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Notes From The SCO Roadshow's First Stop

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the whistlestop dept.

Caldera 382

compactable writes "Just got back from the first half of the SCO roadshow's first stop in Toronto. No unfurling of IP, no NDA, however an interesting view of what's running this litigious blip of a corporation. Full details at my weenie write-up (feel free to mirror the contents so that my ISP doesn't kill me)."

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382 comments

Who is SCO trying to kid? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158574)

Do they think we just can't see thru all there PR?

MIRROR (5, Informative)

xris (11996) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158577)

FM: First Mirror :-)

http://farcaster.net/sco.html [farcaster.net]

NOTE TO OTHERS (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158674)

There's no need to mirror this thing. It's one page of text.. There's no multi-meg images or videos. There's a reason it's still up for you to download and try to mirror: it doesn't need to be mirrored more than it has already!

I know it's going to be slashdotted (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158578)

Notes from the SCO Road show
I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.

And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it.

Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?).

Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons.

One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number.

The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print).

Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?).

What do I take away from this?

Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation.

Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up.

- Compactable

I *love* the SCO Roadshow on PBS (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158579)

It's great when they look at people's old operating systems and tell them how much they owe SCO.

"Well, this is running Linux kernel v2.0.3. You owe SCO $327. Please pay on your way out."

"This is nice, Linux 2.6 exerimental. You owe SCO a full $699, plux a future tax of 10%. Please pay on your way out."

MOD UP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158679)

MOD UP kekekekekekeke

hmm (-1, Troll)

sujan (464326) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158580)

looks like we need a separate section for SCO news.

Re:hmm (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158775)

The story section is called Caldera. There is no OTHER Caldera that we would be talking about. If you do not like it, go mess witih the clicky box in your user profile. kthxbye.

Text in case of /. ing (0, Redundant)

Malfourmed (633699) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158582)

Notes from the SCO Road show

I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.

And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it.

Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?).

Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons.

One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number.

The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print).

Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?).

What do I take away from this?

Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation.

Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up.

- Compactable

And in case your post gets slashdotted (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158600)

Notes from the SCO Road show

I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.

And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it.

Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?).

Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons.

One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number.

The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print).

Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?).

What do I take away from this?

Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation.

Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up.

Notes from the SCO Road show (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158583)

I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended. And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ... Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group). Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ... Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah. Interesting bits? Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however. Really interesting bits? The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it. Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?). Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons. One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number. The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print). Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?). What do I take away from this? Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation. Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up. - Compactable

I am glad (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158586)

I am happy small guys like SCO finally stand up and are able to defend their intellectual property from the likes of IBM. Public outrage aside, SCOsource is doing an important service to RedHat and alike. They are a good addition to the Proprietary Source community and Paid Software circles.

Re:I am glad (1)

Faluzeer (583626) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158821)

Hmmm poor attempt at trolling by you...

I have zero problem with people trying to defend their Intellectual Property Rights, however to do so they should actually *own* them first.

text (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158588)

Notes from the SCO Road show I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended. And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ... Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group). Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ... Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah. Interesting bits? Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however. Really interesting bits? The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it. Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?). Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons. One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number. The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print). Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?). What do I take away from this? Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation. Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up. - Compactable

The real question is (4, Funny)

coolmacdude (640605) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158591)

what is the draw for the average consumer?

I mean at least have a decent sideshow or something.
Like, Hilary Rosen juggling piggy banks of 12 year olds.
then again...

Visitors to Page (-1, Redundant)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158592)

Well, I was number 237 visitor to his page. Be interesting to see that number post-/.

Re:Visitors to Page (2, Funny)

pla (258480) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158646)

I made it to number "Could not write to counter file: /docs/cgi-bin/Counter/data/dcarpaneto.dat". Wow.

Looks like someone runs a counter that dislikes massively overlaped updates. ;-)

Re:Visitors to Page (1)

mOoZik (698544) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158687)

The counter has died now. It was getting about a hit a second. Impressive!

Where was everyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158595)

What? Only 20 people attened? What about the hordes of Linux users that were going to go and put the screws to those primitive screwheads?

Hopefully the next city will be more into it than this one. geez!

Re:Where was everyone? (1)

shane_rimmer (622400) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158723)

I know I'm responding to a troll, but I can only assume people didn't go because they really don't care. We love to rake SCO over the coals here on the old /., but does that zeal extend to real life?

