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More on E-textiles: Electronic Smart Fabric

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the surge-protector-underwear dept.

Technology 150

Little Hamster writes "The IEEE spectrum has an article on e-textile, where conductive fibers woven into fabric using standard textile techniques carry power to sensors, actuators and microcontrollers embedded in the cloth. The result is snowmobilers jacket that can detect crashes and txt an SMS message for help, carpet that can detect motion, or a T-shirt that shows videos. Oh, and the smart fabric is washable too."

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mod (-1, Offtopic)

gantrep (627089) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117472)

parent up

Re:mod (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117698)


Dear Slashdot-community,

I am tired of my windows-friends always bragging about how many girls they get with their pretty XP-desktop and great games and about they always get all their holes exploited.

So I just wanted to know:
- how can I find a girl if I use Linux?
- how can I make my Linux desktop so that it doesn't suck?
- will anyone ever exploit my holes?

Thank you,

Your friend

Fagomir Diroll

TOO EASY. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117473)

I'll let you have it.

Re:TOO EASY. (1)

gentoo_moo (679483) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117693)

All I can think of is Towley from Southpark yelling "Don't forget to bring a towel!" while he smokes out.

Re:TOO EASY. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117756)

Now, my dear friend gentoo_moo, how does your asshole feel after spending the night with your faggot-compagnions Mikey, Timothy and Robby?

Hope you did not catch anything.

So, I just wanted to ask you something regarding your post:
how does it feel to post some bullshit quote from a stupid TV-show for hardcore pedophiles in the expectation to get modded funny, but failing really bad to do so?

Have a nice day; give your butt some rest tonight.

Re:TOO EASY. (1)

gentoo_moo (679483) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117810)

Im so hurt and ashamed. I only wish you had moderator status so you could have expressed how you really feel about my comments. ;)

Re:TOO EASY. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117869)

idiot.

It's a start (5, Interesting)

(54)T-Dub (642521) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117477)

This is the kind of thing we need for Invisiblity Cloaks [wired.com] , chameleon camouflage [wired.com] and Invisible Cars [mi6.co.uk] . Of course we still need a revolution in computing to handle the optic information but it's a start.

Re:It's a start (2, Interesting)

dustmote (572761) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117575)

I just want a t-shirt that changes picture every so often. Maybe one that I can set for "work mode", so it plays mostly subdued patterns that are suitable for work, and "casual mode", which has whatever t-shirt templates I have downloaded into it from iShirt, or the equivalent. (99 cents a pattern, although I hope some of you will still get seven of them, I know us geeks' reputation for BO already)

Re:It's a start (1)

tuba_dude (584287) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118042)

that's a pretty cool idea. With enough processing power and an embedded microphone, you could probably build or download visualizations and have your shirt do trippy stuff in reaction to the sound around you.

Why the obsession with Invisibility? (1)

roxy-skya (555923) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117868)

Other than military use, why is there such an obsession here with being Invisible?

Is it really necessary to accomplish what you're attempting? Besides wouldn't it be dangerous if other's couldn't see you and potentially put you in harm's way? Who would be at fault then, and how would the legal system handle those battles?

How about using this technology to better society and do something practical, rather than the immature comments about porn and sex, usually found within every Slashdot article.

Come on guys, you're smart...do something with this that is important to society.

Duh... (1)

Theaetetus (590071) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117959)

Invisible clothes for women... Sheesh.

How about using this technology to better society and do something practical, rather than the immature comments about porn and sex, usually found within every Slashdot article.

Ooops. ;)

-T

Re:Why the obsession with Invisibility? (1)

(54)T-Dub (642521) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118315)

immature comments about porn and sex
Funny, I didn't see anything in my post about sex or porn. As to the relevance of my post, I'm a technophile, this is a technology site .... come to think of it you are right it was completely out of line. I should listen to what pretensios pricks, with their panties in a knot from riding on their high horses, say more often.

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117478)

i fail it CSLib style.

networking in halls kills lab cslib.

deal.

Then a Boewulf cluster would be... (-1, Offtopic)

DrFlex (711207) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117479)


AN ORGY!

Re:Then a Boewulf cluster would be... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117700)

a Beowulf clusterfuck?

Re:Then a Boewulf cluster would be... (0)

DrFlex (711207) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117997)

Whatever turns you on my friend.

Let's see here... (2, Funny)

Ikn (712788) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117495)

/me glances over today's headlines So, what we can look forward to seeing are t-shirts that can answer homework questions. Rock on!

