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546 comments

first post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771664)

bitches!

Since when... (5, Insightful)

ArchAngelQ (35053) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771670)

is Europe just one contry? I'm all for conciceness, and yes, Europe is becoming peaceful and in many ways a single, strong political force, but the contries in Europe are far from being a single contry.

Furthermore (4, Insightful)

hhnerkopfabbeisser (645832) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771687)

Since European carrier rockets are in their fifth generation now, I wouldn't consider them "news".

Europe has sent things up into space for quite a while now...

Re:Since when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771688)

I was under the impression that since the Euro and the EU was introduced that the union is now a single entity, with former countries such as germany and holland and so on are now the equivalent of texas and california.

Re:Since when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771699)

It's closer to a confederation (ie: what the US was like before the constitution). Member nations also maintain their sovereignty...that's certainly something states in the US can't claim.

Yes and no (4, Informative)

amcguinn (549297) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771834)

In some ways, a country like the UK has less independent power than Texas, as the EU regulates particularly economic matters more than the federal US government

In most ways, conversely, the EU member states are more independent than US states (e.g. they each have their own army - UK did not need EU approval to send troops to Iraq)

The interesting point is that there is no limit to the power that will be centralised in the EU, and an assumption that every few years a new round of treaties will centralise power further. The treaties are full of the phrase "Ever Closer Union", and explicitly prevent seccession. (To the best of my knowledge, the equivalent question in the USA was, um, unclear until 1861-65).

Obligatory plug (though my membership lapsed some years ago): UKIP [independence.org.uk]

Re:Yes and no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771836)

US states (e.g. they each have their own army

What do you think the militias and the National Guard are?

Re:Yes and no (3, Insightful)

amcguinn (549297) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771851)

I had that in mind, but I was under the impression that they could not be sent out of the country (except in the capacity of US Army reserves under federal command). Was I mistaken? If Texas could have chosen to send troops in support of Argentina in 1982, for instance, without US govt approval, then my example was bad.

Re:Since when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771691)

AFAIK 'Europe' as a whole (at least the EU part of it) has a space program that is funded and operated by many nations. There's pretty much no other way to describe the space program unless you want to list every involved country.

Holy dyslexia, Batman! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771740)

Stop writing "contry", you are hurting my eyes!

Re:Since when... (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771750)

Well, most of the effort from European Union countries comes through the European Space Agency [esa.int] . This is why it's probably okay to classify them as "the europeans". They've not done any solo manned stuff yet, but have done a lot with space probes and unmanned missions.

Although they don't have manned launch vehicles of their own, they work with the Soviets and with NASA. Their highest profile manned project is their work on the International Space Station [esa.int] - both in terms of supplying space hardware and astronauts. Their most notable unmanned project is the groundbreaking joint-NASA SOHO [estec.esa.nl] sun observation probe.

Upcoming projects of note: a manned Mars [esa.int] mission is in the (very) early planning stages.

It seems as though international cooperation should be the *only* way to go when it comes to grand plans such as reaching Mars. If NASA, ESA, China, India and the Soviets all put their differences aside and pulled together - humanity could become a truly spacefaring species within our lifetimes (graduating from a "type 0" to a "type 1" species that has mastered interplanetary travel [where type 2,3 = extra-solar and galactic travel).

Re:Since when... (2, Informative)

wheezl (63394) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771785)

Whoever modded this as flamebait is an idiot. While the EU is an economic entity.. to call Europe a country is just plain silly.

Europe's a country now? (0, Redundant)

J23SE (107309) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771676)

Wow... someone forgot to send me that memo

Oh well, at least he spelled it right. One miracle at a time.

Europe is a continent (5, Insightful)

brrrrrrt (628665) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771679)

Can someone please change the insinuation in the text that Europe is a country? For heavens' sake, I thought it was just braindead American tourists that visit our "country" who thought this, not Slashdot editors.

Re:Europe is a continent (1)

sllim (95682) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771730)

Wrong place for this...
But I make the argument that the EU is quickly approaching being a country made up of seperate states in the same way that the US is.