What would I rather do than spend a couple of hours hearing what new and ludicrous stuff has floated from the bowels of SCO? Hmmm, play with my kids, have sex with my wife, go outside and enjoy the cooler weather, get that coding project done, or even get a root canal (umm, not all at one time).

Re:Where was everyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158770)

Right, split that up into to seperate events.

I'd code while having a root canal first, because from pain springs great art. And I could also use looking forward to the next event as motivation.

Then I'd have sex with the wife outdoors while we played with the kids. Famliy that plays together has kids that grow up to be pornstars.

Re:Where was everyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158745)

I'm in Toronto but I have a job.
Unfortunately it involves using SCO Openserver.
It really is backwards. It doesn't even have nethack.

Re:Where was everyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158747)

Couldn't get the day off from pizza hut.

If (when) it's slashdotted, here's the text... (-1, Redundant)

deadcasuals (74571) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158599)



Home :: Compactable Dave :: Notes from the SCO roadshow

Notes from the SCO Road show

I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" [sco.com] (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.


And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ...


Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker [sco.com]. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).



Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...


Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah.


Interesting bits?


Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.


Really interesting bits?


The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har [groklaw.com]). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing
that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it.



Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages [caldera.com], however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?).


Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons.


One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware.
330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number.


The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's [rfc-editor.org] called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A
crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to
point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource [opensource.org] software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour
printer (thanks to features in gimp-print).


Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not
mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be
interesting to anyone there?).


What do I take away from this?


Apart from copies Lone Tar [cactus.com] & BackupEDGE [microlite.com], not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix
in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation.


Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up.



- Compactable

Hell, just cuz everyone else seems to be doing it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158820)


I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.
And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it.

Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?).

Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons.

One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number.

The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print).

Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?).

What do I take away from this?

Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation.

Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up.

The best part... (3, Funny)

badasscat (563442) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158602)

The best part of this whole thing is watching this poor guy's site counter shoot up. Was at 131 when I got there - now at 584 two minutes later. I'm watching the Slashdot effect in action in front of my own eyes!

Re:The best part... (1)

XO (250276) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158643)

I got there with only 5 comments posted ,now there are about 30.. and his counter was dead as a doornail, files not available. lol

Re:The best part... (1)

0rbit4l (669001) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158702)

The best part of this whole thing is watching this poor guy's site counter shoot up.

That does sound fun. All I get is a measly:

Could not write to counter file: /docs/cgi-bin/Counter/data/dcarpeneto.dat

Not quite as thrilling as watching the numbers fly by...

Re:The best part... (5, Interesting)

compactable (714182) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158720)

Damn. I was interested in seeing the /. in real time... that's why I put a counter there ...

Um.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158780)

By watching, one could presume, it's with your eyes; as well, in front of them. You win the blue ribbon for being doubly superfluous.

Re:The best part... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158848)

3354 at 19:54 central time.

SCO roadshow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158604)

Found this old source code in the attic. Grandpa claims it's his source for visicalc which he claims he wrote in the 50's. What's it worth?

The full text (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158610)

Notes from the SCO Road show
I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g)
out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially
interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention
shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but
interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.

And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering
that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher
turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops
of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker.
He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder.
Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units
(no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that
is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts
seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens
(Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us
Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry
list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T
paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their
sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have
thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of
acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details
to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned.
The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable.
From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the
MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of
Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded
as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF
Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to
Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front
about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never
got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in
protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code
review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must
have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against
legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of
the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade
Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP
subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published
"top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article).
And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site
removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current
operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of
SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing
hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session.
During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in
the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely
a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are
profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One
raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's
stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not
bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation
will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the
times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it.

Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO
is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen
these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the
RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an
unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit -
anyone have a link to an archived copy?).

Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons.

One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment
by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware.
330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares.
How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory
will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit,
they didn't place a timeline on this number.

The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes
are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an
infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files
larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features
back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming
enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big'
feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old
486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use
the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state
of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd
member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are
you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than
to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay.
Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH,
Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of
building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his
amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that
they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer
(thanks to features in gimp-print).

Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service
(big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution"
(their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become
associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he
actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the
service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last
couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone
there?).

What do I take away from this?

Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have
stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM'
more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant
some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at
the people behind the corporation.

Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global
marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while
discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux
whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't
buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a
non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get
on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up.