Re:Let's see here... (1)

Ikn (712788) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117799)

I swear, it was funnier before I posted it. In Soviet Russia, pants display you! Alright, I'm done.

Re:Let's see here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117836)

Go home.

Oh great... (4, Funny)

djhankb (254226) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117508)

What happens when my shirt or pants lock up?

Re:Oh great... (5, Funny)

Nykon (304003) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117536)

Im more concerned about when someone hacks my underwear.

Re:Oh great... (1)

Strange Ranger (454494) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117745)


Wow, talk about a dirty hack.

At least your underwear would finally log some down time.

;]

Re:Oh great... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117846)

Dude, are you like 13 or something? Did you know you have a misspelling on your website? No one is going to benifit from your mad skilz.

"Nykon Systems: Making Linux a little less scary since 2001" my ass.

how long... (2, Funny)

Schwartzboy (653985) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117646)

Before we see the Blue Shorts of Death? Will we have to drop our pants to "reboot"?

I can see a lot of potential here if the technology gets far enough...instead of a wrist-mounted little GPS device that shows "you are here" info, you might have the length of an entire shirt-sleeve for a display. Maybe Big Brother can implement some sort of forced personal information display so that wi-fi sensors in the shirt respond to remote commands issued by police to display your name, address, etc. across the front or back of your shirt. Heck, they could just forget that and track you using the homing signal in your cyber-undies.
And, of course, the obvious: the day somebody ports an emulator or three to ThreadIX, the Clothing Operating System of the Future, "pocket pool" will take on a whole new meaning.

Re:how long... (4, Funny)

the_pooh_experience (596177) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117912)

..instead of a wrist-mounted little GPS device that shows "you are here" ...
I can tape a piece of paper to my wrist that has "you are here" written on it, and it will always be right! That paper doesn't even have to be e-textile-based.

Re:how long... (1)

Brahmastra (685988) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117992)

Can't be any worse than brown shorts of death

Re:Oh great... (1)

sharkey (16670) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117802)

Bend over so someone can reBOOT you.

Re:Oh great... (1)

Zildy (32593) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118457)

Someone may have penetrated a hole in your clothing, accessing critical components. We recommend that you sew on a patch.

Dammit honey (2, Funny)

Soporific (595477) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117509)

I told you not to bleach my monitor, it causes all the colors to wash out!

~S

Not good... (-1, Flamebait)

MoeMoe (659154) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117513)

And how long do you think it will take to bring 2nd generation RFID tags into place after this?

Well...? (1)

mschoolbus (627182) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117521)

What video inputs can I get on my T-shirt?

slashdotted (posted AC to avoid kwhore) (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117529)

2 seconds after posting and it's already loading slowly...gotta love /. :)

The AC

Ready To Ware

Electronics and fabrics woven together will make smart dressers of firefighters, football players, and fashionistas alike

By Diana Marculescu, Radu Marculescu, Sungmee Park & Sundaresan Jayaraman

With cellphones hanging off shoulder bag straps, pagers hooked to our belts, digital cameras dangling from our necks, PDAs bulging in our pockets, and MP3 players clipped to our shirts, we're all beginning to look like electrogadget pack mules.

Like a pack of ravid gorillas with ants stuck up their anuses, the editors of slashdot behave in a quite odd manner when it comes to censorship and poor journalism. Readers should rise up in sacred jihad against these practices; the moment draws near.

We have a more versatile and, we dare say, elegant alternative: e-textiles. Your shirt, coat, or sweater, even your carpeting or wallpaper, is the device. Conductive fibers woven into the fabric using standard textile techniques carry power to sensors, actuators, and microcontrollers embedded in the cloth. Software controls the communications inside the on-fabric network and can send radio signals using Bluetooth or any flavor of the IEEE 802.11 wireless standard to PCs and PDAs, and over the Internet.

Applications are astoundingly diverse. An Army commander, for example, could monitor a platoon of soldiers clad in SmartShirt gear developed by two of us (Jayaraman and Park) at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. The shirt communicates vital signs in real-time, and when all hell breaks loose on the battlefield, the commander sees at a glance who's been hit and who hasn't--and who is gravely injured and in need of immediate attention.

Closer to home, a fire chief could keep tabs on a unit as it enters a burning building. He could order his team out when the sensors they're wearing transmit data back to his command center telling him that the firefighters are inhaling hazardous fumes or too much smoke or that the fire is too hot to handle.

