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Goodbye, Galileo

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the and-columbus dept.

Space 341

deglr6328 writes "On the 21st of this month the Galileo Space Probe, which has been orbiting Jupiter for nearly eight years, will plummet fatefully into the crushing pressures and searing heat of that planet's interior. The spacecraft's 14 year journey has brought the discovery of, among other things, the first moon orbiting an asteroid, the first remote detection of life on earth when Carl Sagan used data from an onboard infrared spectrometer to observe the spectral signature of Oxygen in our atmosphere, it has caught snowflakes of Sulfur Dioxide as it flew through the plume of an erupting volcano on Io, snapped pictures of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 as it smashed into Jupiter's atmosphere and most importantly, provided proof a >60 Km deep ocean on Europa with hints of oceans on Callisto and Ganymede(listen to Ganymede's eerie sounding plasma wind). And all this with scarcely more computing power than a late '70s video game and a maximum data transfer rate of ~120 bits/s over a distance of more than 600 million Km. In a mission spanning three decades, the Galileo space probe has answered many of humanity's questions about space and presented us with the knowledge to ask many more which will be answered by the next generation of Jovian explorer. Goodnight Galileo."

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341 comments

GNAA Anuses Cheeses (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888166)

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Re:GNAA Anuses Cheeses (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888197)

This troll needs to be updated. irc.isprime.com doesn't work anymore.

second post (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888172)

I thought Galileo was already dead. Isn't he from the 1600s or something?

Re:second post (0)

CrazyGringo (672487) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888312)

Galileo, Galileo, will you do the fandango?

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2nd post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888189)

Biatch!

you forgot the magic (-1, Offtopic)

Magic Thread (692357) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888215)

This shows how geeky Im am... (5, Insightful)

epicstruggle (311178) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888193)

but I would rather have a replica of this space probe in schools/colleges than any number of sports trophies. The amount of hard work and dedication required to do things like this should inspire our youths, instead of their current role models (kobe bryant, et al.)

later,
epic

Re:This shows how geeky Im am... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888253)

Sports make money for schools, science doesn't.

Very sad, but true.

Re:This shows how geeky Im am... (0, Offtopic)

Slashdot Junky (265039) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888382)

Why is a person modded down when they post true statements? Yes, I did post this exact comment in reply to another comment also modded down.

-Slashdot Junky

Re:This shows how geeky Im am... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888420)

That was not a true statement but an opinion.

As for my own opinion: If you had even a hint which way to hold a bat or stick, you'd know that the world of athletics could care less about your passions. While combining brains and brawn is a laudable achievement, they both demand an involvement with often allows for little outside interests (This applies to music as well...and no Im not talking about strumming Hotel California on your guitar) and are sub-cultures which rarely crossover.

A trophy with an Arnold in a double biceps or side chest pose circa 1974....and the jocks will drool over themselves even more.

zeke

Re:This shows how geeky Im am... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888272)

Hummm Kobe Bryant works hard too, it's just a different type of work.

Re:This shows how geeky Im am... (1)

Slashdot Junky (265039) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888361)

Why is a person modded down when they post true statements?

-Slashdot Junky

Sounds of the plasma wind (5, Interesting)

N7DR (536428) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888199)

listen to Ganymede's eerie sounding plasma wind

The reason that it sounds so "eerie" is because it is recorded with a receiver whose channels are harmonically related. A true wideband recording would sound quite different. This is true of the similar Voyager plasma recordings as well.

Re:Sounds of the plasma wind (1)

Dark Lord Seth (584963) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888386)

Even with that explanation, it STILL sounds like it was ripped from a bad 60's B-movie where aliens take over the world with lasers that sound like the aforementioned .wav file.

It's not the size. It's how you use it. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888200)

all this with scarcely more computing power than a late '70s video game

When it comes to real engineering, the fewer resources you need to meet your goals, the better of a job you did. Throwing in larger processors just to you can brag about the power of a Beowulf cluster of those is just a poor job.

