Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Linux Distro For Linksys WRT54G

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the why-yes-it-does-run-linux dept.

Wireless Networking 227

scubacuda writes "Here is a tiny Linux distro for the Linksys wrt54g (d/l the distro here). In just a few seconds, you can give your access point's ramdisk syslog, telnetd, httpd (with cgi-bin support), vi, snort, mount, insmod, rmmod, top, grep, etc." Interesting -- "The script installs strictly to the ram disk of the box. No permanent changes are made. If you mess something up, power-cycle it."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Who is ur daddy?!?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894791)

Who is ur daddy?!?!

Re:Who is ur daddy?!?! (0, Offtopic)

the_bahua (411625) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894830)

Some might say Hammurabi or Nebuchadnezzar, but it's not certain that either of them ever actually went to Ur, even though Babylon often claimed lordship over Ur, Nineveh, and many other Mesopatamian cities.

John. Who is yours? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894970)

does it still function as an AP (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894792)

does it still function as an AP properly?

Wow! (-1, Troll)

Not The Real Me (538784) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894794)

And, I bet the same number of people who try this out will be the same number who still use BSD -- about 10.

Re:Wow! (-1, Troll)

Not The Real Me (538784) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894884)

The BSD people obviously have no sense of humor. That's what happens when you spend all your time in your mommy's basement playing Quake, and D & D.

Re:Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895009)

Hey I live in the attic. Get it right!

fp? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894798)

i hate myself.

We all hate you too. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895036)

Have a shitty day!

That's cool. (1)

FreeLinux (555387) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894799)

Slow as hell and not terribly practical. But, still very cool.

Re:That's cool. (3, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894826)

not terribly practical? Running snort on a wireless router isn't practical?

Slow? 125mhz MIPS is slow?

Might want to better explain what you mean.

More constrained by memory (4, Insightful)

GGardner (97375) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894864)

125 Mhz MIPS CPU is fast enough to do some interesting things, but the box only has 16 Mb of RAM, and no local disk for paging. That's going to be the limiting factor for most of the fun things you'd like to do with this box.

Re:More constrained by memory (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894939)

In my day, laddie, we had 64kB of ram and 1 MHz. And we liked it! Three miles in the snow we walked, every day, to the terminal... barefoot!

More seriously, you can do a hell of a lot with 16MByte of RAM and 125MHz. My old Amiga was happily connected to the internet for years with less than that.

Stick FORTH on any box and (assuming you know FORTH, of course), you can make most any computer jump through hoops, devoid of the efficiency problems that bloated tarbaby languages like C++ introduce.

Re:More constrained by memory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894945)

fuck that, just use asm

Re:More constrained by memory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894977)

Forth usually has inline asm. A major advantage of forth over a conventional asm is that it has a REPL i.e. it's interactive. You can fit an interactive development environment on machines with a few K of ram.

Re:More constrained by memory (4, Funny)

jd142 (129673) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894975)

In my day, laddie, we had 64kB of ram and 1 MHz. And we liked it! Three miles in the snow we walked, every day, to the terminal... barefoot!

Up hill both ways, too!

Re:More constrained by memory (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895166)

It warms my heart to see that people outside of the embedded business still care about and know how to handle low (by today's standards) performance/memory devices.

"Yes grandson, there was once a time where chips weren't able to and didn't need to run Linux and Java."

Re:More constrained by memory (1)

MbM (7065) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895002)

Too true; I attempted to run debian's mipsel port but lacked the memory to even run 'apt-get' without triggering the OOM killer.

Re:More constrained by memory (1)

nchip (28683) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895082)

howabaout Network Block Device? I though NBD was created just for situations like that.

Re:More constrained by memory (4, Informative)

MbM (7065) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895257)

I tried an nfs mounted swapfile with only minimal success. It'd get further but it would go into some heavy swapping flooding the network, durring which time the access point was very unresponsive; just not practical for actual use.

Re:That's cool. (4, Interesting)

FreeLinux (555387) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894877)

Snort logs will be written to /var/log/snort

Ramdisk based snort logs aren't too enticing to me.

