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RIAA Offers Amnesty to File Sharers

CowboyNeal posted more than 10 years ago | from the turning-yourself-in dept.

Music 789

Mister Dre writes "Apparently, the RIAA is planning to offer amnesty to file sharers who promise to delete copyrighted material from their computers. To take advantage, of course, you 'have to send a completed, notarized amnesty form to the RIAA, with a copy of a photo ID.'" Hey RIAA, how about I just stop sharing files, and we call it even? I know I own most of the CDs for the files I listen to, but I stopped buying those too so you'll know where I stand.

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789 comments

jack valenti, call for you on line 1.... (5, Funny)

sweeney37 (325921) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875807)

first, they drop the price of CDs. now they're offering amnesty.

somebody call satan to see if hell froze over.

Mike

Re:jack valenti, call for you on line 1.... (5, Interesting)

Goldberg's Pants (139800) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875826)

Sure... "Amnesty"... Photo ID...

This is a like those stings where wanted criminals "win a prize" and when they go to collect it, get arrested.

They need to drop CD's a LOT further in price before anyone I know will buy them again.

The Simpsons apply everywhere! (4, Funny)

mrpuffypants (444598) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875991)

Homer: Up and away in my beautiful my beautiful motor boat! Da da da da!
Bart: But we didn't enter any police raffle.
Homer: That doesn't matter, the important thing is we won.
[parks]
Marge: I don't know, there's something very peculiar about
this!
Homer: Sheesh! You're the most paranoid family I've ever been
affiliated with. [gets out]


Later on, after Homer enters the Police Station, to Wiggum: I'd like a yellow boat please, with extra motors.

Re:jack valenti, call for you on line 1.... (5, Informative)

dietz (553239) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875948)

Jack Valenti [mpaa.org] is actually the head of the MPAA [mpaa.org] . They are in charge of suing you when you download movies or distribute open source software to play DVDs.

The RIAA [riaa.com] , the subject of this story, is in charge of suing you when you download music or copy CDs. The head of the RIAA is Cary Sherman [riaa.com] , after Hillary Rosen retired recently.

Re:jack valenti, call for you on line 1.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6876002)

You're trying so hard for + informative.

It's pathetic, really.

RIAA subpoena (5, Funny)

tcd004 (134130) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875809)

For your viewing pleasure: A copy of a subpoena from the RIAA. [lostbrain.com]

Tcd004

Re:RIAA subpoena (0)

Shaklee39 (694496) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875953)

Um. How is this informative? It is a joke at the real subpoenas. Quoted from it:

That's right. Put down the Red Bull, scream "Holyshitmotherfucker!" as one long, unintelligible word and start saving your summer job wages, because we're coming to collect.

Of course, we realize that after receiving this letter, you may have doubts about the lengths of our penises. Our act of sending out more than 900 subpoenas could be interpreted by some therapitsts to be an effort to shore up our waning masculinity--a litigious "beating of the chest," if you will.


this is the real subpoena [raisethefist.com]

Re:RIAA subpoena (1)

sTavvy (669239) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875967)

Me thinks that this should have been modded funny!! did moderators read the "Subpoena" ??

What a deal (5, Funny)

mpeg4codec (581587) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875816)

So, in order to buy amnesty from the RIAA, I have to sell them my identity? Sounds fair...

Re:What a deal (5, Funny)

rushiferu (595361) | more than 10 years ago | (#6876005)

"So, in order to buy amnesty from the RIAA, I have to sell them my identity? Sounds fair... "

That's because you didn't read the part where you sign with your blood and mail the document back in an envelope made of the flesh of your first born. Remember, always read the fine print!

Whytf bother (1, Interesting)

pouncer7 (580711) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875824)

Legal extorsion. It's ridiculous what they're doing. $7500 per song? If a CD costs... $15... then they're just paying their bills with that $7500. I don't understand how they dont just get thrown out of courts. Blame it on media and an ignorant general public... blegh

so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875828)

..that they can finally have an even bigger list of people to sue in the end when they somehow find a way to say the amnesty was not a legally binding agreement. Ooooh I am rushing to sign up...

Fair Use? (3, Interesting)

evil carrot (669874) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875831)

Tell you what, RIAA... if and when you attempt to charge me for all of the MP3 files I have, then I will send you a notarized letter of contempt along with pictures of my CD collection. In fact, I'll even include a list of all 1478 CDs that I legally own.

