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Plasma Comes Alive

CowboyNeal posted more than 10 years ago | from the artificial-societies dept.

Science 267

j_hirny writes "So, it seems that the widely acclaimed theory of how life begun, during hundreds of millions of years is, at least, not the only one which is being researched. As New Scientist report, a physicist managed to create life-alike beings made of plasma. They can replicate, grow and duplicate. They don't have amino-acids or DNA strains, of course, yet they may reveal something new about life's beginnings."

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267 comments

Nobody cares, CowboyNeal (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7011941)

Nobody cares.

overused (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7011946)

I for one, will welcome these new Plasma Blob overlords. Now, continue with informative comments, dear slashdotters.

Re:overused (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012019)

OK, where did this overused joke originate? On slashdot? I've only been seeing it for the last 2 weeks, maybe. Anyone know - or does everyone just try to get in on somebody else's inside joke?

Re:overused (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012036)

Well, it started on the Simpsons. It have been on /. for some years, but it's only recently it has become overused. I think the next big thing will be "Yes, and I'd like an hour on the holodeck with Seven of Nine" as a sarcastic reply to something.

Re:overused (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012038)

From the Simpson's episode "Homer in Space".

Re:overused (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012071)

Actually, it was called, "Deep Space Homer."

Bitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#7012220)

Don't you ever correct me again motherfucker.

Re:Bitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#7012238)

I'll correct you with the back of hand iff'n ya ain't careful

Season 5 (3, Redundant)

WTFmonkey (652603) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012061)

Kent Brockman reports on Channel Six.

Kent: We're just about to get our first pictures from inside the spacecraft with "average-naut" Homer Simpson, and we'd like to -- aah!
[Camera shows a close-up of an ant floating in front of the three astronauts]
Everyone: Aah!
Kent: Ladies and gentlemen, er, we've just lost the picture, but, uh, what we've seen speaks for itself. The Corvair spacecraft has been taken over -- "conquered", if you will -- by a master race of giant space ants. It's difficult to tell from this vantage point whether they will consume the captive earth men or merely enslave them. One thing is for certain, there is no stopping them; the ants will soon be here. And I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords. I'd like to remind them that as a trusted TV personality, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground sugar caves.
Marge: Mmm, don't worry, kids. I'm sure your father's all right.
Lisa: What are you basing that on, Mom?

Re:overused (-1, Offtopic)

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Big Deal (0)

overshoot (39700) | more than 10 years ago | (#7011959)

Prior art from 40 years ago: James Blish's The Star Dwellers

Re:Big Deal (3, Funny)

Jeremy Erwin (2054) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012136)

It reminded me of one of those funny Stephen Baxter novels--wherein the main characters are so completely devoid of humanoid characteristics that one loses interest after the thirtieth page.

Re:Big Deal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#7012300)

What does prior art have to do with anything when nobody even mentioned copyrights?

So... (3, Funny)

Brainboy (310252) | more than 10 years ago | (#7011965)

So how does this help us discover plasma weaponry technology? I've played enough first-person shooters, i know its possible!

Plasma Comes Alive... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7011967)

...but will not sell more records than Frampton.

And the difference... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7011978)

Between these plasma lifeforms and the fire "lifeforms" I just made with my match is what?

Bullshit (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7011981)

This New Scientist article is full of hot air.

Re:Bullshit (5, Insightful)

letxa2000 (215841) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012188)

No kidding. Read the article, it's silly. So what. They created plasma "bubbles" that can grow in size, split into two bubbles, and "communicate" by "emitting electromagnetic energy." That's communication? Then lightning is communicating...

This is about the same as blowing into a straw and watching bubbles come out of your soft drink and saying you've created life because the bubbles grow, shrink, split into two, and emit carbon dioxide energy when they bubble up to the top of the liquid.

Can this be done with other substances? (2, Funny)

agent2 (628468) | more than 10 years ago | (#7011982)

So what if they could do this to biological materials? Would it be possible to create cells from living things?