Imagine the boon to athletes. A swimmer stroking through the water, vital signs monitored by electrodes attached to wires hanging off her body like the tentacles of a jellyfish, would welcome a sleek, instrumented training suit. And five-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, who lost an estimated 6.5 kg during the first individual time trial of this year's Tour, could have used a racing suit dotted with moisture, temperature, and pulse sensors. Such attire could have warned the U.S. Postal Service team manager that Armstrong was becoming dehydrated as he was warming up. In turn, the manager could have ordered Lance to drink replacement fluids before he launched from the starting line on his way to a rare time-trial defeat.

Similar performance- and safety-enhancing garb has already been prototyped by Finnish researchers at Tampere University of Technology and the University of Lapland, and at outerwear maker Reima Oy in Kankaanpaa, Finland. They developed a machine-washable jacket, vest, trousers, and two-piece underwear set for snowmobilers. The jacket is embedded with a GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) chip; sensors monitoring position, motion, and temperature; an electric conductivity sensor; and two accelerometers to sense impact. If a crash occurs, the jacket automatically detects it and sends a distress message to emergency medical officials via Short Message Service. The message conveys the rider's coordinates, local environmental conditions, and data taken from a heart monitor embedded in the undershirt.

O.K., you don't plan to join the Army, rush into a towering inferno, or compete in the Tour de France. You have no interest whatsoever in swimming and snowmobiling. Nevertheless, e-textiles are soon going to add functionality, fun, and style to whatever it is that you do like to do.

Just last May, German chipmaker Infineon Technologies AG, in Munich, and its partner, Vorwerk & Co. Teppichwerke GmbH & Co., in Hameln, unveiled a carpet that can detect motion--of unwanted intruders, for example--and also light the way to exits in the event of a fire. The carpet is woven with conductive fibers and studded with pressure, temperature, or vibration sensor chips, microcontrollers, and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) [see illustration].

Last year France Telecom showed off a display made of woven optical fibers that can be worked in with standard textiles. A T-shirt or backpack could display text and images, including video and advertising logos, and could be adapted for color-changing scarves and furnishings.

And for those of us who can't stand looking at the same decor day in and day out, International Fashion Machines, cofounded by Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumna Maggie Orth, is commercializing Electric Plaid wallpaper. And when she says electric, she means electric: a swatch now on display at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum's National Design Triennial in New York City slowly changes colors and patterns as conductive fibers heat and then cool threads coated in thermally sensitive inks.

These prototypes are a small sample of the vast variety of fibers and fabrics that can be woven into clothing, carpets, upholstery, and wallcoverings. Coupled with fault-tolerant computing and network architectures, such e-textiles can constitute a platform for health monitoring, communications, multimedia devices, and changing decors.

Mother of all wearable motherboards
Some of these garments will be on the rack or on your local firefighter in the next five years. Infineon's carpet and International Fashion Machines' wallpaper should hit stores within the next couple of years, and perhaps a SmartShirt for infants will, too.

Sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, extinguishes the lives of thousands of sleeping infants every year. An e-textile shirt from New York City-based Sensatex Inc. promises to put an end to SIDS by alerting parents the moment a baby stops breathing [see photo]. With sensors that monitor heart and respiration rates and body temperature, the shirt will communicate wirelessly with a parent's PDA, watch, or PC.

The SmartShirt is the generic name journalists came up with in the late 1990s to describe the Wearable Motherboard, which Georgia Tech licensed to Sensatex [see photo]. In the computer world, motherboards are circuit boards that let you easily plug in chips and processors for specific applications, like graphics or wireless communications.

Similarly, the Wearable Motherboard provides that kind of versatility for clothes. Manufacturers can mix and match sensors, processors, and communications devices that plug into knitted or woven garments made from cotton, polyester, or blends. The garments are threaded with conductive polymer and metallic fibers that serve as data buses and power lines. These devices have the look and feel of typical garments and, after the attachments are unplugged, can be tossed into the washing machine.

The Wearable Motherboard was funded initially by the U.S. Navy in 1996 as a garment to detect bullet wounds in combat. It is woven from a cotton and polyester blend as well as optical fibers that when severed will indicate exactly where a bullet has passed through. It also monitors the condition of the wearer with sensors to measure vital signs. In practice, the user will position the dime-sized sensors on his body and plug the leads into tiny connectors, which measure
5 mm in diameter and look like snaps on blouses. Called T-Connectors, the sensors are placed in the appropriate spots--over the heart or diaphragm, say. Depending on the application, the garment could have dozens or hundreds of connectors.

