Systems Group, PC Desktop R&D, Advanced Technology Business at HP, is eager: "Cases for desktop machines are shrinking steadily, too, and the smaller we can make an expansion slot, the better."

Stancil revealed promising NEWCARD applications at WinHEC 2003, the developers conference held by Microsoft in May 2003. In addition to "essential" applications like 1-Gbit/s Ethernet, IEEE802.11a/b/g, television tuners, analog modems, Flash card readers and HDDs, he also listed a number of "desirable" items such as IEEE1394a/b, various serial and parallel interfaces, asynchronous digital subscriber line (ADSL) modems, cable modems, Flash memory cards, SmartCard readers, Bluetooth and UWB. The concept for the NEWCARD Console, an external peripheral allowing expansion cards to be swapped in and out easily, was also shown. The idea is to have only the display, keyboard, mouse and NEWCARD Console on the desktop, with the PC main unit made as small as possible and stored under the desk or otherwise out of the way.

If the cards are small enough, it becomes possible to use them in personal digital assistants (PDA) and other mobile information gear. Miniature memory cards like the SD cards and MemorySticks used in digital home appliances including camcorders and digital cameras can also be used as expansion interface cards. These cards offer data transfer rates of 2.5 to about 12.5 Mbyte/s currently, only a 20th to a 100th that of NEWCARD, and if manufacturers decide that speed is essential, PDAs and digital home appliances using NEWCARD media will no doubt appear.

USB, PCI Express

NEWCARD supports both PCI Express and USB 2.0 as internal interfaces. While the slot (host) must provide both PCI Express and USB 2.0, the card only needs to implement one. As a result, there will be two types of cards: PCI Express cards directly connecting to the PCI Express interface, and USB cards directly connecting to the USB 2.0 interface.

Connectors now use a unified design so that a common slot can be used for both types of cards. In addition to the SMBus pins for power control, the power supply pins, the ground pin and other shared pin assignments, each interface also has its own special pins. Both PCI Express and USB are serial interfaces, however, so not very many signal lines are required. The total number of pins is only 26, a dramatic reduction from the 68 pins used in existing PC Card designs. (Fig 2)

USB Cards Lead

USB cards will be the first to be productized, with PCI Express cards a bit later, because the PCI Express interface circuits needed for NEWCARD push the card price up. It will take some time before the price of PCI Express chipsets begins to drop.

In contrast, as one component engineer commented, "Once the dimensions and other specs are fixed, we can ship product in 2003. And the price will be very low." The function module in the USB card can make use of an existing USB 2.0 interface IC, now quite cheap after two years on the market.

When a variety of USB card applications are available at relatively low prices, new PC and PDA products specifically aimed at the medium may become available. And when that happens, it will be difficult to claim "NEWCARD compliance," because the PCMCIA, JEITA and other groups demand that NEWCARD slots provide both PCI Express and USB 2.0. A number of engineers involved in the standardization process, however, have said that there is nothing to stop companies from making equipment that supports only USB cards, for example.

Innovations in Shape

As the goal is to provide a wide range of applications in the NEWCARD, discussion on dimensions is fierce at PCMCIA, where the standardization work is being performed. At last the final decisions are about to be made on shape.

There are two candidates being considered, with different widths, conveniently referred to as Type I and Type II. The Type II was originally planned to use a pair of the connectors used in the Type I, and therefore was double the width of the Type I. To prevent users from accidentally inserting the wrong card, a "divider strip" had to be created between the two halves of the card, but this rail then made it impossible to insert a Type II card, too. In the end the Type II card uses the same connector as the Type I, and the width has been reduced considerably.

PC and peripheral equipment manufacturers are especially careful about dimensions because they want to use cards smaller than today's PC Card, but at the same time they want to ensure the flexibility to handle as many applications as possible. And of course they want to implement all the existing PC Card applications in the NEWCARD, too.

The Type I NEWCARD is smaller than the PC Card, measuring only 34mm x 75mm x 5mm. Even so, it can still serve as an adapter mounted inside the compact memory cards already in common use in digital cameras and other products, such as SD cards or MemorySticks.

The basic specifications, including shape and dimensions, will be settled through a vote by member firms, and are likely to be announced at the same time as the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in September 2003 (Table 2).

