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New Heinlein Novel

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the you-read-that-right dept.

Sci-Fi 460

book_reader writes "It's hard to believe but the grand master of sci-fi is back - 15 years or so after his death. His first novel that he wrote in the mid 30's and long since thought lost was rediscovered and will be coming out in November! The thought of a novel he wrote so early in his writing career boggles my mind but who will be able to resist - not I!"

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Who? (4, Funny)

BurKaZoiD (611246) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878848)

Never heard of him.

Re:Who? (2, Funny)

fussman (607784) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878883)

Somebody flog him for his insulence.

Re:Who? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879029)

Flog him for insulin!!!!

Re:Who? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879112)

Man, that's funny, that's exactly what I was thinking too. Great minds think alike.

Keep it real, homie.

Re:Who? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878902)

<sigh> This causes me pain. </sigh>

He is some NAZI dude--Join the GNAA! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878904)

CowboyNeal is an obese smelly socially inept fat white slob.

Re:He is some NAZI dude--Join the GNAA! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878968)

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I think he played Sgt Schultz in Hogans Heroes (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878937)

he was that fat German dude no?

I think he was in GNAA and died of AIDS (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878967)

a few years back

Re:Who? (3, Insightful)

El_Ge_Ex (218107) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879175)

I hope and pray Heinlen doesn't turn into the 'Tu-Pac' of geeks (i.e. ends up having 30 or more works 'discovered').

-B

Re:Who? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879246)

Your membership to Slashdot is hereby revoked. We will be visiting your house/office to take your computer and all other electronic devices, since you obviously don't deserve them.

Cool (-1)

Papatoast (245525) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878849)

good stuff that! 30 yrs after his death..sounds very sci-fi!

Re:Cool (1)

mirko (198274) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879009)

Well, nowadays' motto is "all at once".
It'd have been better if our grandgrandgrandgrandgrandchildren were about to discover it in several centuries from now...
I guess somebody would not appreciate the loss of the copyright, had it been published later...

So, I'd say, some right holder was looking for easy money, found some essay, published it.
Now, it's being hyped and will make money.

BASH early post (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878855)

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Re:BASH early post (-1, Offtopic)

BurKaZoiD (611246) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878900)

WTF is the GNAA and who gives a *fart*

Awesome, can't wait to read it. (-1, Flamebait)

dood (11062) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878857)

Thank god, because I thought his last novel wasn't up to par. Will Jack Ryan be back this time? I heard this one focuses more on his son, Jack Ryan, Jr.

they're back! (2, Funny)

mOoZik (698544) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878859)

The sci-fi gods of the past have come to reclaim the present and shape the future! RUN FOR COVER!

Re:they're back! (1, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879102)

> The sci-fi gods of the past have come to reclaim the present and shape the future! RUN FOR COVER!

I, for one, welcome our new libertarian overlor-HEY!

Re:they're back! (1)

EnderWiggnz (39214) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879197)

i'm assuming that this book will be just one large alien-sex orgy, as heinlein has been digressing into longer and longer alien sex rants in his books.

Re:they're back! (3, Insightful)

AngelfMercy (694727) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879229)

wouldn't that be the opposite, seeing that it's an early work?

MIND BOGGLING! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878867)

The idea that a publisher would scrape an authors dead bones for a little posthumous cash is TOTALLY MIND BOGGLING!

is it bill gates (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878869)

I loved his books

WOW that is a scary icon (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878871)

Thats kinda spooky...oh by the way CowboyNeal is an obese smelly socially inept sexless fat white boy. Join the GNAA today!

just in case of ./ ing (0, Informative)

redcaboodle (622288) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878879)