A flexible data bus integrated into the fabric routes data from the sensors to the SmartShirt controller, which uses a proprietary chip set, in a plastic package the size of a pager. Powered by a watch battery, the controller presses onto the fabric like a fastener to contact the conductive fibers. It processes the signals from the sensors to compute vital signs such as heart rate and wirelessly transmits the data directly to a PDA or PC using Bluetooth or IEEE 802.11b. Or the vital signs data pops up on a display in the parents' bedroom, in the case of the SIDS shirt. But for other applications, the monitor might very well be at the doctor's office, in a hospital, or on the sidelines of a football field.

Reliability through redundancy
Weaving together a complex e-textile system challenges clothing designers and systems mavens alike. How should the sensors, processors, and controller fit together? What kind of software can we write to ensure fault tolerance and quality of service both within the garment and with external devices? Can we come up with a hierarchical design process akin to those used in the IC industry?

Depending on the application and the physical area it covers, an electronic textile relies on dozens to hundreds of sensors and processing elements, each with limited processing, storage, and power consumption: up to 100-MHz processing speed, 64 KB or less of local memory, consuming up to a few tens of milliwatts. Clearly, these devices are not "desktops on a fabric"; nor are they cellphones, PDAs, or set-top boxes, in the sense that e-textiles must have low manufacturing costs. As a result, the devices will inevitably have more processors and interconnects that don't work than do other embedded systems.

And unlike, say, a set-top box, clothes get worn, washed, and torn. Carpets get vacuumed, shampooed, and trod upon. That means e-textiles must be designed based on a fault-tolerant system that can cope with wear and tear. Thanks to Moore's Law, chips are cheap and will get cheaper, which makes redundancy the cost-effective key to reliability. Networking hundreds of processors, sensors, and controllers lets the garment automatically redistribute the workload around failed processors or improve the quality of service if it drops below a certain threshold. For example, many applications tolerate gracefully degrading quality when some percentage of the sensors or processing nodes fail.

Take the swath of acoustic beam-forming fabric developed by researchers at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, in Blacksburg, where an array of microphones woven into the material monitors the environment for audio signals that indicate the position of a tank. When the fabric's power supply runs down, techniques developed by Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU's) Coatnet research group (Marculescu and Marculescu) may come to the rescue.

In the Pittsburgh-based Carnegie Mellon system, when one node starts to fail because of local battery depletion, a redundant node and accompanying battery take over computation and complete the task. The handoff happens transparently to the overall operation, staged carefully to avoid collisions on the communications bus when too many nodes rush to ship their computation to spares. With half the nodes redundant, the lifetime of the system can be extended by 80 percent, with no decrease in overall system quality.

In the last few months, the Coatnet group has developed several prototypes targeted at safety and security applications. One prototype fabric uses processing nodes and embedded temperature sensors interconnected in an array to monitor, for example, the internal and external temperature of firefighters' suits. In the current prototype, one master node for data collection and eight additional slave nodes for sensing are interconnected in a grid to measure temperature over an area.

All nodes run on simple Texas Instruments MSP430 microcontrollers, each running at up to 8 MHz, with a mere 64 KB of local memory and only
1 mW of power consumption. Eight additional nodes can be used as spares for the sensors to prolong application lifetime. The initial wearable version of the prototype works just as well for wallpaper that in the case of a fire "knows" which locations are too hot for firefighters to enter.

Eventually, buildings could also be augmented with camera arrays inconspicuously embedded into wallpaper fabric to scan for intruders. In CMU's prototype, every sensing node uses small cameras and Atmel 8051 processors, running at 70 MHz and consuming up to 500 mW each, to analyze images for possible security breaches and then stream the video to a central display. Redundant devices keep the system running in case of local battery depletion or other types of failures.

But while various projects have proved the feasibility of individual designs, none points to an overall methodology for the evaluation and validation of e-textile systems, something we need if a real industry is to grow around the technology. Today, when an engineer designs an ordinary IC, he maps the application onto a given platform architecture, under specified constraints--performance, area, and power consumption. Constraints met, testers put the prototype through its paces. Only after the device passes muster does full-scale manufacturing begin.