I have stopped buying new CDs and stopped downloading new music. From here on out it's iTunes Music Store or nothing at all... though I do like how UMG is cutting MSRP to $13. That may help.

Re:Fair Use? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875870)

I think the RIAA wants you to stop redistributing, not making a backup of your music.

At the end of the day (2, Insightful)

mao che minh (611166) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875833)

Whether you agree with them or not, the RIAA has determined that file "sharing"(stealing/copyright infringement) has negatively impacted their "industry"(ripping off artists and preventing others from competing, or even distributing, fairly). You have to admit, they have some compelling evidence that justifies their claim. Their critics evidence is rather compelling as well. In light of this, they are approaching this issue as any large conglomerate would: fierce defense of their successful business model.

At the end of the day, the manner in which the RIAA conducts business is legal, though obviously immoral. Willing copyright infringement is not. The RIAA has the funds, will, and know-how to pursue litigation against those that illegally obtains their goods. Those that have to defend themselves usually do not. What one has to ask themselves is:

1." Do two wrongs make a right?"
2. "Am I willing to participate in illegal and immoral activities?"
3. "If I am willing to engage in copyright infringement/theft, am I prepared to accept the possible consequences?"
4. "Is it all worth it?"

I remember when I was a freshmen in college, many people here on Slashdot were begging the RIAA to attack the individuals that were guilty of copyright infringement, and not the parties that provided the software and networks to make it possible. Now the RIAA is doing exactly that, and the good people at Slashdot continue to cry foul. What, pray tell, do you find an acceptable course of action for the RIAA? They are, at the end of the day, merely doing everything in their power to protect their property, their business, and their livelihood. This embrace of amnesty is an obvious last resort measure before they embark on a truly horrific campaign of litigation, a campaign that may ruin them - and they surely know it.

I must sound like a broken record by now, but I have to say what needs to be said (at the price of sounding pretentious and "holier than thou"). I don't infringe on the copyrights of others. I don't agree with how the RIAA conducts business, in fact, I find it appalling and believe that it does the art of music harm. However, my moral compass points away from acts of theft. The only plausible answer, for me, is to neither purchase RIAA goods, nor participate in copyright infringement. I wonder why this state of mind is so hard to grasp?

Re:At the end of the day (5, Funny)

Wes Janson (606363) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875905)

1." Do two wrongs make a right?"


Actually, three lefts make a right. Or, if you wish, the equation can be represented as 2w=xr, where x is equal to the number of wrongs necessary to equal a right. In this instance, x equals 1f, where f=finger. Which is what my response would be to such a request.

Re:At the end of the day (3, Insightful)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875910)

What, pray tell, do you find an acceptable course of action for the RIAA?

Oooh, ooh! I know this one!

First, RIAA should not go after P2P services. They should go after the actual infringers. But not in a cruel way--these are fad-following college kids, after all. How about they tell them that it's wrong, and then find out who does it anyway, and go after the worst of them--and offer amnesty for anyone who is willing to give it up?

Oh, and they have to have a few ways to get digital music legally...

Hey, wait, they're doing that! What's up with that! How can we rail about how evil the RIAA is if they do what's morally and legally right for them to do! :)

Re:At the end of the day (0)

VC (89143) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875913)

What, pray tell, do you find an acceptable course of action for the RIAA?

Fsck off and Die.

Why is downloading music unethical? (4, Interesting)

Anik315 (585913) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875921)

Couldn't it be that there is something fundamentally wrong with laws that are unenforcable and contrary to the norms of human psychology? The nature of intellectual property has changed on a massive scale. This means the laws have to change, not us.

Re:Why is downloading music unethical? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875962)

could it be that so many people are guilty of it that they have gotten a mob mentality, and show their outrage when they are the only ones that get caught?

Just because you suck dick, and your friends suck dick, that doesn't make sucking dick the right thing to do, dick sucker!

Re:Why is downloading music unethical? (1)

IM6100 (692796) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875994)

I'm worried that the laws will change in such a fashion that copyright will be abolished or changed so much that Copyleft and the GPL will no longer be enforcable.

Re:At the end of the day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875925)

You have to admit, they have some compelling evidence that justifies their claim.

Not really. But you keep shilling!

