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'Storage' to Replace Traditional Filesystems?

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the find-porn dept.

GNOME 599

JigSaw writes "OSNews is reporting on Storage, an innovative project which aims to replace the traditional hierarchical filesystems with a new document store which is database-based (PostgreSQL). The current implementation, built under Gnome 2.x for now, offers natural language access, network transparency, and a number of other features. The project is currently in alpha (screenshots already available), and it is part of the next major generation of Gnome. It is currently developed by Seth Nickell, the person responsible for the enhanced Gnome usability on 2.x and its HIG, among other things."

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FIRST POST! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878354)

greetz to gnaa. etc etc

Windows? (1, Informative)

Iron Monkey543 (676232) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878365)

I thought current windows filing system was already database-based? Not that i know anythig on this matter, i just thought I read it somewhere. Can someone enlighten me please

Re:Windows? (1, Informative)

henbane (663769) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878368)

Longhorn will be database based.

Why don't these people just put some effort in reiserFS?

Windows' filesystem (3, Informative)

mic256 (702811) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878384)

I think Longhorn will be the first Windows with a database filesystem. It will probably be based on SQL Server

Re:Windows' filesystem (2, Interesting)

Serapth (643581) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878416)

Yes, from what I have read, that is true. MS plans to use SQL server 2k3 as the underlying technology for the file system for longhorn. What I just dont get though... if SQL is going to be used as the file system... then every Longhorn PC in a sense either needs to have SQL ( or MSDE ) or needs access to a SQL server which seems unlikely as you would bottleneck on the network speed.

What then happens to SQL as a MS product? If its built in to every OS, why then would anyone buy it. Ive seen MS build other peoples apps into their products, but never seen them do it to their own. Are they actually going to kill off a profit centre?

Re:Windows' filesystem (3, Informative)

cyclist1200 (513080) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878453)

The filesystem will be based on SQL Server 2003, but it won't be a fully functional version of SQL Server.

Limitations in the home edition (5, Informative)

yerricde (125198) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878465)

What then happens to SQL as a MS product? If its built in to every OS, why then would anyone buy it.

Remember how Windows XP Home and Pro editions can serve files only to less than a dozen simultaneous clients? This is to boost sales of the IIS bundled with Windows 2000 Server and now Windows Server 2003. Microsoft SQL Server Home Edition will probably be limited.

Re:Windows' filesystem (3, Interesting)

lurvdrum (456070) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878525)

Who owns the patent on this type of filesystem implementation - there must be one? Microsoft, IBM, Seth...SCO?

Re:Windows' filesystem (1)

jsse (254124) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878629)

It will probably be based on SQL Server

Oh great! Next time a user calls and asks where's his excel sheet he saved yesterday, instead of teaching him to use 'Find' over phone I can just tell him: "It's not lost, it's just invisible [newsfactor.com] ." :)

Re:Windows? HUH? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878458)

Informative HUH? das is not informative!

Re:Windows? (5, Insightful)

Zocalo (252965) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878610)

Not quite, NTFS is a traditional file table with some bells and whistles, but it's not a "database" in the sense meant here(1). The next version of Windows, "Longhorn", is supposed to introduce a new file system called WinFS that will use a version of SQLServer as its backend. Whether they will actually deliver or not is another matter, since we were promised this in 1995 with Cairo and Taligent (remember them?), and now that Longhorn appears to have been pushed back...

There are also issues with gaining acceptance for the change in the way things work. This kind of thing has not really been done on a large scale in the wild before, on any OS, so whether people will be willing to accept the security and reliablity issues that may ensue is another matter. For example, what are the implications of a compromise in the database engine? MS is planning on using SQL, so if things go awry and it becomes possible to maliciously inject raw SQL to the filesystem interface... Oops. On the otherhand, the benefits for data retrival are *huge*. Imagine being able to find any audio files on your entire system by Justin Timberlake or Britney Spears and delete them all in one go by searching on the tag fields! ;)

(1) Technically, all filesystems are databases, it's just that current ones are a collection of flatfile database tables that can point to each other, generally in a heirarchial manner. When people say "database" in the same sentence as "filesystem" they usually mean "relational database". As an aside however, high end databases usually forgo the need for a file system and provide the ability to write their tables directly to disk on a dedicated partition.

Ahead of the game. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878371)

Take THAT Longhorn.

Re:Ahead of the game. (1, Informative)

Serapth (643581) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878387)

What an incredibly dumb thing to say... this is exactly what Longhorn is going to do, and they announced it well over a year ago!

Re:Ahead of the game. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878421)

well, in fact, Microsoft keeps announcing that feature as part of the 'next release' since what... early '92?

