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Mac OS X Software Roundup

pudge posted more than 10 years ago | from the ride-em-in-let-em-out dept.

OS X 55

zpok writes "The Register runs an interview with the two only Mac OS X coders on the OpenOffice Project. In short: no, OO.org for Mac OS X won't be delayed until 2005, but they could really really use some help." jeblucas writes "There are new versions of Macromedia's media suite: Macromedia Studio MX 2004 with new versions of Dreamweaver, Flash and Fireworks. There's also a professional version of Flash (for PDA, phone, and video authoring with direct links to Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premier, and Avid Express) to be had for $700." A user writes, "Cricket Media has released a Mac OS X application for hardcore Netflix users who want to manage their accounts without using the website. The app is an interesting example of what can be done with WebKit." lordDallan writes "Opera had recently released Opera 6.03 for Mac OS X. Purchase of this version includes a free upgrade to 7.0 when it becomes available."

cancel ×

55 comments

In other Apple news... (2, Informative)

heldlikesound (132717) | more than 10 years ago | (#6801765)

OSX 10.3, coded-named Panther is at B49 right now, and as of B44 has labels ala the beastly operating system that was OS9.

Also, new Powerbooks are nowhere to be seen, which is leading many, myself included, to believe that we will not seen them until the Paris expo, which is sometime in mid-Sept.

Re:In other Apple news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6801948)

Apple has cut the prices of the Powerbooks and G5's pretty steeply for the education market. The 12" PB is looking awfully cheap at these prices.

Re:In other Apple news... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6802392)

OSX 10.3, coded-named Panther is at B49 right now, and as of B44 has labels ala the beastly operating system that was OS9.

Negative. Panther has had labels since before A202, the WWDC preview release.

Re:In other Apple news... (1)

TheGreek (2403) | more than 10 years ago | (#6804527)

WWDC seed was 7A179. There was a test SWU that tested the SWU functionality and also put in some fixes. Accordingly, the build was bumped to 7A202.

Re:In other Apple news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6805943)

I should have been more clear. My sentence was badly written. What I meant was, "Panther has had labels since the WWDC release, which came before A202, though I can no longer remember its build number."

Re:In other Apple news... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6802646)

Labels? So I can hilight an application icon in orange? Who gives a fuck?

Re:In other Apple news... (1)

azav (469988) | more than 10 years ago | (#6806277)

Rumor has it new PBs will be out after IBM develops a low power version of the G5

mac os x? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6801774)

can that run linux?

Re:mac os x? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6801853)

Jesus no man....Moc OS X is an operating syste.......Ha Woah, almost got me there. You are good...almost too good.

I guess it could be done (1)

FrankoBoy (677614) | more than 10 years ago | (#6801911)

After all, even a fuckin' teletype [slashdot.org] can run Linux ;) Too bad the Apple Public Source License [apple.com] sucks so much [slashdot.org] though, since it discourages many fine programmers to write new stuff that MacOS X could run as well.

P.S. It's not because the parent message was offtopic that my reply is. Anyway, do as you please.

Re:I guess it could be done (1)

MoneyT (548795) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802152)

And exactly what is stopping these programmers from releasing their software onto OS X under a different licence?

Re:I guess it could be done (1)

FrankoBoy (677614) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802372)

I thought the link I made with the FSF statement on the APSL made that point clear enough : it's a practical and moral matter for many programmers to follow the FSF guidelines, moreover when software release is concerned. Maybe they could still do it in most cases, but many simply wouldn't because of Free Software principles.

rant
And moral issues are always relevent to moral people. For example, even if I think RMS pushes the enveloppe too far sometimes ( like his views on Debian in this interview [ofb.biz] ), I agree with most of his public statements. I think that everything is political in some way ( y'all ought to take some time to think about that if you didn't already ), and that sacrificing morality for mere practicality is dangerously frivolous.
/rant

Anyway, thanks for the reply mate, I realize my previous message could have been clearer :)

Re:I guess it could be done (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6802422)

it's a practical and moral matter for many programmers to follow the FSF guidelines

Define "many." "Many" is a weasel-word; it carries no meaning by itself, and so can be used to prove just about any point. In this context, "many" is probably measured in dozens. In other words, "it's a practical and moral matter for dozens of programmers."