WHOA! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7011987)

I wouldn't have been impressed if they could only replicate, but replicate AND duplitcate, whoa!

No (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7011990)

The Bible says that God created life. Accept it and move on.

Re:No (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012119)

It's time for a bible burning.

Neat (5, Insightful)

Bobulusman (467474) | more than 10 years ago | (#7011993)

Sanduloviciu says this electric spark caused a high concentration of ions and electrons to accumulate at the positively charged electrode, which spontaneously formed spheres (Chaos, Solitons & Fractals, vol 18, p 335). Each sphere had a boundary made up of two layers - an outer layer of negatively charged electrons and an inner layer of positively charged ions.

Plasma cells are an interesting idea, but I doubt it's time to rip up the old textbooks yet. The 'nucleus' was only a collection of gas atoms. It kind of sounds like the researchers had to jump through hoops to get these 'cells' to grow or divide. Still, it might give us some new insights.

Re:Neat (4, Insightful)

rde (17364) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012034)

I'm forced to agree. Particularly when I note his argument that they can survive at lower temperatures, even though they need to be nice and toasty to be created in the first place. So what? Irrespective of the temperature Argon cells can survive at, I really doubt [DR]NA would survive such a creation process. Unless it was that sort of thing that glued the amino acids together in the first place... nah. Probably not.

More like a lava lamp (4, Insightful)

srichman (231122) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012065)

Sorry, I think your first assessment is right. There are few new insights here. The phenomenon described in the article sounds roughly like the formation, "mitosis," and migration of bubbles in a lava lamp. Okay, you can call these things cells. That's somewhat reasonable. But the researcher said, "the emergence of such spheres seems likely to be a prerequisite for biochemical evolution." That sounds like serious pop science quakery to me. It is only correct with the loosest interpretation of "prerequisite," "bio," and/or "evolution," and even then it's highly misleading.

Re:Neat (1)

Infosquawk (131022) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012115)

It kind of sounds like the researchers had to jump through hoops to get these 'cells' to grow or divide.

No doubt. They're also stretching the bounds of what we'd call "communication" to the breaking point...

Finally, they could communicate information by emitting electromagnetic energy, making the atoms within other spheres vibrate at a particular frequency. The spheres are not the only self-organising systems to meet all of these requirements. But they are the first gaseous "cells".

Gotta Love /. (-1, Offtopic)

GamezCore.com (631162) | more than 10 years ago | (#7011997)

Nothing like huge science/medical breakthrough stories being posted which could potentially explain our existence or open whole new doors to our way of thinking... and the first posts contain such insight as:

"suck my cok

props 2 gnaa"

and First Person Shooter weaponry.

Sheesh...

No (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012052)

We all know in our inner soul that God created life and these attempts to replace God with science are pathetic excuses for people with a dark soul that has been invaded by satan to replace God with primitive ideas.

Re:No (5, Interesting)

NickFitz (5849) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012116)

...pathetic excuses for people with a dark soul that has been invaded by satan to replace God with primitive ideas

What, like ignoring the intellectual faculties given you by the Creator in favour of slavish devotion to some ancient collection of fairy tales?

No offence, but experiments with plasma aren't anything like as primitive as some of the things my Christian friends believe, such as the two creation myths in Genesis (although they never seem to have noticed that there are two, they just run with the cute serpent story).

Just my $0.02. You may now inform me that I am damned.

Re:No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#7012204)

Did you read the parent post? The person did not mention Christianity or the Bible. Believing in creation does mean using the Bible as your handbook.

Re:No (1)

NickFitz (5849) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012281)

The capitalisation of "God" and the mention of Satan hinted that we were at least talking about Judaism, Christianity, or Islam. My point is, I think, valid for all three.