Another HTTP server on 8000 doesn't do anything for me either, especially when the one on port 80 is already like molases running up hill in winter.

The fact is that this might be useful in troubleshootingsomething on the router but, for production use it isn't terribly practical. But, then again who's going to rely on this router for any real production use. This is after all, a home or small office device.

What about NFS based snort logs? (1)

tugrul (750) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894901)

The nfs drivers are not loaded by default If you would like to mount a nfs disk, insmod the drivers from /var/modules/ in the following order : sunrpc.o, lockd.o, nfs.o then mount your disk.

Re:That's cool. (1)

perlchild (582235) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895136)

what about snort logging to sql? or did they forget the required libraries?

Re:That's cool. (1)

Fuyu (107589) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895225)

From the article, "The snort configuration file should be changed for your network configuration and needs. Snort logs will be written to /var/log/snort. Snort can be configured to log to a remote system if desired."

Re:That's cool. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895161)

"Slow as hell and not terribly practical."

Kinda like most things open-source, right?

/. what's going on? (-1, Offtopic)

segment (695309) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894809)


I dont know what is happening here at Slashdot, but I seriously hope taco, michael, and the others get off the SCO bandwagon... Why the hell do they only seem to accept mainly SCO, LINUX, and Anti Microsoft articles is becoming so yesterday, and I hope they (and I know some of you are reading this) start accepting things outside of the typical media whore range of articles that have appeared here for the past few months.

  • 2003-08-11 NSA's Statement on Cybersecurity (articles,security) (rejected)
  • 2003-08-19 DNA based game playing computer (science,science) (rejected)
  • 2003-09-06 Brown Dwarfs fingerprinted (radio,science) (rejected)
  • 2003-09-06 Study Indicates Possible Surface Water on Mars (science,science) (rejected)
  • 2003-09-07 GSM cellular phone encryption cracked (articles,security) (rejected)
Researchers at the Technion [technion.ac.il] claim to have found an effective way to crack the encoding system for cellular telephone conversations conducted over GSM (Global System for Mobile) networks. The team of researchers in Haifa, including Professor Eli Biham and doctoral students Elad Barkan and Natan Keller, presented their findings at the Crypto 2003 conference held two weeks ago at the University of California, Santa Barbara [ucsb.edu] . GSM is one of the two standards widely used for cellular service. This digital technology was originally developed for Europe, but now accounts for over 70 percent of the world market. There are now some 540 cellular companies providing GSM services to approximately 870 million subscribers throughout the world. Full story [cryptome.org]

It has been 14 years since two little-known electrochemists announced what sounded like the biggest physics breakthrough since Enrico Fermi produced a nuclear chain reaction on a squash court in Chicago. Using a tabletop setup, Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann, of the University of Utah [utah.edu] , said they had induced deuterium nuclei to fuse inside metal electrodes, producing measurable quantities of heat. That was the opening bell for one of the craziest periods in science. Cold fusion, if real, promised to solve the world's energy problems forever. Scientists around the world dropped what they were doing to try to replicate the astounding claim. Full story [sfgate.com]

Astronomers using NASA [nasa.gov] 's Hubble Space Telescope [hubblesite.org] have discovered three of the faintest and smallest objects ever detected beyond Neptune. Each lump of ice and rock is roughly the size of Philadelphia and orbits just beyond Neptune and Pluto, where they may have rested since the formation of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago. The objects reside in a ring-shaped region called the Kuiper Belt, which houses a swarm of icy rocks that are leftover building blocks, or "planetesimals," from the solar system's creation. The results of the search were announced by a group led by Gary Bernstein of the University of Pennsylvania [upenn.edu] at a meeting of NASA's Division of Planetary Sciences in Monterey, Calif. Full article [eurekalert.org]

Re:/. what's going on? (-1, Offtopic)

RobertTaylor (444958) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894828)

Dont moan about rejected stories.