In other, other words, who gives a rat's ass about the FSF? Certainly the vast majority of programmers do not.

And moral issues are always relevent to moral people.

Yes, they are. But moral people must also be pragmatic enough to recognize the difference between an actual moral issue and a made-up, no-account issue. Liberty is a moral issue. Source code is not.

I think that everything is political in some way

Of course it is; this conclusion is implicit in the definition of the term. However, this does not mean that it is necessary for everything to be politicized. Quite the contrary. The vast majority of issues have no true moral or political aspect to them. It is neither a moral nor a political question whether I use creamer in my coffee. It is neither a moral nor a political question whether Apple uses the APSL, or some other source code license, or no license at all. It's purely a practical matter, a subtle point that folks such as yourself seem to miss on a regular basis.

sacrificing morality for mere practicality is dangerously frivolous.

Making mountains out of molehills makes it more difficult for folks to recognize the actual mountains. In other words, by making a huge stink out of a topic of no consequence, you are distracting people from questions that really do require careful thought and consideration.

You're not a part of the solution. You're a part of the problem.

I realize my previous message could have been clearer

It's not really a matter of clarity. You're painting a very clear picture. It's just that you're looking at all the wrong stuff.

Well... (1)

FrankoBoy (677614) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802620)

( I'm conscious I'm using many ( haha ) vague terms like "many" or "sometimes" quite often here. It's only because I don't know of statistics about this. These are my observations and while I think they're accurate, please take them as so. I don't have higher pretentions about them. )

You're right when you say that nobody would give a fuck about the FSF if only dozens of people would agree with the ideas it maintains. Now, browse a little on SourceForge and look at the projects going on under the GPL ; yes, sometimes prior license issues are the cause of this, but it's obvious many people license their new software by choice. Same thing for the bunch of GNU projects out there. Nuff said.

I'm rather surprised by the remainder of your argument ( "Source code isn't political" and such ). What about source codes for voting machines, privacy and "national security" concerns ? These are very politically decisive examples, don't you think ? Whether it is politicized or not is not relevent since it actually happens and shapes our political systems in subtle ways, whatever you might think about it.

Refusing to see the political aspect of technology is the problem I'm referring to. I'd like to know how you think that me being interested in this perspective is a problem to the programming community.

BTW, I do realize that Apple getting SOME OF its sources public in a way is already a Good Thing. All I was saying in my original post is that it could be better. It matters to me because of its political implications and possible long-term effects on the software community, in practicality as well. Consider that a molehill if you please ; I don't.

Re:Well... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6805894)

Now, browse a little on SourceForge and look at the projects going on under the GPL

That is absolutely the wrong way to judge how many people drink the FSF's kool-aid, for two reasons. First, the GPL has disproportionate mindshare. How many people tack the GPL on their software just because they're buzzword compliant, with little consideration given to what the GPL actually means, much less what the FSF wishes it could mean?

But far more importantly, the GPL (as has been widely discussed elsewhere) is a viral license. It infects, for lack of a better word, other projects without regard to, and sometimes against, the wishes of the authors of that project. So the fact that the GPL is used X times doesn't mean there are X people who buy into the FSF's propaganda. It just means that the sum of the people who buy into the propaganda, the people who don't know any better, and the people who got infected by the GPL equals X.

What about source codes for voting machines, privacy and "national security" concerns ? These are very politically decisive examples, don't you think ?

Nope. Federally owned source code, like all federally owned intellectual property, is either in the public domain, or classified. There's no reason to even bring an anti-capitalist agenda into that discussion.

Refusing to see the political aspect of technology is the problem I'm referring to.

Don't misrepresent my position. I'm not refusing to see it. I absolutely acknowledge it. I'm telling you that it's not what you make it out to be. Source code is not an important political issue, to the extent that it's a political issue at all. You are wasting your time worrying about source code when there are real battles to be fought.

I'd like to know how you think that me being interested in this perspective is a problem to the programming community.

You're wasting your own energy on an unworthy and harmful pursuit. (Your own talents may be negligible, but their value is certainly nonzero.) Also, you're distracting otherwise talented people from worthy pursuits with your blah-blah-blah.

