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Gates Says Windows Reliability Is Greater

CmdrTaco posted more than 10 years ago | from the release-the-worms dept.

Microsoft 568

mogrinz writes "According to an interview with the New York Times, Bill Gates is proud of the achievements Microsoft has made in increasing the security of Windows. As for the effects on people being attacked by SoBig.F, etc? Gates says this is "something we feel very bad about". Gates summarizes the Microsoft position very succinctly: "We're doing our very best, and that's all we can do"."

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Greater than (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837800)

my first posting ASS!

Re:Greater than (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837833)

"That's no moon.." -Obi Wan Kenobi

Just Great (1, Troll)

Tuna_Shooter (591794) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837806)

May his best isnt good enough ..@

Re:Just Great (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837828)

I was hoping to find Windows on the dot com fad list.... **sigh*

Re:Just Great (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837878)

Whether his best is good enough is indeed an interesting question, but the world has obviously thought they are good enough since his companies products have sold very well.

Re:Just Great (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837916)

Partake in the basking glow of sweet sweet microsoft.

The wonderful security of Windows.

The beautiful complexity of Internet Explorer.

The unending usefulness of Word, Excel, and Frontpage.

Damnation for all things "Linux".
Linux zealots need to
1. Shoot a penguin, then eat it.
2. Delete their hard-drives and never touch a computer.
3. Take basic Grammar and Vocabulary lessons.
4. Jump off the nearest bridge. Seriously they serve no useful purpose.

Re:Just Great (2, Insightful)

sperling (524821) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837965)

The world doesn't care if security is good enough.
MS give people what they want, not what they need. Combined with their marketing bulldozer, ofcourse they're selling well.
If any other OS should have a chance to compete, it'll need to think about what the end user looks for, not what they should be looking for.

With the resources of the OS community it's not at all impossible to create something secure, but still as userfriendly as Windows.

Re:Just Great (5, Insightful)

digitalunity (19107) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837921)

Now that's just mean.

If by reliability, you mean it's ability to function in a proper way without self-destruction, I'd say he is succeeding. Windows XP is indeed better than the previous offerings. Once upon a time, you didn't even have to touch your computer and it would spontaneously have problems. It has gotten much better. Now, it's resilience against the evils of the internet...

That's another story. Indeed, Gates should institue a moratorium on new projects until the old ones can become stable enough to actually properly handle the internet.

Sobig.F is a good example of how fundamental the problems with Microsoft software is. The changes required to secure (pick one: Windows,IE,Outlook,Exchange,IIS) need to happen at the API layer. Unfortunately, this would take industry-wide support, something not even Microsoft can make happen overnight. It would seem with all the money companies already have invested, there is a lot of corporate inertia to overcome.

re: above (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837812)

at least tech support is...............

Wow, it's really secure now! (5, Funny)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837813)

Shit, it's so secure I need a password to read the article:

Welcome to The New York Times on the Web!

For full access to our site, please complete this simple registration form.
As a member, you'll enjoy:

In-depth coverage and analysis of news events from The New York Times FREE

Up-to-the-minute breaking news and developing stories FREE

Exclusive Web-only features, classifieds, tools, multimedia and much, much more FREE

Please enter your Member ID:

Please enter your password:

Remember my Member ID and password on this computer.
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Re:Wow, it's really secure now! (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837874)

You know, having been a reader of The New York Times since I was ten, I can't really object to registration.

Re:Wow, it's really secure now! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837900)

How old are you? 12?

Re:Wow, it's really secure now! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837905)

You know, having been a reader of The New York Times since I was ten, I can't really object to registration.

I'm sure you can. You probably just haven't tried hard enough. Maybe you need to object to a few simpler things first and work your way up to it.

Re:Wow, it's really secure now! (1)

Dot.Com.CEO (624226) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837964)

Pity the idiot moderators did not appreciate your humour... Excellent nick, as well!

No? (5, Funny)

jabbadabbadoo (599681) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837814)

"Q. Blaster included a message attacking you. Do you take these things personally?

A. No. "

He should.

Re:No? (5, Insightful)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837845)

Why? His company released a patch to fix it a few months before the attack started.

Would Linus feel particularly hurt if a worm went around that attacked kernel v0.94 ???

Tom

Re:No? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837849)

Why should he?

Because linux is free?

