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Anniversary of the First Computer Bug

CmdrTaco posted about 11 years ago | from the am-i-bugging-you-yet dept.

Bug 398

aheath writes "According to the US Naval Historical Center the first computer bug was logged on September 9, 1945 at 15:45: "Moth found trapped between points at Relay # 70, Panel F, of the Mark II Aiken Relay Calculator while it was being tested at Harvard University, 9 September 1945. The operators affixed the moth to the computer log, with the entry: "First actual case of bug being found". They put out the word that they had "debugged" the machine, thus introducing the term "debugging a computer program". The Wikipedia has a "computer bug" entry that lists some other "famous bugs" including the fictional HAL 9000 bug. What is your favorite computer bug story?"

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It runs in the family... (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | about 11 years ago | (#6911640)


September 9, 1945 at 15:45: "Moth found trapped between points at Relay # 70, Panel F [..] "

September 10, 1945 at 08:02: "Darl McBride Sr. claims he owns the moth."

September 10, 1945 at 23:53: "We snuck into Darl's room and put his hand in a bucket of warm water."

September 11, 1945 at 09:46: "Darl gets to work late but is proud to show us 'his' new bucket. We all hate him."

Re:It runs in the family... (4, Funny)

Incoherent07 (695470) | about 11 years ago | (#6911671)

You forgot

September 10, 1945 at 13:25: Al Gore claims to have invented the moth.

and you forgot... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911731)

THAT YOU'RE NOT FUNNY!

Re:and you forgot... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911823)

It depends. If he was trying to show that the SCO jokes are as old and tired as the Al Gore jokes then he is very witty. Otherwise he is just a moron.

STOP IT!!! SCO JOKES NOT FUNNY ANYMORE (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911723)


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Re:FP for all True-Christian(tm) BASH members (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911749)

YOU FAIL IT!

R-A-I-D?!?! (5, Insightful)

inertia@yahoo.com (156602) | about 11 years ago | (#6911663)

Somehow, saying "First actual case of bug being found" seems fake to me. It's like finding cavalry sword from the first world war with the inscription, "Corporal James Smith, Third Mounted Infantry, World War One." You'd know that even if the sword was real, the inscription was years after WWII, making it less valuable, and lessening it's voracity.

Or is this the first actual case because they suspected before there were actual bugs in the system but never found them?

Then again maybe it was just prophetic. Like NASA when the STS missions launch(ed): "3...2...1...Liftoff! [message about this mission and it's 'first' for space here]"

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911702)

You read to many Encylopedia Brown books.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911740)

Is that were that came from? For some reason, my memory recalls that sword and the phrase "AGA-NAGA-NAGA!" from the same book.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (5, Funny)

garrulous (653996) | about 11 years ago | (#6911714)

"Corporal James Smith, Third Mounted Infantry, World War One." You'd know that even if the sword was real, the inscription was years after WWII, making it less valuable, and lessening it's voracity

It hungered for recognition no less.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0, Insightful)

Wakkow (52585) | about 11 years ago | (#6911718)

It's where the term "bug", as we now know it, came from. Thus, that was the "first bug". Sure there were problems with the code/vacuum tubes/whatever before, but they never called it a "bug" until then.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (3, Informative)

Sgt York (591446) | about 11 years ago | (#6911846)

It's funny, this story came up as the QOTD when I logged in yesterday. I wish I remember what the quoted source was...

Anyway, the blurb said that although it may have been the first computer bug, the term 'bug' had been used to refer to technical problems in radio operations for many years prior.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (4, Informative)

gid (5195) | about 11 years ago | (#6911867)

The term "bug" in the technical sense was used long before that. That's just a famous episode of an actual bug causing a bug. Look at the history of the bug [catb.org] for more information.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (3, Funny)

fenix down (206580) | about 11 years ago | (#6911961)

They taped the moth to the page? Were they saving it in case they had to stick it back in there sometime?