Re:At the end of the day (5, Insightful)

Mark_MF-WN (678030) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875943)

At the end of the day, the manner in which the RIAA conducts business is legal, though obviously immoral. Willing copyright infringement is not.
It has never been legal to issue subpoenas without due process. Why the RIAA was given that power is beyond comprehension. Actually, it's entirely within comprehension: they give the government lots of money.

I disagree... (2, Insightful)

poptones (653660) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875950)

I agree. said it long ago - the end will only come when the RIAA is forced to act against its own consumers. I've been welcoming this turn of events for years - not because I think people should be sued, but because...

a) Sharing RIAA music is helping spread RIAA music, and we don't want that.

b) Suing your own customers is the short path to bankruptcy. Knowing how the record companies treat their own customers, Mom may think twice about spending twenty bucks on that Britney CD little Tammy wants...

Stealing or copying? Do they mean the same? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875960)

Whether you agree with them or not, the RIAA has determined that file "sharing"(stealing/copyright infringement) has negatively impacted their "industry"(ripping off artists and preventing others from competing, or even distributing, fairly). You have to admit, they have some compelling evidence that justifies their claim. Their critics evidence is rather compelling as well. In light of this, they are approaching this issue as any large conglomerate would: fierce defense of their successful business model.
At the end of the day, the manner in which the RIAA conducts business is legal, though obviously immoral. Willing copyright infringement is not. The RIAA has the funds, will, and know-how to pursue litigation against those that illegally obtains their goods. Those that have to defend themselves usually do not. What one has to ask themselves is:

1." Do two wrongs make a right?"
2. "Am I willing to participate in illegal and immoral activities?"
3. "If I am willing to engage in copyright infringement/theft, am I prepared to accept the possible consequences?"
4. "Is it all worth it?"



I remember when I was a freshmen in college, many people here on Slashdot were begging the RIAA to attack the individuals that were guilty of copyright infringement, and not the parties that provided the software and networks to make it possible. Now the RIAA is doing exactly that, and the good people at Slashdot continue to cry foul. What, pray tell, do you find an acceptable course of action for the RIAA? They are, at the end of the day, merely doing everything in their power to protect their property, their business, and their livelihood. This embrace of amnesty is an obvious last resort measure before they embark on a truly horrific campaign of litigation, a campaign that may ruin them - and they surely know it.


I must sound like a broken record by now, but I have to say what needs to be said (at the price of sounding pretentious and "holier than thou"). I don't infringe on the copyrights of others. I don't agree with how the RIAA conducts business, in fact, I find it appalling and believe that it does the art of music harm. However, my moral compass points away from acts of theft. The only plausible answer, for me, is to neither purchase RIAA goods, nor participate in copyright infringement. I wonder why this state of mind is so hard to grasp?

Now, did I just steal your comment? Somebody tell me, what have I just done? Thank you.

Re:Stealing or copying? Do they mean the same? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875998)

The terms are used hand-in-hand and interchangeably because there is much debate over what exactly the unlawful aqcuisition of copyrighted material is. This is an old subject, read up, oh tiny minded one.

Re:At the end of the day (1)

rmohr02 (208447) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875979)

I remember when I was a freshmen in college, many people here on Slashdot were begging the RIAA to attack the individuals that were guilty of copyright infringement, and not the parties that provided the software and networks to make it possible. Now the RIAA is doing exactly that, and the good people at Slashdot continue to cry foul.
I don't cry foul. As long as the recording industry doesn't give special attention to the people who run the networks, I'm ok.
What, pray tell, do you find an acceptable course of action for the RIAA? They are, at the end of the day, merely doing everything in their power to protect their property, their business, and their livelihood.
Offer ways to legally obtain music online (especially titles that are hard to find--many people who infringe copyrights only do so because they can't find legitimate copies of the music they like), and don't overprice CDs. If CDs were cheaper (the recent price cut by _one_ of the _five_ major labels is a step in the right direction, but a bigger step needs to be made), I might consider buying one or two. Finally, they should stop abusing their monopoly--it may not be good in the short term, but it will be better in the long run, as they won't be eventually disbanded.

Re:At the end of the day (3, Interesting)

Sphere1952 (231666) | more than 10 years ago | (#6876003)

The independents are having a banner year. Only RIAA members are hurting.

If the RIAA members don't want people downloading their songs then they ought to start each song with a notice so we can tell which songs not to download. I think that everyone has the right to assume the artist is using their fundamental free speech right to be heard unless they tell us they are asserting their federal statutory copyright. Why should our basic right to free speech and freedom of association be compromized just because the evil RIAA monopolies have a problem?