Re:No? (5, Funny)

Dark Lord Seth (584963) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837890)

If he did, two minutes of reading slashdot would be enough to drive the guy to suicide.

Re:No? (1)

Zeinfeld (263942) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837974)

If he did, two minutes of reading slashdot would be enough to drive the guy to suicide.

What makes you think that Bill does not read Slashdot? Plenty of Microsoft employees do.

If you want to find out his nym, simply look for the posts that start off 'I don't understand' and then go on to list some issue he has with the way windows or some other computer program works.

Bill is just a geek like you or me with slightly more money.

I want my money back!!! (0, Troll)

HanzoSan (251665) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837979)



We should get a refund, all these billions we gave to Bill Gates, and he cant spend some of it to fix his damn OS?

He is trying his best? What a load of bullshit!!!!! Microsoft just refuses to spend their #$@! money!!!!

Best? (0, Funny)

Surak (18578) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837819)

Well, apparently Mr. Gates, your best isn't good enough, now is it?

Re:Best? (2, Insightful)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837854)

Say what?

A patch for the blaster worm came out before the attacks. People [regardless of the OS] are just too stupid to run the fucking update process.

Even if they ran FreeBSD they'd have to keep ontop of updates. That is unless they want their apache server to get rooted or their ssh daemen pwn3d or their wuftpd completely j4ck3d.

Tom

Re:Best? (1)

Angry White Guy (521337) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837881)

Microsoft dropped the ball on that one. Their BSA tool was a joke, the patch was spotty at best.
They did their best to mitigate the damages by mirroring Windows update servers, but it was too little, too late.

For all the other outbreaks, I blamed admins. This one however, I blame Bill. I just hope that they learned from this one, and do better in the long run.

Re:Best? (1)

thogard (43403) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837932)

I've got a disk full of logs that shows you are not telling the truth. There were versions of msblaster nearly 3 months before any patch came out of MS and since my honeypot tried to delvier nearly a billion spam message I think your claim is total BS.

Obligatory quote from "The Rock" (5, Funny)

arnie_apesacrappin (200185) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837821)

Losers always whine about their best. Winners go home and fuck the prom queen.

Re:Obligatory quote from "The Rock" (1)

thinkninja (606538) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837885)

BAH!

Re:Obligatory quote from "The Rock" (1)

osgeek (239988) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837888)

I must have missed a meeting. When did quotes from The Rock become obligatory?

Re:Obligatory quote from "The Rock" (1)

vxagent (464817) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837903)

What a stupid statement. Obviously posted by a child. Grow up and post something intelligent.

Re:Obligatory quote from "The Rock" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837926)

Nice, real nice :)

Re:Obligatory quote from "The Rock" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837931)

..so who gets fucked here?

Re:Obligatory quote from "The Rock" (3, Funny)

synergy3000 (637810) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837955)

In this case the prom queen happens to be windows users.

Re:Obligatory quote from "The Rock" (1)

GoofyBoy (44399) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837988)

If I posted this quote the next "Linux/Opensource" article about "Linux making in roads on the desktop" or "Linux catching up to MS" can I get modded Funny too?

Do your best?? (-1, Redundant)

Shifty_McWriteoff (698909) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837823)

I think a quote from "The Rock" will
suffice:

"Loser's always whine about their
best. Winner's go home and ----
the prom queen!"

If the Department of Homeland Security
wants to use M$ exclusivley their
"best" wont cut it.

Re:Do your best?? (-1, Redundant)

keesh (202812) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837841)

The word is fuck, not ----. Please use it.

Fear of lawsuits? Bah! (5, Funny)

denisdekat (577738) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837832)

I like the part about "are you afraid of product liability suits". He should have answered. "no, now that we understand how to buy politicians and use lobbyists, we no longer fear the law".

Re:Fear of lawsuits? Bah! (1)

surfinbox (602851) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837956)

It absolutely makes me puke that the US Army is going to install a whole mess of Windows [nwsource.com] just after the Navy/Marines just about lost their Intranet to Nachi [washtimes.com] .

Isn't somebody in the Defense Department actually taking a strong look at this crap? I don't care if you use SCO, just avoid Microsoft with my Country's Defense systems.

I'm starting to wonder if the Terminator's SkyNet [wikipedia.org] was a Microsoft product?!

A SoBig Achievement (3, Insightful)

jamie (78724) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837834)

Bill's made it possible for any random high-school loser [reuters.com] to destroy $14 billion [net-security.org] of other people's hard work. He's soaked the world in gasoline and handed out a billion matches. That's an "achievement"?