Re:Ahead of the game. (2, Insightful)

kubla2000 (218039) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878435)


Yeah, and as Longdong gets pushed back and delayed and delayed and pushed back and postponed and delayed, it'll be last to market but microsoft will still have been the first to announce it. I guess that's more innovative than they've been in the past when they'd simply wait for someone to do something interesting before buying them out.

It's not enough to say. One has to do. Microsoft has proved many times over that it often makes grand announcements only to provide something far more watered down by the time they get to market.

We'll see what they're DB-based file system really is when (and if) it gets here.

Re:Ahead of the game. (2, Interesting)

Serapth (643581) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878483)

To my understanding, the delay in Longhorn's release is a result of the TrustWorthy computing initive...

This, IMHO, is a good thing. The big difference between MS and Open Source on something like this... in Open Source land, you can often see progress from day one... no matter how unstable it is. With MS, you wont see anything until the whole product is done... Not saying one is better then the other, but...

Re:Ahead of the game. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878446)

Well, and BeFS DID it ... seven years ago ?

Re:Ahead of the game. (1)

mirko (198274) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878672)

I guess you meant BFS, the BeOS filing system ?
I worked with it and it was really good.
The guy that wrote it also wrote a very good file system design and implementation manual which I can't find anymore on O'Reilly's web site...

Re:Ahead of the game. (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878632)

No, Longhorn is about putting SQueaL Server in between the user and the file system to cock-block any attempts at mounting the filesystem without paying a vig to Redmond.
Longhorn is aptly named. Brings to mind the ithyphallic eidolon from Schrodingers Cat Trilology [powells.com] by Wilson.
Frank Zappa's advice comes to mind: "Keep it greasy, so it'll go down easy".

Won't compile :( (-1, Redundant)

anonymous coword (615639) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878372)

Anybody understand this error?