So by that logic you could say that Europe is a country, or possibly soon to be one.

Yes I know I am bending the logic a bit. But give me 20 years. It is coming.

Re:Europe is a continent (1)

hhnerkopfabbeisser (645832) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771772)

Sure it's coming, but the article was not written in 20 years, was it? It should stick to the facts as they are now.

Re:Europe is a continent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771797)

It should stick to the facts as they are now

remember, we're talking about the BBC here.

Re:Europe is a continent (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771833)

And what's that supposed to mean?

BBC was one of the few news broadcasters who provided a dissenting view on the war on Iraq. While CNN and FOX were showing footage of their gung-ho "in-bedded" reporters going in with the invad... eh, liberating troops, BBC was actually analyzing the righteousness of the war and paying attention to the civilian casualties. This, of course, provoked childish "Baghdad Broadcasting Corporation" quips from the US and pressure from the UK government, which only serves as a proof that BBC was hitting a sore spot.

If you're referring to the row between Downing Street 10 and BBC [bbc.co.uk] and, more recently, the Hutton-inquiry [bbc.co.uk] where the case for war is getting ripped to shreds right now, you couldn't be more wrong.

BBC has been shown to be consistently true in their reporting and the governments' (both UK, US and now Australia) lies have been exposed by the reporting. Journalism that brings down governments is the very best kind of journalism.

Re:Europe is a continent (1)

Sonicated (515345) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771827)

So by that logic you could say that Europe is a country, or possibly soon to be one.

Yes I know I am bending the logic a bit. But give me 20 years. It is coming.


Bending the logic a _bit_? Please, get real. Stick to the facts. Europe is a continent.

Re:Europe is a continent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771841)

Europe is THE continent.

Re:Europe is a continent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771763)

You may not be aware of the EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY. [esa.int]

Pretty safe to assume that they are Europeans from Europe. :)

Re:Europe is a continent (1)

Sonicated (515345) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771806)

You may not be aware of the EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY.

Pretty safe to assume that they are Europeans from Europe. :)


Quite. However because a number of nations have formed a space agency it doesn't mean they are a single country.

Re:Europe is a continent (1)

Tomji (142759) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771825)

Also look at the member states of the ESA. It's not everyone from the EU and even someone extra like Switzerland

Offtopic: not a country - yet (3, Interesting)

pwarf (610390) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771777)

Okay, the writing is a little sloppy.

However, the slip was understandable in this case given that for the purposes of space exploration and research Europe acts as if it were a single country through the ESA.

Also, calling Europe a country is really just extrapolating based upon current trends. EU member states have given a surprising amount of sovereignty away to the union as a whole, and the current setup looks like it invites a gradual erosion of national sovereignty in favor of centralized power.

Of course, significant cultural differences may slow unification, but increased immigration rates needed to compensate for falling native birth rates may quickly reduce cultural differences between European countries.

I expect the EU to essentially be a single country within my lifetime.

Do Europeans forsee an inevitable centralization of power until the EU acts like a central country, or is there a limiting factor to centralization that I missed?

Re:Offtopic: not a country - yet (1)

bo0ork (698470) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771832)

The factor that many americans miss is that all european countries have a lot of history -- and quite often that history consists of kicking each others butts in war.

Add to this the significant (sometimes huge) cultural differences between EU nations, and you'll soon come to the conclusion that a superstate is the dream of powerhungry politicians, not the people who happens to live in europe.

Re:Offtopic: not a country - yet (3, Insightful)

JanneM (7445) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771835)

And extrapolating current trends, you don't object to calling the US, Mexico and Canada one country either?

There are a lot of resistence towards too much integration in Europe; not surprising, what with the large cultural, political and linguistic differences. If Europe ever coalesces into one state, it will take quite a lot more than one or two generations. More likely, this will never fully happen.

Re:Europe is a continent (1)

Eric Ass Raymond (662593) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771816)

Yeah, Europe is not a country but EU sure is developing towards a European superstate.

It's now like a loose confederation but it probably will change more and more into a federation within the next few decades. This is only a good thing if the us-vs.-them mentality - that seems to be thriving both in the USA and Europe these days - can be restrained.