Anonymous? (1)

chill (34294) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875834)

'have to send a completed, notarized amnesty form to the RIAA, with a copy of a photo ID.'

What? Didn't the "anonymous" subpeonas get anywhere?

Call the bluff (2, Insightful)

bouis (198138) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875837)

The RIAA can't file and prosecute hundreds of thousands of lawsuits, but it sure as hell can send hundreds of thousands of threatening letters.

Boggles the mind. (5, Funny)

GoofyBoy (44399) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875840)


I won't even get off my ass, go store and buy a CD so what makes them think that I will get something notarized?

Oh Good... (4, Insightful)

Quaoar (614366) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875843)

So you mean I can sign a document that might guarantee me jail time if I ever download an mp3 again? Where do I sign?

No. (5, Insightful)

JAYOYAYOYAYO (700885) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875845)

Keep in mind the RIAA is not the only organization that owns copyrights on music. Whats stopping some other company from taking advantage of these admissions of guilt?

Re:No. (1)

mao che minh (611166) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875918)

Ask for amnesty, but only if the RIAA agrees to never make your identity known to any other party, except law enforcement should you ever renig on your agreement (of course). That's what I would do, because as you stated, it would be absurd and self defeating not to.

Right...amnesty...sure (5, Interesting)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875846)

This is the same trick I use when I am trying to fire an employee. I make them reread the company policy, and sign that they did, so the next violation, I can boot them legally.

Now extend this. You sign your soul to these folks, and they catch you sharing files again. Water tight case as far as they and the court systems are concerned.

Re:Right...amnesty...sure (2, Insightful)

El (94934) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875934)

Not the same. Somebody that wants to keep working for you is pretty much forced to sign the paper. But I don't see any reason why anybody that intends to share files in the future would feel that indentfying themselves to the RIAA is in their self interest.

Re:Right...amnesty...sure (1)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875982)

The idea is the same, if the motivation behind it is not.

And you'd have to be deaf, dumb, blind and stupid to think this is a good idea ( that's right Mr McBride, I'm lookin' right at you )

Ya, right! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875847)

How about I keep doing what I want and the RIAA and its over priced crap can go to hell!

They can't sue everyone.

Re:Ya, right! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875987)

you're right. But they can sue one of you into oblivion.

I hope that the one person is you.

Re:Ya, right! (2, Insightful)

bladernr (683269) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875996)

If it's crap, why would you ever download it?

The RIAA is defending their own property. You may not think it should be their property, but it is. You may not like the way they are enforcing it, but it is legel.

If someone steals something of mine, I will do everything I can to enforce my property rights. In other words, someone steals from me, I'm going to fight. Does that make me wrong or evil?

The RIAA is doing that on a large scale.

I, for one, hate the RIAA and most of the industry. I express my distaste the best way: I refuse to buy their products or listen to their music, free or no.

Dead (1)

SugoiMonkey (648879) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875848)

Recording companies are dead.

Someone had to say it.

I hope not (1)

mao che minh (611166) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875978)

I truly hope not. Record companies serve a purpose: an organized and well funded entitiy that can find good talent, and advertise and distribute said talent, in order to benefit both the artist and the public. Not all record companies have to be as draconion and vile as those that the RIAA represent. There are record companies out there that are quite fair and moral, and there might even be more should the RIAA ever perish.

Windows? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875851)

Windows is copyrighted, right?

How about you not "share" copywritten materials? (0, Redundant)

Dancin_Santa (265275) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875853)

Just because you can "share" copywritten materials doesn't mean that you are legally permitted to. The RIAA is completely right about this.

Disregarding whether filesharing leads to lower sales or whether the RIAA could support better artists or whether or not the RIAA is approaching this thing like total jackasses, the main thing to remember is that filesharers are violating the law.

It is foolhardy to think that you could flagrantly break a law and suffer no retribution.

Re:How about you not "share" copywritten materials (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875903)

Sorta like when the Colonists refused to pay insanely high taxes on tea and then threw it all into the Boston harbor?

Re:How about you not "share" copywritten materials (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875946)

Or how about when the fronteirsmen gave the smallpox infested blankets to the Native Americans? They got away with that one too.

Oh, and BTW, You're a cock.