The finding and publishing of "For Us, the Living" by Deb Houdek Rule As of this writing, August 31, 2003, there are only about half a dozen people in the entire known universe who can accurately claim that they have read every novel Heinlein has written. For those of us who thought there would never again be another new Heinlein novel, the impossible has become reality . "For Us, the Living," is a brand new, never before published novel by Robert A. Heinlein. It is going into print now for the first time and will be in bookstores by the end of November, 2003. "For Us, the Living" was written by Heinlein about 1938-9, before he wrote his first sf short, "Lifeline." The novel, "For Us, the Living," was deemed unpublishable, mainly for the racy content. So racy is/was the content that in the 1930s the book could not even have been legally shipped through the US mail! For this reason, after a few publisher rejections, the novel was tabled by Heinlein, but the content was mined for his later stories and novels. A fellow named Nehemiah Scudder even appears in "For Us, the Living." It's important to point out that according to those favored few who have thus far read this long lost Heinlein novel, it did not go unpublished because it was bad--they say it's quite good, though clearly a first novel by the author (it has a two and a half page footnote!). It was unpublished because the mores and culture of the time would not allow it. "For Us, the Living," was put aside, and eventually lost. The Heinleins apparently destroyed all copies they had. And because at the time it was written Heinlein was not a member of the science fiction community, no other sf writers knew about it. He had let one or two friends read it, and it is by a long trail through one of them that this rarest of treasures was located. Robert James, Ph.D., Heinlein Society member and Heinlein scholar, had been researching Heinlein and his life, focusing on Heinlein's second wife Leslyn, when he came across a vague mention of an early novel, a copy of which one-time Heinlein biographer Leon Stover was supposed to have. Robert James went searching, and after serious hunting, finally located a forgotten copy in a box in a garage that had changed hands at least once since Heinlein himself had given it to a friend to be read. This copy had annotations written in the margin by Heinlein himself, with some in a second hand that was probably then-wife Leslyn's. Robert James presented the manuscript to the Heinlein Society's secretary, David Silver, who promptly contacted Arthur Dula, the representative of the Heinlein literary estate. As they told the tale, they only informed Art that they had a "surprise" for him. When they picked him up, and the three of them were alone in the car, they handed Art the manuscript of this never before seen "new" Heinlein novel. "...when I regained consciousness," Art Dula said, describing the moment, he knew at once this treasure needed to be published for the benefit of us, Heinlein's readers. Through Eleanor Wood, agent for the Heinlein estate, they arranged publication of "For Us, the Living," the first truly new Heinlein novel since "To Sail Beyond the Sunset," published shortly before his death. Heinlein's last novel is now his first. Virtually no changes have been made to the manuscript from Heinlein's original draft. The book, Robert James said, was not a first draft but a polished final draft. Only a very few minor edits and spelling corrections were made. There will be a foreword by Spider Robinson and an afterword by Robert James. There are two bonuses to this landmark event that bear mentioning. As most novels have dedications at the beginning, the dedication of "For Us, the Living" will be to us... to Heinlein's Children. The other bonus is another gift to us. The money earned by this novel will be going to directly and substantially support Heinlein's dream, and the dream we, Heinlein's Children, share. Earnings will be going to the advancement of human exploration of space. When you purchase "For Us, the Living" you are also contributing, in a real and meaningful way, the furtherment of this dream. Yet again, Heinlein 'pays it forward.'

Re:just in case of ./ ing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878889)

MIND BOGGLING!

Re:just in case of ./ ing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879031)

Please don't mod this karma whore up. If he was really concerned about a slashdotting (which isn't occuring) he could have just posted it as anonymous. Even worse he could have at least worked out the formatting to make it readable. Don't waste your mod points on crap like this.

My thoughts on this (4, Insightful)

Ignorant Aardvark (632408) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878885)

I don't know whether to be elated or scared. It's kind of common knowledge that Heinlein's earlier works are better than this later works ... but if this is his first work, it might not be all that good. There might be a reason it wasn't published up until now ... there might be a reason Heinlein hid it away for all these years. I'll definitely buy it and read it, but I'm keeping my expectations low.

Re:My thoughts on this (2, Funny)

Sphere1952 (231666) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878917)

Read the article, bozo.

It's a dirty book.

Re:My thoughts on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878920)

Either way, I think we can agree that this is MIND BOGGLING!

Re:My thoughts on this (4, Informative)

tsetem (59788) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878978)

While going through the Heinlein Society homepage, I found this review [heinleinsociety.org] of The Number of the Beast. I've never read the book (but will now), but it seems to imply that Heinlein intentionally wrote the book bad to show how a SciFi book should not be written.

The review is pretty interesting, and I think I'd like to read it just to see what they are talking about. Morbid curiosity maybe?