I, for one, wouldn't mind seeing a one world state with a thriving space program, but I have very little hope of seeing that in my lifetime.

Re:Europe is a continent (1)

delong (125205) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771852)

That's funny, because I don't know any American that thinks Europe is a "country." But I know plenty of Europeans that seem to think so.

Derek

Brazillians in space? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771681)

What's next, Mexico to the moon? And no, manned flights will still be dominated by a few. These others are just payload rockets, used for putting small sattelites into orbit.

Human space flight is a waste (0, Offtopic)

GringoGoiano (176551) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771731)

Sending humans to space is, for now, a waste of life, time, and money. Payloads are of more strategic importance.

Like, WTF? (5, Insightful)

tietokone-olmi (26595) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771682)

So. About a year ago, give or take a little, a NASA shuttle breaks apart and goes kaboom on re-entry. A couple of fucking big articles appear on slarshdot, it's like a national day of mourning is declared and shit. That's OK -- after all, people died and the US warmongering neo-conservative bureaucrat assholes got yet another reason to cut funding to space exploration and related technologies.

But now, a Brazilian launch vehicle explodes, on the pad no less (think Challenger, only a bit sooner) and all those 16 dead people merit are one measly link, a couple of phrases in a slashdot heading (half of which is speculation about the future of missions to space from an unbelievably US-centric viewpoint) and not much else. Like, what the fuck?

Re:Like, WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771700)

No, you see, you don't understand. That was an *american* spacecraft which exploded..

MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771709)

Quite right!

Re:MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771716)

done. I fail to see the point of having mod'd that 'flamebait'. It's a perfectly valid and fairly sensible opinion, frankly.

Re:Like, WTF? (1)

tigress (48157) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771711)

Calm down. This is just the first story. We're just waiting for the conspiracy theories, and the usual terrorist organizations (Al-Queda, Hamas, USPO) claiming responsibility.

MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771739)

This shouldn't be flamebait.

MOD PARENT UP, damn! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771742)

It's an unpopular, but valid viewpoint that has to be said and considered, not swept under the -1, Flamebait carpet.

Re:MOD PARENT UP, damn! (0, Offtopic)

pv2b (231846) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771820)

This is exactly why I browse at -1.

I vastly prefer the GNAA and friends to moderators with an agenda.

My latest outrageous conspiracy theory (pulled out of my arse at this very moment) is that the high-karma long-time /. members are the same as, or at least support, the /. trolls, in order to maintain their collective grip on censorship. After all, if there were no trolls, who'd want the moderation?

But this, of course, is outrageous. Or is it?

Re:Like, WTF? (3, Insightful)

Lshmael (603746) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771744)

You claim Slashdot is Americentric (which it is, to an extent), but you fall into that trap yourself.
A couple of fucking big articles appear on slarshdot, it's like a national day of mourning is declared and shit.

Aren't national days of mourning (by their definition) national? And this is completely different from Challenger. Challenger was a shuttle meant to carry people into space. This is a rocket that carries satellites. Sure, it's horrible that people die, but there were technicans, not astronauts (no sex, no story...).

Furthermore, I fail to see how the speculation in the original post is "US-centric." The very idea is that other countries (China, India, Brazil) are going into space. The US had a nice space program in the past. See the connection.

Lastly, your "one measly link" comment. What links do you have that show extra information not covered in the BBC article?

Re:Like, WTF? (5, Insightful)

orbbro (467373) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771747)

Yes, it has to be said: This submission was incredibly insensitive.

Interestingly, about as many people (~20) died in this Brazilian accident as died in the history of NASA events (17), according to this article [foxnews.com] .

So, stemen is saying, in effect, Brazil just lost as many people as (or more than) NASA ever did, but let's ignore that and ridiculously speculate about the USA's future potential for space dominance.

Sweet.

OK, let's speculate about USA's potential in space (1)

gacp (601462) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771830)

Nil.