Try reading FAQ at http://developers.slashdot.org/faq/editorial.shtml !

Re:/. what's going on? (-1, Offtopic)

segment (695309) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894885)

moan about rejected stories? Im not moaning at all but I would rather see something (and Im sure others would also) more informative than whats been done this week. Shall we take a look?

  • Half-Life Games Make Steam Compulsory On September 7th, 2003 with 45 comments
  • The Quest For Frames Per Second In Games On September 7th, 2003 with 50 comments
  • Lord British Returns To Ultima Online On September 6th, 2003 with 33 comments
  • Metal Gear Solid GC Enhancements Discussed On September 6th, 2003 with 13 comments

Don't worry I won't bore you with SCO details [slashdot.org] . This would turn out to be a 2mb post trying to detail the past 30 days alone. But doesn't anyone find it strange that /. passes up some really good articles for bs. I've filtered out so many other portions of /. because most of the time it's bs, so what's let if I end up having to block out 99% of /. I won't have nothing good to read and rant on about now would I... Not moaning, just letting timothy and others know life doesn't revolve around two SCO stories a day, nor some e-tard passing a fast one to get visits to his consulting page.

Re:/. what's going on? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894917)

Ok, and not a single one of those made it to the front page. They were all on games.slashdot.org [slashdot.org] .

Exactly why is it that there shouldn't be GAMING stories in the GAMING section of slashdot?

I mean, seriously, have you even read what you had to say? It looks like this:

"Wah, wah, I hate /. and I'm bitter they didn't post my stories! I know, I'll bitch about things that aren't even on the front page. It makes sense cuz my entire list of rejected articles weren't even from the section that I'll bitch about!"

I will admit that the eds are lazy, they don't spell check, they post what they want, etc etc (and don't get me started on the drivel michael posts), but it's their fucking site.

Cry some more. Really. It'll help.

Re:/. what's going on? (0, Offtopic)

Hanji (626246) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894850)

Well, I can't answer for the rest of them, but the dna game-playing computer one has already been posted to /.: World's First Game-Playing DNA Computer [slashdot.org]

Re:/. what's going on? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894861)

First, the GSM story was posted in another form, a few days ago.

Second, shut up. You obviously had this whole troll written out, just waiting for a chance to stick it near the top of a new /. story. Shut up and deal with it. If you don't like what gets accepted, well, too fucking bad.

Also, you copy/pasted whole paragraphs from the stories you link to. How fucking insightful is that?

If you don't like what gets posted here, then keep finding your news elsewhere. You obviously have done so already, why do you need to bitch about it to the rest of us?

Re:/. what's going on? (-1, Offtopic)

antiMStroll (664213) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894880)

Slashdot's front page at the time of your post:

Developers: Linux Distro For Linksys WRT54G
Science: Supersonic Flight Without The Sonic Boom
BSD: BSDCon '03 Nearly Here (OpenBSD 3.4, Too)
Step-by-Step Computer Destruction
Games: Kids Kill, Victim Sues Game Maker
Google Turns 5
Users feel Password Rage
Star Wars Kid & Episode III?
Your Rights Online: The Economist Contrasts American, European Patent Approaches
Using GPS To Prevent Train Crashes In India

No SCO, no Microsoft and one Linux story on a traditionally Linux-centric forum. The editors are far from perfect but I don't see your point.

Take that emacs zealots! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894813)

This comes with vi and NOT emacs, as 95% of all distributions don't come with emacs!

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (5, Funny)

ville (29367) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894872)

And emacs takes up 95% of those distros that come with it.

//ville

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (1, Funny)

Dog and Pony (521538) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894980)

Gotta wonder what those other 5% are there for...

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (4, Funny)

wik (10258) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895097)

Emacs documentation.

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (0, Redundant)

myov (177946) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895049)

Emacs is a great O/S. But what it needs is a good text editor.

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (1)

Barbarian (9467) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894883)

how about pico, or something that's a little easier to use than vi?