make
make all-recursive
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/norman/Development/storage/libstorage'
Mak ing all in libstorage
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/norman/Development/storage/libstorage/libst orage'
if /bin/sh ../libtool --mode=compile gcc -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -I. -I. -I.. -pthread -DORBIT2=1 -I/usr/include/gnome-vfs-2.0 -I/usr/lib/gnome-vfs-2.0/include -I/usr/include/bonobo-activation-2.0 -I/usr/include/glib-2.0 -I/usr/lib/glib-2.0/include -I/usr/include/orbit-2.0 -I/usr/include/gnome-vfs-module-2.0 -I/usr/include/pygtk-2.0 -g -O2 -MT storage-item.lo -MD -MP -MF ".deps/storage-item.Tpo" \
-c -o storage-item.lo `test -f 'storage-item.c' || echo './'`storage-item.c; \then mv -f ".deps/storage-item.Tpo" ".deps/storage-item.Plo"; \
else rm -f ".deps/storage-item.Tpo"; exit 1; \
fi
rm -f .libs/storage-item.lo
gcc -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -I. -I. -I.. -pthread -DORBIT2=1 -I/usr/include/gnome-vfs-2.0 -I/usr/lib/gnome-vfs-2.0/include -I/usr/include/bonobo-activation-2.0 -I/usr/include/glib-2.0 -I/usr/lib/glib-2.0/include -I/usr/include/orbit-2.0 -I/usr/include/gnome-vfs-module-2.0 -I/usr/include/pygtk-2.0 -g -O2 -MT storage-item.lo -MD -MP -MF .deps/storage-item.Tpo -c storage-item.c -fPIC -DPIC -o .libs/storage-item.lo
storage-item.c:7:44: libpq-fe.h: No such file or directory
storage-item.c:8:28: libpq/libpq-fs.h: No such file or directory
storage-item.c:34: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c:35: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c:35: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
storage-item.c: In function `storage_get_table_from_type':
storage-item.c:212 : error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:212: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
storage-item.c:212: error: for each function it appears in.)
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:220: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c:220: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
storage-item.c:221: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c:221: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
storage-item.c:222: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c:223: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
storage-item.c:224: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c:225: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
storage-item.c:226: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c:227: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
storage-item.c:228: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c:228: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_matches':
storage-item.c:283: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:283: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:289: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_query_results':
storage-item.c: 307: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:307: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:330: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:342: warning: passing arg 1 of `g_strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:343: warning: passing arg 1 of `g_strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_cache_soup':
storage-item.c:360: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:360: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:371: warning: passing arg 2 of `g_hash_table_lookup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:373: warning: passing arg 1 of `g_strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:374: warning: passing arg 1 of `g_strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_set_from_recordid':
storage-item.c: 397: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:397: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:407: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:411: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_n_parents':
storage-item.c:470: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:470: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:474: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_parents':
storage-item.c:490: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:490: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:497: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_remove_ext_int':
storage-item.c:545 : error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:545: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:547: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:547: error: `dbConn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:556: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:570: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:579: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:598: warning: passing arg 2 of `storage_remove_helper' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_remove_helper':
storage-item.c:611: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:611: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:617: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:626: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_approx_size':
storage-item.c:64 8: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:648: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:653: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:656: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_read_entire_binary':
storage-item.c :712: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:712: error: `connection' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:731: error: `INV_READ' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:733: error: `SEEK_END' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:738: error: `SEEK_SET' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_handle':
storage-item.c:777: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_children':
storage-item.c:815: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:815: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:823: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_nth_child':
storage-item.c:843: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:843: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:851: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:855: warning: passing arg 1 of `storage_item_new_from_recordid_login' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_sever_nth_child':
storage-item.c:87 9: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_insert_child':
storage-item.c:912: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_n_attributes':
storage-item.c:937: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:937: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:941: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:945: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:949: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_attributes_pairs':
storage-item .c:967: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:967: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:976: warning: passing arg 1 of `strlen' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:976: warning: passing arg 2 of `memcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:976: warning: passing arg 1 of `__strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:977: warning: passing arg 1 of `strlen' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:977: warning: passing arg 2 of `memcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:977: warning: passing arg 1 of `__strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:986: warning: passing arg 1 of `strlen' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:986: warning: passing arg 2 of `memcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:986: warning: passing arg 1 of `__strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:987: warning: passing arg 1 of `strlen' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:987: warning: passing arg 2 of `memcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:987: warning: passing arg 1 of `__strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:996: warning: passing arg 1 of `strlen' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:996: warning: passing arg 2 of `memcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:996: warning: passing arg 1 of `__strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:997: warning: passing arg 1 of `strlen' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:997: warning: passing arg 2 of `memcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:997: warning: passing arg 1 of `__strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_has_attribute':
storage-item.c:1017 : error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1017: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1028: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_get_attribute_value':
storage-item. c:1048: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1048: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1061: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1074: warning: passing arg 1 of `strlen' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:1074: warning: passing arg 2 of `memcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:1074: warning: passing arg 1 of `__strdup' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_set_attribute_value':
storage-item. c:1097: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1097: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1118: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1134: warning: passing arg 1 of `atoi' makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_delete_attribute':
storage-item.c:1 156: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1156: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1173: warning: static declaration for `storage_item_set_for_new' follows non-static
storage-item.c: In function `storage_item_set_for_new':
storage-item.c:1175: error: `Oid' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1175: error: syntax error before "blobid"
storage-item.c:1176: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1176: error: `dbConn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1178: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1178: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1185: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:1198: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:1201: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1223: error: `blobid' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1223: error: `INV_READ' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1223: error: `INV_WRITE' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1338: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `storage_quint_query_maker':
storage-item.c:1344: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1344: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1347: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1347: error: `dbConn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1358: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1393: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1403: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `storage_quad_query_maker':
storage-item.c:1408: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1408: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1411: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1411: error: `dbConn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1427: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1459: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1469: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `storage_tri_query_maker':
storage-item.c:1473: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1473: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1475: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1475: error: `dbConn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1494: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1516: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1526: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `storage_dbl_query_maker':
storage-item.c:1530: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1530: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1532: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1532: error: `dbConn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1576: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1596: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1606: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `storage_query_maker':
storage-item.c:1609: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1609: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1659: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1677: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `make_query':
storage-item.c:1681: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1681: error: `dbConn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1682: error: `PGresult' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1682: error: `results' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1688: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:1690: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1721: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `new_connection_login_info':
storage-item.c:1725: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1725: error: `connection' undeclared (first use in this function)storage-item.c:1727: error: `ConnStatusType' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1727: error: syntax error before "stat"
storage-item.c:1735: error: invalid lvalue in assignment
storage-item.c:1736: warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast
storage-item.c:1737: error: `CONNECTION_BAD' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1743: error: `stderr' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c: In function `create_connections':
storage-item.c:1758: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1758: error: `connection' undeclared (first use in this function)storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1768: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `getConnection':
storage-item.c:1771: error: `PGconn' undeclared (first use in this function)
storage-item.c:1771: error: `connection' undeclared (first use in this function)storage-item.c: At top level:
storage-item.c:1792: error: syntax error before '*' token
storage-item.c: In function `releaseConnection':
storage-item.c:1796: error: `connection' undeclared (first use in this function)make[2]: *** [storage-item.lo] Error 1
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/norman/Development/storage/libstorage/libst orage'
make[1]: *** [all-recursive] Error 1
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/norman/Development/storage/libstorage'
mak e: *** [all] Error 2

Re:Won't compile :( (1)

Tirel (692085) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878393)

storage-item.c:7:44: libpq-fe.h: No such file or directory
storage-item.c:8:28: libpq/libpq-fs.h: No such file or directory


sir, you dun have libpq!