Condolencas pra o meus irmaos do Brasi :,-(

Re:Like, WTF? (5, Insightful)

wheezl (63394) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771760)

I think this illustrates how nationalistic space excursions are even to this day. Which futher illustrates how best to sell such space programs to the rest of the US. My first reaction was that 16 (update 20) technicians had died. They work on cool, sexy, and dangerous rockets. I work with UNIX, video, and industrial robots. My first reaction was "20 people a lot like me died today". Brazilian, Chinese, Indian, North American, Whomever......

They probably didn't read Slashdot.. but those were our peeps that went down.

That's the way to think about it.

p.s. and no there will be no 8 hour special on any channel about what happened or who died. For one it happened in Brazil..... for another, the news media (and the general populace) doesn't give a rat's ass about the technicians.

Re:Like, WTF? (1)

gacp (601462) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771846)

Brasil is a HUGE country. A big chunk of it is dense rainforest, and almost unexplored. Go check, even elevation data are shitty. And the environment is changing really fast. Brasil NEEDS to have space capability for monitoring its enourmous territory. It's not just pride. And one thing we non-Usans have learned this year is that we just CAN'T rely on the US.

So, condolences for this terrible loss. Go on, Brasil! Order and progreess, and Per ardua ad astra.

Not good FORGIVE ME I can't help it. (1, Funny)

ratfynk (456467) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771683)

I guess we might not get to see the remake of Amazon Women on The Moon too soon.

A sincere appology from a fool. (2)

ratfynk (456467) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771704)

To the relatives of the ones who died sincere appologies and heart felt sympathy. I am sure most slash dotters would say this also. We grieve your loss and hope there will be peace for your loved ones.

Re:A sincere appology from a fool. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771728)

I guess we might not get to see the remake of Amazon Women on The Moon too soon
To the relatives of the ones who died sincere appologies and heart felt sympathy. I am sure most slash dotters would say this also. We grieve your loss and hope there will be peace for your loved ones.

Is this what they call "poster's remorse"?

Why (0)

sap.de (557490) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771684)

I have to wonder why everyone wants to send a manned rocket into space ?
Is it some kind of "we can too" ?

The space race was originally between USSR and USA, do other countries feel they need to spend so much money in order to feel on par with the USA ?
I think they could spend the money elsewhere improving the living conditions for their nationals.

Re:Why (3, Insightful)

Gleng (537516) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771738)

Of all the egotistical, ethnocentric bullshit.

"Other countries" (read: the rest of the populated world) wish to develop space programmes because of the huge benefits one brings to the economy and scientific development of the country envolved. Amongst the fact that a space programme gives a country's citizens something to hope and dream about.

Not to "feel on par with the USA".

For fuck's sake.

MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771761)

Good points!

Re:Why (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771770)

The rocket that exploded was meant to put satellites in orbit rather than sending people to outer space. This program is plausible since it's very expensive to use foreign tecnology to do that. Space programs aren't just sending people to outter space to develop cancers and glioblastoms in them after placing a flag and collecting dust.

There're some very bright people working at those projects here (with budgets smaller than you can imagine) and only because Brazil has other problems it does not mean that we don't have the right to have our own space program. Think about the Afghanistan and Iraq wars and you'll see that they're more expensive than what is expected for the NASA Mission to Mars in 2020 (40 bi plus 4 bi each launch).

Instead of developing useful tecnology with those programs, some governments (along with approval from the population) cut the space program's money and invest in other things like warfare just because they think that space programs are just "sending men to the moon" or that they're dangerous for the people involved. This right when the war has already killed more than 60. Go figure.

Re:Why (1)

Golias (176380) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771853)

The space race was originally between USSR and USA, do other countries feel they need to spend so much money in order to feel on par with the USA ?
I think they could spend the money elsewhere improving the living conditions for their nationals.

It's noteworthy that nations which are along the equator are much better locations to launch satellites from than Florida. Putting shit into orbit for profit has become a pretty good way to make money over the last 20 years or so.

In other words, a Brazilian space agency could easily show a net profit (if it doesn't already).