Re:A SoBig Achievement (0, Interesting)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837859)

Bill's made it possible for any random high-school loser to destroy $14 billion of other people's hard work

Well, remember Bill Gates himself is a college dropout [zpub.com] . Dis might explain dat ...

Re:A SoBig Achievement (1)

Surak (18578) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837875)

What would you like to burn down today?

Re:A SoBig Achievement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837898)


hahaha that article quoted mi2g, do a quick google and find out what the real security people think of them, snake oil sellers and FUD merchants come to mind check out theregister.co.uk and vmyths.org for info too

Re:A SoBig Achievement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837904)

don't pick on billy. His mommy was part of United way and helped introduce him to the bigwigs at other compaines.

Re:A SoBig Achievement (1, Insightful)

danheskett (178529) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837922)

Ohh come off it with the $14B. We all - ALL - know that those numbers of lost money are a big fat joke. Its a fake number made up to sound scary and its all bogus. BOGUS.

Every MS virus, worm, and what not does not cause BILLIONS in lost dollars. There are I am sure some cases of actual lost real money, but if they totalled billions I'd be surprised.

MS is doing everything they can to keep people using updated software. Literally they make you go out of your way to run out-ot-date unpatched software. At some point the blame has to shift from MS to the end-user.

And a final word, Jamie. The fake numbers about dollars lost work both ways. That number includes "brand loss", productivity, and all slew of non-scientific estimations. It's a joke. You wouldn't like it very much if they determined falsely that some Apache flaw was the cause of billions of damage.

I think you should grow up.

Re:A SoBig Achievement (4, Interesting)

xoboots (683791) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837989)

> Bill's made it possible for any random high-school loser [reuters.com] to destroy $14 billion [net-security.org] Actually, they haven't found the creator of msblast yet--just some teenage copycat. In fact, that $14B is supposedly caused by SoBig, not msblast. And don't you love the figures that these organizations pull out of their ass, I mean, databases. Of course, it is a crying shame that microsoft is allowed to sell such unsafe software--but it took legislation to get seat belts into cars and even more legislation to get the great unwashed to wear them. My god, there was debate as to the need for drunk driving laws! To expect software providers to do the right thing is a bit of a folly, really.

Re:A SoBig Achievement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837993)

Bill's made it possible for any random high-school loser
Get off your high horse and go fuck yourself.

Just because the guy's overweight and doesn't have many friends according to his neighbors, doesn't mean he's a "loser." I'd venture to say that a damn large percentage of us fit that description: not in the best of shape, we have a few very close friends but very few "showoff" friends, and we spend large amounts of time sitting in front of a computer.

Do you consider yourself a loser?

DAILY REMINDERS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837835)

DAILY REMINDERS:

How many Billion$ in reserve? (0, Troll)

Sphere1952 (231666) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837836)


If Microsloth was doing their best if fix Windoze666 they'd be broke. Instead they're doing their best to rip everybody off.

Re:How many Billion$ in reserve? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837981)

ooh... "Microsloth", "Windoze666". Way to propagate slashdot stereotypes!

Your best? (-1, Redundant)

thinkninja (606538) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837837)

Losers always whine about their best. Winners go home and fuck the prom queen!

Reg Free link (4, Informative)

sheddd (592499) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837842)

for you lazy Geeks:

Link [nytimes.com]

Easy math. (2, Funny)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837846)

I think the formula he's using is:

x+50%(where x = 0)

You can alter the percentage to taste, Bill does.

Google News to the rescue (1, Insightful)

edgrale (216858) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837851)

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/31/technology/31SMI C.html?ex=1062907200&en=97bebbbc61452055&ei=5062&p artner=GOOGLE

Please. (4, Insightful)

Fnkmaster (89084) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837852)

They didn't even bother locking down any of these dangling ports until somebody exploited the fuck out of them. Now they are at least going to ship Windows with the Internet Connection Firewall enabled by default, which is a good thing. They are a reactive organization - it comes with the territory of having a dominant market position and being scared shitless of change, unless and until it forces itself on them, usually by inducing fear of losing the dominant market position.

Re:Please. (0, Insightful)

GoofyBoy (44399) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837945)


How is this insightful?!?!?!