Less is more.

Parent is a copy&paste troll, mod down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888319)

This was originally said here [slashdot.org] .

WRONG. (1)

StewedSquirrel (574170) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888399)

Actually, if you will notice, this post came BEFORE the other one. That leads me to conclude that the OTHER one is copied.

Stewey

Re:WRONG. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888450)

Foolish Earthling. Totally unprepared for the effects of time travel.

Re:It's not the size. It's how you use it. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888465)

It is because they did not have Windows then, otherwise they would have had to reboot couple of times a day!

Government sponsored hoohaw (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888201)

Ever notice how when you are required to recite something over and over, the words lose their meaning and blend together, like when you recited the Pledge every single day of the school year? Is this patriotism, or a waste of time?

Iplejuhleguhns
tothaflag
uvtheyounighted staits uv umerika
andtothe republik
forwichitstanz
wonnashun
undurgod
ind uvisuble
with liburtyandjustis foroll

Now let us pray,

Cumlorjezus
beeourgest
anletthine
gifstousbeb lest
ahmen

Re:Government sponsored hoohaw (1)

bj8rn (583532) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888414)

Is this patriotism, or a waste of time?

It's patriotism, as true patriotism (and true belief) can only be external, on the outside. The recital is a ritual. It's not directed at you who recites it but at the state - you show the state that you are patriotic and loyal to it, even if you actually don't believe it (you just do it because you're told to - "the law is the law"). The state knows, of course, that you don't actually mean what you say, but it's always wise to check those who either don't recite the 'prayer' or are a bit too eager (the true believers are always the ones who are suspicious).

Goodbye Galileo (0, Redundant)

intrinsicchaos (652706) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888202)

Aim for the stars...and beyond!

Re:Goodbye Galileo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888235)

I'm pretty sure it's aiming for Jupiter at this point :)

Re:Goodbye Galileo (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888265)

Aim for Jupiter...and within!

Popular Science Article (5, Informative)

ixt (463433) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888212)

This month's issue of popular science has an article also. Click. [popsci.com]

The HEALINE! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888213)

I thought they meant the Galileo.

My first reaction was "whaa...? but he's already dead!".

redundant (1)

Magic Thread (692357) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888238)

This has already been said [slashdot.org] . Parent fails it!

Plop! (3, Insightful)

FrostedWheat (172733) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888217)

Dropping the spacecraft into the planet just seems wrong! It's like flushing a dead goldfish down the toilet!

So long Galileo! We salute you!

*flush*

Re:Plop! (1)

Chris Tucker (302549) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888362)

So FrostedWheat sez:

"Dropping the spacecraft into the planet just seems wrong! It's like flushing a dead goldfish down the toilet!"

Oh, there's a reason that Galileo is crashing into Jupiter.

The Freemasons want to ignite Jupiter into a star.

It's all here:

It's a long chunk of PRIMO crackpottery, but keep reading, you'll get to the good bits about Galileo.

Just adjust your tinfoil hat accordingly. You don't want THM knowing that you're onto their plans!

Re:Plop! (1)

Chris Tucker (302549) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888388)

See! The Freemasons are EVERYWHERE! They censored the URL!

Either that, or I screwed up.

THIS [grailwerk.com] is the URL I messed up on.

Sorry about that!

What is this "The Preview Button" you speak of? Your words confuse me.

So FrostedWheat sez:

"Dropping the spacecraft into the planet just seems wrong! It's like flushing a dead goldfish down the toilet!"

Oh, there's a reason that Galileo is crashing into Jupiter.

The Freemasons want to ignite Jupiter into a star.

It's all here:

It's a long chunk of PRIMO crackpottery, but keep reading, you'll get to the good bits about Galileo.

Just adjust your tinfoil hat accordingly. You don't want THM knowing that you're onto their plans!