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (1)

Gherald (682277) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894937)

Pico is dead, GNU Nano would be the WTG

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895208)

Pico's probably on there, but pico sucks. Go ahead, just learn vi. Everyone else is doing it.

For a plain, no-nonsense, and standard editor, it's pretty damn good.

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894889)

Thats because people CHOOSE to install emacs, but no one in there right mind would install vi so Vi Zealots force it on them ;-)

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (1)

Stonent1 (594886) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895120)

Not true, I had gentoo that installs nano by default and the first thing I did was install vi!

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (2, Funny)

Bodrius (191265) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894927)

That's because Emacs is at heart an Operating System, not an application.

I'm patiently waiting for the Emacs distro that runs Linux in a VM.

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (1)

spektr (466069) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895047)

That's because Emacs is at heart an Operating System, not an application.

I'm patiently waiting for the Emacs distro that runs Linux in a VM.


When it runs vim I will give it a try...

Re:Take that emacs zealots! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895118)

vi is not a very popular editor on linux distributions, i would say emacs is more popular.

article in case of slashdotting... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894814)

yeah i was looking and i hit refresh and his counter jumped about 200 hits in a couple seconds so heres the article in case slashdot kills another site:

Jim Buzbee
September 05 2003

Mini wrt54g distribution Version 0.1

This is a mini Linux distribution for the Linksys wrt54g. In about 20 seconds, you can install a small set of Linux tools to your access point's ramdisk.

Upon completion of the installation, you will have a system with basic tools such as syslog, telnetd, httpd (with cgi-bin support), vi, snort, mount, insmod, rmmod, top, grep, etc.

To install, modify the script wrt54g.sh for your ip address and password. By default the script uses Java to move files to the wrt54g. If you would prefer wget, uncomment the wget lines in the script. I had a problem with older version of wget translating escaped characters before passing the URL on to the server. Your mileage may vary.

The distribution has been tested on firmware version v1.30.7, Jul. 8, 2003. The installation has been tested on Linux and OSX

The script installs strictly to the ram disk of the box. No permanent changes are made. If you mess something up, power-cycle it.

Upon successful execution of the script, you will be able to telnet to your box and start exploring its capabilities. Note that there is no login prompt, you telnet directly in as root. Be careful.

An alternate web server is installed on port 8000 of the box.

The nfs drivers are not loaded by default If you would like to mount a nfs disk, insmod the drivers from /var/modules/ in the following order : sunrpc.o, lockd.o, nfs.o then mount your disk.

To run snort, execute the following command on the box : /var/bin/snort -c /var/etc/snort.conf &

The snort configuration file should be changed for your network configuration and needs. Snort logs will be written to /var/log/snort

If you wish to change the files sent to the box, untar distro.tar and add or subtract files. Normally you should not run the install script more than once for a power-cycle of the box. i.e. if you want to run the install again, reset the wrt54g first.

I have attempted to limit all changes to the ram disk, but there are no guarantees that you will not damage your unit by using these tools.

Download the distribution
Visit my wrt54g snort page
Thanks to Ross Jordan, C. J. Collier, Ben Grech and others who did the heavy lifting in figuring out how to get new code on the box

Jim Buzbee jbuzbee@nyx.net

consolevision roxors!

Re:article in case of slashdotting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894851)

oh come on ... I waited 5 seconds and it went up 12 hits.

Re:article in case of slashdotting... (2, Interesting)

suwain_2 (260792) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894853)

Heh, I refreshed it a couple times (it loads instantaneously), and it climbs ~10+ hits every second. 948 was my first number, now it's 1102. I don't recall Slashdot linking to a site with a live hit counter any time recently, much less one this low.

I've got a copy of the file itself if they go down, too.

Well this means... (5, Insightful)

Nik Picker (40521) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894815)

For us that buying a linksys router is even more preferable. For a personal user to any business criteria the advantage over having full source to this hardware is incredible. Certainly its going to ensure that they stay high on our prefered supplier list provising we can access the boxes and code. incidentally we install WiFi in Public spots for the UK which is being kinda slow to take this up.