I am also happy to accept that similar criticisms could be levelled against just about any religion, as they all involve some degree of acceptance of the absurd. So Christians shouldn't feel that I'm picking on them; I was citing my friends by way of example, but if the original post came from somebody of a different faith, then I'll say the same about my Moslem and even my Hindu friends. (For some reason, I don't know any Polynesian animists.)

Re:No (1)

Exiler (589908) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012210)

You, sir, are damned to a life long orgy of sin and fun.

damnit, that never sounds quite right from an atheist =/

Re:No (1)

b-baggins (610215) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012260)

I always get the biggest laugh out of "educated, enlightened, I've moved past unthinking Christian mindless robot" types who are unthinking mindless robot types.

Do you honestly think you are the first person in the history of the world to notice the two creation accounts in Genesis?

Do you think that all the great Christian thinkers like Irreanus, Aquinas, Luther, Calivn, etc. didn't know there were two creation accounts in Genesis?

Do you think they just looked at it, and said, Oh, my, they disagree. We'll just sweep the second one under the rug!

If you do think this, then you really should be too embarrassed to call any Christian unthinking or ignorant, or blinded to reality.

Huge medical science breakthrough? (0, Offtopic)

pr0ntab (632466) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012207)

Did you even read the article?

If so, did you comprehend it?

Then you would know why no one has taken any effort to post anything meaningful. You're just seeing the funny-karma-whores and the crapflooders (background noise) who invade every article.

Face it, CowboyNeal picked a dud. The article was full of hot gas and fanicful speculation.

Life "out there" (1)

useosx (693652) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012000)

This shouldn't surprise many Slashdotters... I think a lot of us have suspected that any life forms we might find in the universe won't look like Klingons.

Also, probably reinforces our existential terror.

Re:Life "out there" (1)

CaptnMArk (9003) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012060)

Does this mean my time spent learning Klingon was wasted?

Do'Ha'

Re:Life "out there" (4, Funny)

WTFmonkey (652603) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012179)

Um, no. There are MANY other things that mean your time spent learning Klingon was wasted, but this isn't one of them.

Plasma Aliens (5, Interesting)

Zarkonnen (662709) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012001)

This is interesting in the light of speculation about life-forms living on the surface of suns. (As described, for example, in David Brin's [davidbrin.com] Sundiver.)

Considering that a the surface of a sun itself consists of plasma, it's not improbable that spheres like in the experiment get formed there all the time. The question is whether there is any way those spheres could attain a more complex form of internal organisation, or if they remain stuck at that basic level.

Plasma Comes Alive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012002)

yeah, but unlike peter frampton, plasma cant make a guitar talk

These guys may be on to something (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012004)

My florescent desk lamp has been looking at me funny.

overused (0, Funny)

SHEENmaster (581283) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012081)

I for one welcome our new florescent desk lamp overlords...

Re:overused (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012133)

Damnit...this is *not* funny. It's redundant. This joke has been used multiple times already related to this story. Mods on crack. Stop modding this shit up!

Re:These guys may be on to something (4, Funny)

twoslice (457793) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012086)

My florescent desk lamp has been looking at me funny.

I'll bet that your lamp isn't the only thing looking at you funny...

I for one. (-1, Redundant)

tonywestonuk (261622) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012009)

I for one, welcome our plasma life-form overlords!

Opps... That should be.... (0, Offtopic)

tonywestonuk (261622) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012040)

...I for one, welcome our NEW plasma life-form overlords!

(next time I'll use preview)!

Re:Opps... That should be.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012123)

Argh, stop it already!

It has already been posted...

Intel's new 32-bit CPU "Prescott" will be a 64-bit (-1, Offtopic)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012010)

All according to an article [theinquirer.net] the mother-of-all-sources The Inquirer [theinquirer.net]!

Offtopic? Hrrrrrmmm... Well, yes... But severely interestingly so, anyhow!

Galactically yours,

G3ckoG33k

Ob: (3, Funny)

Bearpaw (13080) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012017)

"It's life, Jim, but not as we know it."