Re:How about you not "share" copywritten materials (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875947)

I don't see anyone burning down HMVs or doing donuts in Columbia's parking lots.

Welcome to democracy (4, Interesting)

Mark_MF-WN (678030) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875968)

I've said it before, and I'll say it again:

MORE AMERICANS ENGAGE IN FILE-SHARING THAN VOTE IN FEDERAL ELECTIONS.

Anyone who disagrees with file-sharing is flying in the face of democracy. American copyright law is unjust, and ignores the beliefs of the American people. To continue enforcing it is raw fascism.

Trust is frail (5, Funny)

Locky (608008) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875854)

To NYCGirl

We'll forgive you for your evil-doings. Just send us Photo ID, address details, mother's maiden name, breast size and we'll let you go free. We promise.

Love,

Your Friends, The RIAA.

XOXOX

As Ash says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875855)

It's a trick.

Get an axe.

Three words (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875857)

Take the offer.

Your asshole will thank you for not getting it raped every night, and your wallet will thank you for the same reason.

How about I just hand them over now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875858)

My genitals, I mean surely you'll be devouring them soon, so why wait? If anyone knows a person thinking of signing up, slap them stupider and prevent them from doing so. As if the *AA would have any compunction about following up future indescretions and using the 'amnesty' as proof in court of previous illegal activities undertaken.

Filesharing shit (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875861)

In Soviet Russia, goatse [goatse.cx] looks at YOU!

how about we offer amnesty? (1, Funny)

smd4985 (203677) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875865)

this is crazy - they should send us an amnesty form for the YEARS of overpriced CDs, heavily marketed lolliPOP junk, and their refusal to embrace technology in the fear of losing their oligopoly.

Re:how about we offer amnesty? (2, Insightful)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875942)

Note to smd4985 -- we've had years of local bands, indie artists, and classical music to indulge in if RIAA doesn't suit us. We can always go somewhere else for our music--but if we take what they're selling, we should still pay for it.

Anyone else think... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875867)

Maybe the costs of suing millions of people and the bad press finally hit them? Not to mention the ultra scary thought that a generation would grow up, become voters, and change the law.

and when they realize that is failing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875869)

they ask you to send them your computer along with your ID

Dumb idea (2, Insightful)

r_glen (679664) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875872)

Just because the RIAA promises not to sue you doesn't mean others (like the actual copyright holder?) can't.
Besides, where's the motivation for those who have stopped sharing and haven't been subpoenaed?

What's next? Who needs police with this new crime honor-system?!

Yes...Trust us, we are the RIAA (5, Funny)

retro128 (318602) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875874)

Dear Filesharer,
We know we can't possibly track all you bastards down in order to put you (or your parents) into financial ruin just like you have done to our starving "artists". So instead, just give us your photo, name, and address and admit you are pirating music and we promise nothing will happen. Really.

-The RIAA

Ok, RIAA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875875)

...how 'bout I give you the finger, and you give me my MP3s?

Re:Ok, RIAA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875897)

How about we give you a paltry semi anti-establishment, I know my rights movie quote and you bash it to fuck with your quasi wit and lack of a life.

You should become an editor.

or how about: (1)

jamienk (62492) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875887)

Hey RIAA, how about I offer you amnesty for being a historic scourge on civilization? Yeild now and we'll write the history books "The RIAA saw that technology had the potential to let anyone in the world listen to any audio that was ever recorded... They conceeded that this major boon to humanity far outweighed the convoluted legalism and propoganda they spewed in order to reap in unearned cash..."

Beware of megaCorps.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875889)

...bearing paperwork requiring your sig.

The point is obvious (1, Redundant)

The Evil Plush Toy (513809) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875890)

Isn't the point of this obvious?

They're building a database of known but "repented" filesharers, so they can "check up" on them later. Basically takes the busy work out of hunting down Kazaa users. (How many people will actually never pirate another song after this? Exactly. Now you've just made your copyright-infringing ass known to the RIAA. Nice one).


New amnesty (4, Funny)

secolactico (519805) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875891)

I hereby offer amnesty to whoever it is that stole my car stereo two months ago.

All you have to do is come (unarmed) with me to the nearest police station and sign a full confession. I will then proceed to "forgive" you. You won't even have to return my stereo (wich you probably sold inmediatly to support your crack habit).