Re:My thoughts on this (1)

Stuart Park (467611) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879096)

Do yourself a favour and save your sanity.. don't read "The Number of the Beast". I got about 2/3 through it and then just found it too hard to suffer through the remaining pages - worst Heinlein novel ever in my opinion. I much prefer stuff like "Door into Summer" and let's hope this new (old?) novel is of a similar standard.

Bad, no. Confusing, yes. (1)

Unknown Poltroon (31628) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879195)

THe first tiem i read it, it made no sense. Upon rereading it, i found it interesting. Plus it figureing out where tamara hid the gun kept my brain occupied for a while.

Re:My thoughts on this (1)

Enry (630) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879278)

Of course, that's the book I'm reading now. It's bad, but I've read worse.

Re:My thoughts on this (1, Interesting)

mforbes (575538) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878981)

Considering how boiler-plated all of his work post-1945 was, I don't think I'll be buying it... but out of curiosity, I'll probably borrow a copy from the library. I want to say that Heinlein was a one-note song, but it's not true. He had several notes, always played in the same order: space exploration (which I applaud), sex, self-righteousness, anti-communism, eugenics, and more sex. I'm not eager to read more.

Re:My thoughts on this (1)

hcduvall (549304) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879013)

Not that I disagree, but this one would be interesting because its a pre '45 novel.

Re:My thoughts on this (-1, Redundant)

lobsterGun (415085) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879008)

Heinlein has a new book??? Isn't he dead? How could he have a new book? Is this some kind of Crossing over with John Edwards thng???

This is all so confusing!

Re:My thoughts on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879078)

If it were like John Edwards we would still be stuck on finding who has a relative with an M in their name. Oh wait that's me! It must be my Mom. Oh and has she passed. No. Oh well she says everything is fine anyway and wants to remind you of your dog. I didn't have a dog, I was allergice. Well that's what she meant. Wow you're good. Wait weren't we talking about Heinlein?

As you can tell I am a big fan of John Edwards. What other show proves the stupidity and gullibility of mankind better. Well maybe the pet psyhcic. Now that's a scam I should have thought of.

Re:My thoughts on this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879271)

I can see the original poster not reading the linked story, but did you even read the /. summary?

Re:My thoughts on this (2, Funny)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879062)

Read it in bed next time you're sick. Everyone knows that it's not a sin to read bad literature when you have a head cold.

Re:My thoughts on this (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879145)

A bad head cold? You must be soft. Oh no mommy. I got the sniffles. I's gots to stay home in bed. Suck it up. If you aren't going to die in the next 4 hours then you should get off your ass. I am not saying that you shouldn't call into work but at least get up.

Re:My thoughts on this (4, Insightful)

msuzio (3104) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879092)

Eh. Sounds too much like his later works.

Everything after "The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress" kind of sucked, IMHO. Once he got so into the whole sex/polyamory thing as a constant focus, I just lost interest. He actually managed to make sex boring to me, which is really saying something. Yeah, OK, Lazarus Long has slept with everyone and their mother... yeah, wonderful, free love is awesome, whatever.

I actually heard Heinlein was kind of pissed about how his works inspired the poly crowd, but I don't see what *else* he was intending to say in all these books. I mean, just off the top of my head -- Friday, The Number of the Beast, The Cat Who Walks Through Walls, Time Enough For Love -- all of these books were soured for me by what seemed like constant, totally unerotic sex. In "Friday", it was almost mechanical... boring.

(Yes, I know someone will post a page-count vs. sex acts ratio to try to convince me otherwise, but I don't care).

[ ObSenselessRant: Oh yeah, and Piers Anthony is a dirty old man. "Bio of A Space Tyrant" sucked once he got into the hero having consensual sex with a 12 year old. That coupled with Xanth novels titled "The Color of Her Panties" makes me want to have authorities monitoring his shack in Florida... ]

I hate this kind of stuff (3, Interesting)

henbane (663769) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878906)

Let the man rest in peace. Did he approve of the editor? Did he have any input in to it since 1930?

Free as a Bird [amazon.com] anyone?

How much material has Tupac released since he died?

And all that crap that Tolkien's son claimed he wrote to make some money

Why, why, why do this to Heinlein as well?

Add the "Dune Lite" books to that list... (5, Insightful)

Jack_Frost (28997) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879095)

Brian Herbert's books are cereal box covers compared to the depth of the originals turned out by Frank Herbert. Still though, I won't call this graverobbing until I read it.