- Compactable

Suspicious... (4, Funny)

RyanFenton (230700) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158612)

Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" ...And recently Linus Torvalds made #5 on the list of most influential people. Perhaps they are saying that because he became influencial by virtue of "Their Work", that they, by proxy, have the world's most influential executive?

Ryan Fenton

Re:Suspicious... (1)

Gzip Christ (683175) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158683)

Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" ...And recently Linus Torvalds made #5 on the list of most influential people. Perhaps they are saying that because he became influencial by virtue of "Their Work", that they, by proxy, have the world's most influential executive?
Hmmmm.... now that you mention it, I've never seen Linus and Darl in the same room at the same time. Have you? Could be it that Linus and Darl are secretly the same person?!


--------
The fake Gzip Christ isn't not user number ~0xA6CA7

Re:Suspicious... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158762)

Wow, that was funny. I'd love to learn to become so humorous. Can you tell me what humor college you attended? Because by God that was funny. Perhaps even funnier than your sig!

Hahahahahah (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158618)

Oh my god. This is all they have? hahahahahaha
All you long term sco investors better sell tomorrow are you can say by by to your $$$.

Hardened POS? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158619)

Mention was also made in the road map of ... SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine).

Since it is SCO, should we assume that POS stands for "Point of Sale"... ...or the other thing? :)

Re:Hardened POS? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158771)

Obviously:
Piece of Shit.

Re:Hardened POS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158846)

Well, duh.

DAMN!!!! (1)

Elpacoloco (69306) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158621)

Now I'm really mad that my brokerage account lacks the enourmous amounts of money to sell short. I'd make a killing on these small minded fools.

Re:DAMN!!!! (5, Informative)

cmowire (254489) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158749)

You generally haven't been able to short much of it because there are more people who want to short it than stocks in the brokerages. Most of the shares are owned by either the Canopy Group of a few other folks. The short interest is *insane* on that stock -- as in maybe 15% of the shares out on the open market and not covered by the Canopy Group and such have been short-sold.

For POS (1)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158626)

Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?).

You know, for Piece of Shit, I'll stick with my Win 98 box with my games. For Point of Sale, I like the IBM system we have. I think I'll keep it..don't tell SCO

Re:For POS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158735)

AHaHAHaHAHA WIN98 PiECe oF SHiT AHAHAHAHAHA MICRO$OFT IS eViL You ARe TeH FuNNaY WTF LoL !!!1!1!1!!! !!!

M$ == So FuNNaY CuZ THeY HaVE MoNeY

NeTSCaPe RooLZ, LiNuS TorVaLDS Is TeH SEXAY

BILL GATES 6 6 6

Re:For POS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158758)

AHaHAHaHAHA WIN98 PiECe oF SHiT AHAHAHAHAHA MICRO$OFT IS eViL You ARe TeH FuNNaY WTF LoL !!!1!1!1!!! !!!

M$ == So FuNNaY CuZ THeY HaVE MoNeY

NeTSCaPe RooLZ, LiNuS TorVaLDS Is TeH SEXAY

BILL GATES 6 6 6!

Re:For POS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158773)

AHaHAHaHAHA WIN98 PiECe oF SHiT AHAHAHAHAHA MICRO$OFT IS eViL You ARe TeH FuNNaY WTF LoL !!!1!1!1!!! !!!

M$ == So FuNNaY CuZ THeY HaVE MoNeY

NeTSCaPe RooLZ, LiNuS TorVaLDS Is TeH SEXAY

BILL GATES 6 6 6!~

BLOCKQUOTE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158630)

Please learn to use the BLOCKQUOTE HTML tag...
text spanning from end to end of the window/screen is just ugly...

How does this crap end up on the /. front page? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158632)

Oh yeah, it's pro linux.

Why the delay in getting PAM? (3, Funny)

ToadSprocket (628571) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158635)

Unfortunately for SCO, Darl heard the word "Pam" and had been looking for Pam Dawber of "Mork and Mindy" fame for the past several years. Apparently, Robin Williams wasn't returning his calls.

A minor nit... (5, Informative)

HotNeedleOfInquiry (598897) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158637)

I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...

Actually, Harley claimed to trademark the distinctive "potato,potato" sound of its engine and threated legal action when either Yamaha or Honda introduced an engine with the same cylinder timing and sound.

Re:A minor nit... (5, Funny)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158818)

Actually, Harley claimed to trademark the distinctive "potato,potato" sound of its engine and threated legal action when either Yamaha or Honda introduced an engine with the same cylinder timing and sound.