Anyone reading slashdots posts on MS the last few weeks has already heard this argument before thousands of times. Not particulary insightful if this same point has been posted to death with nothing new.

Re:Please. (-1)

m1chael (636773) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837958)

then all the firewall makers are going to cry, "why billy, why?"

Re:Please. (1)

LaCosaNostradamus (630659) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837977)

True dat. But let's not forget Featuritis. Billy-Boy's right that they've been doing the best they can ... while operating on an overdrive to stuff more sexy features into Windows CV (Current Version) and Windows NV (Next Version). There are only so many hours in the day to stuff the turkey, so you can only expect the 11th hour meat inspection to fall short of FDA standards.

Billy and his monkey-dancin' posse were constantly rewarded for their Bad Code Production Line {tm}, and it's twice more the pity that lost business to Linux is the only signal of strength that will reach their receiver.

Myself, I can see the future convulsions of the We Did Our Best giant, and Open Source material will have to run the gamut of legal hurdles put into place through the influence of Billy's Billions. SCO's attempt is just a prelude. I'm glad I have my Slackware Linux CDs. Even a refined tech expert like a Congressman can't figure out how to kill the data on those CDs with some sort of Internet Kill Signal {tm}, even an EMP. And I can use Open Source to surf the Internet safely.

Better to automate patch downloads IMHO (1)

tessaiga (697968) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837990)

Considering that most casual Windows users have no idea how to configure a firewall properly (or even what those dang "port" thingies are), it's understandable that Microsoft was reluctant to ship Windows with ICF enabled. People like that are either going to see all their IM/webconferencing/file sharing/etc software stop working once their ports are blocked (and start a massive wave of calls tying up tech support), or else default to allowing everything to go through the firewall which defeats the purpose of having it in the first place.

Your point of Windows shipping with a bunch of open ports being a Bad Thing is a good one, but a better solution would be to just have the ports closed by default -- why nail a bunch of boards over an open doorway when simply closing and locking the door would suffice? I also think Microsoft is going to have more luck with their current plan of automating updates -- as many people have already pointed out, the exploit used by MSBlast already had a patch out for over a month before the first attack, and people who downloaded it were fine. Virus software companies have known for years that the only way to get people to update regularly is to build it into the software, a la LiveUpdate for Symantec. Letting expert users who are savvy enough to get the relevant patches by themselves anyways opt out of auto update keeps everyone happy.

I say Debian Gnu/Linux reliabity sucks. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837856)

Have you even tried debian stable? Well I hope you have a pre ghz boxen becasue Debian won't even boot on computer! SuSE 8.0/1 could, Redhat could, Gentoo could, Mandrake could! I got it working on my cheap laptop but it sucked really bad

I hope you like your Debian scwealing on your Packard Bell pulsar, and I hope you like getting fscked! Every sane distrobution uses Ext3 or ReiserFS, not ext2 like debian.

Do not mod flamebait, or troll. Because if you do you are a zealot who has their head up their ass!

Re:I say Debian Gnu/Linux reliabity sucks. (2, Informative)

dmp123 (547038) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837886)

Why, because you're not trolling or flamebaiting?

I have three Debian stable installs here, all using ext3, yes, ext3 filesystems. How did I do it?

Well, I could boast about my l33tness, but I just selected the 2.4kernel install option from the menu, and then when it asked me to choose a filesystem, I had reiserFS and ext3. W00t!

So, it's not really that hard now, is it?

David

Re:I say Debian Gnu/Linux reliabity sucks. (2, Interesting)

s/nemisis (7175) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837928)

ok you have obviously not read the mission statment of debian and know little about debian, so i won't bother with calling you an idiot, which you are, or any other names. I will simply say: if you don't like it or can't get it to run, leave the linux thing to people that can get it to run and who actually read and understand what they are using is about and simply keep your mouth shut about it. If you really have to say something about how you really want something done .... submit a bug report.

Dear Bill ... (5, Interesting)

Ninja Programmer (145252) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837858)

Dear Bill,

Far and away your #1 bug is the infamous "buffer overrun" flaw. These usually mostly manifest themselves in string libraries. I know that you have at least 3 library solutions in-house (Safestr for C, CString in MFC, and basic_string in STL) but your developers don't use them otherwise these problems wouldn't happen.

I'd like to point you out to another alternative:

http://bstring.sf.net/

Which your developers may prefer. But whatever you do, why don't you simply make it a requirement that <string.h> simply be outlawed (you could easily write a tool to enforce that couldn't you?), or take some other drastic action?