Re:I hate this kind of stuff (4, Insightful)

TopShelf (92521) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879167)

If you RTFA (I know, I know...), you'll see that what was recovered is a final draft, which required only a few "minor edits and spelling corrections." Hardly comparable to your other examples.

As to the Tolkein stuff, some was well worth posthumous publication (Silmarillion, Book of Lost Tales, etc.), but they did end up going waaaay overboard.

Maybe this will be good (4, Insightful)

Mycroft_514 (701676) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879170)

>Let the man rest in peace. Did he approve of the editor? Did he have any input in to it since 1930?

What editor? If you read the top, it was published with only minor spelling corrections. This is similar to the tack that was taken with 2 other works after his death. They were re-published the way HE wrote them, not the way they were first published.

Spider Robinson was a friend of his, and if he has some say in the matter (he did one of the forwards for this book), then it ought to maintain some integrity.

Mark me down as optimistic until I get a chance to review it. Most of his "so-called" hack work is better then 90% of today's writers anyway.

Re:I hate this kind of stuff (2, Interesting)

Sunracer (103819) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879176)

So don't buy it?

Newly discovered works of long-since-gone authors may be invaluable sources to other people from scholars to fans. Would you ban the publishing of a "book" written by a scribe in the ancient Egypt? Or the new opera by Mozart that no-one knew about?

You don't have to buy Christopher Tolkien's publications, either, but someone might just love to see just one more glimpse into Middle Earth that J.R.R. wrote in the corner of some notebook page.

Oops (1)

eyepeepackets (33477) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878908)

Fours posts and I'm wondering if the Heinlein Society folks have time enough for A NEW SERVER.

Oy, that's too bad. *shake*

Re:Oops (1)

eyepeepackets (33477) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879016)

Ah, guess they did have time enough. Coolness!

Re:Oops (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879128)

Loaded fast for me. Maybe you just need a NEW INTERNET CONNECTION or perhaps a lesson how to undo the Caps Lock key.

Troll, Troll go away. Come back again when you have something valuable to say.

in case of slashdotting. (-1, Troll)

Tirel (692085) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878909)

mirror is here [tinyurl.com]

A few years ago (3, Informative)

Richy_T (111409) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878910)

after achieving fame and recognition, Terry Pratchett released one of his early stories. It was somewhat naff and an obvious ripoff of "The Hobbit". Hopefully this will fare a little better.

Rich

"The Grand Master" is misleading (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878916)

He was _a_ grandmaster, but not _the_ grandmaster.

http://www.steampunk.com/sfch/awards/nebula-gm.h tm l

Re:"The Grand Master" is misleading (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879139)

No, that would have been my idol, Grandmaster Flash, and his fellows, the Furious Five. Don't push me, coz I'm close to the edge indeed.

So is it Public Domain? (0, Redundant)

goldspider (445116) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878919)

Or, although it was written 80 years ago, is someone still making money off of this work? If so, who owns the copyright? and for how long?

Re:So is it Public Domain? (2, Informative)

gowen (141411) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878991)

IIIRC, the standard term is presently 70 years after the author's death, so more than 50 years to go. And thats assuming that the US govt (proudly sponsored by Disney) haven't pushed for further extensions to prevent Mickey Mouse entering the public domain.

Re:So is it Public Domain? (3, Informative)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879004)

Re:So is it Public Domain? (3, Funny)

1s44c (552956) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879034)

If so, who owns the copyright?

shh, your wake up SCO.

This sort of thing makes me puke (3, Insightful)

mckwant (65143) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878927)

I mean, really. A substantial chunk of artistry is knowing what isn't worth publishing. Now, we've got Douglas Adams and Heinlein releasing stuff from beyond the grave that they might not deem publishable, given the option.

Simply getting more of an artist's work is NOT necessarily a good thing. For instance, I got a hold of a bootleg of a bunch of old Pixies studio sessions. The stuff they released is good, but you know what?

The stuff they didn't release is crap. They wrote bad songs, recognized them as bad songs, and DIDN'T release them. There's a reason that stuff stays in the attic, and fans should be able to respect that, IMHO.