But such a design methodology won't work with wide-area textile networks like those in carpeting. With e-textiles, partitioning the fabric holds the key to reliability and repeatability--in other words, manufacturability. By partitioning the application into small chunks computed locally, we can minimize communications among processing nodes. In doing that, we can decrease the possibility of congesting connecting links or losing data packets among communicating nodes or sensors.

Designed properly, preprogrammed processing nodes can be reprogrammed when operating conditions change. For example, such a truly smart fabric could route data packets or control signals around a hole in a wounded soldier's uniform or a wet area of a baby's outfit.

Will the fashionistas bite?
In the beginning, there won't be a single killer application to make this market flourish. Rather, niche applications like SIDS monitoring, military uses, or athletic training will get the ball rolling. Going from there to a wider consumer market will take more than a few teenagers' wanting to play MP3 tunes straight from their jackets. Perhaps multifunctional suits that would not only count calories but also change color could spawn a larger market, or garments that authenticate you automatically and let you move easily from one secure environment to another.

In some cases, privacy as well as safety issues will play a crucial role in swaying consumers' decisions. While these concerns apply to other consumer electronics, too, that hasn't stopped cellphones and PDAs from becoming the must-haves of modern life. And the convenience factor could well tip the scales in favor of a ready-to-ware revolution. After all, only in weird dreams do we leave home naked, but fully conscious we often step out sans cellphone.

Parent is Article Pasting Troll (3, Informative)

H0NGK0NGPH00EY (210370) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117656)

Come on moderators, can't you even read two paragraphs into a comment?
Like a pack of ravid gorillas with ants stuck up their anuses, the editors of slashdot behave in a quite odd manner when it comes to censorship and poor journalism. Readers should rise up in sacred jihad against these practices; the moment draws near.
Besides, the site isn't even remotely slow. Sheesh.

Re:slashdotted (posted AC to avoid kwhore) (0)

Qwell (684661) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117666)

"Like a pack of ravid gorillas with ants stuck up their anuses, the editors of slashdot behave in a quite odd manner when it comes to censorship and poor journalism. Readers should rise up in sacred jihad against these practices; the moment draws near."

Jesus christ mods, read the post before you mod it informative.

Re:slashdotted (posted AC to avoid kwhore) (1)

WTFRUDOINBiotch (538107) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117778)

Like a pack of ravid gorillas with ants stuck up their anuses, the editors of slashdot behave in a quite odd manner when it comes to censorship and poor journalism. Readers should rise up in sacred jihad against these practices; the moment draws near.

Ravid gorillas?

You should check your grammar when discussing the manners of editors. :-)

Hmm... (2, Funny)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117530)

I can't wait until the first time someone says, "Hey, you have a loose thread", yanks it, and gets a voltage shock.

Hmm...come to think of it, that'd be a worthwhile application...I'd buy one. :)

no cheating (5, Funny)

Brahmastra (685988) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117534)

Clothes that report whenever they are being removed to the spouse.

Re:no cheating (2, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117612)

And carpeting that lets her know when you try to sneak back in at 4 A.M.

Yeah, that's gonna be a big seller.

KFG

Great... (0, Flamebait)

LegendOfLink (574790) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117543)

Now we're only a step away from having Spammers make our e-clothing so congested with crap that it won't be of any use.

Even worse, what would happen once Spammers figure out how to broadcast video through the e-clothes, would we have people all over the place with Penis Enlargement ads on their new Old Navy cargo pants?

It's worse than that: (0, Flamebait)

Atario (673917) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117614)

carry power to sensors, actuators and microcontrollers


Actuators. The spammers could program your clothes to walk you to their offices...forcibly.

Oh, and Ashcroft wants regular updates on this technology.

"I am a consumer whore" (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117544)

That's what I want animated on my T-shirt.

Re:"I am a consumer whore" (1)

murphyslawyer (534449) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117653)

And how! [bitterfilms.com]

just what I need... (0, Troll)

griffjon (14945) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117555)

pr0n spam to scroll down my jacket during an interview.

Better, 'targeted' ads -- penis enlargement posts on boxers (hm, or panties? who's /really/ the target market?)

This'll be fun. No, really. It'll bring the BSOD to the level of a fashion statement!

Re:just what I need... (1)

Moth7 (699815) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117602)

Or even better, the clothing could actually check whether or not such advertising was necessary ;-)

You could also make .... (5, Funny)

pavon (30274) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117559)

a high tech chastity belt!