Usability (-1, Flamebait)

Eric Ass Raymond (662593) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878411)

Just click on install.exe.

Oh wait, you're using Linux. Nevermind. Happy hacking. Ain't open source wonderful? You've got the source and now you even got the opportunity to debug it!

Re:Usability (-1, Offtopic)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878537)

Which is better than having a dysfunctional, proprietary crap-pile and an opportunity to debug it.
It's not that I mind paying for software, it's the "I've got a secret" attitude that makes me yawn.

Re:Won't compile :( (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878414)

If you don't understand what it means you probably shouldn't be playing with alpha-level software. It's not finding the PostgreSQL include files.

i think (2, Interesting)

Tirel (692085) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878373)

it's better for programs to abstract data like that, the fs should only to provide access to the medium, nothing else.

Re:i think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878487)

Yeah man, I mean totally far out...
Its just like the drugs man, they give you access to the medium man, its like nothing else

Re:i think (1)

eric76 (679787) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878521)

I agree completely.

On the surface, using a database type file system where files are just objects stored in the database along with other things seems like a great idea.

But I think that the result will probably be less resilient to damage and result in an increased possibilty of losing your data or finding them corrupted.

i think-Oracle. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878578)

"But I think that the result will probably be less resilient to damage and result in an increased possibilty of losing your data or finding them corrupted."

Well someone better phone up Oracle and let them know. Oh the horror.

murf (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878389)

73n7h p057!

Mexican prostitutes (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878390)

Watch those raven haired beauties suck your thick white cock with real zeal!

Priceless!

Re:Mexican prostitutes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878430)

But can they solve this [slashdot.org]

Re:Mexican prostitutes (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878613)

thick white cock

Isn't that a contradiction in terms?

so is everyone copying BeOS (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878394)

It's really a sad that there was a perfectly good implementation of database file system, but the company wasn't able to topple a monopoly and got squashed. MS really should have just bought BeOS and ported everything over to it. They could have just called it LongHorn and released it this year instead of waiting until 2006.

Re:so is everyone copying BeOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878644)

Eugenia? Is that you?

Finally something new to play with! (4, Interesting)

Trigun (685027) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878398)

Hopefully they plan on extending this to the networked environment, allowing multiple domain/realm file permissions, authentication, and encryption.

Anything to replace NIS and its bastard stepchildren.

Replacement for ls (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878403)

SELECT * FROM MY_FILES

Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878407)

Does this mean that Linux will finally get rid of its insanely cryptic and esoteric Filesystem Hierarchy Standard?

Let's hope!

Re:Hmm (4, Informative)

UnuMondo (642324) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878445)

No, because doing away with the root filesystem, user stuff in /home, config files in /etc, and so forth would break a number of Unix standards Linux's big advantage of being able to run many Unix apps (if you compile from source) would disappear. Storage will apparently be an interface to the existing real filesystem. Joe User won't know the difference.

Re:Hmm (2, Interesting)

orb_fan (677056) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878649)

Not true.

This isn't a replacement filesystem, just a document-storage system - you won't be able to access your documents easily from a shell.

It is a good starting point though, once working, the next step would be to compile it into the kernel, so that you can create Storage partitions, etc. and be able to do something like:

cd music by U2

Now that would be cool

I can see it now. (1, Funny)

Sphere1952 (231666) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878412)

Command: please run current microsoft worm.
>

Re:I can see it now. (1)

p3d0 (42270) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878474)

Huh?

oral sex with my girlfriend (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878417)

Greetings, Slashdotters. What follows it the true story of my first sexual experience. Being a typical Slashdot nerd, I never had much luck with females. That all changed my Sophomore year in high school when I met an attractive nerd girl that actually took some interest in me. We dated on and off for a while, but by my Senior year of high school (back in 2000), we had a pretty serious relationship. And so it came to pass that in October of 2000, I had oral sex performed on me for the first time, by my seventeen year old girlfriend.

Now, of course, I had imagined what it would feel like, and I had watched a lot of porno and did a fair amount of masturbation, but the spectacular sensations of oral sex had really surprised me. As she sucked my cock for the first time, I was amazed by how much pleasure the warmth and the wetness gave me. Granted, she was inexperienced at this point and a little nervous, but things improved with time. One of the things that that I really enjoyed was, after sucking for a while, she'd stop for a bit and rub her face on my cock. The sensation of my already moist member rubbing against the smooth skin of her face was absolutely incredible.

