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Bureau of Engraving and Printing Issues New US$20

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the legal-tender dept.

The Almighty Buck 706

jea6 writes "Hot off the Western Currency Facility presses in Fort Worth! The Bureau of Engraving and Printing is issuing the new US$20 note to banks today. The newly redesigned Series 2004 $20 notes have background colors (so long, greenbacks) and improved security features. Ask your bank to send a few your way. Unlike the U.S Mint's "Golden Dollar", these notes will be issued to replace the Series 2001 note. Look for a redesigned Grant in 2004 and a new Benjamin in 2005. The US Government is spending $53,000,000 over the next 5 years to make sure everybody knows that this is a real note, so go get acquainted with one."

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Good idea (0, Informative)

msoya (599813) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170751)

So the USA is catching up with the rest of the world at last?

Re:Good idea (1)

spectrokid (660550) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170798)

They will have to watch themselves or some foreign banks will actually start accepting these 100$ notes!!!

Re:Good idea (1)

msoya (599813) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170812)

$100? In some places they don't accept $50! In England some English shops still refuse to accept Scottish notes, despite them being legal. Too easy to counterfeit, much like the higher-denomination US notes.

Re:Good idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170849)

Not really. The notes are all still the same size, which doesn't really help those with poor eyesight much.

Still, coloured notes. Watch out there America, it's all getting a little racy isn't it?

Re:Good idea (4, Interesting)

Yorrike (322502) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170940)

Nah. The best notes I've come across, and I'm not being biased as I've used notes in lots of countries, is our very own New Zealand notes [rbnz.govt.nz] .

Made from plastic, but designed to feel like paper, they are practically unforgable. They have transparent windows, water marks, textured areas, the whole shibang. If you ever manage to get hold of one, you'll realise just how impossible a task making a replica would be.

Just from the link above, here's the security features of our notes (all of which I think are rather cool):

1. Each polymer note has two transparent windows. One of the transparent windows is oval-shaped and sloping and has the denomination numerals embossed in it. The other clear window is in the shape of a curved fern leaf.
2. There is a fern immediately above the clear fern-shaped window. When you hold the note to the light, the fern should match perfectly with another fern on the other side.
3. You should easily be able to see a shadow image of the Queen when you hold the note to the light.
4. Each note has an individual serial number printed horizontally and vertically.
5. Polymer notes have raised printing, which stands up on the surface and can be felt when you run your fingers over it.
6. Tiny micro-printed letters "RBNZ" should be visible with a magnifying glass.
7. Under an ultraviolet light, the polymer note appears dull. Most commercial papers used in forgeries will glow under an ultraviolet light. However, polymer notes contain special inks, which make particular features glow under an ultraviolet light. For example, the front of each genuine note has a fluorescent patch showing the denomination numerals, which can only be seen under an ultraviolet light.

Re:Good idea (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170980)

If by "catching up" you mean "appealing to the lowest common denominator for which something like numbers are just way too subtle of a distinguishing feature to rely on when they count all the foreign aid money the USA sends them", then yes. Yes, we are finally "catching up".

Thank you for your patience, most generous neighbor.

But don't get your hopes up too high. You'll never trick us into using any of the commie SI crap.

Euro (2, Funny)

quigonn (80360) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170760)

So, when will the USA switch to Euro?

Re:Euro - when will the usa adopt? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170817)

The USA will adopt the Euro currency the moment European countries stops depending on the USA to resolve every international crisis.
As a show of unity, France and Germany will adopt the Russian Ruble - the three countries will rename the currency the "crumble". Crum - for short.
Euro - what a shitty name for currency!

Re:Euro - when will the usa adopt? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170837)

Why shouldn't we expect you to resolve the ones you started?

What about all the ones the US did nothing about? Sierra Leone? The Argentinian Junta? The Malaysian emergency? No, you've heard nothing about those. Especially not the last one, which shows how to beat communist jungle fighters...

Re:Euro - when will the usa adopt? (4, Interesting)

quigonn (80360) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170854)

Euro - what a shitty name for currency!

Even more creative than "Dollar", because this name was ripped off from the Austrian currency "Taler" that was first established in the 15th century. But Euro on the other side symbolizes unity, a unity of countries with a currency stronger than the dollar (it is way stronger, even OPEC thinks about switching from Dollar to Euro as standard currency).