Investigations, EMI

In 2003, when the NEWCARD standard is expected to be finalized, manufacturers will launch full-scale development efforts for NEWCARD and the PCs supporting it. Already a number of key issues have become apparent for connectors and expansion slots.

The cause of many of the problems expected to be encountered with the connectors stem from the fact that the NEWCARD uses PCI Express. The signal transfer rate in PCI Express is quite high, at 2.5GHz, and that represents a major problem for connectors. The connector and the circuit board contact each other here, making impedance mismatches likely. An impedance mismatch would not only cause signal reflection, attenuation and other problems, but can also be a source of electromagnetic interference (EMI). As one connector developer explained, "The effects of impedance mismatching become more severe as signal speeds rise."

The PCMCIA has defined a few mandatory electrical characteristics for NEWCARD. For three items - reflection loss, insertion loss and near-end crosstalk - separate values have been defined for the 1st generation of implementations using current data transfer rates, and the 2nd generation with even faster performance.

Ejection Mechanism

Few connector manufacturers, with the notable exception of FCI USA Inc which has been working with the PCMCIA on the emerging standard from the very start, have begun work on verification testing. One of the things they are most worried about is the NEWCARD ejection mechanism, for which the PCMCIA does not define implementation. The PCMCIA's Saunders explained, "The button-type ejection mechanism currently used in PC Card slots creates a lot of unused volume in the PC. As a result, we haven't made an ejection mechanism mandatory. All the manufacturer has to do is leave about 15mm of the NEWCARD protruding from the PC case so the user can grasp it and pull it out."

Actual products, however, are likely to come with ejectors. Many connector manufacturers agree with Kenichi Suzuki, manager, North American Sec, International Business Dept, Hirose Electric Co Ltd of Japan, that "Users familiar with MemorySticks and SD cards will be unlikely to feel at ease pulling cards out with their fingers." A number of connector firms are considering using the same sort of push-push mechanism as used for MemoryStick and SD card media, and seem to be getting ready to request PC manufacturers to cooperate.

by Takahiro Kikuchi, Chikashi Horikiri

# Websites:
HP: http://www.hp.com
IBM: http://www.ibm.com/us
JEITA: http://www.jeita.or.jp/english/index.htm
PCMCIA: http://www.pcmcia.org

(August 2003 Issue, Nikkei Electronics Asia)

Old news (2, Informative)

philask (216894) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744241)

Yawn.

http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=03/02/21/2029 22 9&mode=thread&tid=137

http://www.dpreview.com/news/0302/03022103pcmcia ne wcard.asp

Yaaaay, lets make a NEW standard! Thatll solve it! (-1, Flamebait)

Bowie J. Poag (16898) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744243)


"I love beating myself in the head with a frying pan, because it feels FANTASTIC when I stop!"

Who comes up with this shit? Is it lost on everyone, that having more than one "standard" means there IS NO standard?

Re:Yaaaay, lets make a NEW standard! Thatll solve (5, Insightful)

RazzleFrog (537054) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744273)

This is a new standard to replace the old standard being created by the same association (PCMCIA) as the old standard. This new standard will allow gigabit ethernet on a card and will be much slimmer than the old cards. They are also talking about making it built into slimline desktops.

Re:Yaaaay, lets make a NEW standard! Thatll solve (1)

egriebel (177065) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744621)

This is a new standard to replace the old standard being created by the same association (PCMCIA) as the old standard.

ObWho: "Meet the new boss/Same as the old boss"

BOWIE YOU LIMP WRISTED BUTT PIRATE, STFU FAGBOY! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744342)

FIRST POST!

Re:Yaaaay, lets make a NEW standard! Thatll solve (-1, Offtopic)

Call Me Black Cloud (616282) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744414)

I, for one, welcome our newcard overlords. I'd like to remind them that as an excellent karma poster, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground peripheral caves

The real name (2, Funny)

ded_guy (698956) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744246)

NEWCARD (development codename)

Yeah, we all know that when it's finalized they'll call it cardXP.

Clearly it will be... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744305)

CardOne

Re:The real name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744484)

Yeah, we all know that when it's finalized they'll call it cardXP.
No, Card0ne :).

Decide what you want... (0, Funny)

Cap'n Canuck (622106) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744249)

Cheaper, faster, more pr0n.

Pick one.