Add manned flights, and you could be talking huge numbers. Look at how much money various rich dickheads have been willing to pay the Russians for passenger seats on rocket launches in recent years. Sending boy-band stars and Microsoft executives into space could be a very plump tomato... especially if you let the rest of us pay you to not bring them back.

Space=Power (4, Insightful)

fredistheking (464407) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771697)

It seems that most governments are realizing how important control of there own satellite based telecommunications/spying/surveilence, etc., has become.

There's a reason for these "accidents"... (-1, Troll)

Toasty16 (586358) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771702)

...God doesn't want people to leave earth. Of course, sometimes he doesn't want them to return [space.com] .

/bad taste

columbia (5, Insightful)

seanadams.com (463190) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771703)

The day columbia came down, I was talking to a friend of mine and for some reason it occurred to me (trying to cheer her up) to say "at least they pulled off a sucessful mission up to that point". It was just my way of trying to see the silver lining (and I still feel that way), but she glared at me like I was the most callous prick in the world.

Sorry, but mankind will never achieve anything in space if we're not willing to sacrifice lives and money to get there. I salute the brave men and women with the courage and the talent to go, especially these Brazilians who have the balls to keep trying these dangerous satellite launches under a new space program.

Uma semana triste (1)

GringoGoiano (176551) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771705)

A morte do representante das Nacoes Unidas no Iraqe ... e agora isto. Uma semana triste na nossa historia.

Re:Uma semana triste (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771812)

nice try karma nigger

Re:Uma semana triste (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771815)

Yep. And you are an idiot.

Posting messages in Portuguese in a non-Portuguese speaking message board doesn't make you look smart -- it just makes you a glaring idiot.

Let me make this clear to you in your native language: "Deixe de bancar o idiota. Ninguem esta impressionado que voce sabe falar portugues.""

Thanks for the entertainment.

Sympathies (3, Insightful)

ndogg (158021) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771712)

My sympathies to the families.

These things are essentially big bombs. No matter how many tests people do, there is always the slight possibility that something like this can happen. Hopefully they'll be able to find the cause and work on that for their next launch.

Competition is a good motivator, and hopefully this will motivate other countries to go up into space.

To The Future (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771714)

Will the future of space exploration be dominated by names other than Russia and the USA?

If anyone else has the technological and financial backbone to fund space programs, then certainly other countries/continents will be major players in the decades to come.

It's certainly a positive that governments besides the U.S. and Russia are willing to go into space. Hopefully this Brazilian explosion won't setback their program too much.

Sympathy (4, Insightful)

Stonent1 (594886) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771718)

Just wanted to express my sympathies to the family and friends of those who lost their lives. To quote President Reagan when he spoke to the nation about the Challenger shuttle explosion, "The future doesn't belong to the faint-hearted; it belongs to the brave."

What Space Race? (4, Insightful)

PingXao (153057) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771720)

The space race is hardly heating up in the commercial arena. Boeing recently canceled their Delta IV program due to a lack of customers [spaceflightnow.com] in the commercial satellite business. They wrote off almost a billion dollars. To wit:

However, over the last several years demand for commercial launches eroded while global launch capacity increased. In light of the continuing severe downturn in the commercial launch market, the company has determined that a meaningful recovery of demand and pricing is unlikely for the foreseeable future.

I'm hoping the Chinese have some serious success in their announced manned space program. Perhaps that will incentivize the U.S. to get off their butts and start doing some serious exploration.

Grr.... (2, Funny)

tuxedobob (582913) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771792)

You know, I was all ready to harp on you for saying "incentivize", but dictionary.com says it's a word. Stupid American Heritage Dictionary. Sheesh, next thing you know, "veep" will be a word....

(Look it up.)

Re:Grr.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771847)

This is why you should use dict.org [dict.org] instead.

No definitions found for "incentivize"

Aaaaah, that's the stuff...

The short answer. (5, Funny)

cryms0n (52620) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771722)

Will the future of space exploration be dominated by names other than Russia and the USA?

Not with exploding rockets they won't.