Re:This sort of thing makes me puke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878950)

I have to agree with you, this publisher's obviously profit-driven actions are MIND BOGGLING!

Re:This sort of thing makes me puke (1)

wondafucka (621502) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879105)

Yeah some of the stuff released post-humously or as a sequel to capitalize off notoriety is crap. It's up to the individual to recognize this.

We live in a well informed society. It's not like there is some brutal dictator who is styiming reviews of Alien4 so that the public will have to go and $ee it for themselves.

There is, however, a brutal dictator that keeps me from accessing books on spelling and grammar.

Re:This sort of thing makes me puke (1)

Col. Klink (retired) (11632) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879245)

You need to RTFA. In most cases, I would agree with you. But the only reason this wasn't published was that it was too racy by 1930's standards. There's no reason to believe he didn't want this published. He had tried to get it published, but in the '30s, they wouldn't have even been allowed to ship it by mail!

Also: "Earnings will be going to the advancement of human exploration of space."

Re:This sort of thing makes me puke (1)

John Jorsett (171560) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879273)

Why should it matter to you if they publish this, even if it is crap? It's not like they're going to force you to read the thing. Don't buy it.

best career move evar... (1, Funny)

PoPRawkZ (694140) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878934)

death is often the best career booster for some people... take hendrix for example.

Re:best career move evar... (0)

Walrus99 (543380) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879220)

Actually Hendrix was at the height of his popularity when he died, so it wasn't such a good career move. It did provide some material for Spinal Tap.

The phrase was first applied to Elvis. When he died he hadn't had a hit single for many years.

RAH vs PKD (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878935)

Who is better?

Never say never... (4, Funny)

telstar (236404) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878944)

Wow, never say never...

Heinlein's got another book...
Celine Dion came out of retirement...
Cher had her comeback tour...

I'd given up waiting for a sequel of "From Justin to Kelly" but this story has nenewed my hope!

His last novels were ghosted anyway.... (2, Insightful)

Wizzy Wig (618399) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878949)

His last few novels were so tedious. Doesn't matter... I'm not an adolescent know-it-all utopian collectivist anymore... a new Heinlein novel doesn't get my interest like it once would have.

Re:His last novels were ghosted anyway.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879178)

Why is it that all these people who didn't even read the post at the top of the page get modded up? This isn't a late novel but one of his first.

We discussed this at TorCon... (4, Interesting)

Jack William Bell (84469) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878960)

We discussed this at TorCon [slashdot.org] last weekend. The general consensus was:
  1. Everyone would be more confortable about this if Ginnie (Virginia Heinlein) was still alive and vetting this.
  2. There is probably good reason why RAH didn't want it published.
  3. We will all buy it and read it anyway.

Re:We discussed this at TorCon... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879037)

Yeah, at least in Tolkien's case, his son Chris at least had some sort of idea about how to produce all those notes into a decent book (Silmarillion, others)..

Re:We discussed this at TorCon... (2, Interesting)

rusty0101 (565565) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879237)

as to point 2, from the article, it appears that at the time it was a bit racier than the public mores whould allow to be published.

I tend to suspect that if you go to your local book store in November and December, you can easily find books that are far racier than this book will be/was.

I suspect that even in comparison to Glory Road, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, and Strnager in a Strange Land, this will be considered tame. Then again I haven't read it yet, so I don't know.

I agree with point 1, though it sounds like his second wife had as much review control at the time as Ginnie did later on.

One of the things that I would like to see would be an edition with the annotations by all the people who had written notes in the margins. Other than copy edits of course.

That's just my views however.

-Rusty

Um, yeah, I've got one too (2, Funny)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878975)

I found it down the back of a sofa that I bought from the ex wife of the cousin of the guy that fixed the car of Heinlein's dentist's cleaning lady.

You can have it for a million bucks. I'll donate the money to, uh, space or something.

This isn't another homosexual sodomy romp is it? (-1, Troll)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878977)

Oh wait, that's Oscar Wilde.

I get those old-timey writers all mixed up.

Re:This isn't another homosexual sodomy romp is it (3, Funny)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879076)

Heinlein was into incestuous consensual patriarchal discipline dom-sum fetishism, fool!

Wait, I might be thinking about Stephen R. Donaldson. Which one sets their daddy-daughter fucking in rocketships?