Re:Plop! (5, Informative)

niko9 (315647) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888380)

If the orbiter were left to circle Jupiter after running out of propellant (barring an intervention, this would likely happen within a year), it might eventually crash into Europa, one of Jupiter's large moons. In 1996, Galileo conducted the first of eight close flybys of Europa, producing breathtaking pictures of its surface, which suggested that the moon has an immense ocean hidden beneath its frozen crust. These images have led to vociferous scientific debate about the prospects for life there; as a result, nasa officials decided that it was necessary to avoid the possibility of seeding Europa with alien life-forms. And so the craft has been programmed to commit suicide, guaranteeing a fiery, spectacular end to one of the most ambitious, tortured, and revelatory missions in the history of space exploration.

That's why they are ditching it in said manner.

Question Galileo couldn't answer (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888220)

What does Uranus smell like?

Re:Question Galileo couldn't answer (0)

xenoandroid (696729) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888490)

You!

Remote Detection Indeed (2, Funny)

screwthemoderators (590476) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888225)

Bitterly disapointed, Carl Sagan was never able to detect intelligent life on our planet!

Re:Remote Detection Indeed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888481)

Hmm. Yes. Quite. Indubitably. How insightful.

underrated small probe vs. overrated expensive toy (4, Interesting)

M1FCJ (586251) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888226)

I find it strange that such a man made equipment was both underrated and overrated at the same time.

It promised a lot, then with the failure of the high-gain antenna, it delivered a lot less than expected.

Both Voyagers sent us a lot less data but the data was publicised much more energetically.

Since the probe has been plauged by malfunctions for some time I agree it is time to let it go. Bye bye...

You completely inhale the pastes in crust (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888233)

It has come to my attention that you completely inhale the pastes in crust. Read on for more about this fascinating topic.

The world went into shock a few weeks ago when goatse.info [goatse.info] reported the results of a study which concluded that inhaling paste is a very dangerous pastime, one that no one is advised to take up. Eventually, everyone adapted to the new state of affairs and began inhaling other things. Almost everyone, that is. But not you! According to my records, you still inhale paste!

Why?! What the fuck is wrong with you?!

You moron, you idiot, you imbecile, you gay nigger [nero-online.org] ! Arg! You make me so fucking sick! FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU FUCK YOU.

Building them like they used to (5, Insightful)

TWX (665546) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888234)

Galileo was not cheap. Neither were the Pioneers or the Voyagers. Look at the return on the investment, though.

NASA has not made a good argument for cheaper = better. The Hubble Space Telescope was flawed when it went up and spent the first three years of its lifespan doing very little compared to its design. We have lost several probes headed Mars. Quality has not been top priority at NASA, and until it is, we're going to continue to see failure after failure, I'm afraid. Galileo wasn't perfect, with deployment problems of its high-gain antenna, but it did not fail entirely, and it did not require humans in suits to go play with it for it to work right. We need that kind of engineering again.

We need to build them like we used to.

Re:Building them like they used to (2, Informative)

M1FCJ (586251) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888251)

NASA has not made a good argument for cheaper = better. The Hubble Space Telescope was flawed when it went up and spent the first three years of its lifespan doing very little compared to its design.

Surely you are not claiming that Hubble was cheap? It was the most expensive piece of mass sent to space. More than 3 billion was spent just to build the thing, not to mention three shuttle missions and millions spent in the operations.

The science it produced is worth the price but it wasn't cheap.

Re:Building them like they used to (1)

TWX (665546) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888343)

And they're already planning to end-of-life it. It's only been up since 1990. Galileo is being destroyed only because they don't want it to crash into Europa and possibly corrupt the environment there, if there is life.

Re:Building them like they used to (2, Informative)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888331)

Hubble was not built under the cheaper=better flag. Hubble was built in the same time frame as Cassini and Calileo.

Re:Building them like they used to (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888338)

Yeah, but back then NASA had big money pockets.

Re:Building them like they used to (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888367)

Galileo was not cheap. Neither were the Pioneers or the Voyagers. Look at the return on the investment, though.

yeah umm... all that return.