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (3, Informative)

aridhol (112307) | about 11 years ago | (#6911730)

Or is this the first actual case because they suspected before there were actual bugs in the system but never found them?
This was the first computer bug, but not the first engineering bug. A "bug" has always been a problem, whether blamed on demons or by errors on the part of the engineer. So what they're saying is that, although we've used the term "bug" for some time, this is the first time it's actually a physical insect.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911734)

Indeed. The "first actual case" wording indicates that they had been using the term "bug" in a metaphorical way before this incident, but I'd always heard that the metaphorical use of the word came about *because* of this incident. So something's wrong in this account.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911741)

Wow, voracious sword....sounds like a modern game title. -b *************** voracious ( P ) Pronunciation Key (vo-rshs, v-) adj. 1. Consuming or eager to consume great amounts of food; ravenous. 2. Having or marked by an insatiable appetite for an activity or pursuit; greedy: a voracious reader. [From Latin vorx, vorc-, from vorre, to swallow, devour.]voraciously adv. voracity (-rs-t) or voraciousness (-rshs-ns) n. Synonyms: voracious, gluttonous, rapacious, ravenous These adjectives mean having or marked by boundless greed: a voracious reader of history; a gluttonous consumer of fine foods; a rapacious acquirer of competing businesses; a politician ravenous for power. Source: The American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright (C) 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911806)

Well, the Vorpal sword has been known to snicker-snack.

Also, "it's" means "it is," not the possessive of "it."

/anal

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911748)

You'd know that even if the sword was real, the inscription was years after WWII, making it less valuable, and lessening it's voracity.

Interesting. But how much does a typical WWI cavalry sword eat, and why would the inscription lessen its appetite?

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911802)

You know, I think that's the second time I've done that on Slashdot. Gee, maybe spell check isn't making me look any smarter. ;-)

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911869)

It thirsts for the blood of its enemies....

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911920)

Well, I guess I was pretty smart to get rid of that sword I had that had "World War I" inscribed on it. I made a great deal, too. I traded it for a coin in mint condition dated 247 B.C.!

Re:R-A-I-D?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911931)

I have a coin marked "150BC" in my collection...

Best Bug (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911675)

That one in the drug delivery machine that killed a bunch of people.

Re:Best Bug (0, Offtopic)

JohnwheeleR (662355) | about 11 years ago | (#6911733)

What the fuck is so funny about that moderators?

excellent propogation (5, Funny)

Doesn't_Comment_Code (692510) | about 11 years ago | (#6911677)


Those things really multiply don't they?

First you find ONE in a computer relay. Then, almost sixty years later, they've multiplied so that there's one in every program I write.

Like cockroaches.

You just can't get rid of them. They're hard to find. And when you squash one, three more come from nowhere!

Etymology (5, Funny)

BWJones (18351) | about 11 years ago | (#6911681)

"Moth found trapped between points at Relay # 70, Panel F, of the Mark II Aiken Relay Calculator

Cool. I always wondered about the etymology of "computer bug", and now I know the etymology is truly related to entymology. :-)

Re:Etymology (2, Informative)

stratjakt (596332) | about 11 years ago | (#6911773)

It's not, really. It's just a popular legend that people like to believe, like the one that Abner Doubleday invented baseball (noone knows who invented baseball or when since similar games had been played for centuries).

The word bug was in use in the manufacturing and industrial world, meaning what it means today - some little pain in the ass or defect with the system or product.

I guess this could be the origin of "computer bug", but thats kind of a stretch. It's just a cute story profs like to tell freshmen.

Re:Etymology (1)

Esion Modnar (632431) | about 11 years ago | (#6911957)

now I know the etymology is truly related to entymology

What's the difference between etymology and entomology?

It's just a little 'n.

Pffft ... A measly little moth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911686)

Personally, I think "de-snaked" is more impressive

Fried Snake [ufl.edu]

Re:Pffft ... A measly little moth (1)

malia8888 (646496) | about 11 years ago | (#6911888)

The "Fried Snake" may be digitally enhanced; however, we fix computers in the tropics and find the darndest things.

Momma gecko (small lizard) layed her eggs in a nice toasty Dell computer. Apparently, as soon as egg #1 hatched the resulting egg "goo" fried the motherboard/shorted out something.

Mrs. Gecko was unavailable for comment.