Buffer overruns are certainly the most common kind of bug that isn't caught by QA (the right answer is not to try to train QA to find them -- they would require the skill of a hacker.) If you concentrate on this one bug alone, you will probably easily remove 80% of these attacks.

Re:Dear Bill ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837913)

Right on brother! Bill = swill!

Re:Dear Bill ... (3, Insightful)

BlackSabbath (118110) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837942)

Buffer overruns are as old as the hills and not Windows specific per-se. But this just highlights how hard it is to get people (in this instance just about everyone in the SDLC) to do the right thing. These things are so prevalent because of various combinations of factors:
- programmer ignorance
- management blindness
- marketing pressure
- auditing failure

Even if only one of the above factors was strongly mitigated you would get a massive reduction in these slipping through.

At the very least, there must be some level of automated checking of code to check for the grossest and most repeated coding mistakes.

Works for me but I'm an expert user (5, Interesting)

j_dot_bomb (560211) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837861)

I have never gotten a virus with xp. Never even even had one come up in a virus scan. But, I do all the right things like use a firewall and autoupdate. I also do things no one else does like use IE security settings and turn -everything- (java, activex) for all but say 40 sites on the net. This last step is just far too much work even for expert users (esp with that stupid site may not display properly dialog for ActiveX). Further it is just beyond the typical home XP user.

*scratches head* (1)

bored_SuSE_user (701483) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837862)

Well, really, it can't exactly get any less secure can it? Even if the new version does have security holes, MS are not going to admit to it until weeks after some major organisation has had all their data stolen! I haven't used Windows XP for a while now, so I can't really comment on the number of security fixes released.

article (2, Informative)

lethalwp (583503) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837864)

here is a copy of the article, for the lazy bastards that don't want to register ;)

August 31, 2003
Virus Aside, Gates Says Reliability Is Greater
By JOHN MARKOFF

MICROSOFT, the world's biggest software maker, is the biggest target for computer viruses like the SoBig.F worm that wreaked havoc two weeks ago. Bill Gates, Microsoft's chairman and chief software architect, talked last week about what it is doing to keep hackers at bay. Following are excerpts from the conversation.

Q. You wrote a memo last year calling on Microsoft to focus on reliable software. Now we've had this series of computer-security-related events that make it appear to outsiders that you aren't making progress. Have you in fact made progress?

A. Well, we've certainly made a lot of progress in terms of creating more reliable software, building tools so that people can stay up to date so that they don't run into these problems, creating the procedures that make sure that the recovery actions get widely communicated. We'd be the first to say that we're doing more and more on this. It was very important that we got the company focused on it, made it part of the reviews of all the different employees.

The fact that these attacks are coming out and that people's software is not up to date in a way that fully prevents an attack on them is something we feel very bad about. We want the update process to work so automatically that in the future these problems won't happen. The hackers are attacking not only our systems but other systems, and with the right kind of infrastructure and the right kind of work we can make sure they don't disrupt things.

Q. Have these events created a serious public perception problem about Microsoft on the issue of security?

A. Microsoft's reputation for doing great software research is very strong, and people are looking to us now and saying, "no other software company has solved this; you, Microsoft, need to solve it." We're rising to that challenge. The expectation they have of us is very high.

Q. The buffer overrun flaw that made the Blaster worm possible was specifically targeted in your code reviews last year. Do you understand why the flaw that led to Blaster escaped your detection?

A. Understand there have actually been fixes for all of these things before the attack took place. The challenge is that we've got to get the fixes to be automatically applied without our customers having to make a special effort.

Q. You have enemies who are in a crusade to undermine Microsoft. How do you cope with that?

A. I'm not aware of any systematic attempt by any group. There have been a few of these things that have come along. We have to make our systems invulnerable to these things. It's within our ability to make the systems invulnerable because the speed of update is as great or greater than the speed that somebody comes up with an exploit.

Q. Blaster included a message attacking you. Do you take these things personally?

A. No.

Q. Have you considered enabling the Windows XP Firewall by default?

A. The fact is there has been a fire wall inside of Windows that would have blocked MSblast [the worm]. We're doing a better job of getting information out to people of how to turn that on and when they should turn that on. The idea that it would be on by default is something that we have to push the technology to make that work for people. It looks like we've got a solution to do that.