Wondering what that guy is doing with your daughter? This sensors on her clothes will monitor everything from body temperature, to heart rate, to surface contact! Using this you can determine if articles have been removed and remotely activate an electric shock - or using the builting GPS, track down the guy and beat him to a pulp the old fasion way!

Furthermore, the dancing images of Hello Kitty displayed on the clothing will ensure that any girl will be dying to have them! Yours for only $199.99!

Hmmm... (1)

Moth7 (699815) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117571)

So if I want to clean these fabrics am I able to just reset the screen memory? o.0

Re:Hmmm... (1)

Telepathetic Man (237975) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117941)

or maybe hit the degauss button...

mmm... demagnetizing *slobber

Landwarrior (4, Interesting)

BWJones (18351) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117572)

The Army has also been a big backer of this sort of technology for their Land Warrior [fas.org] program. They want the ability to dynamically update their cammo for a variety of conditions from light to dark, from desert to urban to forest.

Re:Landwarrior (1)

sl0ppy (454532) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117617)

yes, but what if it crashes? does the whole outfit suddenly turn blue, making the wearer stick out like a sore thumb?

plain ole cammo for me, thanks!

Re:Landwarrior (1)

BWJones (18351) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117867)

yes, but what if it crashes? does the whole outfit suddenly turn blue, making the wearer stick out like a sore thumb?

Gives new meaning to "Blue screen of death" does it not? :-)

No Sweet-thing (4, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117577)

I was staring at your video, honest.

Great, just what the world needs, a Tommy Hilfiger jacket that can implement the [marquee] tag.

KFG

What's KFG anyway? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117734)

Kentucky Fried Gorilla?

Kentucky Fried Gonads. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117809)

Finger lickin' good.

Re:What's KFG anyway? (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117890)

Initials. Duh.

KFG

a likely scenario (3, Interesting)

sl0ppy (454532) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117582)

someone walking down the hall, passes someone with a small handheld computer.

the handheld computer quickly negotiates with the clothes on the walker's back, when bingo! the break in happens.

from that point on, the subject walks around with Kick Me! labelled on their back.

another victim, and a smile breaks out on the person holding the handheld computer.

Re:a likely scenario (2, Funny)

pavon (30274) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117862)

The best part of this is that the jocks would never be able to hack the nerds clothes, but nerds could hack their letterman jackets all day long and they would never know who was doing it! Oh, sweet revenge :)

Until they decide to just pulverise the first nerd they see :(

E-by-gum-textiles.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117586)

Theres trouble t'mill!

Oh Dear, what sort of trouble?

I dont know I was just told to come in here and say "Trouble t'mill". I didnt expect the spanish inquisition..

(Woosh) Noboby expects the Spanish Inquisition!! Our chief weapon is suprise. Suprise and fear. Two Weapons..

etc - ok thats from memory.. I feel better now.

Yes, but can it... (2, Funny)

Esion Modnar (632431) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117607)

detect when you've run out of TP in a public toilet and send txt for help?

Re:Yes, but can it... (1)

Anomander (672837) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117804)

Wonder why I couldn't understand why you would want twisted pair in a public toilet...

Re:Yes, but can it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7118214)

plain sms is outdated, this new tech would send MMS messages with evidence photo!

I would sure hate.... (0)

eclectro (227083) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117609)


for the underwear to short out.

How well will "e-textile" hold up to moisture??

Re:I would sure hate.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117674)

Yeah, I can see it now...

Someone hot walks into room, a short time later, everyone is writhing in pain on the floor.

How about... (1)

JudgeDredd (561957) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117611)

How about a T-shirt that shows a video of the snowmobile crash?

Otherwise your friends won't believe you when you say how big that cliff was

Obvious joke... (3, Funny)

show me (696663) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117619)

Now that's what I call multi-threaded computing!

Mod him up.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117801)

Well I almost laughed..

Hmm. (1)

Xenothaulus (587382) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117633)

Let's hope Microsoft doesn't get involved with this. All our clothes will be blue...

Or better yet... (2, Funny)

El (94934) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117637)

how 'bout shoes that can detect someone is trying to light a fuse stuck into them?

Great (1)

netfool (623800) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117639)

How long until your house gives you a call at work to tell you it's burning down?

Re:Great (1)

d3faultus3r (668799) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117813)

Hi, it's the house. just wanted to tell you I'm burning down. Could you call the fire department or something?