Best bug ever (5, Funny)

nnnneedles (216864) | about 11 years ago | (#6911688)

Win98 crashing on Bill Gates in front of millions of viewers.

Re:Best bug ever (5, Informative)

grub (11606) | about 11 years ago | (#6911803)

Which can be enjoyed... (1)

Kegetys (659066) | about 11 years ago | (#6911830)

...here [venus.co.uk] .

according to opera... (5, Interesting)

ih8apple (607271) | about 11 years ago | (#6911699)

according to opera... [opera.com]

"The origin of the word "bug" has wrongly been associated with an incident where a moth was pulled out of a Mark II computer. Apparently, the term was used prior to modern computers to mean an industrial or electrical defect."

according to the lexicon (1)

sloveless (518479) | about 11 years ago | (#6911845)

http://catb.org/jargon/html/B/bug.html

What is your favorite computer bug story? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911701)

it was when I read an article on slashdot and I tried to reply, then suddenly my fingers slipp

Historical notes. (-1, Troll)

Sheetrock (152993) | about 11 years ago | (#6911705)

An interesting sidenote to this, 'bug' was actually in usage before the bug was found; it was an acronym for Byte Under Guard, used when an if/then block failed to test the byte properly.

Also, bytes became commonly known as 8-bit values later, when IBM determined that was the sanest value for them. Before that, they were simply a common usage unit, much as 'int' has become today.

Re:Historical notes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911908)

Am I the only one who realizes that this post is full of shit? I mean mod it funny if you want but it is no more interesting than the guy who made the SCO joke.

Re:Historical notes. (1)

kst (168867) | about 11 years ago | (#6911962)

An interesting sidenote to this, 'bug' was actually in usage before the bug was found; it was an acronym for Byte Under Guard, used when an if/then block failed to test the byte properly.

The term "bug" was in use long before 1945, but the term "byte" only goes back to 1959 (according to www.m-w.com). The acronym for "Byte Under Guard" sounds like a back-formation.

Also, according to The Jargon File, the log entry with the moth is from September 9, 1947, not 1945. See here [catb.org] .

My favorite computer bug is Linux (-1, Troll)

stratjakt (596332) | about 11 years ago | (#6911706)

I mean GNU/Lunix

You're Wrong (1)

headbulb (534102) | about 11 years ago | (#6911836)

Linux has the Penquin..

If Anything Windows is the bug.... Have you seen that rainbow butterfly.. Not only is it a bug, it's proud of it. Why else would it dance around like a fairy.

Re:You're Wrong (1)

RedWolves2 (84305) | about 11 years ago | (#6911974)

The butterfly is the mascot of MSN not Windows. The M.C. Escher like Windows is the brand of the Windows Operating System...

term "Bug" was already in use (4, Insightful)

asmithmd1 (239950) | about 11 years ago | (#6911708)

By the way they logged the bug, "first actual case of bug being found" the term was already in use and they were pointing out the irony that the bug in this case was a real bug

Re:term "Bug" was already in use (1)

matthewp (19841) | about 11 years ago | (#6911767)

asmithmd1 wrote: By the way they logged the bug, "first actual case of bug being found" the term was already in use and they were pointing out the irony that the bug in this case was a real bug

True. The article suggests, however, that this incident was the origin of the verb 'to debug'. The Slashdot writeup manages to confuse the two.

This is not the first bug (0)

Otis2222222 (581406) | about 11 years ago | (#6911711)

The etymology of the word "bug" as we know it dates to long before the first computers were introduced. This just happens to be the first COMPUTER related bug on record. My guess is that it's a joke, i.e. "hey, Bob we found that BUG in the system. yuk yuk yuk."

Definitely a weird one.. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911717)

My favorite bug was in an existing product that had been on the shelves for a while and went through numerous patches to fix many bugs. Going through the testing, I found the UI could not be moved around the screen with a left handed mouse configuration! Immediately, I dropped the bong and decided a cup of coffee and looking on a few other machines were in order. Did those and the bug was legit. Sent it to development and they scrubbed it "as designed". Silly bug, but I can't believe no one tested or complained about it.

Re:Definitely a weird one.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911842)

Does this mean I have to test my website with my left hand, too?