Re:Decide what you want... (1)

Neophytus (642863) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744436)

its actually one where 'you can have two of three' works fairly well.

Re:Decide what you want... (1)

Cap'n Canuck (622106) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744497)

its actually one where 'you can have two of three' works fairly well.

No, this is /.. Pick one. You know which one...

SoBig is So Annoying (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744251)


I received that mess in one account 60 times in the last 18 hours, and it appears they're all from one computer at a library in New England. GOD DAMMIT!

crazy (4, Interesting)

Boromir son of Faram (645464) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744254)

Isn't this the wrong way to go about it? Usually the hardware is built and then the standard is derived from that, guaranteeing compatability. What if the standard requires something that turns out impossible to implement? Everything will be broken. We'd never have cool tech like FireWire, PCI, and SDRAM if hardware producers had to wait for a standard before they even started working on products.

Re:crazy (1)

ded_guy (698956) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744311)

I may be off base here, but isn't that basically what happened with 802.11a--that it turned out they couldn't implement it? Then .11b was the toned-down but feasible standard?

Re:crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744537)

Not really, but I don't have time to explain it. Google should answer your question (basically the different letters are completely different working groups that do different things).

Re:crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744317)

From the article:

The Personal Computer Memory Card Interface Association (PCMCIA) is writing the standard jointly with standard bodies like the Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA). Involved are major PC manufacturers like Dell Computer Corp of the US and Hewlett-Packard Co (HP) of the US; and of course Intel Corp of the US and Microsoft Corp of the US {emphasis mine}.

Seems to answer yout question, doesn't it?

Re:crazy (4, Informative)

Trigun (685027) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744362)

The 'standard' is being built upon already established standards, specifically PCI express and USB 2.0. The connection interface will have to implement both, whereas the card itself will only have to implement one of the two.

The remainder of the standard has to do with tolerances for the connection interface, something that should be standardized to prevent rogue cards burning out your bus, or creating too much interference. They also deal with size and shape, as well as trying to standardize the exection mechanism (although this is only a suggestion at this point).

Re:crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744551)

Wow, that sounds like a real larf to manage at the software end of things. Two possible logical interconnects you say? Oh, what fun!

Re:crazy (1)

Trigun (685027) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744593)

I am assuming that they merely plug into their respective busses and the Plug and Play code will take care of the rest. Really an elegant solution IMHO.

Re:crazy (1)

Mattb90 (666532) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744580)

But for the same reason we had Novell-Ethernet, which meant that there were two Ethernet standards floating about in the early 1980s up until 1988 (Novell and IEEE). This created all sorts of problems, and all because Novell didn't wait for the standard to be completed.

Barry Bonds vs. Jared Gould (-1, Troll)

BarryBondsTroll (699883) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744258)

Personally I think Barry would kick Jared's ass! What do you think?

Re:Barry Bonds vs. Jared Gould (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744490)


Jared could walk away pretty fast... Eat Fresh!

(Why was the parent modded "troll"?)

The end of multiple standards (3, Insightful)

yourruinreverse (564043) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744267)

Will this mean the end of all these crazy SD-card connection based peripherals?

No, of course not. It just adds one more peripheral standard.

Why do we need PC cards anyhow (4, Interesting)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744268)

Can some informed person speculate as to what the purpose of a PC card is in the day of Firewire800? Does a PC card have better bus access or something? Is it a form factor issue (e.g. its not dangling but is sort of part of the laptop?) With laptops getting smaller and PC-cards tending to get larger and bulging outside the chasis, the form factor issue looks less distinct to me. so why PC cards?

Re:Why do we need PC cards anyhow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744299)

and PC-cards tending to get larger
How about you RTFA before posting. Oh wait. That's right. This is slashdot and I have to get my troll post in before everybody else.

we need them because (4, Insightful)

abhisarda (638576) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744522)

because there are millions of laptops that are not equipped with USB 2 ports. Thats why there are PCMCIA USB 2 cards.
Many laptops have only 1 USB port( those made before 2002).
If you already have a USB mouse, where can you plug in that webcam, USB external keyboard etc?
Many laptops made before 2002 do not have Firewire ports. If you want to use the iPod and camcorders, you need a Firewire PCMCIA card.

Take 56k modems and 10/100 ethernet ports. Again, older laptops do not have them onboard. You need PCMCIA cards for that.
Then you have the case of wi-fi. Unless your laptop is a Centrino, there is no way of going wifi without a wireless card.