Well, potentially life-like, anyway. Intriguing.

Aah! My plasma! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012018)

I'm not supposed to get jigs in it!

Overrated in a way (5, Insightful)

ramk13 (570633) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012024)

I don't really see how these are cells like biological cells. It just a bunch of particles following electrostatics. Just because it resembles what biological cells do in a few ways doesn't mean that it's the 'beginning of life' or anything like that.

Similar things happen with particles in water. If you go to any water treatment plant and look at the flocculation tanks you'll see tons (literally) of particles colliding each other, forming new particles. They have natural organic matter and other crud absorbed to their surfaces, and if coniditions are right, they can break apart (too much shear).

It's interesting still, in the sense that anything that self assembles usually minimizes the total energy of a system in a 'neat' way, but I wouldn't rewrite the theory on how life begin, because of it.

Re:Overrated in a way (1)

iCat (690740) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012249)

doesn't mean that it's the 'beginning of life' or anything like that.

But surely, on Earth, a few billion years ago there was a point in time when there was 'non-life' then a few seconds later 'life'. Even if you consider evolution of life as a continuum, it does make sense to say there was a moment when 'life' began. The question is, was 'non-life' just a bunch of free-wheeling molecules, or an arrangement of chemicals that exhibited some of the attributes we might agree today can easily be labelled as 'life'.

Re:Overrated in a way (3, Insightful)

Blue Stone (582566) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012253)

We need to redefine what constitutes "life" to avoid silly mistakes like this, occuring from a flawed definition.

I propose "5. The ability to wear a propellor-beanie."

That should sort the wheat from the chaff!

Not! (2, Interesting)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012028)

I'd consider that one of the definitions of "life" could be "a pattern that attempts its own continuance despite destructive obstacles".

Reproduction is simply a continuance of that pattern. Think about it:

1) loud noise == cat runs to preserve itself.
2) War == baby boomer generation.

ad nasueum. What we have is a curiousity of bare physics, nothing more.

Re:Not! (2, Insightful)

Avian visitor (257765) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012293)

So you can't tell if a "pattern" is alive unless you expose it to a "destructive obstacle"?

Bacteria will take no better attempts to survive than a forest fire. One is considered alive the other is not. How do you tell which one by your definition?

On the other hand, an electric current (a pattern of moving electrons if you will) through a coil will fiercely attempt its continuance when confronted by a destructive obstacle - you will get a nice spark if you break the circuit. Again, we don't consider electron currents to be alive.

Re:Not! (1)

iCat (690740) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012294)

"a pattern that attempts its own continuance despite destructive obstacles".

So Dodos were not alive?

odd (1)

potpie (706881) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012030)

This is probably going to spell doom for humankind. The plasma-monsters will look like those things in the Final Fantasy movie, and we'll have to build special living habitats like in Logan's Run.

More information... (3, Insightful)

JayBlalock (635935) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012044)

Why didn't the article say more about under what exact conditions the plasmoids replicated and communicated? I mean, you can say they "duplicated themselves" when all you really did was cut one in half.

Whether they were doing these things spontaneously (or in response to only environmental stimulii) would make a huge difference in how big this is.

That's nothing (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012050)

There's thousands life forms spraying out from a stiff 18 cm attachment to my body. They taste yummy!

A bit of wordplay here (5, Insightful)

beacher (82033) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012051)

"the ability to replicate, to communicate information, and to metabolise and grow. He found that the spheres could replicate by splitting into two. Under the right conditions they also got bigger, taking up neutral argon atoms and splitting them into ions and electrons to replenish their boundary layers.
Finally, they could communicate information by emitting electromagnetic energy, making the atoms within other spheres vibrate at a particular frequency. The spheres are not the only self-organising systems to meet all of these requirements. But they are the first gaseous "cells".