Re:Euro - when will the usa adopt? (1)

CausticWindow (632215) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170929)

even OPEC thinks about switching from Dollar to Euro as standard currency

If this ever happens, the US is up shit creek. Expect lots of trouble if they try to do this. Remember Iraq?

Re:Euro - when will the usa adopt? (2, Informative)

mblase (200735) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170961)

Actually, the American "dollar" borrows it's name from Spanish currency, not Austrian. Bumming from naked_ape's accurate writeup at everything2.com:
The origin of the word dollar comes from the coins that Spanish emperor Carlos I ordered to coin at the beginnings of the XVIth century. They were of silver, (read Webster's wu for more precise information) and they had the same value as the German thaler.


A century later, when the spanish thalers began to circulate in North America, they were called spanish dollars, as someone wrote "dollars" instead of "thalers".

When the U.S.A. became a nation, the dollar acquired the category of national currency. In those coins were engraved the Columns of Hercules, the symbol for the Spanish Empire, that ultimately were converted into the sign that epitomizes dollars and money everywhere: $

Re:Euro - when will the usa adopt? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170887)

is that the sound of a dollar prices tumbling i hear or just the noise from a nation of unemployed going down the pan ?

Re:Euro - when will the usa adopt? (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170943)

Euro - what a shitty name for currency!

It makes the name of budget black holes like "Eurofighter" so much mnore appropriate though

Re:Euro (0, Redundant)

Sir_Stinksalot (595305) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170967)

We are considering replacing the penny with the euro as soon as the euro comes up a little in its worth!

fr15t ps0t (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170762)

fuxorz i roxor!

This is flamebait (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170763)

So eat me, YODA YODA.
Second Post

News? (-1, Offtopic)

perly-king-69 (580000) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170766)

"News for Nerds. Stuff that matters." Slow news day then?

Re:News? (1)

sjwt (161428) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170806)

Just incase you have to leave the electronic banking world and use hard money.

53mill?!! (-1)

mesmartyoudumb (471890) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170775)

Redefining the old addage: You've got to spend money to make money!

Look at all that pink and purple.. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170778)

..Boy our money sure is gay.

*Simpsons' quote*

No more Cracks Then (1)

DocUi (697881) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170779)

About Our Canadian Monopoly money then! Mwah! Actually it's a good thing I think, makes it harder to counterfit, and eaiser to recognize at a glance. What is really cool is the $AUD (australian) with the plastic style see through portion of their money. ~The Doc.

Anybody got... (0, Funny)

moonbender (547943) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170782)

...any very high-quality, very high-resolution images yet? I want to, um, memorise it so that I can't be tricked. In fact, why not print a few, let's say, thousands of it on my color laser printer - memorising is so much easier if you don't have to stare at a computer screen!

Re:Anybody got... (1)

Acidic_Diarrhea (641390) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170811)

The micro-printing on bills means that they cannot be adequately reproduced on a laser printer so I'm not sure what your point is. Were you trying to be funny?

Re:Anybody got... (1)

rcs1000 (462363) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170813)

Unfortunately, these notes have a (c) on them. I was going to run off a few thousand myself, but realised I might be giving the open source community a bad name by my copyright violation ;-)

Re:Anybody got... (1)

Zocalo (252965) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170824)

Heh. If the switch to the Euro was any indication, then you can expect to have a bunch of forgeries real soon now. Because the notes are so new, they don't even have to be very good forgeries, so colour laser printed ones would probably fool a significant number of people, especially if the feel of the paper is right.

Re:Anybody got... (1)

doomdog (541990) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170851)

especially if the feel of the paper is right

But that's exactly the hardest part -- gettng the "feel" of the paper (er, "linen") to match real money. Counterfeiters can do an excellent job in reproducing the look of the currency, but since they can't buy the same paper, it never feels the same...

Re:Anybody got... (1)

Detritus (11846) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170884)

They can just take a pile of one dollar bills and bleach them.

Re:Anybody got... (1)

doomdog (541990) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170952)

A lot of people mention things like this, but I don't think they realize just how hard it would be to accomplish. Bleaching the bills to remove the green ink, but leaving the red and blue color in the small fibers? Not an easy task. Then there's the completely different issue of finding the right shade of green to print the new currency. The green used on money isn't commercially available, so you'd never have an exact match...

Regardless of what everyone else here thinks (since you're all wrong, for the most part), counterfeiting is *not* an easy task. This isn't like some loser setting up a meth lab in his trailer -- it requires a significant investment in time and equipment... I believe most counterfeiting is done either through organized crime or through foreign governments -- no one else really has the resources to do it right...