Part of the problem, you see.

BTW, I do realize that Apple getting SOME OF its sources public in a way is already a Good Thing.

Again, you miss the big picture. It is neither a good thing nor a bad thing in any absolute sense. It has both good and bad aspects. For the good, people can read Apple's source code and learn. For the bad, Apple has waived the opportunity to sell access to their source code for a profit, which has a miniscule but real effect on the national economy and the satisfaction of the shareholders. There are both good and bad aspects to giving away IP; one cannot simply embrace the good and ignore the bad and hum one's workers' motto while pretending that the world is a socialist paradise.

It matters to me because of its political implications and possible long-term effects on the software community, in practicality as well. Consider that a molehill if you please ; I don't.

The fact that you lack perspective is the very crux of my bitch. I realize this is important to you. I understand why. I'm telling you that you are wrong to ascribe such importance to this matter, and that by directing so much of your energy toward it at the expense of matters that are actually important, you are causing a net harm to the world.

You're a bad person because you're wasting your time on something that doesn't matter, while attempting to seduce others into doing the same.

Re:I guess it could be done (5, Insightful)

merdark (550117) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802583)

<I>And moral issues are always relevent to moral people.</I>

But not all morals are the same. I, for instance, think that the GPL is a terrible license. I have no problem with BSD or propietary licenses though. Why?

I see the GPL as being very hypocritical. Preaching some twisted form of freedom while imposing restrictions on software. At least proprietary licenses are very clear in that sense.

Don't let the FSF delude you. We are talking about software here. There are much much much more important issues in the world than software licenses. Your energies would be far better spent on those problems (think world poverty, environmental concerns, the increasing aggressiveness of the USA, etc).

Right (2, Interesting)

FrankoBoy (677614) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802681)

I definitely agree with you on most of your post. Some restrictions on software you're talking about are my main problems with the GPL, and that's the case I pointed out in my last post ( RMS on Debian offering non-free packages ). I mean, even if I think something is immoral, I won't forbid someone from doing it : that'd be policespeak. I'm all for getting rid of licenses you know, but I do understand that due to the business model mostly used in the software industry right now, some kinds of limits are to be drawn. I'll be quite thrilled if the situation exists where all licenses could be gotten rid of, but that's revolution stuff and I won't get into this here ;)

BTW, I do realize there are MUCH more important issues, and I do spend time on some of the ones you talked about and on others too ( popular education, for example ). But I'm on Slashdot here, not on infoshop.org [infoshop.org] , you know ;)

Re:I guess it could be done (1)

frankie (91710) | more than 10 years ago | (#6804625)

I think that everything is political in some way, and that sacrificing morality for mere practicality is dangerously frivolous.

If you're so worried about computer ethics, why do you have a Hotmail account and use Macromedia products running on Windows to create your web pages [er.uqam.ca] ? Do you believe that ASPL is morally worse than MS-EULA, or are you being hypocritical?

You're funny (2, Funny)

FrankoBoy (677614) | more than 10 years ago | (#6804940)

My Hotmail account is for anti-spam purposes. I use other e-mail addresses to communicate at work and with my friends, but I use this disposable address for public stuff like my Web page, Slashdot, chatrooms and whatnot. I think preserving my inboxen clean while filling MS servers with junk is definitely a win-win situation, moreover when you consider that I got plug-ins to block their ads.

As for the Flash stuff on my site, it's just getting pretty old :) I've made these animations like last year, and at that time I didn't know much about alternatives to mainstream software so I took the obvious path. Anyway, I've been thinking about new stuff to put in there soon, and of course I'll get rid of Flash stuff at one point. Thanks for your interest in my Web pages sir, any suggestions ? ;)

Th1rD p057! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6801840)

w00t!

In related news (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6801917)

Mac addicts proclaim victory over Microsoft as the Macintosh software library nearly doubles in size.

Re:In related news (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6804024)

...and three extra feet of shelf-space are added to the short half-aisle of boxed software for the Mac in the back of the store.