Eventually, she became, and still is, quite the eager cocksucker. In fact, she has even swallowed a few times. The first time, we were lying on my bed watching a Twilight Zone marathon. Eventually, she must have gotten a little bored with that because she slipped under the covers and started rubbing her head in my lap, getting me aroused, which didn't take very long. She pulled out my cock, and began sucking vigorously while I watched Twilight Zone... truly a geek's paradise! Anyway, it didn't take long before I felt myself reaching climax, and at this point I reached down to pull her off of my cock, but much to my surprise she pushed my hand away and took my whole load in her mouth. She kept her mouth on my cock for a while, holding my hot load in her mouth, enjoying the role of a cocksucking slut.

An interesting thing about my girlfriend is that she enjoys sexual role-play, in a sense. She often asks me to force her to deep-throat my cock, and to slap her face a bit and tug on her hair. At first, I was a little surprised and even scared to do this, but after a while I found it rather enjoyable to feel so much control over my girlfriend. Besides, it's all play.

Anyway, our relationship is still going strong, as is the cocksucking... she can't seem to get enough of it! I am, however, a little disappointed that she refuses to let me penetrate her virgin cunt. This is mostly due to fear of pregnancy, though. She doesn't seem to trust condoms too much. I guess I can understand her paranoia about the risk, and I certainly don't want children either, but I would really enjoy the feel of my cock inside her tight, moist little cunt. Maybe someday...

softwar gangsters/corepirate nazis.. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878420)

to replace traditional net...working, with all form of payper liesense hostage ransom stock markup FUDgerIE?

that's what these guise [oxnix.com] are planning, anyhow. fauxking virotic phonIEs they are.

Screenshots ? (1)

makapuf (412290) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878426)

I know, I'm the first to look for screenshots, but antialiased filesystems are a bit too much, maybe.

That's a good thing I think to separate filesystem and document storage. Better than vfs : either it's plain fs (simple == good for admin), or sophisticated document retrieval architecture with richer semantics than a tree (or graphs if you count links).

And then, do not let GUI apps show you the filesystem, only storage system.

Re:Screenshots ? (2, Funny)

tsetem (59788) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878460)

> I know, I'm the first to look for screenshots, but antialiased filesystems are a bit too much, maybe.

Reminds me of an internal joke we have here. Our ClearCase file server was an SGI.

Why?

Because the filenames were rendered so much prettier than on a Linux or Sun box...

Re:Screenshots ? (0, Funny)

Xenoproctologist (698865) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878528)

Antialiased filesystem? Is this eight bits to describe 128 shades of "0" and 128 shades of "1", or is it one binary bit plus an eight-bit alpha channel?

Damn, I knew this hard drive space "age of plenty" was too good to last. Curse you, Moore's Law, for taunting me so!

AWESOME! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878427)

the OSS community jacks another idea, this time from Microsoft

keep up the "innovation" fellas!

Actually I think this was stolen from Star Trek... (0)

zinkem (679064) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878475)

You know, standard sci-fi talk to your computer in normal english and get results kinda crap :)

Obvious advantages (5, Interesting)

tsetem (59788) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878429)

There's lots of advantages to this kind of system, especially if interfaces are written for other OS's (Windows, Solaris, OSX)
  • Networked file system. No more NFS/SMB hacks. Everyone accesses the data in a common way, and can access the same data
  • Integrated mime-types. No more relying on file extensions and other hacks. The mime-type (and subsequent viewer) is right there in the query
  • Integrated version control. Have and keep a history of all of your files as they were managed and maintained through their lives, as well as a history of who modified them. If this aspect could be enhanced with branching & merging, then would make other CM Systems (CVS, ClearCase) obsolete?

Of course it's only wishful thinking. I'd be nervous to see exactly how this integrates into other "Legacy" applications. I can also see be performance penalties since you are now querying a database, rather than looking at a simple file structure...

Re:Obvious advantages (5, Insightful)

dabadab (126782) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878500)

"Integrated mime-types. No more relying on file extensions and other hacks. The mime-type (and subsequent viewer) is right there in the query"

And how does that meta data gets to the db? Oh, right, it will rely on file extensions and other hacks :)

Re:Obvious advantages (4, Insightful)

azaroth42 (458293) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878510)

Obvious disadvantages:

SQL is slow compared to things like BerkeleyDB

We already have journaled file systems that can save metadata (though not user defined, I think)

Your database becomes corrupt, you lose everything.

Sorry, give me something that gives me back my data -fast-. If I want to do selects for files, I'll use locate and xargs.