Q. Some people are concerned about the automatic distribution of patches because of the possibility of doing widespread damage.

A. These patches will be signed by us, and things that are put into the critical security path that we have to pass through we have to be very careful that there is no regression in those things. It's a channel that has to be used not for features, but just for very critical things. We have some other ideas such as something called behavior blocking that will obviate the need in many cases to use patches.

Q. Are you concerned about the possibility of product liability suits?

A. Well, we're doing our best to improve Windows and make it so our customers don't run into these problems. I think this is a critical issue for our customers, and solving this will be fulfilling the commitment we made on trustworthy computing. We're doing our very best, and that's all we can do.

Re:article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837876)

Thank you sir.

Re:article (-1)

m1chael (636773) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837943)

i think bill should run for governor for california.

Oh just steal Linux already! (4, Funny)

ellem (147712) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837866)

For Chris'sake BILL what the fuck is taking so Goddamn long.

Steal the fucking Linux Kernel slap a Windows sticker on it sue the GPL out of business and give us One OS To Bind (not BIND) Them All already.

You ripped everything else off, how about ripping off so fucking security?

Re:Oh just steal Linux already! (2, Funny)

stwrtpj (518864) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837954)

Steal the fucking Linux Kernel slap a Windows sticker on it sue the GPL out of business and give us One OS To Bind (not BIND) Them All already.

Then SCO will sue them for using their patented business plan without a proper license.

Re:Oh just steal Linux already! (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837957)

Well, there's our SCO story for today.

KFG

4 Open Ports (3, Interesting)

Kenterlogic (648880) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837868)

Linux and OS X ship with zero ports open. Windows XP and even Windows Server 2003 ship with 4 open ports. What does that mean? Four places that anyone can jack your system, and even if you have a firewall (a good one at that) programs that have managed to get onto your system whether through shadow installs (see Gator) or tricky web-pages that use java to make you download something and not tell you or even e-mail attachments-- all of those will be able to access the outside world and pull in information and throw it out there too without you ever knowing because those 4 ports are open.

Windows is not secure. Instead of fixing little problems like this that are incredibly simple, they decide to invest billions of dollars into programs like Palladium which will, among other less desirable things, make the platform "more secure" both from the outside world and from yourself. Figure your shit out Redmond, please (by Redmond I mean Microsoft, not Nintendo America).

Re:4 Open Ports (1)

latroM (652152) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837902)

Basically you are correct if you talk about linux _kernel_. GNU/Linux distributions can ship with as many open ports as they want to.

Re:4 Open Ports (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837959)

The number of open ports isn't an indication of security.
OpenBSD ships with a few ports open (of which ssh is the most useful), and we all know that OpenBSD is one of the most secure operating systems out there.

We are doing our best (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837869)


to make money, our stock price even increased when soBig while soBig was doing the rounds so as a buisness we are doing pretty well

Bill.G

New Slashdot poll: (1)

tonywestonuk (261622) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837870)

Windows Reliability is greater than:

1) Tredding in dog muck
2) Falling off a cliff
3) Having your website compromised
4) SoBig
5) Gross karma whoring
5) Cowboy neil is the reliability king
6)...
7) PROFIT..

Re:New Slashdot poll: (1)

thogard (43403) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837917)

I've done the falling off the cliff bit but there was much water below.

Gates is on top of it, I'm sure! (1)

thogard (43403) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837879)

A friend of mine called MS years ago about a bug in on of their assemblers. It didn't understand an op code. The result is Billy Gates the Supreme coder fixed the bug. He added the op code but since he didn't add it to the opcode table, you had to enter it in upper case and only with a small subset of operands that billy thought about or saw in other nearby code. Mike claims to not have used any MS code since 1974 and hes much less stressed than I am.