Re:Definitely a weird one.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911944)

Only if it's got streaming pr0n!

Re:Definitely a weird one.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911950)

Interesting? I think the moderator is the one who needs to drop the bong. His post doesn't even make sense. What the hell is moving a UI around?

Hmm.... (0)

Kedisar (705040) | about 11 years ago | (#6911722)

Could I spray a can of Raid on my RAID disks to eliminate bugs?

The ultimate irony... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911725)

...was that an update to Mark II Aiken Relay Calculator (a small screen over the air intake) was developed on 1 September 1945, but the navy was too slow in installing the patch.

They didn't install the patch... (1)

John3 (85454) | about 11 years ago | (#6911858)

...because their free 90 days of support had run out on 31 August 1945 and they didn't want to pay the $500 annual support contract.

Celebration! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911727)

In lieu of this great event, we should all celebrate by releasing herds of moths in our computers!!!

Re:Celebration! (2, Funny)

Lane.exe (672783) | about 11 years ago | (#6911811)

Or install Windows ME. The effect is startlingly similar.

The good old days... (1)

John3 (85454) | about 11 years ago | (#6911728)

...when technicians and programmers found the bugs. Now vendors just release the code and rely on the users to do all the "debugging".

Another bug.. (5, Interesting)

Verteiron (224042) | about 11 years ago | (#6911732)

When I was doing inhouse tech support for a large company that makes green tractors, I got a ticket about a system that was having random lockups. After investigating, I found that the lockups were indeed random, so set out to try swapping the RAM first. Judge of my surprise to find a tiny spider caught against the base of a SIMM, blackened and crispy. If someone had told me that there's enough juice flowing through a RAM chip to fry even a spider, I wouldn't've believed it, but there the little critter was. I couldn't believe that little bug alone would be causing a problem, but on a whim I left the chip in, sans spider, and behold, the system worked perfectly.

Odd, that.

And although it's not a bug, I have had someone bring a computer into my shop for locking up, and found a live mouse in it. It escaped into the shop and I believe it lives here on Dorito crumbs to this very day.

Re:Another bug.. (1)

SamBeckett (96685) | about 11 years ago | (#6911826)

I used to work for a large company that makes yellow tractors. We put the spider there and in thousands of your other tractors too! Eat that Deere!

My favourite? (1)

Bilange (237074) | about 11 years ago | (#6911738)

What is your favorite computer bug story?

On Windows 98: Start, Run: C:\con\con

But my real favourite is when Bill Gaets introduced Windows 98 with the famous USB scanner blue screen.

It wasnt really a bug.... (2, Funny)

jmenezes (100986) | about 11 years ago | (#6911739)

It's a new and exciting feature!

Re:It wasnt really a bug.... (0)

lacrymology.com (583077) | about 11 years ago | (#6911770)

And if it was painted many flavorful colors, then Apple could claim it as their own. -m

My Favorite Bug (5, Interesting)

haplo21112 (184264) | about 11 years ago | (#6911747)

The Schrodenbug...named after the Theroy of Schrodinger's cat...where by if you put a cat in a box, its not truely dead until you look at it again...

This is a bug which while in existance in your code has no effect until you happen to notice it, in the code. Then suddenly the effect of having this bug begins to appear. While until you noticed it, the effect never appeared and the program ran as intended.

my favourite bug (3, Funny)

selderrr (523988) | about 11 years ago | (#6911753)

way back, my first job... only 2 programmers, me and another guy who worked from home over a 9600baud modem. We had no CVS or anything like it(we were noob).

The "bug" in question was merely him and me modifying the same file every other day. I used i,j,k,z for iterator variables. He had the habit of using i,j,k,m. The file had 2 functions, one with a parameter z, the other with a parameter m.

I guess you can figure out how horrible such things can get. It took weeks before we figured out it was a naming issue.

Re:my favourite bug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911792)

sounds like the bug was you.

Re:my favourite bug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911881)

I used i,j,k,z for iterator variables


interesting choice of names... with that inconsistency the problems were well deserved.

Re:my favourite bug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911927)

That has to be one of the worst posts I have read in awhile. WTF cares?