All those advances in uhhh... something.

Well, I'm sure those probes did something besides keep geeky types out of the workforce.

Re:Building them like they used to (4, Informative)

Rura Penthe (154319) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888370)

What are you talking about. Hubble was not built cheaply. And since its repair it has been one of the best things NASA has ever done. By the time they plan to retire it (~2010 I believe?), it will have been in use for just under 20 years and the Jack Webb telescope should be ready.

deglr6328 is such a poet (2, Funny)

MikeCapone (693319) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888246)

This article almost made me cry.

Re:naww (1)

deglr6328 (150198) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888313)

geez. what a complment, thanks! :-)

Re:naww (1)

MikeCapone (693319) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888352)

I'm adding you to my friend-list :)

Re:naww (1)

deglr6328 (150198) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888365)

neat i'll do the same

Re:naww (1)

MikeCapone (693319) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888401)

Haha. Great.

Will you marry me?

:D

Re:deglr6328 is such a poet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888342)

Mis-spelling and capitalizing "sulphur" is definitely poetic :)

Re:deglr6328 is such a poet (1)

deglr6328 (150198) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888353)

We americans like the "f" word [googlefight.com] .

Re:deglr6328 is such a poet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888475)

"Sulfur" is as correct as "sulphur" ("sulfer" or "sulpher" are right out). Capitalising it is archaic, but not incorrect.

Yours in brimstone and treacle,

the Nazi Grammar Fairy

fair warning (5, Funny)

falsification (644190) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888252)

If Galileo is the spark that lights up the gas giant Jupiter, turning it into a second sun, that will be the last straw. We will then have no choice but to make safety the number one priority at NASA.

Re:fair warning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888403)

Well apparently that's possible, because Galileo contains plutonium and Jupiter has compressed layers of fusionable material. See this post [slashdot.org]

Re:fair warning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888460)

Like on that one ep [tvtome.com] of SG1 that was on monday?

Ganymede's eerie sounding plasma wind (2, Funny)

kuroth (11147) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888255)

Sounds to me like the whole moon is infested with Paradroids.

(For the youngin's, here [rr.com] , here [compuserve.com] , and here [tesco.net] .)

Re:Ganymede's eerie sounding plasma wind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888463)



If I were you, i'd shut up about what you heard, and never talk about it again, ever.

We know where you live.

Jovian explorer? (0, Redundant)

bigdavex (155746) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888262)


In a mission spanning three decades, the Galileo space probe has answered many of humanity's questions about space and presented us with the knowledge to ask many more which will be answered by the next generation of Jovian explorer.

Javian explorer? I thought they just changed it Firebird? I'm so confused.

Time.... to die. (-1, Offtopic)

Groucho (1038) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888264)

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. C-beams glittering in the dark by the Tannhauser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

Re:Time.... to die. (1)

mOoZik (698544) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888285)

Isn't it "memories fade in time like tears in rain"?

in soviet russia galielo goodbyes you (-1, Troll)

longhairedgnome (610579) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888271)

"with scarcely more computing power than a late '70s video game and a maximum data transfer rate of ~120 bits/s"
imagine a beo-wulf cluster of these!!

Data Rate (5, Funny)

t_allardyce (48447) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888273)

"maximum data transfer rate of ~120 bits/s"

About the same as all those links will have in 5 minutes ;)

Re:Data Rate (1)

Bob of Dole (453013) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888292)

Um, it's NASA.

They fall into the "More bandwidth than God" category.

It's not the size. It's how you use it. (1, Redundant)

Magic Thread (692357) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888274)

all this with scarcely more computing power than a late '70s video game
When it comes to real engineering, the fewer resources you need to meet your goals, the better a job you did. Throwing in larger processors just so you can brag about the power of a Beowulf cluster of those is a poor job. Less is more.

Re:It's not the size. It's how you use it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888334)

Why did you post this twice? It was posted anonymously already (http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=77478 &cid=6888200), did you just decide to karma whore it?