But they didn't get full coverage, so Harley's sound like poh-tah-toh-poh-tah-toh and the japanese bikes sound like poh-tay-toh-poh-tay-toh...

Re:A minor nit... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158822)

Potato, potato?

My rice burner of a workstation will beat your poky potato. It makes the "sid" sound.

"Siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiid[shift]Siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii d"

SCO behind the times (5, Funny)

hawkeyeMI (412577) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158647)

My favorite line, while not creative:
The 80's called, they want their features back.
heh...

Wow! (5, Funny)

Q-Cat5 (664698) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158654)

Sounds like I had more fun and got more concise and well presented information at that Timeshare seminar I went to. And I came out feeling far less ripped off, too.

Maybe SCO should take some lessons from Hilton?

Oh, wait, Hilton has an actual product to sell. Woops, my bad.

In case of /. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158658)

Notes from the SCO Road show

I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.

And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance

Read the rest of this comment... [slashdot.org]

From the article... (4, Funny)

Anthony Boyd (242971) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158659)

The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back.

Hilarious! SCO is its own worst enemy.

karma sluts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158666)

nice. 16 posts so far, and one's a mirror and 5 are cut / pastes of the article.

I would have though that SCO... (2, Insightful)

SwansonMarpalum (521840) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158670)

Would have managed a more potent marketing ploy considering that they really don't have any product to be selling. They needed to be able to field technical questions, in detail, and were unable to. This hurts their credibility with those who oppose them.

They needed to secure the support of their resellers, without whom they have no income, however basically it sounds like they snubbed them to their faces.

And as a final pedantic note, we all know UNIX is in Linux. In case they forgot, they released System III under a BSD-like license, and Linux subscribes to many of the UNIX philosophies. (Do one thing and do it well). This isn't even an interesting point.

I still remain unimpressed by SCO.

Re:I would have though that SCO... (1)

ToadSprocket (628571) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158729)

This hurts their credibility with those who oppose them

Because... those who oppose them considered SCO credible before this point?

Re:I would have though that SCO... (1)

DShard (159067) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158815)

I for one was in the middle of writing a check to Darl. But fortunately I got on slashdot and checked out a story about SCO. I am glad that this article made it in with the other gems like that evil bit article is a few down.

Re:I would have though that SCO... (1)

cmowire (254489) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158792)

The people who need to be impressed (those who are interested in buying or selling SCO stock in large numbers) don't go to those sort of roadshows.

They don't need the resellers to pump-and-dump, so they are just grabbing whatver pennies that they can get out of there until they can hit the jackpot.

If you're interested in going... (3, Informative)

ragingmime (636249) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158673)

...ther are still a bunch of stops on the tour that will be going on. Admission is free, and there's more information here [sco.com]. They'll be all over the US, as well as in British Columbia. Maybe someone can stop by and say "hi" to the SCO folks. :)

intellectual property (4, Informative)

penguin7of9 (697383) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158681)

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?).

Well, they can define "intellectual property" however they want to--the term has no legal significance. "Intellectual property" is merely a collective (and misleading) term to refer generally to certain intagible rights. Copyright, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets each have a specific legal status, specific obligations, and specific enforceable rights.

The term "intellectual property" is actually quite misleading (and this is no doubt a deliberate choice by many of the people using the term) because those rights work very differently from other property rights. For example, they expire. You should think of them more as a temporary contract between you and the government, a kind of non-renewable "lease".

Before it gets slashdotted (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158685)

Another mirror [farcaster.net]


Notes from the SCO Road show

I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.

And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance

Read the rest of this comment... [slashdot.org]

Can't wait to see if this will get /. ed... (3, Funny)

pdaoust007 (258232) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158690)

Sympatico being the largest Canadian ISP, I've always wondered if one of their servers could survive the /. effect. I guess we'll find out!

How to say SCO in geek language (1)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158692)

(searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group)

S(anta|pecial) Cr*u(stomer|z) Operations*

Acquisition using Cap not possible (5, Informative)

bstadil (7110) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158699)

Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition

This is not possible with the exception of companies already owned by the Canopy group.

Any company has a fiduciary duty to their stockholders even privately owned.

Any company that accepted this POS (Not Point of Purchase) will open themselves to lawsuit. Any Due diligence will not pass muster.