Just like with dead musicians... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878985)

...the editorial process that keeps shit from reaching the marketplace gets thrown out after the artist's death. You have been warned.

He's back! (3, Funny)

1s44c (552956) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878988)

"It's hard to believe but the grand master of sci-fi is back - 15 years or so after his death"

I'll bet he smells kind of bad.

Re:He's back! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879227)

AFter 15 years? Depending on how well he was enbalmed and packaged he is probably just bones. If he is in a mausoleum it is a different story. He would probably be just a dehydrated mass.

Contains a never before heard Tupac/Biggie battle! (1)

haa...jesus christ (576980) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878989)

I hear Shug Knight wants to bundle this with Tupac's twelfth post-humous release.

For Us, the Living (4, Funny)

Brian_Ellenberger (308720) | more than 10 years ago | (#6878992)

Does this satisfy the definition of ironic?

interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6878994)

i will have to try and pickup a paperback copy when published...

From the 30's... (4, Funny)

Andrewkov (140579) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879017)

Wow, science fiction from the 30's. It will be an interesting read just to see the perspective of someone in the 30's: By 1950 everyone will be driving flying rocket cars. By 1970 the world will be destroyed by war, by 1990 a new race of ape-people will take over the planet. By 2003 the war against the apes will have been won, and the whole galaxy will be colonized by humans! Cool!

Re:From the 30's... (0)

Walrus99 (543380) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879254)

The ape-people did take over. We just didn't tell the dumb humans that we enslaved ... ohh um never mind.

So (1, Troll)

Gay Nigger (676904) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879023)

As if he wasn't enough of a hack in his "prime", they are now releasing, posthumously, one of his very first works?

Oh, I can't wait... *rolls eyes*

Scudder (2, Interesting)

Dr. Smeegee (41653) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879024)

I had read that Heinlein *hated* his Nehemiah Scudder character (who later went on to form a really pleasant theocracy in "If This Goes On...") so much that he was not able to write about him. This should be interesting. :-)

"Heinleins . . . detroyed all the copies . . ."? (2, Interesting)

arsinmsn (602830) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879054)

For me this is the only fact that makes it tempting to read. I wonder when the purge took place, during the early or late phase of his career. That is, does it undermine the straight-on patriarchial onanism of Stranger in a Strange Land or the more shame-riddled tone of "Job."

Opinions are free, they're just not easy.

ST theme became clear the other day (0, Troll)

paiute (550198) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879061)

Semi-on topic: I listened to Starship Troopers on tape while commuting a couple of years ago. There are long polemics in it that are barely endurable - the responsibilites of citizens, blah blah. Then the other day, it came to me. Heinlein was talking about the Bush administration: power-suited chickenhawks gripping the levers of power without ever having had to personally defend those powers with their lives in combat.

Burn Your Trunk! (5, Interesting)

PeterPiper (167721) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879063)

Good advice given to new novelists is, of course, "keep writing'. While your first novel is making the rounds of getting rejected by the various publishers (a process that can take a couple of years), write your second and third novels. Start them on their rejection rounds and keep writing.

Most writers do not sell their first novel (or even their second and third). What they finally do sell is the novel that they have grown into by the practice of writing their previous works. Those previous novels are not up to par with what they finally do sell. Better advice then given to new novelists is "burn your trunk". 'Trunk' refers to all the writing you've done before you finally sell something. It is not up to the standards of what you are now able to produce and publishing it will lower the public's perception of your current talent.

I strongly suspect that this 'new' Heinlein novel is Heinlein's trunk. Likely he never had it published because he himself subscribed to the advice that one's trunk should be burned.

I will buy the book none the less, because Heinlein was by far the novelist who was the most influential on me in my youth. I will consciously remember while reading it though that this is his very first novel, something written in the thirties and not a book that he wanted published because he felt it to be inferior to what he was subsequently capable of.

way behind hubbard, toklein and asimov (5, Informative)

peter303 (12292) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879100)

Heinlein only has three posthumous novels- the original length "Stranger in a Strange Land", an autobiography, and this one. Ron Hubbard published at least 13- including the ten volume Mission Earth series. Toklein published at least 15, including the Allakabeth, Simarillian, a book of poetry, and the 12 volume History of Middle Earth series. Asimov had a have dozen in press that came out after his death. Gene Roddenberry had Final Conflict and Anromedea TV series, plus two more rumored in production. Frank Herbert partially completed 7th Dune volume, and an early edition of his origional Dune are supposed to be published in due course by his son.
The above list doesn't include continuations of earlier novels authorized by these authors estates. There have been a dozen of those. Herbert is the most prolific with the 5th New Dune novel due out next week and eight more planned.