Firewire 800 is "only" in the Macs now. It might come to the PC soon but it will take a while to come to laptops(~6 months). Firewire 400 is the norm for laptops.

Re:we need them because (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744570)

If you already have a USB mouse, where can you plug in that webcam, USB external keyboard etc?

Into your USB Hub. I thought that was the entire point of USB, in fact.

A new hardware standard is not going to help anyone with an old laptop either; they won't have NEWCARD slots to plug in their USB 2.0 and Firewire NEWCARD's anyway, will they?

You've missed the point of new standards like NEWCARD completely.

Re:we need them because (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744631)

They aren't only for Macs at the moment. You can get FW800 PCI cards quite easily on the net for PCs. See http://www.orangemicro.com/ they sell them.

In fact, these were out before Macs even had FW800.

Re:Why do we need PC cards anyhow (3, Insightful)

Quervo (5696) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744531)

I'm not quite sure I'm informed, but I'll give it a shot:

Firewire 800 is only 800 M*bits*/s ~ 100M*bytes*/s
from the article is seems that one way data flow is 250 M*bytes*/s
so it appears to be about 2.5x as fast. That's one advantage.

Having a small harddrive (or other small peripheral) that you could access at high speeds (not a lot around, I know: but think of future advances), that wouldn't be dangling around outside your computer. And since laptops are notable not very expandable, but *supposed* to be portable, having something small and fast and not as much trouble as external drives (8lb notebook + 2 lb external drive = too many pounds) is a Good Idea(tm) in my book.

additionally, there has been some speculation about CPU, memmory, and graphics modules that could be slipped in, but it's not very clear if that's possible or even feasible. But that would be cool if it ever worked.

Re:Why do we need PC cards anyhow (3, Informative)

dasunt (249686) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744608)

I can't speak for other laptop users, but the reason I like PCMCIA cards is that they provide an easy way to swap in and out components, fairly standard (way easier to find a PCMCIA modem then a firewire modem), and the integrated card is harder to break then a dongle, thus leading to the 'bulge' that you speak of for firewire, network, etc cards.

It would be nice (but I'm not expecting) for the new standard to give the PC Card Redux enough room where it can fit, say, an RJ-45 or two squeezed together USB or firewire ports without a dongle. Instead of a flat card like we have in PCMCIA or PC Card, it would be more of a square peggish looking card. OTOH, the flatter cardbus cards we have today are perfect for miniature hard drives, and memory sticks still aren't made in the largest size as the miniature hard drives.

As for myself with my old laptop, I'm going to check out the Xircom realport cards. :)

PCI / ISA problem avoidance (3, Informative)

kevinbarsby (558876) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744277)

I hope they avoid similar problems that plagued ISA / PCI motherboards.

As I recall there were a lot of timing issues with the PCI / ISA bridge which affected system performance.

yeah, whatever... (4, Insightful)

TWX (665546) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744284)

Most modern laptops seem to come with an array of smartmedia, compact flash, USB, Firewire, integrated 802.11, and integrated ethernet, so I don't see what the big deals is. Granted, it's nice to be able to swap things into the computer, bit if excessive numbers of dongles are going to be required, just give me the device in USB or firewire, and let the device be the dongle. That way I don't have to carry around this metal wafer-type box too.

the only two PCMCIA devices that I use on my laptop regularly (which is two years old or more) is the wireless ethernet adapter, which doesn't have a dongle as such, and the compact flash reader, because the laptop is too old to have these features built in. Next unit I buy will probably have them integrated.

Re:yeah, whatever... (1)

British (51765) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744462)

Look on the bright side of using a wireless Ethernet card on PCMICA. When the semi-annual new 802.11x standard comes out, you just buy a new card, instead of replacing a laptop with WiFI built in. :)

Re:yeah, whatever... (1)

dave420 (699308) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744611)

Remember a few years ago, when notebooks came with parallel ports, serial ports, keyboard/moust ports - that was viewed as all we needed. Most people didn't use their PCMCIA slots. Now look at notebooks - I have an old dell inspiron, and without the PCMCIA slots it would be useless. You can't just look at technology and say "Well. That's useless to me now." because they're not making it for now, they're making it for further on down the road, when you're gonna look at these NEWCARD things and go "Thank god for them. Now I can plug my new [insert one of the myriad new technology names here] card into it".