Re:The short answer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771779)

Or maybe the Brazilians wanted to challenge the Chinese lock on the fireworks market?
me

space race heating up is a good thing (2, Interesting)

net_bh (647968) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771723)

There is nothing wrong with other nations developing their space technology. Sure, the naysayers will frown upon this and say that this will be used in ICBMs but we cant be elitist anymore.

In the long run, the US and Russia alone cannot run the International Space Station....they just cant afford it. This will give other nations a change to chip in.

Ofcourse this being /., there will be a barrage of posts saying that China, Brazil, India, etc. should concentrate on feeding their people and improving human rights situation. So much for intelligent, objective conversations...sigh.

Space Station (1)

Detritus (11846) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771784)

The USA can afford to build and run the International Space Station, it just lacks the political will to provide adequate funding. Farm subsidies receive more money than NASA.

Interesting commentary on the article (0)

hype7 (239530) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771725)

"Will the future of space exploration be dominated by names other than Russia and the USA?"

WTF? Where did this line come from?

It didn't even get off the launch pad!

-- james

Re:Interesting commentary on the article (1)

gacp (601462) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771817)

But it will, my brother, it WILL.

That's the whole point. Brazilians, Chinese, Indians, and others, are trying, for keeps, and they will succeed, eventually. While the US space program... well, let's say it's good the Russians are still there.

Whiny Europeans.. (-1, Troll)

xchino (591175) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771729)

You don't see us crying like babies when the europeans refer to the USA as "America" which isn't even a continent to begin with.

Re:Whiny Europeans.. (1)

Lshmael (603746) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771756)

Considering the vast majority of people in our country call themselves "Americans," I should hope not...

Re:Whiny Europeans.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771818)

Hm... Do you refer to yourself as an American then?

PS: Either way, I'd say your post is probably a little hypocritical.

PPS: I'm an American.

Oh crap... (1)

gt25500 (622543) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771745)

Not only is australlia it's own country-continent... EUROPE too?!?!?! What's next? Asia?

Will the future of space exploration be dominated by names other than Russia and the USA?

Apparently not, they need to not blowup first. Yeah yeah, we blew (US) blew up recently but at least we got up. Not to mention we've been up there how many times? Since when?

The cause! (4, Funny)

cryms0n (52620) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771749)

Perhaps a maintenance crewman answered his cellphone
while filling up the tank?

Yes (4, Insightful)

Smartcowboy (679871) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771758)

Will the future of space exploration be dominated by names other than Russia and the USA?"

In a word: yes.

We see more and more countries involved in space exploration. USA and Russia are not the only players anymore.

Russia is out of money so they can't have ambitious project.

USA are founding the NASA less and less. This is a pity. Maybe this will change in the future. If it happen, USA will make a comeback in space exploration

Now many countries want to do space exploration and are willing to trow money in it. This is a good thing because this will speed up the space exploration race. But USA will now have competition not only from russia but from many country.

What will be real great is when there will be private corporation involved in space exploration. Anyone could think of a business model involving space exploration?

21 Dead (2, Informative)

zzztkf (574953) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771765)

By Nihon Keizai Shinun, the number of death has reached 21. Other 20 persons are heavily wounded. It's tragedy for everyone.

progress (2, Interesting)

milliyear (132102) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771771)

I predict that someday, one of these 'newcomers' to the space race will invent some radical new concept in the design/manufacture/launching of rockets, that will eventually be adopted by the USA and others. But they, too, will suffer their share of failures along the way.

Condolences to the people killed/injured and their families, and hoping they did not die in vain and the Brazilian Space Program and all others will continue.

A New Hope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771778)

Hey, maybe we could get Lance Bass on one of those flights!

Europe is not getting involved (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771782)

They are involved for quite long time now. ever heard of ESA [esa.int] ?

But yeah, please, you are welcome to compare Chinese, Japanese and Brazilian space programs with the European one. Americans....

Double standard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771789)

Does it strike anyone else as odd that this "article" starts off "16 people were killed" and then goes blithely into "blah blah new space race blah"? It's much like saying "Columbia broke up today killing the crew; does this herald new and interesting replacements for the space shuttle?".