Re:It's not the size. It's how you use it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888350)

No, I didn't write the original. It was a troll; I wanted to see how high a score it would get. But now that the original is at Score:1 and you've posted this reply, I doubt the dupe will survive long.

-MT

your creator youranus yourpenis (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888280)

galeieo space probes vent plasma near URanus.

other possible uses for the miracles of communication we've been given:

how does won login/become a member?

imPEACH yOUR presIdent your bush has been marked for auto removal

consult with/trust in yOUR creator. get more oxygen on yOUR brains. seek others of non-aggressive
intentions/behaviours.

My WinMP wants lic authority for Ganymede song (3, Funny)

Glasswire (302197) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888286)

...does anyone know the URL for the Ganymede Dep't of Intellectual Property?

Re:My WinMP wants lic authority for Ganymede song (0, Troll)

Magic Thread (692357) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888366)

You should use Linux!

Microsoft sucks!

$1.5 billion well spent (2, Interesting)

bshroyer (21524) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888288)

There's also a bit of dissention [washingtonfreepress.org] currently about the decision to crash the probe. Apparently, there's enough plutonium on board (34 pounds!) that we'll be donating to the Jovian depths.

I'm not sure I like that idea.

Re:$1.5 billion well spent (1, Funny)

slovin8 (579527) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888320)

Yes, I'm sure we don't want to pollute Jupiter and its surronding space with harmful gamarays and neutrinos!

Re:$1.5 billion well spent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888359)

Er ... you do realize that the same argument could be applied w.r.t. Earth, right?

Plutonium Pollution (1)

MinutiaeMan (681498) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888360)

Yeah -- someday, when we start harvesting diamonds from the erstwhile core of Jupiter, some of it will be radioactive with all that plutonium we dumped in!

Like that matters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888442)

I doubt the DeBeers people will weep for the shortened lives of whatever slaves they send to mine Jovian diamonds.

Re:$1.5 billion well spent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888379)

Wow. The United States is the first (and only) to use nuclear weapons on a foreign enemy.. twice.. and now is the first to nuke another planet? Sweet.

Re:$1.5 billion well spent (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888408)

It's an interesting question, and an interesting responsibility (is it ok to end a plutonium-powered probe into orbit around another planet? Even if the answer is "yes", the question needs asking each time). Robert Forward's book

  • The Flight of the Dragonfly
describes an evolved culture of intelligent gaseous creatures living in a gas giant planet. It is awfully big, though, so perhaps they'll forgive us. And of course if it accidentally crashed into Europa we'd be really screwed, so it's the lesser of two evils (or more accurately the least of a set of five or more).

As a side note, between that and

  • Dragon's Egg
/
  • Starquake
, Forward did the best job I've ever seen of describing really alien aliens, with their own thoughts and societies to boot (are there any comparable books by other authors?). Ironic because his handling of human dialogue and situations was awkward as hell in those books. ;)

Re:$1.5 billion well spent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888415)

Gah, I'm dumb. Yes, I really do know what the UL tag is. Need more caffeine.

Re:$1.5 billion well spent (3, Informative)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888435)

Holy crap. That is the dumbest thing I've ever read. First, Jupiter is HUGE. I mean *really* huge. Bigger than you can conceive! To be more specific, Jupiter is around 4.18591697 x 10^27 pounds (thank you Google Calculator). Yes, that's 4185916970000000000000000000 pounds for you folks that don't understand scientific notation.

Now, Nasa is planning on plunging 34 pounds of Plutonium into the planet. That's 3.4 * 10^1 pounds. Hmm... 10^1 versus 10^27. Do I need to say more? I mean... honestly, this is friggin' ridiculous!

Re:$1.5 billion well spent (1)

ToKsUri (608742) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888453)

and whats that for us who dont understand 'pound notation' ?