The card that most makers want... (5, Funny)

blcamp (211756) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744288)

Someday, the peripheral that hardware and software makers may want on all PCs is the Credit Card reader.

Want your next Windows Update? Please insert your Credit Card into the reader. What, this is Linux? SCO needs another swipe of your card, please.

Why stop there? I can see it now: "CNN... the most trusted... and expensive... name in news."

Re:The card that most makers want... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744457)

"CNN... the most trusted... and expensive... name in news."

Or, more accurately, "CNN... the most trusted... and expensive... name in editorial opinions."

Forced Obsolescence (3, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744298)

Hmmm so PCMCIA cards are being phased out next year .. and PCI slots are already on the gone list for next year ( express PCI ) ...

I guess they need to make everything obsolete to sell more hardware and keep the PC market afloat.

Next round of software will be the same: It will require some special hardware components only available in the new machines ( can you say 'trusted computing'? )

Bah.

Re:Forced Obsolescence (1)

colinleroy (592025) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744367)

Next round of software will be the same: It will require some special hardware components only available in the new machines ( can you say 'trusted computing'? )

Next round of proprietary software may be the same, yes; but I doubt my 4 years old 400MHz powerbook will be able to run gnu/linux with free software before it physically breaks (few years more?).

Future Legal Issues (4, Interesting)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744548)

While that may be true today, dont be suprised if in the near future the 'homeland security' department will mandate you use 'approved hardware and software' before you can get online. And use of anything other will be considered criminal...

Then watch it expand to other conutries..

Re:Forced Obsolescence (1)

Suidae (162977) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744452)

Yeah man, my 8 bit ISA cards and MFM drives still work just fine, all PC hardware should be maufactured so I can still use them!

Re:Forced Obsolescence (2, Insightful)

Microlith (54737) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744511)

Yeah let's NEVER update the technologies we use.

133MHz PCI is good for everyone, forever!

8MHz ISA is the most anyone needs!

Any of that NEW stuff is just a thinly veiled attempt to STEAL OUR RIGHTS AWAY FROM US AND MAKE US SLAVES.

*cough*

Re:Forced Obsolescence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744586)

8MHz ISA? You'll use S-100 and like it, young man!

More info: (4, Informative)

cK-Gunslinger (443452) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744306)

Links:

PC Mag [pcmag.com]
Extreme Tech [extremetech.com]

PC size Unchanged (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744319)

It would be nice to FINALLY have some smaller cards. This would allow for easier shrinkage of the computer box. I mean come on! how long has the beige box been around....15-20 years!? and mostly the same size. Look at cell phones, calculators, PDAs, walkmans, etc.. I know the micro PCs are making some headway, but probably 95% are still the same damn size. I for one would like to go to something smaller.

Yes, Yes, Yes I know I'll get some links to micro form PCs and iMacs, but it still remains accurate that most Computers are still bulky large boxes with a spaghetti collection of wires attached to a monitor. How about Plug-in motherboards thru a slot on the back of the monitor, iMacs are definately onto something(no I don't own a Mac), but that's only the first step. Maybe these cards will help it along.

Re:PC size Unchanged (1)

Loosewire (628916) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744375)

arnt we talking about lappy's here not desktops?

Re:PC size Unchanged (2, Interesting)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744378)

PCs have stayed pretty much the same because the majority of PC owners want something upgradable, and something they can fix themselves without a 200x jewelers loupe and nerves of steel.

Various folks have tried the iMac concept, IBMs little goofy thingamajoo comes to mind (was it the S series?) People dont have a problem with the standard sized box, and slots they can use.

MicroPCs have their place, and that niche will expand. But I cant see any reason I would want my main desktop to be anything but what it is, something I can put together and take apart by myself without a lot of headache.

I've built a couple flexATX form factor PCs for my kids, and they're fun, but it's a bitch to work even that small, I wouldnt want to work with anything much smaller. My big tower desktop, I can replace a video card or add a HDD in about 2 minutes.

If it ain't broke, dont fix it.

Pet Peeve (2, Insightful)

CGP314 (672613) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744333)

It's a pet peeve of mine when people call something the New Whatever. It sounds like it is planned for obsolesce. Like they don't think anyone will use the standard or equipment after 3 years.