--Azaroth

Re:Obvious advantages (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878669)

You are obviously too stupid to understand the technology being covered in this thread. Please refrain from further posting.

oh wait... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878433)

... this sounds familiar. maybe newdocms [m-arriaga.net] ??

How does the metadata get into the database? (5, Insightful)

farnz (625056) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878442)

My major concern with all these database type filesystems is that the gains are always shown as things like, "Find all films directed by Steven Spielberg", and yet this is not information that the computer can necessarily gather for itself.

Outside of a work environment, I've rarely encounter anyone who keeps consistent, useful filenames, let alone metadata indexes; it seems to me that people will skimp on the metadata, and thus limit the usefulness to metadata that the computer can collect automatically ("All movies that last under 90 minutes"). It's like CD collections, or books; libraries have nicely catalogued and ordered collections. Private individuals don't; they have roughly ordered collections on the shelf, and don't bother keeping them in any better order. I suspect the same will happen with these metadata systems; people won't do the work needed to make them truely useful.

Re:How does the metadata get into the database? (1)

Trigun (685027) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878492)

then we just make certain that all the work is done up front. Sure you'll have some of the metadata stating that your files were 3nc0d3d by N3o, but if you don't like that, you can change it. White-market files will have the proper metadata.

Re:How does the metadata get into the database? (4, Funny)

henbane (663769) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878504)

"It's like CD collections, or books; libraries have nicely catalogued and ordered collections. Private individuals don't; they have roughly ordered collections on the shelf, and don't bother keeping them in any better order"

Call yourself a geek? How can you possibly but something on a shelf without first checking to see that it's in a proper place observing the subtle cross reference system that backs up the obvious system. Man, I hate it when people move my stuff.

Re:How does the metadata get into the database? (1)

rusty0101 (565565) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878599)

you mean you don't order the books by the color of their binding? How unstylish of you.

-Rusty

Re:How does the metadata get into the database? (4, Insightful)

Tom (822) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878642)

That's why we have community products. For music, CDDB works pretty good and is a working real-life example.

Other metadata is automatically inserted. When you install OpenOffice, it asks for your name and inserts that as the author into any new documents you create, for example.

Sure, the metadata on my personal machine will never be comparable to what a library could do. But it doesn't have to be - it has to be useful for me, not - like the library - for thousands of people with very different interests and approaches.

Re:How does the metadata get into the database? (1)

neillewis (137544) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878670)

My collection of MP3s never had any data beyond a vague [Artist - Title.mp3] file naming convention, but with ID tags, CDDB & iTunes decent gui to store and catalog them, I'm gradually getting there, and while I don't have to see the file I can always get to them if needs be. I shudder to recall some of the dodgy alternatives like RealJukebox. So my requirements would be:

A standard crossplatform way to transfer metadata.
(With XML becoming the default data format, this could be either held in a file or findable/queriable in a standard way from the source site/email/Server.)

An intelligent ui which stops maintenance becoming a chore.

The Trend (1)

TwistedSquare (650445) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878448)

This certainly seems to be the trend in filesystems these days, this must be at least the third slashdot posting about a database filing system I've seen recently. Does anyone have any information on how reliable they are (which I'd imagine would be the major concern about such file systems)? I'm guessing they will not replace ext3 etc., merely be used where applicable.

ext3 + sql (2, Interesting)

Dreadlord (671979) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878456)

I don't know how a database system can improve a file system's performance, especially with the unnecessary overhead associated with, the current state of the ext3 file system is doing quite well, and updatedb/locate works fine for me.
What can really interest me is something like updatedb/locate but with SQL syntax support, this could be awesome.

There needs to be a hierarchy !! (1)

nicolas.bouthors (243330) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878461)

How should I know what's in the storage in the first place if I cannot browse it ?

My .2 euros

Re:There needs to be a hierarchy !! (1)

110010001000 (697113) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878604)

Why would browsing nescessitate a hierarchial storage system? You can browse a db if you would like.

Re:There needs to be a hierarchy !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878662)

> My .2 euros

That's 20 cents :-)

Database-based File system is awesome! (1)

Iron Monkey543 (676232) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878472)

You mean I can just do a SQL script and like magic organize my files?! OMG! My desktop won't look like this anymore [24.167.92.183]

Re:Database-based File system is awesome! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878577)

well right now it looks like this

The page cannot be displayed
There are too many people accessing the Web site at this time.

Please try the following:

* Click the Refresh button, or try again later.
* Open the 24.167.92.183:8585 home page, and then look for links to the information you want.

HTTP 403.9 - Access Forbidden: Too many users are connected
Internet Information Services

Technical Information (for support personnel)

* Background:
This error can occur if the Web server is busy and cannot process your request due to heavy traffic.