Webkit and other open Apple developer developments (5, Insightful)

ihatewinXP (638000) | more than 10 years ago | (#6801945)


With everyone crying about Apple ripping off Watson, pushing out Adobe Premeire, and basicaly running over a number of smaller developers, its easy to forget what they have been giving back in recent months. Lost in hardware rumors Apple is innovating in the developer scene as much as anywhere.
Developing and then giving away Webkit instantly gets a thousand projects off the ground which were previously only musings and ideas (read: netflix manager). The best of open source is when it facilitates truly independent innovative ideas that would be shot down by 'the corporate machine' and never see the light of day (read: SubEthaEdit). Dont forget Apple saw this long ago with Hypercard and have been listening to users wail about its death. Not just of the product but of the idea and philosophy of "I own an Apple, therefore I innovate."

Xcode, Applescript Studio, WebKit, Services, Java, Cocoa..... It looks like taking 5 years to plan a new OS from scratch is _finally_ paying off.

spinning beachball (5, Interesting)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802215)

It looks like taking 5 years to plan a new OS from scratch is _finally_ paying off.


of course there was that period where steve jobs was sent off to wander in the wilderness of NeXT. being a NeXT owner it was of course shocking how NeXT like mac OSX is. all the way down to the spinning multi-colored beach ball.


of course its not really a beach ball. its really a spinning magneto optical disk. a what??? yep the very first next shipped with a magento optical disk as its main drive. It truly sucked (speed wise) and vanished from later editions. (applications launched so slowly you often ended up double and triple launching multiple instances as you clicked on the icon over and over--that probably also one reason why the apple icons hop and can only be launched once). I've always enjoyed the subtle irony of the spinning beachball.


in any case in the next day, NeXT created one of the best RAD gui tool kit ever invented, and a new language to go along with it (objective-C). and gave them away. lots of little groovy app, not major ones, showed up as a result. anyone could make a calculator or an interface to gnuplot. Oh yeah, there was one or two major ones: Mosaic and Zilla (Zilla was not related to 'mozilla', today the modern term for Zilla is 'Grid Computing'. So this strategy of making awesome developmer tools is not new


Its also clear that given how much the mac of today echos its NeXT look and feel (the file browser, the dock, netInfo, three button mice, DisplayPostscript/pdf, cube shaped computers, and of course BSD unix) that not a whole lot of development has happend since its first incarnation. In other words Steve jobs vision got slowed down and only now its taking root and flourishing


playing "what if", would we be further along if he had not cast out? one might speculate that he had to wait for technology to come along. but remember tim bernardslee invented the World wide web to justify buying a NeXT Station, we had postscript, mime e-mail, good sound cards, ethernet,giant screens, and cube shaped computers back in the hey days of NeXT. so maybe we'd be further along indeed if so much time had not been lost.


indeed I think the reason Jobs performance now seems so amazing now is not because is doing anything different but rather because MS and the beigebox makers did not seize the opportunity to innovate during his absence from the scene. the world did not eclipse Jobs it just waited for him to return and lead the way again, showing how to be an early adopter, how to integrate ideas cleverly, and how to tame Unix on the desktop. He didn't have to leap frog his way to the front. he was amazingly enough still there with his NeXT technology. Nothing in principle Sun or MS or IBM could not have done while he was out. BeOS might have been the only one who actually tried, but it was too little too late.

I wonder why apple and jobs seem to be the source of all computer creativity?

Re:spinning beachball (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6804053)

I wonder why apple and jobs seem to be the source of all computer creativity?

It's the kool-aide you've been drinking.

Re:spinning beachball (2, Informative)

misterpies (632880) | more than 10 years ago | (#6804549)

>>it was of course shocking how NeXT like mac OSX is. all the way down to the spinning multi-colored beach ball.

Hang on there. I've been using Macs since the mid 1980s (how I remember the excitement of getting a 20Mb external hard drive to supplement the single 800K floppy...it took me years to fill it. But i digress), and there's always been a spinning beach ball. Of course it started out in B&W since that's how Macs started too (and NeXT was originally launched as a grayscale machine).

NeXT took as much from the original Mac interface as it has given back to OSX.

Re:spinning beachball (1)

transient (232842) | more than 10 years ago | (#6804729)

Hang on yourself. I've used Macs from day one (1983), as well as NeXTSTEP (although I only started with version 2 or thereabouts, but I've still got my black hardware at home). I assure you the "beachball" in OS X was taken from NeXT. It resembled NeXT even more closely in OS X preview releases, before Apple made it puffy.