Re:way behind hubbard, toklein and asimov (2, Interesting)

the_ghost226 (671643) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879235)

The number of cash grabs (posthumous releases) after the author passed away does not reflect the quality of his work.

Philip K. Dick also (1)

astro (20275) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879136)

Similar fact: Some time after his death, Philip Dick's son released Radio Free Albemuth [philipkdick.com] . The site I link to doesn't reference the story that I heard / read (?) about this, that Dick had stipulated that the book was NOT to be published.

At any rate, it is a _fantastic_ book, and really fits as a key part of the Valis 'trilogy'.

astro

I'll be buying. (4, Interesting)

Unknown Kadath (685094) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879151)

Heinlein is one of those authors who made science fiction. His chauvinism occasionally sets my teeth on edge, and his later works are preachy, but these are small blemishes on the body of work of a man, who above everything else, knew how to tell a story. Unlike much SF, his stories are always character-driven. I've often gone back to Glory Road or The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress for a good read that never gets old. Finding out that there's an unpublished Heinlein a few days after hearing about a new Zelazny collection [fantasticbookclub.com] ? My cup runneth over!

My hat's off to the cranky old Grand Master who still makes me all sniffly at the end of Stranger in a Strange Land, almost 10 years after I read it the first time. Where can I place a pre-order?

-Carolyn

He died? (0)

Spackler (223562) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879161)

I didn't even know he was sick.
Oh, yes I did know he was sick.
Why did he always have to change subjects in the middle of a book?

Good story...
And then I heard this big bang over my head, I thought it was the trumpet sounding, but it was every freaking character I had ever written about camping out in the place where I now reside.
Crap drug induced story to fill the rest of the book...

OMG OMG OMG (2, Informative)

2TecTom (311314) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879180)

Yes, yes, yes ... I don't care if it's good, bad or ugly. He's a god and I look forward to reading anything he's written.

IMHO, The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress" is the ultimate Sci-Fi novel and he singlehandedly raised the bar so that Science Fiction wasn't simply regarded as pulp. Many people were inspired by his words and foresight. He contributed many revolutionary concepts and provided so many hours of entertainment that even the thought of anything new is interesting in the extreme.

Interested, but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6879183)

Not enough to pay. I'll probably download.

Oh, and as for guilt, the guy is friggin' dead. His stuff should all be public domain now.

bad, bad science (1)

magarity (164372) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879192)

The most entertaining thing about old sci-fi is the bad science. Well, it wasn't bad at the time but it's comically inaccurate now. Heinlein was good about writing in reasonably black-box style in later books so perhaps this one won't be too bad, but if you've ever read, say, 'under pressure' by Herbert then you know what I mean.

Bad science doesn't hurt good writing (1)

CrosseyedPainless (27978) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879269)

I'd submit Heinlein's "Blowups Happen" and the similarly-themed "Nerves" by Del Rey. They both contain science that was unlikely when the stories were written, but timelessly great writing.

more Heinlein movies? (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879204)

"Stranger in a Strange Land" has been optioned several times. In its day it was pretty riske- spoofing religion, free sex, and government. A first-year Star Trek episode "What about Charlie?" 'borrowed' part of the plot. I think the novel is soemwhat timeless and has merit as a movie.
Any more Heinlein novels to be movies?

My favorit: "Have Spacesuit, Will Travel" (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879236)

Although it was in his teenage pulp scifi, I enjoyed when reading it in the 6th grade. I re-read it again when I was at M.I.T. and enjoyed the twist at the end- the hero wins admission to that college.

Stranger in a Strange Land (0)

boresicle (682579) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879243)

Stranger in a Strange Land is the first and only book I've ever thrown in the garbage after reading it.

Writer Robert Heinlein found alive at 96 (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 10 years ago | (#6879267)

Oh, wait, just a manuscript.

Nevermind.

KFG
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