Re:Well this means... (1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894923)

So you're preferred vendors are the ones that steal GPL code and don't relase the sources? Except when they get caught red handed?

Re:Well this means... (4, Informative)

SuperFlaco (214663) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895177)

Looks like Linksys is doing the right thing and providing the source [linksys.com] now.

Re:Well this means... (2, Informative)

interiot (50685) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895017)

Note that code is not available for everything. In particular, the seattle group [seattlewireless.net] wasn't able to find publicly-avilable drivers for the 802.11g radio.

telnetd? (5, Interesting)

Herrieman (167396) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894819)

Why not SSHD? Nobody in his right mind uses telnet nowadays.

Re:telnetd? (4, Informative)

suwain_2 (260792) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894868)

If you read carefully, it logs you in directly as root -- you're never even prompted for a username / password. It's not meant as a publically-accessible box by any means. (Granted, wireless + root access to anyone seems a little scary...)

ssh/telnet isn't an issue, in this case. It's silly to encrypt something when anyone can get root on it.

Re:telnetd? (1)

temojen (678985) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894966)

With SSH2 and RSA authentcation only, but no telnet, not just anyone could get root.

Re:telnetd? (1)

mindriot (96208) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895079)

It's possibly a good idea to get logged in directly as root, at least for the first-time connect... somehow you'll have to get in the first time. I guess it should be feasible enough to change to ssh with user/password after that (only need a way to store the changed setup before power-cycling).

Re:telnetd? (1)

MADbull (705032) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895018)

to save space and CPU cycles but i agree, telnet is horribly insecure

Re:telnetd? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895145)

On a private network, telnet is just fine.

Would this work with other Linksys routers? (5, Interesting)

cryptochrome (303529) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894820)

None of them support Rendezous (AKA zeroconf), at least not on the level of Apple's airport base stations. That's a hack I'd really like to see.

How does zeroconf add to a wireless AP? (1)

tugrul (750) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895000)

It can't help you with picking a wireless lan or getting you the encryption key, and dhcp already provides a valid IP and routing/dns information...

Priorities are all wrong (5, Funny)

JPelzer (202626) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894827)

OK, this Linksys has only been out for like a few weeks or something, and they've got a linux distro for it... Yet my Toastmaster 5000xdr Quad-port (with FG-200R bagel attachment) STILL isn't supported!

I mean, the linksys probably works fine out-of-box... But my Toastmaster STILL can't check with my Mr.Refrigeration Model XII to see if I'm out of butter and order more online. Sheesh, technology SUCKS!

Re:Priorities are all wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894846)

Then write one and contribute it back to the community, just like the author of this Linksys hack. I double-dawg dare you, and it better not burn my bagels!

Re:Priorities are all wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894848)

-1, Unfunny

Re:Priorities are all wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894860)

My door lock does not know I'm home. I have to actually insert a key to get in, even though I'm the rightful resident of the house.

My car is slightly better. Atleast, I can hit the remote to get in. No keys needed to get in.

Technology!

Re:Priorities are all wrong (5, Funny)

JPelzer (202626) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894943)

> OK, this Linksys has only been out for like a few
> weeks or something, and they've got a linux distro
> for it... Yet my Toastmaster 5000xdr Quad-port
> (with FG-200R bagel attachment) STILL isn't
> supported!

OK, to reply to those that say I should roll my own distro for my Toastmaster, I have been working on a little something. Currently, there is no support for the bagel attachment, and it has some trouble with the more exotic breads (ie, non-white bread). And it occasionally pops them out at dangerous velocities. And you have to first separate the bread and crust using my 'decrust.sh' script, and reassemble them after toasting using 'recrust.sh'.

But otherwise, it's coming along nicely. I did have ONE little bug where instead of ordering more bread, it ordered an industrial bread-machine and hired a staff of 12 to run it. They all seemed so disappointed when I told them they were only hired because of a bug. But I'm sure they get that a lot.