Re:Pet Peeve (3, Insightful)

hey (83763) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744419)

No that *my* pet peeve. Have about the "NT" (New Techology) OS? Not so new any more is it. I don't think New York and New Delhi are so new any more.
Still users are aways calling files new this or new that. Then they come back in a year and say what's that?

Re:Pet Peeve (1)

RickL (64901) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744517)

Or art nouveau. And what about 20th Century Fox? Naming something "New" or giving it a date will only make it seem outdated faster.

Mozart, Bedthoven and friends were smart. They called the modern music of their time "classical". That way, in the future it wouldn't seem outdated and stale, but rather elegant, refined, and well, classic.

NEWCARD??? (4, Insightful)

barureddy (314276) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744335)

I don't know about the rest of you, but I have not noticed the bandwidth limits of my pcmcia card. Granted I don't run a gig-bit ethernet, video equipment (firewire takes care of it), or scsi cards, but I don't use my laptop to do that kind of stuff. What I have noticed is the slowness of my laptop hard drive, which will not be able to handle all this new bandwith anyways. Though it is always nice to have more bandwith and smaller cards, there are more important things that need to addressed.

P.S.
I hope this NEWCARD uses less power.

Re:NEWCARD??? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744646)

Yeah, it's like NEWCOKE. That didn't even last 6 months in the market. Can we expect a re-release of PCMCIA Classic about 6 months after NEWCARD is released? :)

Why not just embed everything but the cpu/gpu/ram? (1)

Salden (571264) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744357)

I mean, we have to buy new motherboards every couple of years anyway. Today's new pc owner only has a video cart installed in their AGP slot, a cpu and ram. Why not make GPUs socketed and just get rid of the slots?

Most other peripherals can be attached externally via usb or firewire.

Re:Why not just embed everything but the cpu/gpu/r (1)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744505)

Because then ytou'd have craptastic mobo's like Intel Itanium made for nVidia chipset.

Trust me, none of these companies would want to make something that simple.

Re:Why not just embed everything but the cpu/gpu/r (2, Insightful)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744533)

Theres more to the video card than just the GPU, you'd need a new RAMDAC for higher resolutions and faster refresh rates and whatnot, and the memory interfaces video cards use get faster and faster, so that's probably not practical.

But I'm with you in concept.

I've always wondered why the northbridge and southbridge cant be socketed. What technically would prevent me from pulling the SiS 645dx chip out of the computer I'm using now, replace it with a pin compatable 648 that will let me use the fancy new HT enabled processors?

Re:Why not just embed everything but the cpu/gpu/r (1)

SpookyFish (195418) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744634)

Socketing the NB/SB likely wouldn't be worth it, you couldn't do more than minor changes. With new features like Serial ATA, 32-64-128 bit interfaces, DDR, and the like, pinouts change and layout of the traces can be critical.

Sure, people could try to plan ahead but it would add cost now, and historically doesn't work out because things move too fast to anticipate everything.

Re:Why not just embed everything but the cpu/gpu/r (1)

silas_moeckel (234313) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744558)

I beleive you want an Nforce2 chipset it's not socketed but todays new PC owner dosent change out there video card. But otherwise slots are usefull for neatness sake if nothing else and high speed busses. The fastest external connector is firewire 800 at 100MB a sec half duplex (Not entirly sure ont hat bit) It cant deal with GigE speeds. PCI at base does 132MB a sec and can clock much faster and wider currently to around 1024MB a sec thats 4 GigE adapters running full out to get buss saturation. And most systems that implement PCI-X run multiple buses of it for more potential speed. Firewire 800 is porbably fast enough for nearly everything a home users needs to do except gigabit networking but dosent scale to servers.

The standard is scheduled to be finalized in 2003 (1)

MrFredBloggs (529276) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744358)

Not long to wait then!

Or maybe the SD Cards are here to stay (1)

DOsinga (134115) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744365)

Second half of 2004 is still some time away. I see all kind of devices around me in the shape of SD Cards or Sony Memory Stick, from modems to GPS cards. Mini Memory Stick works in my phone. It wouldn't be the first new standard that didn't make it because there was already something else that did the job and had the marketshare.



Support a lawyer free internet top level domain
Sign [douweosinga.com] the .ianal top level domain petition.