* More information:
Microsoft Support

Re:Database-based File system is awesome! (1)

Iron Monkey543 (676232) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878601)

blah IIS says that i have a limit of 10 connections and I can't change it it's hardcoded for some weird reason

AS400 did this 20 years ago: (5, Informative)

mikepb78 (704506) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878476)

The filesystem on AS400 is actually a db2 database and it work quite well

Re:AS400 did this 20 years ago: (1)

phfpht (654492) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878616)

But even on the 400 most file operations are strictly hierarchical. /Root/QIBM/UserData/some/additional/path/to/file.e xt or /Root/home/username/whatever or some library list or "files"

Backups (-1, Flamebait)

Florian Weimer (88405) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878488)

You still cannot reliably backup PostgreSQL databases, and you want to store all your files in it? Isn't his a bit premature?

Re:Backups (1)

mikepb78 (704506) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878546)

Then use db2/oracle/mysql etc. Porting should not be that hard.

Re:Backups (1)

joostje (126457) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878563)

You still cannot reliably backup PostgreSQL databases

What's wrong with pg_dump(1)?

Re:Backups (1)

realnowhereman (263389) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878569)

I'm hoping that you are a bit out of date, pgdumpall works fine for me. Since about 7.1 it's done large objects as well. I'm a bit worried that it's not working fine for me and I'm living an illusion. What exactly does it not back up reliably?

Re:Backups (1)

Florian Weimer (88405) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878612)

What exactly does it not back up reliably?

It sometimes dumps database objects in the wrong order, and restore fails as a consequence.

Natural language interface? Hmm... (1)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878491)

Not looking at screenshot 15 it isn't!

"select DISTINCT(recordid) from AttrSoup...."

Well call me old fashioned , but in my day we called that SQL. Why do I get the feeling this is
just yet another database dressed up to look like its providing some always-wanted-but-until-now-folks-it-just-wasnt-po ssible-but-with-new-WizzoFS- etc etc

Call me a cynic but I've seen it all before. Besides , databases are inefficient for manipulation filesystems at a low level so expect
your PC to crawl if you use this on a regular basis.

BeFS hello?? (1)

OmniVector (569062) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878494)

It's about time we started playing catchup with BeOS's filesystem. Though this seems more user-land when a function like this (file systems) should be more kernel-land.

This is essentialy what Longhorn's taked on SQL extensions are going to provide, and I had no idea there was ongoing progress to have this functional in *nix so soon! By the time 2005 rolls around, I have a feeling this will be a lot further a long than microsoft's implementation.

*cracks whip* On zerocool, on uberh4ck3r, on coding monkey! We're catching up :)

Re:BeFS hello?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878602)

Hello BeFS how are you today? I like what you did with your hair, pity about the poor business decisions

filesystem is a database (0, Flamebait)

1s44c (552956) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878495)

So it's about that time again. The old database is a filesystem is a database thing. To people that have not heard of this before this is not a new idea. OS/390 has been doing this for a very long time.

What this world needs is a really big injection of orginal thought, not a rehash of every idea that gets old enough for most people to forget it the first time around.

Re:filesystem is a database (3, Insightful)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878558)

"What this world needs is a really big injection of orginal thought"

They are original ideas, they just don't make it into the PC world where MS dominates. MS come up with as many original ideas as McDonalds
and since all KDE & Gnome (and frankly most open source projects) are doing is playing catchup with MS then originality is never going to be
a prime concern.

Re:filesystem is a database (1)

salesgeek (263995) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878646)

They are original ideas, they just don't make it into the PC world where MS dominates. MS come up with as many original ideas as McDonalds
and since all KDE & Gnome (and frankly most open source projects) are doing is playing catchup with MS then originality is never going to be
a prime concern.


Well said. Invent and innovate, don't just duplicate. I would love to see MS complain, "Those OSS guys have extended the ____ (fill in MS Standard) standard to do _____, ____ and _____. We just can't keep up with them."

Re:filesystem is a database (1)

1s44c (552956) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878665)

"...are doing is playing catchup with MS then originality is never going to be a prime concern."

I don't think most open source is playing catch up with that third rate vendor you mention. Opensource software is of higher quality and for more compatable with everything.

A tiny amount of originality can go a huge way though. It can make the differance between a drone army of tens of thousands average to great programmers producing crap ( microsoft ) and a hundred or so below average to great coders producing quality stuff ( open source. )

Re:filesystem is a database (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878620)

arh why bother

Dubious contents in the filesystem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878497)

Check the screenshots: How exactly do you get all those movies on disk without doing something "illegal"?

I18n? (1)

MSBob (307239) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878498)

This is all great but how is this project going to work with languages other than English?