There is nothing for the acuired company to be gained. The shares can not be sold, their non Legal business has all but disapeared so no synergy and the like can be had, Nothing as far as I can see.

Re:Acquisition using Cap not possible (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158754)

Err... I think they mean *capitalizing* on their ancient IP to *acquire* Linux. :P

Re:Acquisition using Cap not possible (1)

compactable (714182) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158857)

Yeah, this kinda surprised me at mention too. 3 years ago nobody would blink at a weenie overbloated stock take over, but now?

Slashdot mirror (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158701)

Notes from the SCO Road show I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended. And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ... Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group). Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ... Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah. Interesting bits? Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however. Really interesting bits? The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it. Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?). Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons. One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number. The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print). Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?). What do I take away from this? Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation. Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up.

"Caldera Linux customers are indemnified" (1)

Ricin (236107) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158707)

.. "against legal action". That's what they state. Well, legal action of SCO perhaps but not of, say, the FSF or Linus for breaching the GPL.

IIUC, they waivered their IP claims (not copyrights) when contributing to Linux, notably on or around the technologies that have been named so far. So if they don't abide the license or claim it's void that would immediately force them to face copyright issues with the Linux kernel and any other GPL package they've had in OpenLinux or UnixWare.

So where's the GPL license revocation? Someone's gotta move the first (real) pawn. So far all we get is air and it's humid and smelly. Yet we all snore it up so far. And SCO says Ho and the stock goes Woo.

Ever noticed how ... (1)

Muad (11989) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158711)

Ever noticed how Darl McBride [anerispress.com] resembles Kenneth Irons of Witchbalde memory ? Just a thought... (thank god McBride does not have *that* kind of cash :-)

Best. Quote. Ever. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158713)

"The 80's called, they want their features back."

The wierd part (1)

rudy_wayne (414635) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158718)

All of SCO's executives, from King Darl on down, just keep charging forward, as if everything they're doing and saying makes perfect sense. It's almost like some sort of wierd Saturday Night Live parody of a business.

Slashdotted already (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158721)

Notes from the SCO Road show
I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g)
out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially
interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention
shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but
interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.

And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering
that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher
turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops
of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker.
He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder.
Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units
(no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that
is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts
seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens
(Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us
Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry
list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T
paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their
sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Suckoff CowboiKneel Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have
thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of
acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details
to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned.
The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable.
From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the
MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of
Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded
as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF
Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to
Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front
about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never
got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in
protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code
review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must
have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against
legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of
the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade
Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP
subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published
"top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article).
And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site
removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current
operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of
SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing
hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session.
During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in
the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely
a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are
profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One
raised the points th

Re:Slashdotted already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158855)

Phew! Thanks for posting this. I'm not sure if we all could have read the article considering the

TEN PLUS OTHER DAMN COPIES OF THE ARTICLE

already posted.

Thanks again

Wow no NDA? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158731)

And here I thought they weren't charitable :). We can all now laugh at their future 2 billion dollar webservices without infringing on their IP.

Should have mentionedSCO resellers (1)

Ricin (236107) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158738)

I should have mentioned earlier that it's good to hear SCO resellers being very sceptical.

Brains are not easily engineered into WOC (Wake On Command) luckily.

If the audience was primarily SCO resellers, ... (1)

darnok (650458) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158743)

what bone/s did they throw out to convince these guys they were (still) on a good thing?

I mean, the resellers are business people - they must be hearing grumbles from their customer base and getting worried as a result. At least some of their customers must be making noises about going somewhere else for their systems.

What nice story did SCO have to tell them? "We're suing everyone" doesn't help those guys a bit

Re:If the audience was primarily SCO resellers, .. (2, Insightful)

adrianbaugh (696007) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158849)

As you would know if you'd read the article properly, the resellers themselves sounded pretty pissed at SCO by and large; "what is making [SCO] profitable is not making [the resellers] profitable". They seem able to see that this lawsuit is join jack all for them.

Karma Bonus +6 (-1, Offtopic)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158752)

Suddenly I'm getting Karma Bonus +6. I'm good, but not that good.

Or maybe I am.

(Horrible Karma to anyone who disagrees!)

Re:Karma Bonus +6 NEVERMIND!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158767)

Found the problem. My preferences were messed up. The Earth may now continue in its orbit.

Disturbing side to their "GPL is invalid" ravings (4, Interesting)

Dr.Dubious DDQ (11968) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158783)

From the article:
Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it.