So check it out, gnutoast.org... I think it's the future of toasting, possibly even the future of grilling too.

gnutoast.org is a fake! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895139)

i tried going to your gnutoast.org site to try out your distro on my toastmaster, but my browser kept on saying that it couldn't find it. i did a whois on gnutoast.org and it said your site doesn't even exist! wtf?

What is this for? (2, Interesting)

Hettch (692387) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894833)

I'm really not trying to be a troll, this is a serious question. What does making an access point into linux box atually do? Will it still retain all of its normal functions? Will this increase its functionality in any way? Being able to telnet into something as root automatically doesn't seem the safest thing to do for whatever this is, either.

Re:What is this for? (4, Insightful)

Wumpus (9548) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894863)

It's quite useful. You can turn it into a VPN server, have it serve DHCP, put your network's access control mechanism on it, and have a one box solution to a whole range of wireless networking problems.

Re:What is this for? (1, Insightful)

kevin_conaway (585204) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895044)

Isnt that what it already does though anyway?

Re:What is this for? (1)

zakezuke (229119) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895075)

As well as being able to add programs with ease(?). Could be a smart security system that would contact approperate people in the event an alarm is triggered, or a spiffy ethernet sniffer, or if 16 megs is enough, a nice way to smuggle on a quake server to your workplace.

Re:What is this for? (1)

cgranade (702534) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895134)

And create some problems, too, it seems. Don't get me wrong, I think this is uber-l33t, but it seems like perhaps one could use at least a root password, and a simple SSH server. Granted, 16MB isn't much, but still...

Re:What is this for? (1)

windex82 (696915) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894871)

By reading the article im assuming all the normal functions still work, but by adding linux on top of it you are creating an advanced access point with logging, instrusion detection, and what ever else you can get away with running on it. I use a home made freebsd box as a nat/firewall, it gets to log all types of stuff, something you nromally dont get with the router only boxes, and if you did its more then likly no where near as configurable as this would be.

Crap... (5, Funny)

Kedisar (705040) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894838)

I was going to post "But Does it RUN LINUX!?" but then I RTFA. Grr....

Re:Crap... (5, Funny)

Tony.Tang (164961) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894886)

You RTFA? You must be new here... ;)

[Jaw drops] (1)

Saint Aardvark (159009) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894867)

Oh my god. Must purchase.

Well done, Mr. Buzbee.

ssh tunneling? (5, Interesting)

JanneM (7445) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894870)

Could this be used to establish ssh tunneling from clients to the AP? That would, in my eyes, be far preferable to the somewhat lacking link security that 802.11 offers today.

Re:ssh tunneling? (1)

deputydink (173771) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894925)

Could this be used to establish ssh tunneling from clients to the AP? That would, in my eyes, be far preferable to the somewhat lacking link security that 802.11 offers today.

For sure, i bet it would be a simple hack to the cross-comiling build script for mips found here [kegel.com] to include a suitable build of sshd.
Oh, and if you do let me know i'd wouldn't mind a copy. ;)

Re:ssh tunneling? bad idea use VPN (3, Informative)

Splork (13498) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894930)

ssh tunnels are very bad performance. what you want is a VPN.

unfortunately you can't replace the kernel on the box with one that supports cool things because of the proprietary broadcom driver.

(here's to whoever takes the time to write a thunking layer for the linksys 2.4.5 broadcom driver to let it work with modern 2.4.22+ kernels!)

Re:ssh tunneling? bad idea use VPN (1)

tugrul (750) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895039)

Well, all the modifications to the kernel are available to us since anything less would be a violation of GPL. It should be possible to build a kernel that can coexist with the binary Broadcom module.

Re:ssh tunneling? bad idea use VPN (5, Informative)

interiot (50685) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895045)

The "ssh tunnels are very bad performance" statement may be elaborated a bit more on this page titled "Why TCP Over TCP Is A Bad Idea" [sites.inka.de] .