Favorite Bug (3, Funny)

AvantLegion (595806) | about 11 years ago | (#6911754)

>> What is your favorite computer bug story?

Windows ME

cute (2, Funny)

falsification (644190) | about 11 years ago | (#6911756)

What a cute story!!!!

Could we please stop hearing about it?

"First actual case of bug being found" (4, Informative)

JohnGrahamCumming (684871) | about 11 years ago | (#6911766)

That language implies that this was not the first computer bug found, but more the first physical bug found. And hence it implies that the term "bug" was in use long before that time.

The The Jargon File covers this and includes a picture of the bug in the entry on "bug [catb.org] " and states:

Indeed, the use of bug to mean an industrial defect was already established in Thomas Edison's time, and a more specific and rather modern use can be found in an electrical handbook from 1896 (Hawkin's New Catechism of Electricity, Theo. Audel & Co.) which says: "The term 'bug' is used to a limited extent to designate any fault or trouble in the connections or working of electric apparatus." It further notes that the term is "said to have originated in quadruplex telegraphy and have been transferred to all electric apparatus."
John.

To Be Specific.... (5, Informative)

Caraig (186934) | about 11 years ago | (#6911768)

To be specific, that first bug was recorded by future Admiral "Amazing" Grace Hopper, a (rare female) Line Navy officer (as opposed to a WAVE or Naval Reserve officer.) Her name has gone on to one of the most modern guided missile destroyers. She was quite a remarkable woman, read up on her career if you get the chance.

Re:To Be Specific.... (1)

the_argent (28326) | about 11 years ago | (#6911879)

I'll sacrifice some Karma just to get this up the scale a bit. Up the "informative" on the parent, Gracie Hopper was one of the most interesting female geeks on the planet and needs more recognition in this story.

List of worst bugs (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911779)

Here [tu-muenchen.de] are some bad bugs.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Well, except that instead of miscalculating your home budget you could rain nuclear destruction upon the world...

See TechTV for more (5, Informative)

arth1 (260657) | about 11 years ago | (#6911780)

TechTV has some interesting stuff on this:
1. Twisted List: Five Computer Bugs That Changed the World
2. Famous Bugs: The First Computer Bug
3. Famous Bugs: The Funniest Computer Bug
4. Famous Bugs: The Most Tragic Computer Bug
5. Famous Bugs: The Most Embarrassing Computer Bug
6. Famous Bugs: The Most Famous Computer Bug
See TechTV [techtv.com] for more details.

I still think the bug in converting between metric and imperial units causing a billion dollar Mars probe to crash is the top one.

Regards,
--
*Art

Worst Case of bugs I've seen... (2, Funny)

Kushy (225928) | about 11 years ago | (#6911793)

Doing some tech work in Brooklyn, NY. I got a call from a small company (3 machines in a business run out of a apartment).

Well one of the machines was making funny sounds. I heard the machine when I arived and it sounded like a wire was caught in the fan. I opened the case and about 10 very large and nasty roaches ran out, there were about 20 dead ones inside the case.

It seems the 80mm fan in the back got pushed in an left a nice hole in the case, which the 2 childern in the house used to put food they didn't want to eat.

I refused to clean the machine out, and told them what they had to do, I got outta their as soon as I could, trying not to vomit thinking about the roach guts on the CPU fan.

Mainframe Story (5, Funny)

tds67 (670584) | about 11 years ago | (#6911798)

What is your favorite computer bug story?

I don't know if this counts, but here goes:

I worked as student help at a college that had a PDP-11 based mainframe. One night it went down. Computer techs were called out but could find nothing wrong. This continued night after night at about the same time each night. So the techs hung around after hours to keep an eye on it.

Around 6:30pm, the cleaning woman came in with her vaccuum cleaner. She promptly went over to the wall socket, unplugged the mainframe, plugged in her vaccuum cleaner and started vaccuuming the floor.

Re:Mainframe Story (2, Insightful)

Damn_Canuck (702128) | about 11 years ago | (#6911855)

Remarkably, this is the same urban legend story that happened in various hospitals worldwide where several patients mysteriously died nightly in the same wing of the hospital... until it was found that a janitor was coming around and unplugging the life support systems to plug in the floor buffer...