Isn't most or all of that released as GPL? The "invalid" license? Does SCO intend to claim that the GPL's alleged invalidity means the software is "license-free" and therefore they can do whatever they want with it? Perhaps they assume that nobody associated with free software can afford to sue them for copyright infringement...

Re:Disturbing side to their "GPL is invalid" ravin (1)

darnok (650458) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158843)

> Perhaps they assume that nobody associated with
> free software can afford to sue them for copyright
> infringement...

I keep waiting for that to happen - the author of some piece of OSS suing SCO for licence infringement.

There must be at least one OSS author that's reasonably wealthy and could afford to do this, with or without the backing of e.g. the EFF. Chance has to be good that at least one OSS person made a fortune somewhere, somehow, ...

Dude, what's with the left-justified text? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158794)


link HREF="compactable.css" TYPE="text/css" REL="stylesheet"
leads to
BODY {
font-family: arial narrow, helvetica;
font-size: 12pt;
background-color: #FFFFFF;
margin: 0px;
}
Dude: What in the world is wrong with having a margin?

Re:Dude, what's with the left-justified text? (1)

compactable (714182) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158829)

The page was originally part of a frame - I took out the other cr@p to reduce /. effect. Oops on not restoring the other stuff...

Just in case. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158812)

Notes from the SCO Road show I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" [sco.com] (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended.

And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ...

Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker [sco.com]. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group).

Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ...

Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah.

Interesting bits?

Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however.

Really interesting bits?

The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har [groklaw.com]). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it.

Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages [caldera.com], however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?).

Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons.

One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number.

The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's [rfc-editor.org] called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource [opensource.org] software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print).

Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?).

What do I take away from this?

Apart from copies Lone Tar [cactus.com] & BackupEDGE [microlite.com], not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation.

Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up.

- Compactable

We don't need any more SCO publicity, ... (1)

chris_sawtell (10326) | more than 10 years ago | (#7158817)

... because it only fuels the share price pump up.
This means that the innocents of the world will lose even more money when this particular worthless 'House of Cards' inevitably comes tumbling down. In most juristictions of the world this SCO lark is considered illegal. Why does /. want to aid and abet this fraud?

full text (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7158851)