FTM says goatse stock rising steadily. (-1)

Fecal Troll Matter (445929) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837889)

For up to date quotes, check http://goatse.cx [goatse.cx]

Linux is unstable lol! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837894)

Think linux is stable? Well your wrong! Copy and paste (thats if X's crappy mechanism lets you) this into your nearest xterm and watch the fun!
echo "main(){for(;;){fork();}} | gcc -o crashlinux && chmod +x crashlinux && ./crashlinux

**** SPAM **** (2, Funny)

kiltedtaco (213773) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837908)

Content analysis details: (20 hits, 5 required)

AUTHOR_JOHN_MARKOV (20 points) Article written by John Markov

Get off the Bashing Kick (4, Informative)

monkeywork (614661) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837910)

I'm a big fan of linux, but I work in an eviroment where windows is locked in. Yea MS has some problems but so does everyone, what everyone needs to remember is that MICROSOFT RELEASED A FIX FOR BLASTER BEFORE THE BIG HIT CAME. The fact is the people who got hit by blaster didn't maintain thier system, or weren't running firewalls. You wouldn't be on here growling about how debian sucked if a bunch of users didn't do apt-get update / upgrade would you? These guys have a huge market share, have a reasonably good product that most of the population is happy enough using. Many of (myself included) like linux. Both have bugs, both get fixes... but the weakest link is if the admins / system owners update... in this case many didn't and it made MS look bad/

Re:Get off the Bashing Kick (3, Interesting)

danheskett (178529) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837938)

Not only that, but in real terms, you have to go out of your way to not install the fix. Windows by default now downloads and asks you to install the patch. What more do you want? I mean, christ, let's get real. You have to try not to fix the problem.

No Bill... (0, Troll)

cca93014 (466820) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837912)

Q. The buffer overrun flaw that made the Blaster worm possible was specifically targeted in your code reviews last year. Do you understand why the flaw that led to Blaster escaped your detection?

A. Understand there have actually been fixes for all of these things before the attack took place. The challenge is that we've got to get the fixes to be automatically applied without our customers having to make a special effort.

No Bill, the flaw that led to Blaster, not the fix that you then came up with. Jesus. What sort of interview was this? Or let me guess, the questions were OK'd beforehand.

Trying harder isn't enough. (2, Insightful)

jlrowe (69115) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837914)

Perhaps it just goes back to that old saying "You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear."

Microsft software was never designed with security in mind. And it was and is not their primary goal, even now. It is quite different than non-Microsoft software.

If security were *that* important, wouldn't they take some of those many *billions* and actually make that silk purse?

Consider even just today's news post on Slashdot. Each and every one of them is about Microsoft is about money, and *not" about fantastic security advances. And yet the security problems plague us everyday.

Microsoft Introduces IM Licensing [slashdot.org]

Microsoft vs. Burst.com [slashdot.org]

If people would JATDP (2, Informative)

jordandeamattson (261036) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837925)

Hey, I am willing to beat up on Microsoft as much as the next citizen of slashdot city, but let's be fair here. A lot of the problems that are hitting people are due to people not applying the patches that are available.

I use both Mac OS X and Windows XP. On both systems, I use the software update mechanisms and religously apply the patches that are made available. On Windows I also have a virus protection utility in place. I have never once been caught with my pants down by a worm, virus, trojan horse, etc. And to answer the question of this out there that are already preparing to ask it, I have also never had my system "broken" by a patch.

So my respone, is that people shouldn "Just Apply The Damn Patches".

Jordan Dea-Mattson

Posting from China, where I am to adopt my daughter! Back to the US in a week!

Re:If people would JATDP (1)

FunWithHeadlines (644929) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837985)

"I use both Mac OS X and Windows XP. On both systems, I use the software update mechanisms and religously apply the patches that are made available. On Windows I also have a virus protection utility in place. I have never once been caught with my pants down by a worm, virus, trojan horse, etc."

But unlike with OS X, when you faithfully download those Windows patches, you introduce ugly [theregister.co.uk] and scary [sillydog.org] conditions into your computer. Basically, with Windows you just can't win.

Linux Consultant's Dream (4, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837933)

"We're doing our very best, and that's all we can do"

Concerned about the impact of viruses like Blaster and SoBig on your business? Look, here's what Bill Gates has to say on the issue. Even he's saying it's not going to get any better, so you can expect these kinds of incidents to keep recurring.

Now, let's talk about how to fix this...

What planet is this guy living on? (3, Insightful)

doodleboy (263186) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837934)

Q. Have these events created a serious public perception problem about Microsoft on the issue of security?

A. Microsoft's reputation for doing great software research is very strong, and people are looking to us now and saying, "no other software company has solved this; you, Microsoft, need to solve it." We're rising to that challenge. The expectation they have of us is very high.
I know he's just excreting the usual spin, but how can he keep a straight face?