Wouldn't a mainframe require a different power socket for a vaccuum cleaner? Or is this one UBER-vaccuum?

Re:Mainframe Story (4, Funny)

stratjakt (596332) | about 11 years ago | (#6911884)

Yeah, no shit. It must be one of those 220VAC @ 20A vaccuum cleaners. Y'know, the kind that suck harder than CmdrTaco on prom night.

Hmmmmm (1)

defishguy (649645) | about 11 years ago | (#6911819)

"What is your favorite computer bug story?"

Windows XP is the fastest and most secure operating system EVER!

Favorite bug (0)

Icefyre (615125) | about 11 years ago | (#6911838)

Would have to be the X-box getting the blue screen of death. Good stuff.

From the Jargon File ... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911843)

"The text of the log entry (from September 9, 1947), reads 1545 Relay #70 Panel F (moth) in relay. First actual case of bug being found. This wording establishes that the term was already in use at the time in its current specific sense -- and Hopper herself reports that the term bug was regularly applied to problems in radar electronics during WWII.
Indeed, the use of bug to mean an industrial defect was already established in Thomas Edison's time, and a more specific and rather modern use can be found in an electrical handbook from 1896 (Hawkin's New Catechism of Electricity, Theo. Audel & Co.) which says: The term 'bug' is used to a limited extent to designate any fault or trouble in the connections or working of electric apparatus. It further notes that the term is said to have originated in quadruplex telegraphy and have been transferred to all electric apparatus."

Morris worm holes? (2, Interesting)

molo (94384) | about 11 years ago | (#6911847)

Perhaps the most influential bugs of all time were those that allowed the Morris worm to propogate. Sendmail, fingerd, rsh/rexec.. all to blame. The worm led to the formation of CERT. Quite influential.

-molo

I don't know about you... (1)

bmac (51623) | about 11 years ago | (#6911851)

but a real coder has no *favorite* stories about bugs, only their worst nightmares.

How about spending three days trying to track down a bug that ends up being in a third-party floating point library. (The old DOS-extender days with High C/C++ compiler & whatnot).

Those are not good memories in my book. I like to let those memories just drift away into nothingness.

Peace & Blessings,
bmac
For true peace & happiness -- www.mihr.com

My favorite computer bug story (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911853)

Once, when I was a kid, I had lice and scabies. I really like computers.

Another instance (5, Funny)

DoctorHibbert (610548) | about 11 years ago | (#6911874)

Seen on the license plate of a VW Beetle: FEATURE

morons vote for planet/population rescue effort.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911877)

as a means to resolve sum of the buggIE blight brought upon US buy the greed/fear based payper liesense georgewellian fuddite stock markup execrable over @ BugWear(tm) .controll.

we're also building a vessel that floats on almost any suBStance.

that's right. you/we cannot afford the badtoll that lies ahead, should the greed/fear based georgewellian fuddite execrable fail to be neutralized.

that's right. J. Public et AL has yet to become involved in open/honest 'net communications/commerce in a meaningful way. that's mostly due to the MiSinformation suppLIEd buy phonIE ?pr? ?firm?/stock markup FraUD execrable, etc...

truth is, there's no better/more affordable/effective way that we know of, for J. to reach other J.'s &/or their respective markets.

the recipe is:

consult with/trust in yOUR creator. vote with yOUR wallet. more breathing. seek others of non-agressive intentions/behaviours. that's the spirit.

use key words/indexing to identify yourself/your products.

the overbullowned greed/fear based phonIE marketeers are self eliminating by their owned greed/fear/ego based evile MiSintentions. they must deny the existence of the power that is dissolving their ability to continue their self-centered evile behaviours.

as the lights continue to come up, you'll see what we mean. meanwhile, there are plenty of challenges, not the least of which is the planet/population rescue (from the corepirate nazi/walking dead contingent) initiative.