Re:ssh tunneling? (1)

pimpinmonk (238443) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894974)

well, it might be too much processing overhead for the little bloke to do. Many of linksys' products (including this one?) run linux out of the box, so it's not a question of Linksys being unable to do it. However, perhaps they stick to the 802.11 encryption standards because that's all MS products support at this time...

Good observation though, but also if you're transferring sensitive data, you'll want encrypted communication end-to-end because you can just as easily be snooped on anywhere on the net if someone's actually trying to usurp your data.

Sigh (4, Informative)

curmudgeon (75566) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894906)

But still no linux driver for the corresponding WPC54G PCMCIA card?

Re:Sigh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895023)

No kidding -- let's get some better priorities here. We now have linux running on our 54g access point, but have to connect to it from a windows box. Somebody get cracking on those Broadcom drivers!

Hack already implemented (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894915)

Just to let people know, i have already applied this to my university and gotten into the new wireless network that is expanding beyond control. All hubs have the same password, and are very easy to find.

Tomorrow: implement peer-to-peer network using my own protocol that will send chills down the RIAA's backs!

Next day: mirror web sites that get the slashdot effect with a virtual server setup.

All this equals a fun week.

(and yes, I am an Anonymous Coward).

Secure? (0)

1nsane0ne (607735) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894920)

Upon successful execution of the script, you will be able to telnet to your box and start exploring its capabilities. Note that there is no login prompt, you telnet directly in as root. Be careful.

Funny that this is posted so close to this Ask Slashdot. [slashdot.org] This does not fall under the category of secure solutions I take it. Why take something where security is already a concern and make it wide open to the world? Granted putting linux on this could be useful and provide more functions that you could use but at least add some semblance of security.

Re:Secure? (2, Interesting)

temojen (678985) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895010)

From the article:

If you wish to change the files sent to the box, untar distro.tar and add or subtract files. Normally you should not run the install script more than once for a power-cycle of the box. i.e. if you want to run the install again, reset the wrt54g first.

Yes, un-authenticated open telnet as root seems really dumb to me too, but you could always remove telnetd and add SSH w SSH2 RSA only authentication.

Now what would be really cool. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894942)

Is to put a small desktop on it, such as *box, with a few tools such as xterm, dillo, abiword and linuxconf on it, atatch a usb hub to it so I can plug in a usb keyboard, mouse, and monitor and have a cheap linux boxen for administation.

Re:Now what would be really cool. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895216)

no such thing as a USB monitor.

Port it to SMC Barricade? (1, Offtopic)

pvera (250260) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894944)

Please please please please please!

That embarrassing begging display aside, I would really love if somebody would figure out how to add extra functionality to the SMC Barricade wireless routers. At the very least, something to push the logs to a machine elsewhere in the network, as its current archival options are very limited. This is something my old Linksys router was able to do.

Re:Port it to SMC Barricade? (1)

Tadghe (18215) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895101)

Let me add the Asante FR-3000 (or hell, ANY of the Asante devices). to that "Me too" :-).

My review: (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6894947)

I used to work as a consultant for a Fortune 500 company (more than 10,000 employees). As an expert in the field of IT
consulting, I think I can shed a little light on the current climate of the open source community, and Linux in particular.
The main reason that open source software, and Linux in particular, is failing is due to the underlying immaturity of the
technology and the perception of the viral GNU license.

I know that the above statements are strong, but I have hard facts to back it up with. At the Fortune 500 company that I
worked for, we wanted to leverage the power of Linux and associated open source technologies to benefit our server pool. The
perception that Linux is "free" was too much to ignore. I recommended to the company that we use the newest version of Linux,
version 9.0. My expectations were high that it would outperform our current solution at the time, Windows2000, which was doing
an absolutely superb job (and still is!) serving as web, DNS, and FTP servers.

I felt that I was up to the job to convert the entire server pool to the Linux technology. I had several years experience
programming VB, C#, ASP, and .NET Framework at the kernel level. I didn't use C, because contrary to popular belief, ASP and
VB can go just as low level as C can, and the latest .NET VB compiler produces code that is more portable and faster than C. I
took it upon myself to configure and compile all of the necessary shareware versions of software that we needed, including
sendmail, apache, and BIND. I even used the latest version of gcc (3.1) to increase the execution time of the binaries. After
a long chain of events, the results of the system were less than impressive..