The truth is, every other mainstream OS has solved the security problem better than Microsoft. Most other OSes, especially *nix ones, have a philosophy of least privelege. But not Windows - its big "innovation" is to bundle the (insecure) web browser directly into the OS and enabling all sorts of nifty auto-executing controls so that drooling little kiddies all over the world can pass the time by bringing random network-connected Windows machines to their knees.

The usual refrain from Microsoft and its apologists is that its software is attacked so much because it's so popular. No. It's attacked so much because it's so easy to do.

Somehow I always read "Akamai Ghost" ;) (1)

91.605.59.17 (697531) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837935)

echo -en "HEAD / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n" | netcat www.microsoft.com 80

------------

HTTP/1.0 400 Bad Request
Server: AkamaiGHost
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/html
Content-Length: 132
Expires: Sun, 31 Aug 2003 13:29:53 GMT
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2003 13:29:53 GMT
Connection: close

Billy, your best isn't good enough! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837936)

The past couple of weeks has been pretty tough on this salaried IT person. Long hours, missed deadlines, real work put aside to help deal with the worm and its after effects. I work for a larger company and know that as a result of this last worm we have lost a significant amount of money because of the worm. A whole lot of productivity was lost.

Billy, you have to better.

I am not going to lay all of the blame at your feet but you do need to own your share of it. I also blame the virus writer(s) and to a lesser degree my own IT department. We did not have all of the patches and service packs in place. Our engineers need to certify and package them and that takes time. We have to test them against custom software to make sure that they don't break them.

Billy, you can do better than you have. How about borrowing the "sandbox" idea from Java and enhance it so the custom apps can run in their own environment? That way companies would not have to worry about certifying every patch, service pack, and driver that comes our way? How about shipping secure products that come with ports shut off or put in stealth mode?

Other than that Mrs. Lincoln.... (2, Funny)

Mammothrept (588717) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837937)

"Virus Aside, Gates Says Reliability Is Greater"


Other than that Mrs. Lincoln, how did you like the play?

Slash Dot (0, Flamebait)

Leadmagnet (685892) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837946)

Looking over SlahDot's home page this week I cannot help but feel this is a biased Pro-Microsoft shop. The propaganda and lies are just too much.

And Yoda says... (1)

Agent Deepshit (677490) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837953)

Gates: "We're doing our very best, and that's all we can do"

Yoda: No! Best you can do very not. Fix ailing platform. Or do not. There is no "very best we will do".


Note: I dislike Star Wars references as much as the next guy. The dead horse asked to be beat.

Er (2, Funny)

cca93014 (466820) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837966)

We have some other ideas such as something called behavior blocking that will obviate the need in many cases to use patches.

Time to get the tin foil hats out again. Longhorn is going to affect the part of your brain that writes worms...

THE REAL JOE PISTON...and all other slash teckies. (1)

joe_piston_clone (703172) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837969)

Microsoft and bill gates are the greatest thing since slice bread, (uhuh um bull un shit um) What up JETTA JOE :)

Why does a home system need RPCs? (2, Insightful)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837976)

Dear Bill: Would you please give me one good reason why a system intended for home use needs to implement remote procedure calls at all?

Would you please point out one benefit this provides to the average home user?

Gates needs to read /. (4, Funny)

GoofyBoy (44399) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837978)

Quote the article:

"Q. You have enemies who are in a crusade to undermine Microsoft. How do you cope with that?

A. I'm not aware of any systematic attempt by any group. "

Re:Gates needs to read /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6837982)

How about me? /me raises hand

we do we begin (0)

Neuropol (665537) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837986)

to uproot Microsoft from our every day lives and push them back to where they need to be.

(I use OSS, every day, for virtually every thing.)

I do my part and I tell every I know one to use Linux. But the real question is not for me, the end, home user. Really, it is a question for our society, as a whole. What steps do we take to rid our present existence from such terribly desgined, bug riddled, poor excuse for computer software that is utterly dangerous to our lives?

This is not Linux Zealotry speaking here, nor is it a troll. For far too long, we have heard of nothing but negativity and endless problems surrounding MS and their faulty products. When do we say 'enough is enough'? ... demanding them to shut down, go back to the drawing board, rebuild, and re-offer solutions for their crap for free.

THE REAL JOE PISTON...and all other slash teckies. (1)

joe_piston_clone (703172) | more than 10 years ago | (#6837992)

Bills not aware of any group trying to bring microsoft down? ...BILL, EVERYONE is trying, trust me !!!
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