Is a form of eletronic harmonic resonance communication? Is breaking apart in two and merging together reproduction? Given that water has surface tension (boundry layer), can communicate (ooh it vibrates), and reproduce (really vague definition here), water's alive by this vague definition.

Sanduloviciu may have found something interesting, maybe he didn't, but the wordplay and generalizations don't cut it.
-B

Re:A bit of wordplay here (0)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012128)

Well, given that most living organisms are composed almost entirely of water, going strictly on percentages one could easily conclude that impure water is "alive".

Re:A bit of wordplay here (1)

iq in binary (305246) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012234)

Life is a process. Living organisms are really just extremely complicated machines. Ingest fuel, seek fuel, expel byproduct. With most life forms we know, this is done by giving the power supply (stomachs, basically) means to gather it's own fuel.

What's happening here is essentially the same thing, it's just in a way we've not seen before.

Re:A bit of wordplay here (2, Interesting)

Brad Mace (624801) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012317)

I agree they're stretching quite a bit. For one, communication isn't happening unless some action is taken (or considered) in response to a message. Vibrating is not an intelligent or even an instinctual response; it's a basic physical property.

the high temperature needed to form doesn't seem like a major issue since at the very least volcanos and geysers could provide such an environment.

The plasma bubbles are interesting, but they don't seem to have even a wild guess about how they could have led to more typical forms of life.

Just plasmids (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012053)

These spheres are called plasmids and they were first seen more than 50 years ago. Nothing new here...

Re:Just plasmids (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012084)

Sorry - I mean plasmoids...
see: http://www.padrak.com/ine/ELEWIS1.html

Fun w/ Plasma (0)

feendster (635599) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012056)

Plasma is nifty stuff if you have ever played with it. I used to work in a lab w/ a few coaters that we used to coat our SEM samples so that the samples wouldn't charge. (Glow under examination in the chamber.)You could gold or cromium plate a set of safety glasses and various other things. I should have tried this mabe I would still have a job...

Makes no sense (1)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012079)

This sounds not much more than soap bubbles. This sounds like someone creating a simulation, nothing more. This is not where these cells are creating cells that are self sufficient, but just creating a similation. And saying that they communicate is like saying the two tin cans on a string communicate.

Yes, that makes a *lot* of sense (1)

2nd Post! (213333) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012298)

Soap bubbles are important too.

The idea is that you need some kind of self replicating self forming cell structure before you can have DNA; something to protect whatever gets trapped and absorbed inside.

Without plasma cells, you can't contemplate plasma life because the cell protects, shields, and encourages whatever happens inside from whatever is happening outside.

Re:Makes no sense (1)

iCat (690740) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012320)

is like saying the two tin cans on a string communicate

They do communicate. There is a gravitational attraction between them. Maybe the reason we can't figure out how life began is because we don't think outside the box.

Mr. Spock's commentary on plasma balls. (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012080)

"It's life, Jim ... but not as we know it."

Re:Mr. Spock's commentary on plasma balls. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012117)

Spock ate my plasma balls?

Re:Mr. Spock's commentary on plasma balls. (1)

NortWind (575520) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012129)

No, that sounds more like Bones. Spock would say something like "Fascinating, this seems to be a non-organic life form."

Re:Mr. Spock's commentary on plasma balls. (2, Informative)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012261)

No, actually in the episode where Spock got the flying fried egg stuck to his back and ended up temporarily blind because Bones used that really bright light to kill the thing, Spock said those exact words after analyzing one of them with his tricorder.

Besides, in the song "Star Trekkin'" by The Firm, you hear Spock's voice saying "It's life Jim, but not as we know it, not as we know it, not as we know it, it's life Jim, but not as we know it, not as we know it, Captain."

Reality TV (0)

sunderland56 (621843) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012091)

Imagine the horror movies you can make now, when your television screen can literally come alive....