Darling.. (1)

adeyadey (678765) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117642)

Why have you remolded your e-jacket into the shape of Darth Vaders Helmet?

Its ok, I've modded it..

Rolandas Paksas is President of Lithuania (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117644)

...does that jerk Howard Dean know that?

OMG! (4, Funny)

Strange Ranger (454494) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117689)


So now when I get my coffee from that darling teeny-bopper downstairs I'll be forced to see Brittany Spears and Justin Timberlake VIDEOS on her shirts. Oh the pain.

Well, at least that gives me an excuse to stare.
"I was just entranced by your... video, HONEST!"

Interesting... (1)

SirChris (676927) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117690)

So now when I stare at a girl's butt, I can say "No, no. I was just watching TV." Maybe criminals can walk around in jumpsuits that constantly replay their crime on it. So anyone who sees them can see exactly what horrific act they have done. Instead of pinning a note to my kid's shirt before they leave for home, now the teacher can just download a little movie clip of exactly what they did do. "No I wasn't grabbing your ass, I was adjusting the reception." The ideas are just endless.

That's all well and good, but... (1)

Decaffeinated Jedi (648571) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117702)

I'm still waiting on my spiffy new polo shirt made from unstable molecules, Mr. Fantastic. </comicgeek>

Not like RFIDs or anything (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117703)

Put a uniquie indentifier in your razor and everyone is pissed put an ENTIRE F***ing COMPUTER in your shirt and noone thinks that might be a little open to abuse?

Um. (2, Funny)

toothfish (596936) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117708)

A flexible data bus in Sensatex's SmartShirt prototype carries signals from various sensors plugged into connectors in the shirt to a controller at the waist. An optical fiber woven through the shirt can detect penetration by a bullet.

I'm not sure I'd need sensors on my shirt to be able to tell if it had been penetrated by a bullet-- unless I was far enough away from my shirt, and then I'd wonder why it was getting shot at.

Re:Um. (1)

Theaetetus (590071) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118013)

unless I was far enough away from my shirt, and then I'd wonder why it was getting shot at.

You mean, if you're in the shirt, you know why it's being shot at? What did you do?! ;)

-T

Burton Amp Jacket (1)

MadHakish (675408) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117709)

I'm suprised there's no mention of the Burton Amp Jacket with sleeve based controls for your iPod. [mobilemag.com] mmm.. me like.. They only mention this [ieee.org] goofy looking jacket. Looks like he's got a PCB up his sleeve by the outline of the control surface surrounding the buttons. Burton/Apple did a better job IMHO.

Old news. (1)

Quixo-tastic (663394) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117718)

Clothes have been smarter than many of the people who wear them for years.

I can't wait... (0)

Stingr (701739) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117728)

to hack someone's pants and make them fall down.

What about... (5, Funny)

HungWeiLo (250320) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117732)

snowmobilers jacket that can detect crashes and txt an SMS message for help, carpet that can detect motion, or a T-shirt that shows videos

What about some moral fiber that can detect corrupt CEO's?

(rimshot)

I Can See It Now... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117765)

This would make "Being Goatse'ed" all that much more hillarous!

Impractical (4, Interesting)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117812)

The biggest problem with ideas like this is that they sound so great in theory and work so poorly in reality. The CyberJack fans (Neuromancer (sp?), Tek War, etc.) would have you believe that in the future everyone will want technology integrated into their bodies. Yet look at the most popular Sci-Fi such as Star Wars and Star Trek. Note the general lack of bodily implants and the revulsion such ideas produce. Sure, use the technology to make a blind man see or change one's appearance for spy work, but as a standard procedure? Nobody wants it! They simply want their technology like a protective cocoon. The very idea of mutilating one's self in the name of "progress" is seen as evil. (Case and point: The Borg)

Electronic wearables are an exciting field with tremendous possibilities (such as clothing that stays a constant temperature) but don't expect people to be too excited about anything more than passive systems.

Look at transmetropolitan for the alternate view. (3, Interesting)

Unknown Poltroon (31628) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117994)

THe same people who are getting multiple piercings and tatoos with green hair and punk clotes today are the same ones who in 100 years will have the video screens built into their chests and the headlines playing across their forehead. Everyone else will just have animplanted hone and nanotech medical devices. Exelent comic series BTW

Re:Impractical (2, Funny)

switcha (551514) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118215)

The biggest problem with ideas like this is that they sound so great in theory and work so poorly in reality.