Even the page title is "Brazilian Rocket Explodes on Launch Pad". Really bizarre, some people's priorities. I guess we can be grateful for the small grace that no 'merkins were killed, sparing the world a maudlin television remembrance.

Nelson: "HA-ha..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771798)

...Europe is a country... Europe is a country... Europe is a country...

Does Europe have oil? no?? "HA-ha...".. Europe is boring.. Europe is boring.. Let's get back to the BBQ..

A good sign (2, Insightful)

qorkfiend (550713) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771805)

The more countries that sign on, the better. Space exploration, limited to one or two countries, or those who control the ballot, is doomed to die. Will we succumb to Space: the Highest Bidder? or will it be: Space Whoever Gets There First?

I personally bet on Who Gets There First.

I know americans... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771811)

They hold a grudge against (the country) europe because their ancestors couldn't afford to stay at the center of the world.

very sad news for slashdot and ID software (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771814)

I'm fucking crying here. Reuters [reuters.com] , CNN [cnn.com] , and id's site [idsoftware.com] are all talking about this explosion right now. John Carmack and Rob Spindler (a competing X prizer) were both on the pad with the brasillian engineers when this happened, and they as of yet can not find anything. They are 90% assumed everyone on the pad is now dead.

Brazil (-1, Troll)

Talisman (39902) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771821)

As usual, the typical Slashdotter will, without knowing anything about Brazil and its notoriously clumsy government, chalk this up to 'Good Try' and remind the Americans that we better watch out because other countries will surpass us in space and blah blah blah...

I have a condo in Rio. I've lived amongst Brazilians for a little over 3 years now.

You cannot possibly fathom what a bumbling and disorganized country this is. The only surprise about this story is that the rocket didn't veer into a population center and kill hundreds/thousands more. THAT would be a Brazilian-style debacle. Only killing people in the immediate area is a success in their books.

The U.S. government will continue to sit on its ass and point and laugh at these countries, because they KNOW they are not even close to being a threat. Right now it's 90% diarrhea of the mouth, and 10% failed attempts.

The problem is at the most basic societal levels. The way Brazilians simply ARE is slack. They don't work hard, and when they do, things like attention to detail is an afterthought, at BEST.

Those buzzcut, Coke-bottle bi-focal, white button-down Oxford, pocket protector wearing, STRAIGHT-LACED, ANAL RETENTIVE, NO SOCIAL LIFE HAVING NERDS are what a space program needs.

That is a rare, if not non-existent phenotype in Brazil. Down here, being able to do the Lambada is far more important than knowing calculus.

Now go ahead and bash me because I'm not politically correct. FUCK being politically correct. I'm RIGHT, and that's far and away more important. I LIVE IN BRAZIL. I'm not some keyboard jockey in Ohio who thinks he knows the ins-and-outs of the world because he reads the BBC online.

I'm the guy on the ground, and Brazilians are as grabastic as any race on the planet.

Now when it comes to sex, the women are fucking Olympians. But this is rocket science, not shagging. And at that, they simply suck.

Tal

Re:Brazil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771840)

LOL thanks for the chuckle. The Brazillian woman sound like they suck too. I think they should be the first to put a micro-bikini into space.

Re:Brazil (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771849)

You say, "When it comes to sex, the women are fucking Olympians?" What exactly do you mean? I live in Olympia, Washington, and I am ready to change my travel plans if you can confirm this for me.

Hahaha.. pathetic.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6771826)

..so the americans have figured out that Europe is a single country..

I wonder how long it will take the americans to find oil in Europe that requires them to shutdown ESA by heavy bombing and other games.

Re:Hahaha.. pathetic.. (2, Insightful)

qorkfiend (550713) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771831)

5 seconds. Americans (speaking as one) always choose brute force when finesse would suffice.

Space Race? (1)

qorkfiend (550713) | more than 10 years ago | (#6771838)

I could not think of a better incentive for a Space Race than other countries competing. We have "Made it to the Moon" (depending on who you ask)...there are many many other countries out there who have yet to get off this planet. Technology is expanding beyond this planet - 25, 50 years. I'll still be alive. Let's see what happens.
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