Re:Anybody got... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170973)

You can buy linen paper just about anywhere. Break the bills in a bit and no one notices anything.

BTW, it's still called paper, even if it's made from wood, cotton, or papyrus.

A material made of cellulose pulp, derived mainly from wood, rags, and certain grasses, processed into flexible sheets or rolls by deposit from an aqueous suspension, and used chiefly for writing, printing, drawing, wrapping, and covering walls.

Re:Anybody got... (3, Informative)

lorax (2988) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170893)

B.E.P. must have had you in mind. You can download the PDF file of the new bill here: http://www.moneyfactory.com/newmoney/files/Bill_gl ossies_white.pdf [moneyfactory.com]

Does anyone else think that government sites should have .gov domains? I mean, moneyfactory.com sounds like a scam site to me.

BTW, they still have green backs.

Greenback Still Has Green Back (1)

NoCleverName (701924) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170785)

That, they didn't change.

I Always Liked the Green Bills (2, Insightful)

Jameth (664111) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170786)

I know it's kind-of silly, but I always really liked having all green bills. It makes my money-wads look a lot less messy. I've had money-wads of multi-colored bills, and it just gets ugly. The mass of colors ends up so busy that its irritating to look at.

Of course, I'm a little obsessive compulsive and my favorite color is green, but it's alright to have a biased position.

Re:I Always Liked the Green Bills (1)

Aneurysm (680045) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170807)

Doesn't having all green bills contribute to small scale fraud though? Like duping barmen with little slight of hand tricks? I know it sounds like something insignificant, but i'm sure it all adds up. Here in England things like this are impossible as all the notes are different colours.

Re:I Always Liked the Green Bills (2, Interesting)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170833)

Doesn't having all green bills contribute to small scale fraud though?

Sure does... a $2 bill will get you a $20 lap dance from just about any exotic dancer...

Re:I Always Liked the Green Bills (1)

legoburner (702695) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170874)

counterfitting US bills is mainly done by taking a low value US bill (1, 2 or 5) then bleaching it as white as possible. The paper retains the texture/chemicals for fraud tests. Then you just print on a very high resolution printer from a high resolution scan of a higher value bill (typically 20 as 50 and 100 arouse too much suspicion). The rest of the developed world use different sized banknotes for a reason (that get larger by value to stop this). Nobody in the US checks watermarks and you can change serial numbers in photoshop/gimp. Use in a poorly lit place or in a stack of valid notes and nobody would ever know. (note; this is just what I heard on the grapevine, I have never tried this!)

Re:I Always Liked the Green Bills (4, Insightful)

quigonn (80360) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170823)

Actually, the colors make sense. When a color marks a certain value, it's easier to distinguish them. With bills all in this greenish color you have to look closely to know which value it has. In fact, this led to a number of tricks to make people believe that they get a US-$ 20 bill, but instead they only got a US-$ 5 bill. So colors do have their advantages. And the Euro proves that colorful bills can look elegant, too.

Re:I Always Liked the Green Bills (3, Interesting)

Divide By Zero (70303) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170922)

I guess I'm in the minority here, but when I'm executing financial transactions (from going to the bank to going out to lunch), I CHECK the denominations of the bills I give and those I recieve. The new-look (not the brand-new-look) currency has a high-contrast, big, blocky, really-hard-to-miss printing of the denomination in one corner, and if I'm overpaying (using a $10 for less than $5, $20 for less than $10), I hand that side to the cashier or whoever's taking my money to make sure they get it.

I have sympathy for the blind, but no color change is going to help them. Changing the size of the bills here would meet with such outrage as hasn't been seen since the Susan B. Anthony dollar. (Good thing we issued the Sacajawea dollar - everybody's using that, right?)

But hey. Something's better than nothing, right?

Re:I Always Liked the Green Bills (1)

ponxx (193567) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170977)

Several currencies come not only in different sizes and colours, but also have indentations on them in braille so the blind can "read" the value of the notes... do you think including that sort of feature would cause outrage too?

Re:I Always Liked the Green Bills (1)

andrewscraig (319163) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170864)

The thing I don't like about US money (speaking as a foreigner) is the fact that from feel and cursory glance every note is the same. You have to actually read the notes to know which one is which. How does a blind person handle money in the US? With the euro, every note is a different size and colour, and some of the notes have a different texture (the EUR5 and EUR10 is made from different material to the higher denominations.). It's very difficult to mix up a EUR5 and a EUR50 here, but the US$5/US$50 (from the corner) has a single digit missing...and memorizing dead presidents heads doesn't sound like a fun task! So at least you're getting one step in the right direction with coloured corners!