The first bombshell to hit my project was that my client found out from another consultant that the GNU community has close
ties to former communist leaders. Furthermore, he found out that the 'x' in Linux was a tribute to the former Communist
philosopher, Karl Marx, whose name also ends in 'x'. The next bombshell to hit my project was the absolutely horrible
performance. I knew from the beginning that Linux wasn't ready for the desktop, but I had always been told by my colleagues
that it was better suited for a "server". As soon as I replaced all of the Windows2000 servers with Linux servers, the Linux
servers immediately went into swap. Furthermore, almost all of the machines were quad-processor x86 servers. We had no idea
that Linux had such awful SMP support. After less than 1 day in service, I was constantly having to restart servers, because
for some reason, many of the servers were experiencing kernel panics caused by mod_perl crashing apache! The hardship did not
end there! Apparently, the version of BIND installed on the server pool was remotely exploitable. Soon after we found that
out, a new worm was remotely infecting all of our servers! We were not expecting this, because our IIS servers running on
Windows2000 had never experienced a worm attack. Microsoft has always provided us with patches in the unlikely event that an
exploit was found. It took us hundreds of man-hours just to disinfect our Linux servers! After just 48 hours of operating
Linux servers in our server pool, we had exhausted our budget for the entire year! It was costing us approximately 75% more to
run Linux than Windows2000.

Needless to say, I will not be recommending Linux to any of my Fortune 500 clients. In the beginning, we thought that since
Linux was such "old" technology, it would be more mature than anything on the market. We also found out the hard way that
rag-tag volunteer efforts responsible for Apache and BIND simply are not able to compete with the professional operations of
Microsoft. I guess the old saying is true; "You get what you pay for!" Needless to say, I will be using Microsoft's "shared
license" solution for my enterprise clients, rather than the communist GNU license.

As it stands now, I do believe Linux has some practical uses. I think it will be useful in a University setting for first year
computer science students to compile their "Hello World!" programs on (provided that gcc won't kernel panic the machine).
Simply put, Linux just doesn't handle the rigors of a real-world work environment.

Yeah, but does it work with the BEFSR41? (3, Interesting)

caryw (131578) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894952)

Has anyone tried this on a Linksys router other than the WRT54G? My BEFSR41 4 port cable/dsl router is still running strong, and I would love to have telnetd and the such on running on it!

Thanks!

- Cary

Link to file (3, Informative)

BenFranske (646563) | more than 11 years ago | (#6894992)

The article has already been posted, if the file becomes unavailible due to the /. effect a temporary mirror of the file is availible at: http://lightntrax.com/ben/wrt54g.tar.tar [lightntrax.com]

Re:Link to file (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895122)

whore

I'm still waiting... (1)

SwansonMarpalum (521840) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895053)

for my Linksys IOS!

Does it run on European versions? (1)

killbill! (154539) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895116)

Was wondering since the wrt54g sold there seem to be different from the US ones...

(they're using different drivers, and linksys' website claims flashing an EU model with a US firmware will destroy it...)

Anyone tried yet? (don't want to have to buy another one hehe)

Power outage anyone? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895144)

Interesting -- "The script installs strictly to the ram disk of the box. No permanent changes are made. If you mess something up, power-cycle it."

Does this also mean that as soon as a power outage occurs, I will lose *all* logfiles, packet captures and even the distro?

worried (3, Interesting)

trans_err (606306) | more than 11 years ago | (#6895203)

Wouldn't this be seen as a horrible exploit for this router? Think about it anyone, who knows the router's IP (shesh thats difficult), can install a distro, with telnet access onto the router, thus being able to run things like sniff all day long....

We should be fighting this not supporting it.

security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#6895206)

What would be slick would be a working NoCatAuth http://nocat.net/ solution on this bugger.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?