Notes from the SCO Road show I decided to go to the SCO "City to City Tour" (%s/City to City/Farewell/g) out of morbid curiosity - what did SCO say about itself? I was especially interested to see if the time allotted to "roadmap" would even mention shippable product (o; It was interesting - not exactly as I expected, but interesting nonetheless. Highly recommended. And apparently easy to attend. 64 seats, less than 20 attendees. Considering that when I applied I went to a waiting list, I was expecting a higher turnout ... it may be worth putting yourself on the list for future stops of the show ... Grandest cheese at the presentation was VP of Marketing, Jeff Hunsaker. He started out with an hour the company's report card & backgrounder. Here's the view of SCO painted: 330 employees, 2+ million deployed units (no mention of OS breakdown - would be interesting to see what % of that is Caldera Linux), target market is small-ish business. Reference accounts seem to be franchised fast food & drug oriented. Think Pizza Hut & Wallgreens (Arnold Clarke & Argos were UK references, Shoppers Drug thrown in for us Canuks). Nothing IT-intensive. Avaya & Lucent were mentioned on the laundry list, however no detail was given, and I cannot imagine descendants of AT&T paying too much to some guys in Utah for hideous product (searches on their sites for SCO only brings mention of their "Special Customer Operations" group). Oddly enough, market cap & stock price were mentioned extensively (who'd have thought?). Reference was made to using their capitalization as a means of acquisition; however no details were given (assuming there were any details to give). The fabled '2 quarters of profitability' was also mentioned. The name Caldera was dragged through the dirt, as they were never profitable. From the slides you'd think SCO had roots much, much deeper than the MS Xenix junk they spawned from. In fact, the analogy they whip out is that of Harley-Davidson (HD was purchased by AMF, went to hell, then arose re-branded as the mega-label you know today). I refrained from pointing out that pre/post-AMF Harley produced respected product, and did not send threatening letters to Yamaha owners ... Mention of the legal battle? Nothing technical. Representatives were up-front about their lack of legal knowledge, and inability to comment. It never got past the mud-slinging stage. Same old, same old. Their interest is in protecting their IP. This is about a breach of contract. Linux 2.4 code review shows Monterrey-esqe code relating to memory-access that must have come from AIX 5L. Caldera Linux customers are indemnified against legal action. Blah blah blah. Interesting bits? Their definition of IP (I've never seen a formal definition, and so some of the things on the list amused mildly): Copyright, Contracts, Methods, Trade Secrets, and Know-how (Know-how? How about "stuff we have" - can that be a IP subject too?). Their mention of McBride making some soon-to-be-published "top 5 influential executives list" (that'll be a keeper of an article). And heavy mention of HP's support. Reference was made to their web site removing their logo, however they emphatically associate SCOs current operations and HP's approval. Nothing to substantiate, however. Really interesting bits? The crowd. I was expecting Linux zealots. It was mostly a room full of SCO resellers. And they were not too big on having a love in. Nothing hostile, however not one positive comment for the morning's session. During the "we be so profitable" section of the spiel, one reseller in the crowd asked "where does the money come from?" The response was largely a pointer to the SCO source initiative. The response? "What you are profitable in will not make me profitable.". Wow. That was good. One raised the points that this quibble is hurting his business. SCO's stance is that they'd love to settle this tomorrow (har har). Stance not bought by aforementioned reseller - the paraphrased retort was 'litigation will resolve nothing that I am interested in. SCO needs to adapt to the times, or it will perish'. Wow wow. People seem to get this. I like it. Some new "this is why IBM is evil" quotes. At least to me. Turns out SCO is broadcasting these from their SCO source pages, however I had not seen these up to this point. I thought all they tried to sling were the RMS & Perens mis-quotes about Linux being a brilliant hack from an unaccountable community (the old quotes page has been gone for a bit - anyone have a link to an archived copy?). Also of interest was SCO's roadmap. For two reasons. One, they intend to do great things. They have a plan to create an environment by end of next year that spans from device drivers to application middleware. 330 people in Utah. Sure. They also have a vision of monstrous market shares. How monstrous? Two billion in web services. Those with even a small memory will remember that the IBM suit is targeted at three billion. To their credit, they didn't place a timeline on this number. The other reason the roadmap was entertaining? I now know how retro SCOs OSes are. Riotous, riotous stuff. How they had the ya-yas to declare Linux an infant OS in need of their IP is beyond me. Upcoming features? PAM. files larger than 2 gigs. NFS over TCP. The 80's called, they want their features back. NTPv4 was a listed big feature on a slide of 10 to 15 upcoming enhancements. How does an NTP enhancement get mentioned as a 'big' feature? Wow. I never knew it was this bad. Maybe I should lend my old 486 running Debian from '97 to Pizza Hut - it sounds like they could use the upgrade. Even the guy presenting was a leelte embarrassed by the state of the OS. When mentioning PAM support his comment was "finally!". A crowd member picked up on this & asked "when you say 'PAM - finally!', who are you implying you are behind?". The response was pretty generic, other than to point out that rigorous certification testing was a portion of the delay. Also of note was the volume of OpenSource software in the box - OpenSSL/SSH, Apache, Samba, CUPS, Gimp-print, bash ... you name it. Maybe their idea of building a super-OS involves a fistful of RPMs. He tried to convey his amazement at the fantastic future of UnixWare by telling the crowd that they would someday be able to print in colour from their colour printer (thanks to features in gimp-print). Mention was also made in the road map of a new online update service (big whoop), and SmallFoot, which is a "Retail Hardened POS solution" (their words, not mine). When did "you want fries with that?" become associated with the five 9's of reliability? For the live update, he actually walked us through how you would set up an account to use the service, another indication that SCOs internal force has missed the last couple of years of the Internet (how could this be interesting to anyone there?). What do I take away from this? Apart from copies Lone Tar & BackupEDGE, not a whole lot. I could have stayed for the free t-shirts (nothing says 'this is between SCO & IBM' more than the slogan "is unix in your linux?"), but that would have meant some boring slides. Entertaining, but no new insights, other than a peek at the people behind the corporation. Being the VP of Global Marketing (a shame we couldn't get inter-global marketing to show up, but hey, we're only Toronto), Hunsaker digressed while discussing how SCO has reduced OpEx about how fantastic the whole Linux whacking has been for his company in the news. And I quote: "You couldn't buy better coverage". And he's right. Truthfully I thought SCO was a non-entity before this bicker began. It's amazing how far a group can get on a comedy suit. It'll be interesting to see when & where this winds up. - Compactable
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