EVERYTHING is going to change, despite the lameNT of the evile wons. you can bet your .asp on that. when the lights come up, there'll be no going back, & no where to hide.

we weren't planted here to facilitate/perpetuate the excesses of a handful of Godless felons. you already know that? yOUR ONLY purpose here is to help one another. any other pretense is totally false.

pay attention (to yOUR environment, for example). that's quite affordable, & leads to insights on preserving life as it should/could/will be again. everything's ALL about yOUR motives.

take care, we're here for you.

most folks PCs/networks still infactdead (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911971)

plus, they have to pay some stock markup frauds/felons, to remain non-functional/in their infactdead state?

talk about yOUR buggIE sheeples?

It works better if you plug it in (3, Funny)

CeladonBlue (187054) | about 11 years ago | (#6911882)

While working on an embedded printer driver board, I had just burned new firmware and installed it, tested it, and, because we had had an incident where the internals of another printer had melted together, left it off and unplugged. Five minutes later one of the applications programmers came storming into my office claiming that my new firmware was crap. I calmly walked back out to the lab, looked over the machine, and commented "it works better if you plug it in..."

Thank God the found a bug in there. (1)

nooboob (553955) | about 11 years ago | (#6911909)

What if they had found a marmot or a preschooler or something? "I be at work late sweets, we're de-marmoting tonight.

Re:Thank God the found a bug in there. (1)

nooboob (553955) | about 11 years ago | (#6911978)

And I'd just like to say my grammar really isn't that bad. I was just try to beat the flurry of "Thank God they didn't find " posts so I could get the Mr. Funny Man Super Points first.

Just be glad... (2, Funny)

Esion Modnar (632431) | about 11 years ago | (#6911923)

they didn't find a rabbit in there. Then we'd all be referring to "derabbiting" or "derabbitizing" the program.

The Story of Magic (1, Redundant)

delcielo (217760) | about 11 years ago | (#6911952)

I first heard of this right here on Slashdot. Wish I could remember who posted it that time so that I could give them proper attribution. Oh well.

http://jargon.watson-net.com/section.asp?f=a-sto ry -about-magic.html

speaking of bugs (1)

mabu (178417) | about 11 years ago | (#6911956)

In the late 80s or early 90s there was a software company that ran a promotion that they would give you a VW bug if you found a bug in their product. I can't remember what company or software package this was but I thought that was a bold statement about the quality of their software. Too bad very few companies could get away with that now.

Anniversary? Horse Pucky. (2, Interesting)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 11 years ago | (#6911958)

The term bug when referring to a flaw in a mechanism does NOT originate in the coputer machinery of 1945. In fact, it is much older, and is traceable to as far back as Tom Edison:

On November 18, 1878, Edison wrote to Theodore Puskas, "It has been just so in all my inventions. The first step is an intuition--and comes with a burst, then difficulties arise. This thing gives out and then that--"Bugs"--as such little faults and difficulties are called--show themselves and mo nths of anxious watching, study and labor are requisite before commercial success--or failure--is certainly reached" (Matthew Josephson, Edison: A Biography, John Wiley & Sons, 1992, page 198).

My favorite bug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 11 years ago | (#6911977)

is the one that let people widen/lengthen slashdot pages.

one of my favorites... (1)

jeremie_z_ (639708) | about 11 years ago | (#6911982)

... is the bug in the Patriot anti-missile system!
url [etsu.edu]
an error in the way it rounded 1/10000th of seconds made it less and less accurate proportionnally to the time since it had been booted up!
so remember to always reboot your anti-missiles counter-mesures before using them!

my Spry Mosaic bug story (5, Funny)

Tumbleweed (3706) | about 11 years ago | (#6911991)

Okay, back in the day(tm), I worked in technical support at Spry, makers of Internet in a Box(tm). One of my duties was to write up bug reports for the internal support system for the tech support reps.

Turns out we had a bug in Spry Mosaic that, when it hit an empty IMG tag (as in, nothing else in the tag but the letters IMG), it would instantly crash. When I wrote up the document, I forgot to escape the less-than and greater-than marks, so it put the actual tag in the tech support document.

The upshot - when the tech support reps searched the database for 'crash in browser', one of the hits that would come up was the document I made - when they loaded it to see the details on 'crash in browser', that's exactly what they got. Ooops.

I can laugh about it now.

Actually, I laughed about it then, too. :)
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