Re:spinning beachball (1)

transient (232842) | more than 10 years ago | (#6804794)

Make that 1984. ;-)

Re:spinning beachball (1)

MochaMan (30021) | more than 10 years ago | (#6805118)

No, he's right. I also used both Macs and NeXT boxes, and the spinning colour-wheel/beach-ball/CD was originally a black and white spinning "colour-wheel" on the Mac. If you ever used HyperCard, it showed up pretty often. On NeXT boxes, it became a spinning CD, but was very similar. But you're right, it wasn't the colourful blob it is now until MacOS 10.1 or 10.2, it was the exact NeXT cursor.

I disagree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6805699)

I know what you mean but your mistaken I beleive. macs had a 2-d spinning wheel. sort of like a pie chart with equla slices two of which were black and two of which were white. it did not resemble a CD or magneto optical disk. it was just a figure. the Next version was full grey scale, with shading to give it dimension, it was intended to have the diffractive look of a shiny multi-hued disk (and when it became color it became actually hued). the colors are not so much a rainbow as consistent with a look of a CD lit from the right direction.

Re:I disagree (1)

misterpies (632880) | more than 10 years ago | (#6807963)


sure, but one reason the NeXT version was full grayscale & fancy while the Mac version was B&W and simple was that Macs originally shipped with B&W screens (no grayscale) and a resolution of 72dpi. I think icons were 12 by 12 pixels (maybe 16 by 16) - you try representing a fancy diffraction pattern on a system like that.

Re:I disagree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#6811657)

To be pedantic, the "monochrome" NeXT systems actually used 2-bit greyscale. I'd suggest at least 8 bits for "full grey scale".

Re:Webkit and other open Apple developer developme (0, Interesting)

Lussarn (105276) | more than 10 years ago | (#6803213)

Oh come on. Climb down from your high horses.

Webkit is forked of khtml dickhead. They are forced to give it away. If they where not there would be no code for you to look at.

Apple is about as much open source as Microsoft. Only giving away code they have to give away or code noone except Mac users care about (darwin).

Apple is in no way in the spirit of open source. I have used other open source operating systems well before Macs barely could multitask and this OS X you speak so highly about give nothing new to the open source table. All the interessting stuff is locked down so tight you can't do anything with it from an open source perspective.

So please. You have a great operating system there in OS X. Lets stay at that. It isn't particulary open source. Apple is a big company and could bring a hell of a lot more to the table then what they do right now. Until they do, many of us will not consider it to be the next open source operating system.

I guess I'm in a karma burning mode today...

Re:Webkit and other open Apple developer developme (5, Insightful)

hysterion (231229) | more than 10 years ago | (#6803382)

Webkit is forked of khtml dickhead. They are forced to give it away. If they where not there would be no code for you to look at.
They aren't forced.
KHTML is LGPL [temple.edu] .
Could you restate your point?

Lussarn is rude and illiterate, but correct (3, Insightful)

melquiades (314628) | more than 10 years ago | (#6845001)

The parent is wrong. Despite all his typos, and Lussarn has it right: LGPL is a recursive license for derived works (e.g. forks). The only difference between LGPL and GPL is for other projects which depend on the licensed one -- if khtml were GPL, then Safari would have to be GPL as well; as it is, Apple only has to release Webkit open source.

However, the big question is -- and this is much bigger than Lussarn gives it credit for! -- why did Apple choose to use khtml at all? They could have written their own rendering engine and kept it completely proprietary. They also could have used Gecko and kept it completely proprietary, since the Mozilla license is, IIRC, a BSD-style non-recursive license. (Anybody know for sure on that one?) Apple had plenty of choices resulting in a completely proprietary Webkit, and they didn't take them.

So saying that "Apple is as much about open source as Microsoft" is just plain wrong. When was the last time Microsoft open sourced anything? Sure, they used open source code in their products -- but they've actively avoided any and all recursive open source licenses.

Apple may not be an angel -- they're a corporation, for heaven's sake, and they're beholden to their shareholders and not to the moral compasses of Slashdot readers -- but they've consciously decided to participate some in the take & give back process of open source when they could very well have just stayed out completely.