Storage (1)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878508)

OSNews is reporting on Storage, an innovative project which aims to replace the traditional hierarchical filesystems with a new document store which is database-based (PostgreSQL).

I have a new way to get between point A and B. I call this product "Car". To fuel it, I've started a fuel company called "Gas". Of course, people will abuse "Car", so I've also created something to keep them in line, called "Fuzz". Fuzz will be powered by what I call "Donut".

(hey, it's Friday, gimme a break :-)

Patents? (1)

SynKKnyS (534257) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878538)

Is this method of finding and storing files patented?

Why link directly againsat libpq? (2, Insightful)

Wdomburg (141264) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878540)

It seems silly to tie the implementation to a single database, when gnome-db is fast approaching 1.0.

Metadata (1)

eiggen (553741) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878562)

This idea really is interesting!

However, I wonder how it will take metadata from files and put it into the DB directly... like for ID3 tags for example...

Will there be intelligent plugins a la Reiser4 that will transparently do this?

ok, (1)

noselasd (594905) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878579)

wtf is this going to help ? People are as much boneheads in putting the right attributes/keywords on a "file" as they are to categorize them in a hierarcy(traditional filesystems). Why is this so great ?

I spot a pirate! (1)

meshko (413657) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878583)

U2 albums, Spielberg movies, Nicole (Kidman?) movies... I think someone is in trouble!

As for the idea of database file systems -- I don't think we need this yes. Both file systems and database research should concentrate on distributed /mobile aspect (even Coda, AFS and friends are not yet widely accepted/ready for prime time).

Everyone is getting into the act? (1)

VernonNemitz (581327) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878591)

Old Slashdot articles:
one guy [slashdot.org]
How-To [slashdot.org]
OpenBeOS [slashdot.org]

woot woot (1)

VAXGeek (3443) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878597)

I hope they add a DBI soon so I can store all my files in a CSV file.

Re:woot woot (1)

forsetti (158019) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878621)

But where would you store your CVS file? ;)

ReiserFS future (1)

realnowhereman (263389) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878598)

I personally like the way reiserfs is roadmapped. If I understand it correctly it will be a superset of existing filesystems. That is /home/myname/documents/report/2003/ will still work, but then so will /documents/reports/2003/myname; and so on.

Multiple paths to the same object seems perfect to me.

leisure suit larry reborn? (1, Funny)

steffl (74683) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878609)

great, so now navigating the data will be like playing leisure suit larry! at least that's what I was reminded of when I read the queries in screeshots...

erik

UPDATE overlords (0)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878611)

SET welcome = TRUE
WHERE name = 'PostgreSQL';

"Damn, I left that on my roommate's desk" (5, Insightful)

kfg (145172) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878637)

"Well, where do you go?"

"Stanford."

"No problemo, I'm heading that way later and I can grab it for you. What's your room?"

"Dorm 5, Room 109. It's the desk on the left."

( We didn't bother to state earth.us because we were already inside those directories)

Yes, yes we do think heirarchically. Most of the history of human thought has been fitting everything we can lay our filthy little brain cells on into heirarcheis, whether they wish to fit into them or not. It's intuitive.

As for natural language didn't we learn about that with COBOL? Natural language only speeds the learning process slightly ( the majority of the learning still lying in the realm of understanding the basic concepts involved), but then becomes a pain in the ass forever afterward.

Looking at the screenshots it's also ugly as all sin. The physicist in me can't help but feel that a model that ugly can't possibly be correct.

I think this makes just about as much sense as using a document preperation language (XML) as the basis of a database.

Which is to say, none.

KFG

This is awesome! :) (1)

Trolling4Dollars (627073) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878645)

Quite a while back I made suggestions like this indicating that this is the direction that most of the computer industry is moving in. I am certain that I am not the only one that was thinking this way and this project proves it. The natural language feature is something that surpasses my original concept of predefined end-user datatypes (movies, music, documents, mail, etc...). The only drawback I can see to this kind of system is the amount of horsepower needed to run it. But as long as the requirements stay below those of M$, I think all will be well. :)

Obligatory BeOS comment (1, Redundant)

The_Hun (693418) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878648)

And do not forget about BeOS, a pioneer of a database-like FS. There is also a BeFS for Linux [sourceforge.net] .

About time (1)

varjag (415848) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878666)

Current filesystems are nothing more than hierarchial databases. While relatively straightforward to implement, hierarchial DBs have major drawbacks, e.g.

- Complex searches are slow;
- Integrity control is hard;
- There's no decent way to refer to an item in several distinct branches (hence the kludges like symlinks in filesystems).

Database world has been moving from hierarchal to relational DBMS since the late 70's. It's about time for filesystems to catch up.
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