... CyberJack ... Star Wars ... Star Trek ...

Only on /. would you see a statement like the first, backed up by citing examples from Science Fiction. ;)

Re:Impractical (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118330)

Science Fiction is useful in this case for pointing out what people actually want the future to be like. The questionable science doesn't always make it practical, but that doesn't stop people from trying to make it a reality. Or are you arguing that Star Trek was popular because people don't want the future to be like it? ;-)

They watched Back to the Future II (2, Funny)

robogun (466062) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117831)

"Drying mode on...
"Your jacket is now dry."

Re:They watched Back to the Future II (1)

JediTrainer (314273) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117945)

Heh. I couldn't help but notice in the movie that his hair ended up being dry after that too.

How long until I can get me one of those jackets? 2015 is only 12 years away, folks!....

Great... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7117859)

now another thing to plug in every night... come on... let's perfect the solar cell first, huh?

Political lie detector ties? (1)

wardk (3037) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117876)

This could be applied by a frustrated, untrusting citizenry.

we could force all elected and appointed government officials to wear "lie detectorware". the fabric turns beet red whenever they spout bullshit.

I was alarmed, at first... (1)

cavemanf16 (303184) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117878)

...when I read this part:

Eventually, buildings could also be augmented with camera arrays inconspicuously embedded into wallpaper fabric to scan for intruders. In CMU's prototype, every sensing node uses small cameras and Atmel 8051 processors, running at 70 MHz and consuming up to 500 mW each, to analyze images for possible security breaches and then stream the video to a central display. Redundant devices keep the system running in case of local battery depletion or other types of failures.

But then quickly a quote from everyone's favorite movie sprung to mind:

"There's way too much information to decode the Matrix. All I see anymore is blonde... brunette... redhead. ... I'll give ya a little piece of advice: If you see an agent, you do what we do. Run."

And once again I realized that no matter how bad it gets, ultimately it's all the same as before, and no one can actually control or design any kind of dystopian future as described in the book 1984. All ya gotta do is reconcile whether you want to embrace the new technologies and make the best of what we've got, or if you want to relegate yourself to living "the old way" like an Amish person.

Re:I was alarmed, at first... (1)

mcglothi (218370) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118367)

Major corporate security systems today (for the most part) focus more on event based video rather than constant surveillance.

The thinking here is that if a security officer stares at a bank of monitors for an entire shift, day after day, and nothing is happening, it just becomes a blur. However, with event based video, the video pops up only when events (such as door forced open, or door held open) occur. Much more of an attention getter.

I would think the facilities folks would be more interested in this technology than the security groups, they could incorporate needed video coverage without having domes or cameras hanging from the ceiling.

No thanks (2, Funny)

ecantona (322912) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117926)

Software controls the communications inside the on-fabric network and can send radio signals using Bluetooth or any flavor of the IEEE 802.11 wireless standard to PCs and PDAs, and over the Internet.

I am sure someone can find a way to hack it and put malicious content on your t-shirt. Let say you are walking down the street and suddenly someone put some porn on your shirt, that can be very embarrassing .

like my raincoat (1)

ShaggyBOFH (694048) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117933)

Ya, but is it reversable?

----

stain matching (0)

foxhound01 (661872) | more than 10 years ago | (#7117947)

now you can wear a white shirt to eat spaghetti, and leave with a spaghetti sauce colored shirt...maybe italian food WILL have a second coming...

I will pay money (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118050)

to the first person who develops the hack to make a woman's clothes show me what's on the other side.

LK

I JUST LOGGED ONTO MY UNDERPANTS!! (1)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118088)


Now teenagers have a new fear when dating.... (0)

linkdead (695379) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118402)

Little Johnny might just find Suzie's daddy waiting shotgun in hand when he arrives home....electronic pants paged him...

Amish Strip Clubs!!! (1)

4/3PI*R^3 (102276) | more than 10 years ago | (#7118455)

Now women can be fully dressed yet appear completely nude. As strippers dance each piece of clothing will slowly display the image of the persons body directly beneath it.
Not only that but magine the other possibilities:

furry bush for the first dance, landing strip for the second dance, slip & slide clean for the third dance, and back to furry bush for the fourth dance.

If the guy requesting a lap dance likes big round nipples, no problem. When the next guy wants small nipples, he's happy too.

Excuse me as I go to the ATM!!!!!

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