And don't try to tell me that hasn't done anything useful for anyone. Or has BSD never pulled a patch from Darwin? Has khtml not examined the optimizations Apple made?

Re:Lussarn is rude and illiterate, but correct (1)

hysterion (231229) | more than 10 years ago | (#6846590)

Thanks for the correction -- you are absolutely right [gnu.org] .

Obviously I was confusing this with the case of the Darwin kernel/OS and other projects, where (I believe!) they are indeed releasing more code than they really have to.

I also agree with your other comments.

Re:Lussarn is rude and illiterate, but correct (1)

melquiades (314628) | more than 10 years ago | (#6847236)

Yes, you're right: Apple was under no obligation to open-source Darwin -- it's based on FreeBSD, which uses (of course) the BSD license.

Re:Webkit and other open Apple developer developme (3, Informative)

bursch-X (458146) | more than 10 years ago | (#6803998)

>code noone except Mac users care about

Surely the Open Source Darwin Streaming Server is of no interest to anyone but Mac users. Also Open Directory, Rendezvous and the Apple CDSA framework for encrypting etc. is completely useless.

Thanks for telling me I wouldn't have noticed that.

SubEthaEdit (was Hydra) (5, Informative)

leejor (41648) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802043)

And be sure to check outSubEthaEdit [codingmonkeys.de] This is the renamed Hydra. Okay, the new name is kinda funky, wouldn't MagrathaEdit have sounded better? And be sure to read the interview the the Coding Monkeys [macdevcenter.com] behind SubEthaEdit at O'Reilly. It is really amazing what a small group of programmers have pulled off. Give these guys another six months and they may be nearly feature competitive with BBEdit.

Lee Joramo [joramo.com]

Re:SubEthaEdit (was Hydra) (1)

Domini (103836) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802872)

Ah, yes... I saw that yesterday... I though it was funny that two groups would both bring out the same type of collaborative editor for free... So that's what happened to Hydra.

The only problem I had with Hydra was that it had no vi mode. (Or other programming enhancements.)

Re:SubEthaEdit (was Hydra) (1)

follower-fillet (140975) | more than 10 years ago | (#6805745)

Thanks for this information, "SubEthaEdit" returns exactly zero results on Google.

Talk about killing brand recognition...

Re:SubEthaEdit (was Hydra) (1)

Lars T. (470328) | more than 10 years ago | (#6809053)

Well, the problem was that somebody recognized their brand.

Okay.. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6802130)

SubEthaEdit or whatever is a mind-numbingly STUPID name. I'm going to continue to call it Hydra, just like I still call Phoenix "Phoenix" and Chimera "Chimera". Good lord. Any idea on what the BS "legal issues" are all about? Can't be much of a trademark as I've never heard of any software program called Hydra before. Oh well guess when the C&D hits your mailbox you better fold unless you can afford to win.

I would've just named it "Tafkah"...

Also, just because I"m feeling rude: those guys are really dorky-looking. Except the guy on the left he looks pretty cool. Looks to me like he's trying to get away from the others.....

Say, isn't the guy in the OSX shirt a member of Kraftwerk...? Hmm...

In smaller-time news (3, Informative)

BortQ (468164) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802154)

Lux 3.0 [sillysoft.net] - the latest and greatest version of my world domination game - was released last week. It's like the boardgame Risk but with random maps and all sorts of bells and/or whistles.

Re:In smaller-time news (1)

coldwd (471354) | more than 10 years ago | (#6805476)

If you're a fan of Risk, check out iConquer [mac.com] , which is a bit more full featured, has lots of plugins to add extensibility, and is cheaper than Lux.

I'm thoroughly addicted at this point :)

Re:In smaller-time news (1)

BortQ (468164) | more than 10 years ago | (#6806413)

I was just wondering, what features does iConquer have that Lux lacks?

Hey look! (0, Redundant)

numbski (515011) | more than 10 years ago | (#6802898)

Slashdot is doing webcopynews of versiontracker!! :)

*ducks*

The Netflix app might actually get my fiancee to use my mac a little more often. It's always the little things...