Please send the following: (1)

Ro'que (153060) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875893)

to send a completed, notarized amnesty form to the RIAA, with a copy of a photo ID...

...Along with your social security number, credit card numbers, expiration date, checkbook, cell phone (not number, the physical phone), mother's maiden name, Slashdot username/password, and a copy of your SAT scores.

why in the world (1)

shawnywany (664241) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875894)

would you admit to something as bad as filesharing? i bet they just want to laugh when your files include scat porn (i swear, a friend was playing a joke on me!)

This is really a new intelligence test. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875895)

Send in your notarized form with photo ID IQ: 50
Send in your notarized form w/o photo ID IQ: 60
Send in the form with only your first name IQ: 70
Use the form to line the kitty box IQ: 80
Ignore the whole thing IQ: 100
Send in the notarized form with a local politician's name IQ: 130

It will only help to a point (1)

Angel 666 2003 (695217) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875899)

I think that even though this is a major step for the RIAA it does not completely solve the problem. Unless the RIAA finds some way to decide whether or not a certain music file is pirated or not they will have a hard time distinguishing your "legal" music from its illegal addons.

i dont think anyone is prepared to give up their complete collection of music, however large it may be, because of a few files that the RIAA suspect are pirated.

Haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875902)

they crack me up sometimes.

Opt-Out link included (2, Interesting)

Crypto Gnome (651401) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875904)

"Just Click this link to opt-out of our lawsuit."

<sarcasm> Heck Yeah, after all, it worked so well for all that SPAM I received. </sarcasm>

How many of you have
  • access to a lawyer on retainer
    or
  • the money to pay for a laywer
    or
  • the legal skills yourself
to verify with absolute certainty that filling in this form is any less self-destructive than emailing RIAA lawyers
  • proof of your name & all relevant contact details
  • complete file listing of your hard drive
  • logs of when and where you downloaded all your illegal content
  • some amazingly witty taunt along the lines of "so sue me, I dare you"

Right. (1)

Jonas the Bold (701271) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875907)

Hey RIAA, how about I just stop sharing files, and we call it even? I know I own most of the CDs for the files I listen to, but I stopped buying those too so you'll know where I stand.

Ha. I'm not. Not because I think it isn't copyright infringement, or because I think its not stealing but copyright infringement, or even because I think stealing from a major corperation somehow doesn't violate any principles I should have, or because music is bad, or because record companies abusing musicians, or anything else:

I just don't feel like actually buying the stuff.

Just because I don't care doesn't mean I don't understand.

Why do I share music? Because I want these networks to stay useful for other people, like myselves, who don't give a shit.

I don't think it's right. It isn't right. Any of the more reasonable above reasons are only be reasons why I don't care.

Huh? (1)

El (94934) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875909)

the RIAA will not pursue legal action if infringers delete all unauthorized music files from their computers
How does the RIAA intend the verify this? It appears by giving them your name and address, you're giving them permission to come knocking on your door with a warrant?

Yep, the article gets it right... (1)

AEton (654737) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875920)

The Recording Industry Assn. of America

There's a whole herd of assen cluttering up my boxen, that's for sure.

On a slightly less topical note, has anyone recently received a spam/troll email en titled "Legal Reminder from the RIAA", claiming to be from "D. Gephardt", and containing information supposedly written to an evil MP3 file sharer? I've seen several copies of this irksome post making the rounds, and can't decide whether it's legitimate RIAA FUD or trollish double-FUD. Mm, fear-uncertainty-doubt.

I don't see the point (1)

DaLiNKz (557579) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875924)

Whats this going to do? I'd rather wait until I get cought and say I was just about to delete everything, and that my Amnesty form is in the mail.

They don't, and never have sued someone for MP3's (2, Insightful)

Machina70 (700076) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875926)

At least not for JUST having them. They sue people who make them available publically/widescale. Since I have never shared my MP3 files(and since I own the albums) I have zero fear of a letter from the RIAA. I'm only saying this because of the many responses by people who legally buy music, but prefer an MP3 format that seem to indicate they feel threatened by the actions of the RIAA. I'm offended that multi-national corporations are banding together to shape U.S. law, and to the U.S. civil courts as their personal criminal punishment system.(if you're not aware,the standards for proff in civil court are MUCH lower than for criminal court. That's why you're hearing about lawsuits, not criminal proscecution)

Maybe IANAL, maybe IAAL (2, Interesting)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875935)

This is dangerously close to extortion. On the face of it, obtaining identity by means of threats is probably not extortion because it is not "money or [an]other valuable thing." However, if these identities are later used to persue court cases which result in monetary settlement, this could be considered extortion.