Re:I Always Liked the Green Bills (1)

meta-monkey (321000) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170915)

I agree with you. I'm glad that the new 20 is still pretty much 'green.' It has some highlights in different colors, and a bluish background, but for the most part, it's still green.

I understand the reason all the European money is different colors and sizes, and yes, it absolutely makes sense...but I just don't care. Greenbacks should be green.

I don't get it. (4, Insightful)

CGP314 (672613) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170789)

There will be no recall or devaluation of any U.S. currency. Old or new, all U.S. currency always will be honored at full face value.

So, tell me, if I'm a counterfitter, why wouldn't I just copy the older bills and 'age' them in the washing machine?

Re:I don't get it. (1)

wolf- (54587) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170831)

While there will be no recall, old bills are pulled from circulation. Only between 5-10% of the money printed each year is actually new to the system as value, the other percentage is printed for the replacement of old bills.

So, keep printing your old style counterfits. The public will begin to question their authenticity if they are in the minority. The public does that now with new redesigned bills when they are new.

Re:I don't get it. (1)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170954)

So, keep printing your old style counterfits. The public will begin to question their authenticity if they are in the minority. The public does that now with new redesigned bills when they are new.

... and the public does this now with $2 bills [snopes.com] .

And to top that off, I have a bicentenial $2 bill that looks nothing like the other $2 bills out there.

Then there are those mysterious bills that say "sliver certificate" [fastcoin.com] . How the hell are we ever supposed to know what is money and what isn't?

Re:I don't get it. (1)

harks (534599) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170836)

Yes, but as time goes on, the older bills will be more uncommon and attract more of the acceptor's attention when you use them, making any imperfections in your counterfeit more likely to be noticed.

Re:I don't get it. (2, Informative)

hype7 (239530) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170859)

So, tell me, if I'm a counterfitter, why wouldn't I just copy the older bills and 'age' them in the washing machine?


The US government has promised to honour them. Not necessarily Joe Blogs on the street corner.

What normally happens is that the country's central bank draws a line underneath a certain date, and says "from this day forth, only the new currency is legal tender. If you want to exchange the old currency for new currency, bring it to us or a big private bank".

Normally, the outlets that accept the old notes have some pretty sophisticated devices for checking whether the currency is legitimate or not, regardless of how old it is. I know my bank took a very long time to check a whole lot of foreign notes I wanted exchanged when I got back. The teller had to take them out back and run them through a variety of tests. This would be no different.

-- james

Re:I don't get it. (5, Funny)

Detritus (11846) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170863)

If you're a "counterfitter", you would be helping build kitchens, not printing money.

Banknotes wear out (1)

Stephen Williams (23750) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170872)

Banknotes don't last forever. In a few years' time, the old-style $20 notes will have been withdrawn by banks simply because they're old and tatty and falling apart. (By which time, the counterfeiters will have figured out how to forge the new notes, but hey).

-Stephen

Thats a lot of money for... ummm... money. (4, Funny)

pi radians (170660) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170790)

Only in America will they spend $35 million dollars to promote something everyone already wants, money.

and here's where the other $18 million is going (5, Funny)

Schlemphfer (556732) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170852)

From the summary:

The US Government is spending $53,000,000 over the next 5 years to make sure everybody knows that this is a real note, so go get acquainted with one."

From the parent post:

Only in America will they spend $35 million dollars to promote something everyone already wants, money.

The other $18 million is being earmarked to fight dyslexia. Or was it $81 million?

Re:Thats a lot of money for... ummm... money. (1)

ponxx (193567) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170924)

Hardly, i have no numbers, but the EU had a huge programme to educate people about the EURO, i wouldn't be surprised if it had cost more...

Re:Thats a lot of money for... ummm... money. (2, Insightful)

teg (97890) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170990)


Hardly, i have no numbers, but the EU had a huge programme to educate people about the EURO, i wouldn't be surprised if it had cost more...



That's a very different issue - a new currency, not just a new bill. The euro was replacing many currencies at different values used by different nations, merging them into one.