Dreamweaver like tool for Linux? (-1, Offtopic)

bornholtz (94540) | more than 10 years ago | (#6804132)

Okay, I'm pretty much off topic here, but the story does mention DreamWeaver.

Anyway, what's the best DreamWeaver-like site manegement tool for Linux?

So cool! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6804322)

So cool, software roundup, macosx!

Since when Slashdot give some free plugs to commercial, CLOSED SOURCE software?

Silly.

Macromedia products are way over priced, and Opera is what's that.

Pudge, not everything from the mac fans are good.
If some mac fans pitch themselves into closed-source, unaccountable, overpriced, buggy software, that doesn't mean the fine slashdot cronw should do the same.

And MacosX sucks, also. Ya, BSD is good...on a PC! On mac hardware, it's awful. The interrupts are all fucked and the latency is too big. Im not talking about Aqua, but the underlying thing, darwin.
Ah the joke. They open-sourced it and instead of improving it with optimisations and GRAPHIC DRIVER SUPPORT for the oldies, they do the silly dance, FINK! Porting packages that would run better on Linux! But there's hopes. GCC gets improved to generate better PPC code, and optimise drawin.
It's common knowledhge that anyway, not hacker, graphy!!

Help Contribute to OO? (1)

kev0153 (578226) | more than 10 years ago | (#6804825)

So how does one get in touch with Dan Williams mentioned in the interview? I would like to help a bit with porting OO to mac os x. Not much of a coder but they mentioned that they could use some warm bodies for other tasks

Re:Help Contribute to OO? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6805064)

Try here:

http://porting.openoffice.org/mac/

here:

http://www.ooodocs.org/modules.php?name=Forums&f il e=viewforum&f=20
and when it is up, here:

http://trinity.neooffice.org/

SubEthaEdit is a great name (2, Interesting)

cbuskirk (99904) | more than 10 years ago | (#6806081)

If you are going produce a piece of software for collaborative editing, why not name it for the fictionally greatest collaborative work of all time the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Thousands of Hitchhikers submit entries via the SubEtha network. The perfect geek name for a geek product.

What about Director? (1)

azav (469988) | more than 10 years ago | (#6806154)

I didn't seee Director MX mentioned. Everyone appears to be flash centric these days but there has been a Mac OS X version of Director out for 8 months and Director can do a lot of things that Flash can't and even can include Flash inside a Director movie.

Plus with xtras, you can write your own C++ to extend Director's functionality. We just got another SQL database xtra today.

Sorry to not see it mentioned in the software roundup.

Other interesting / cool software (and some not) (1)

WillAdams (45638) | more than 10 years ago | (#6806833)

- TeXshop (Apple Design Award winner---modelled on NeXT' TeXView.app --- add in EquationEditor.app to get NeXT's TeX eq -> eps Service)

- Fugu - spiffy front-end to some sort of secure file transfer protocol

- Free Ruler (but I wish Mac OS X had user-definable logical screen dpi and that so many apps weren't hardwired to 72dpi)

- rBrowserLite - spiffy free FTP client / alternative file browser

- TextLightning.app (shareware) - way cool fileservice which allows apps to open arbitrary .pdf files and get a (visual) formatted version of the text therein.

- sBook5 - nifty AI-based contact / note manager

- Zippist - drag-drop zip program

- Purgatory Design's Intaglio drawing program - AFAIK, the only OS X graphics program which fully supports AAT / ATSUI

- the QT port of LyX (this is way cool on Win32 too)

Un-cool software, which should have been cool includes:

- Macromedia FreeHand MX - this should've been a Cocoa version which was a successor to Altsys Virtuoso for NeXTstep. Instead we got a Carbon program w/ no Unicode or nifty type system support.

William

Macromedia is lazy, update Mac Flash Player! (1)

Two Scoops (694777) | more than 10 years ago | (#6832438)

Here I see an update for the Flash program, but what about Flash Player? I find it depressing that for a Mac you need a quicksilver dual G4 to smoothly run a typical animation (God forbid if it's interactive), but it runs fine on a low-end PC. When large objects change alpha or multiple movie clips move all at once it's more like Flash Photographer. Macromedia should make a COCOA Flash player that actually remotely approaches the Mac's potential. It feels slower than an emulator, something's really wrong here.
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