Re:Maybe IANAL, maybe IAAL (2, Informative)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 10 years ago | (#6876008)

Oh yeah, since this is interstate communications we're talking here, I'll cite Title 18 USC Chapter 41 - EXTORTION AND THREATS. I'm sure it's on the web.

Obligatory Matrix reference (1)

CPgrower (644022) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875945)

RIAA: Sign this amnesty form certifying you will delete all unauthorized music files from your computer.

File sharer: How about instead I give you the finger and you sell CD's at reasonable prices.

Re:Obligatory Matrix reference (1)

mbottrell (702614) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875963)

Hmm.. I wonder if I can find share the amnestiy form? Maybe we all fill out the form using Mr. JackAss as the name and then all submit that. :)

This is proof that the Record industry.... (1)

Newer Guy (520108) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875957)

This is absolute proof that the record/music industry has the best drugs out there...and the RIAA people take them liberally! Seriously, they can't be serious about this can they? You send a notarized statement and a photo id? I don't think so! There's no way in hell I'm going to give the RIAA gestapo anything with my picture on it!

They call it a form... (1)

Daimaou (97573) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875959)

...but we all know that is just a legal innuendo for dropping your pants so they can notarize your butt with the big boot of "justice".

Megalomania (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875961)

Can you spell megalomania [m-w.com] ?

After all, they're just a corporation. It's the responsibility of the government to decide, if someone should be punished. There are courts for that.

Dear Filesharers: (4, Funny)

Quaoar (614366) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875964)

Catching you guys is HARD. Please just turn yourselves in...pretty please?

A ploy? (1)

MoeMoe (659154) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875973)

Who's to say that this isn't the RIAA's way of saying "Repent and yee shall be saved"... This in some twisted way makes sense for them. They are close to the straw that breaks the **AA back and instead of going the legal way about things and having to spend cash on lawyers to make cash on Joe Geek, they figure that a confession would both stop said file sharer from distributing more of their content and simultaneouslygive them a bargaining chip against Joe in-case he ever wanted to share content again to make him think twice.

How about a picture of (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875981)

my fat hairy ass? I'll even get it notarized.

Voluntary deletion (1)

r_glen (679664) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875985)

From the article: "The RIAA will not pursue legal action if infringers delete all unauthorized music files from their computers."

So their new plan is to make people "promise" to delete all of their questionable files voluntarily?
God, where was this tactic when my mom discovered my 7th-grade porn stash, huh?!

And in related news ... (4, Funny)

DogIsMyCoprocessor (642655) | more than 10 years ago | (#6875986)

the state troopers offer amnesty to you for all the speeding you've done up until now that they didn't catch you doing. But if you speed from now on, they might ticket you.

Read this for what it is, a trap. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6875989)

According to sources, the RIAA will not pursue legal action if infringers delete all unauthorized music files from their computers, destroy all copies (including CD-Rs) and promise not to upload such material in the future. Each infringing household member will have to send a completed, notarized amnesty form to the RIAA, with a copy of a photo ID.
Those who renege on their promise will be subject to charges of willful copyright infringement.

As opposed to 'unwilful' copyright infringment?

Let's look closer. You agree to remove all 'unauthorised' music files from all computers.

Firstly, I've never seen a music company 'authorise' a music file, except for Apple iTunes with its crappy DRM.
Secondly, according to Merriam Webster;


Main Entry: computer
Pronunciation: k&m-'pyu-t&r
Function: noun
Usage: often attributive
Date: 1646
: one that computes; specifically : a programmable electronic device that can store, retrieve, and process data


That's pretty broad. Just about anything that can play an mp3 or ogg qualifies.

By signing this, you are signing away your rights to possess _any_ mp3 or ogg files. Even if you own the CD.

You want to play that mp3 CDROM in your car stereo? Tough.
Wanna rip that new CD to mp3 so that you can play it on your {empeg | PC | iPod} ? No can do.

Wake up everybody - this is little more than a trap. I'm not totally sure whether they're after lawsuit revenue, or whether it's a scheme to ram DRM down our throats. But I am sure that those RIAA sum are up to no good. Again.

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