PCMCIA stands for (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744368)

People Can't Memorise Complex Irritating Acronyms

Re:PCMCIA stands for (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744529)

IMHO STFU! ROFL PCMCI != PITA, u AC!

BRB G2P (gotta pee)

Re:PCMCIA stands for (1)

SpookyFish (195418) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744569)

I always thought it was:
People Can't Memorize Computer Industry Acronyms

I think I like your version even better!

Re:PCMCIA stands for (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744616)

Without RTFA'ing, I see NEWCARD is in all-caps. I'm sure it stands for something obscure and retarded.

anyone else see brewing and think ...? (3, Funny)

simong_oz (321118) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744376)

Heh, so much for RTF! I saw the words "Standard Brewing" in the subject and without bothering to read further immediately clicked through to a story I thought was going to be about one of my favourite subjects - beer! I was not amused ...

Headline (2, Funny)

Mike Schiraldi (18296) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744382)

Did anyone else read the headline and think this was about some kind of peripheral that calibrates beer-making machines?

Re:Headline (2, Insightful)

MarkGriz (520778) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744514)

I reread the headline several times, thinking "what the hell does brewing have to do with PC cards?"

Mmmmmm..... Beeeerrrr.

Re:Headline (1)

avalys (221114) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744523)

No. Even if you're a drunken, blinded squirrel with Alzheimer's, it's impossible to read that headline that way.

***ALERT***
Your blatantly obvious attempt at a +5 Funny moderation has been detected!
***ALERT***

Brewing Standard (3, Funny)

Anders (395) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744388)

I did not get further than "Standard Brewing" before I thought of RFC 2324 [faqs.org] , namely the Hyper Text Coffee Pot Control Protocol.

steps (2, Interesting)

Bubba-T (578601) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744432)

Step one create a new standard and milk the licensing as long as your can.
Step two repeat step one.

Oh great! (1)

Inflatable Hippo (202606) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744433)

Now driver support will become even crappier since the same number of engineers will be split across NEWCARD and PCI versions of every new product for several years.

I suggest that it be a licensing requirement for NEWCARD devices that the details of how to access the cards functionality be published.

At least the open source community has a fighting chance of providing the kind of support that most card manufacturers ought to be.

Re:Oh great! (1)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744665)

Yeah! Device support in linux rocks! It's even better with BSD!

Now if I can only figure out why the fuck my printer, mouse, modem, network, wifi and video card dont work with my l337 slackware box.

Keeping up with the standards (2, Funny)

RickL (64901) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744434)

Floppy disk: $.10
CD-R: $.50
256 MB SD Card: $50
Wifi PCMIA card: $50
Having to keep up with the standards: priceless

For everything else, there is NewCard

Didja know... (1, Offtopic)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744466)

Do you know what's SOOOOO great about standards??

There's sooooooo many to choose from!!

(PoOO! Tang!!) Thankyou Thankyou. I'll be here all night.

Stupid name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744467)

Yes, sure it's just a prototype name but I hate it when companies call something "new-whatever." What happens when it's old technology?

It's the same as calling your computer something like "cheetah." It's sounds stupid as hell when the PC is obsolete and slow.

Linux support for this (-1)

psylence (87893) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744498)

Sweet, so we should expect solid Linux support for most devices this will host in what, 5, 10 years?

MOD PARENT DOWN DOWN DOWN! (1)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744556)

-1: We already know what a joke linux "device support" is.

If I get a NEWCARD sound card... (4, Funny)

BigBadBri (595126) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744525)

will it talk NewSpeak?

Doubleplusgood!

If only this new standard could last as long as... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744538)

...Slot 1, it would be a success.

Acronym Soup. (0, Redundant)

---- (147583) | more than 10 years ago | (#6744571)

Finally, a new consumer computer technology that is not acronym based!

People Can't Memorize Computer Industry Acronyms for crying out loud!

/* ---- */

Very interesting (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6744583)

For those who can't be bothered to read the article, the new interface is basically USB + PCI-Express. This means that 2 new things become possible; cards that can use the USB interface become very cheap so we should see a load of cheaper devices appearing as cards. Secondly, PCI-Express cards are possible.

One thing I was wondering is, is there any chance people could fit a graphics card into this form factor. Then you could upgrade the graphics of too-slow laptops.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...