Re:Reality TV (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012102)

Yeah ... like in Videodrome. Come to think of it: what is a plasma display but a big collection of plasma balls? If we could induce them to spontaneously replicate we could make big screen TVs really cheap.

You knew it was coming... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7012092)

I, for one, welcome our new plasma masters.

Richard Simmons (-1, Offtopic)

Jack Comics (631233) | more than 10 years ago | (#7012114)

Aha! This explains Richard Simmons. I knew he shouldn't be catagorized as "human." Life-alike would work though.

a anwser the Q. why I only have one sock ? (0, Offtopic)

JOW (165099) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012145)

That might explain why I only find one sock I always suspected some plasma DNA Thing,

Mathematician's rule of the thumb: (5, Funny)

Krapangor (533950) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012153)

if it's published in a journal with a title containing the word "chaos" then it's rubbish propability p is increased by
min(1-p,exp(1/(1-p))).

Some people even throw an integration over the spelling errors in the publication into this formula. (Seiberg's famous bad spelling trace integral.)

Seed the Earth and Give Back the Life You Leech (1)

tgraupmann (679996) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012156)

If these wisps form at high temperatures and can sustain themselves at high temperatures, what would happen if these beings were inserted into a volcano upon creation? Would Earth's core become a breeding ground and become a living ocean? Would Hell become a positive place?

My Polymer is Alive! (3, Insightful)

Salis (52373) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012161)

It's viscous, it's a psuedoliquid! It can migrate down gravitational potentials! It can replicate itself by splitting (and even ostracize OTHER forms of polymers who try to get in between)! It vibrates, oh it vibrates! It absorbs water, it's drinking, it's drinking!

MY GOD, IT'S ALIVE! ...
(Yes, this is a joke)

Physics itself produces some amazing phenomenom. While it might be cutesy that some plasma is splitting and vibrating synchronously (everything vibrates, sigh. Lasers vibrate synchronously), it is not 'Alive'.

someone please tell me... (1)

acidrain69 (632468) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012166)

what the difference between replicate and duplicate is?

Re:someone please tell me... (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012277)

Replicate implies that process is being performed by the object doing the replication.

Re:someone please tell me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#7012295)

I think it a process vs. product situation. Like to replicate a duplicate would be the act of creating a copy.

Proving that life can originate off terra (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#7012201)

Certainly creates a dynamic environment/behaviour where organic molecules can try trillions of possibilities.

If a successful demo is ever achieved, I would be convinced that sol isn't the only place to say "where do we eat".

They're called plasmoids (1)

rotoplooker (709300) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012206)

These bubbles are called plasmoids and they were discovered long ago (see google - type plasmoids).

I'm gonna get crap for this, but... (1)

Nuclear Elephant (700938) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012214)

I find it amusing how quick people are to dismiss any possibility of a creator (e.g. God) but will believe in a theory that could only be illustrated by a group of individuals acting as "the creator" by purposely and intelligently orchestrating life. Even if the scientists involved could create a 100% "life" form using plasma, the fact that it was done with human intelligence and by procedure automatically discredits their findings which are ultimately suggesting life was based on life from chaos and randomness.

Spider Robinson == J. H. (Particular) Christ! (2, Informative)

Dr. Smeegee (41653) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012246)

Spider Robinson posited this kind of life in Telempath [baen.com], a way-neato "vengence is stupid" story filled with the usual Robinson themes: Brotherly love, Tolerance and Good Weed.

Old news... (1)

Samosmatiker (199857) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012292)

Stanislaw Lem wrote a very good piece fiction about a scientist discovering a form of live in plasma about 15 years ago. I can't remember the title, but that should be no problem: just read the first Lem story you can get, these are seriously good stuff.

This would explain a lot. (0, Troll)

jd (1658) | more than 9 years ago | (#7012312)

Think about it. Members of Congress are all full of (extremely) hot air. What if, in truth, these are merely humanoid shells around plasma lifeforms bent on taking over the world?
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