Re:$1.5 billion well spent (1)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888468)

Heh, I originally had the figured in kilos, but I figured the 'mericans would have an easier time of I converted. In kilos, we have:

~1.5 x 10^1 kg of Plutonium versus a Jovian mass of 1.8987 x 10^27 kg.

Nuke it from orbit! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888459)

It's the only way to be sure!

colonization (4, Interesting)

gregeth (688579) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888299)

From the article: "Obliteration is precisely what nasa intends for the spacecraft. The reason is that Galileo may still harbor some signs of life on Earth: microorganisms that have survived since its launch from the Kennedy Space Center, in Florida, in 1989. If the orbiter were left to circle Jupiter after running out of propellant (barring an intervention, this would likely happen within a year), it might eventually crash into Europa, one of Jupiter's large moons. In 1996, Galileo conducted the first of eight close flybys of Europa, producing breathtaking pictures of its surface, which suggested that the moon has an immense ocean hidden beneath its frozen crust. These images have led to vociferous scientific debate about the prospects for life there; as a result, nasa officials decided that it was necessary to avoid the possibility of seeding Europa with alien life-forms." But I always thought it would be great to colonize another planet with earth's bacteria. :) But really, wouldn't doing something like that possibly help to set the stage (a ways off) in the future, when we can send a manned crew out towards Jupiter. Just think if we sent hundreds of probes containing simple life like bacteria, maybe we could help to create a more hospitable place. Of course, then you have to worry about the pesky part about it being mostly ocean(frozen nonetheless).

Re:colonization (1)

Drachemorder (549870) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888391)

If you contaminate Europa with Earth organisms, and later send a probe to Europa to attempt to detect signs of life, you might detect the contaminants and mistake them for alien life. And then of course you have the whole "Prime Directive" debate: do we want to alter the course of development of whatever alien life there may be?

Re:colonization (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888480)

you are a fag

Eyes for an eye (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888311)

Ironically, Galileo Galilei spent his own last eight years [atheistfoundation.org.au] under close house arrest. To pile on the irony, he spent the last five of them blind, in part because he was prevented from consulting a doctor. Maybe these past eight years of clear vision can help make up [dslnorthwest.net] for that in a small way. But I doubt it.

THANK GOD! (5, Funny)

happyhippy (526970) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888314)

One less satellite to gain intelligence and come back looking for its creator.

Re:THANK GOD! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#6888470)

Does anybody but me understand this reference?

Vger, Decker, Kirk Unit... its all good!

Transcipt from last Galileo probe (5, Informative)

andy666 (666062) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888317)

Here is the transcript of the last Galileo probe to "land on" Jupiter:

Time Event
________ _____
11:04 a.m. Coast timer initiates probe operation
12:46 p.m. Orbiter flyby of Io (~1000 km) (No imaging or spectral data collected)
2:04 p.m. Energetic Particles Investigation (EPI) begins measuring trapped radiation in a region previously unexplored.
5:04 p.m. Probe entry and data relay
5:05:52 p.m. Pilot parachute deployed
5:05:54 p.m. Main Parachute deployed
5:06:02 p.m. Deceleration module jettisoned
5:06:06 p.m. Direct scientific measurements begin
5:06:15 p.m. Radio transmission to orbiter begins
~5:08 p.m. Visible cloud tops of Jupiter reached
5:12 p.m. Atmospheric pressure the same as Earth's sea-level pressure
5:17 p.m. Second major cloud deck is encountered (uncertain)
5:28 p.m. Water clouds entered (uncertain)
5:34 p.m. Atmospheric temperature equal to room temperature on Earth
5:46 p.m. Probe enters twilight
6:04 p.m. End of baseline mission. Probe may cease to operate due to lack of battery power, attenuation of signal due to atmosphere, or being crushed.
6:19 p.m. Orbiter ceases to receive probe data (if still transmitting)
7:27 p.m. Ignition of Galileo main engine (49 minute duration) to insert into Jovian orbit

probes die, shuttles die quicker (1)

dAzED1 (33635) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888340)

every so often we send a shuttle up, and sometimes it explodes/etc. Why can't we just send some more probes like this? The whole crap with sending people up just doesn't work - we're not getting any better at it. We should instead just send unmanned flights. Imagine the cost savings.

Yeah, the ISS is a great dream...but...what's the point? Zero gravity labs can be mimiced here on earth far cheaper and safer. Sending one shuttle up has an extremely HUGE environmental impact. In mere moments a search brought up some decent points [spacedaily.com] about further problems/inefficiencies. The technology of today is, in theory, much higher than what we had years and years ago. Its time we took our current system, did something like sell it to the chinese (they'll get it anyway, we might as well make the money), and build something with technology newer than 30 years ago. They still use 386 cpu's in the damn thing. Its time to put the entire fleet to rest, and stop paying to maintain it. Just because the cold war is over doesn't mean we don't need to do more than send people up and watch them explode - we need to still push the envelope.

Communications potential of space probes? (4, Interesting)

-tji (139690) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888364)

In other similar stories, they always mention the small trickle of data that these crafts can return. I always wonder if this represents some physical limitations, or just the state of technology at the time of the probe. If they had more communications potential, they could return all kinds of data, images, even video. Anyone know of background info on space communications?

How do the new probes compare to these old ones in terms of communications capabilties? What sort of xfer rates can new ones support?

What are the limiting factors in space communications? Is it the power of the transmission, under the power limitations of the craft?

Duh (1)

I'm Galileo (704842) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888374)

Dude, I did a lot of other stuff too. People just don't appreciate enough :(

Re:Duh (1)

I'm Galileo (704842) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888400)

I discovered that your satellite you call 'Moon' has phases for example. Then NASA go and name some lameass vehicle with sticks sticking out with my name. Then they use up my name of centuries of planned achievements.. I couldn't trademark it you know. Where's a SCO lawyer when I need one?

Mod troll down (1)

Magic Thread (692357) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888455)

Parent is not really Galileo, but a fake. Note the low UID. The real Galileo is this one [slashdot.org] .

Why not send it back to Earth? (0, Interesting)

Bowie J. Poag (16898) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888428)

Here's a thought. ...Send it back to Earth, send a Shuttle up there, grab it, return it to Earth, and analyze it for signs of life.

Having spent 10+ years floating around, it might have picked up a thing or two, and might lend some creedence to the panspermia thoery of how life started on Earth. If space is "dirty" with life, surely some of it would have clung to Galileo...?

Other than being massively radioactive, and something that would piss alot of hippies off if we actually DID bring it home, it would make for good science.

Re:Why not send it back to Earth? (2, Informative)

Phanatic1a (413374) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888466)

Send it back to Earth

Um...how? That would require a truly ridiculous amount of delta-vee, and it's pretty much out of gas.

Re:Why not send it back to Earth? (1)

LMCBoy (185365) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888478)

It doesn't have the fuel to make the return trip to Earth (much less fuel for braking into Earth orbit once it got back here!)

It would be really cool to see it in the Air & Space Museum, though. Well, except for all the latent radiation.

Good... (0, Offtopic)

Cyno01 (573917) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888440)

I'm glad they decided to destroy this, unlike some of our other probes. We all know what happened when V'Ger came back, who knows what Galileo could have done.

three decades? (1, Insightful)

Chromal (56550) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888451)

It's mission spanned three decades? Uhm. 1989-2003 = 14 years. Three decades = 30 years. Galileo was active is less than half of three decades, and its useful mission was even less of that. Yeah, 1989-2003 technically means 80's, 90's, and 00's, but calling that "three decades" is assinine, misleading, and vaguely dishonest.

Please tell me.. (-1, Flamebait)

CausticWindow (632215) | more than 10 years ago | (#6888476)

is this Euro week on Slashdot?

How on earth am I to interpret > 60 Km? How many miles are that?

First the poll, now this, I'm starting to wonder about the editors bias.

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