Re:Thats a lot of money for... ummm... money. (1, Funny)

PhiltheeG (688063) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170960)

Hey, you have to spend money to make money ...

pssst: the counterfeiters are winning (4, Interesting)

ArmorFiend (151674) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170796)

In 2001 they released a new bill design, and said "we want to stay one step ahead of the counterfeiters". Before that the bill had been unchanged for, what, 30 years? And now three years later, they're releasing a new bill? Its being kept hush-hush, but this is a clear sign that our currency is being successfully counterfitted.

Re:pssst: the counterfeiters are winning (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170829)

im not surprised - compared to european currency, the dollar looks like it's been printed on a below-average quality inkjet printer.

Re:pssst: the counterfeiters are winning (1)

finkployd (12902) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170850)

However it has the advantage of not looking like it was designed by a second grade class. :)

Finkployd

Re:pssst: the counterfeiters are winning (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170926)

no, instead it was designed by someone who thought it would be a really good idea to make 1 dollar bills the same size as 100 dollar bills. now that's forethought.

personally i prefer these ones: www.deceptiondollar.com [deceptiondollar.com]

Re:pssst: the counterfeiters are winning (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170846)

But as long as the old currency is accepted and will be accepted at face value now and forever, why would any counterfeiter try to tackle the new notes when he could more easily make copies of the old ones? I guess he will have to make an eventual attempt, but he'll be able to avoid suspicion on account of passing out old notes for quite a while.

Re:pssst: the counterfeiters are winning (1)

!the!bad!fish! (704825) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170909)

And now three years later, they're releasing a new bill? Its being kept hush-hush, ...

In what way is a slashdot article hush-hush?

Re:pssst: the counterfeiters are winning (2, Interesting)

hype7 (239530) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170927)

And the counterfeiters will still keep winning! You know why?

Because there are so many dumb people out there [thesmokinggun.com] .

-- james

Re:pssst: the counterfeiters are winning (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170928)

Actually they wanted to go to full color money over a decade ago, but the American people are so conservative about money they fought it every time the subject was brought up. The treasury admited before the 2001 redisign that it wasn't good enough, they said it was all they would be allowed to do at the time. Sort of a stop-gap measure. I'm sure they are keeping it hush-hush, so that by the time people start calling congres to complain it's already a done deal.

I thought starting with high value bills like they did last time, was a great way to train Americans that the new money wasn't fake.

If you think my version of the story is wrong, listen to the comedy and talk shows. They'll be all talking about how much they dislike the new money.

How soon forgery? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170801)

The 20 is the most forged in the US, while the 100 is most forged outside the US. I have seen a clerk us a special marker pen to check a 50 someoen tried to use at a restaraunt, but what is the new method for this new 20?

Acquaint yourself with the new currency (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170804)

Don't be fooled - http://www.deceptiondollar.com/ [deceptiondollar.com] gives it to you straight!

Color of Bill Clinton bill? (0)

ChaoticChaos (603248) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170809)

Would the color of a Bill Clinton bill be pink? ;-)

back when we all had jobs (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170970)

I'm already nostalgic for that punk Clinton.

Think these are good? You should see the .au notes (5, Informative)

hype7 (239530) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170822)

The Aussie notes are amongst the best in the world, IMO.

Different colours for different values.

Different sizes for different values.

They're based on Polymer [rba.gov.au] . Put one through the wash, it comes out looking like new. Well, almost.

Some extremely sophisticated anti-counterfeiting techniques [rba.gov.au] .

Our Reserve Bank has even been thoughtful enough to worry about those with vision impairment [rba.gov.au] .

And, they just look cool [rba.gov.au] .

Re:Think these are good? You should see the .au no (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170853)

No Money that has the queen on it looks "Cool".

Re:Think these are good? You should see the .au no (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170951)

The much-stronger-than-the-US-dollar Sterling wishes to disagree.

Aussie bank notes are cool as .... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170896)

Remember being absolutely amazed by the $5 note when in Oz in 1994 (I think it was the only plastic one at the time).

Tell me tho, Is there any truth to the suggestion you can bake these notes in a slow oven to shrink them to make key-fobs? Or were you Aussies just pulling my leg?

Re:Aussie bank notes are cool as .... (1, Funny)

hype7 (239530) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170984)

Tell me tho, Is there any truth to the suggestion you can bake these notes in a slow oven to shrink them to make key-fobs? Or were you Aussies just pulling my leg?


What, Australians trying to pull a fast one on an American?

Never! ;)

-- james

Re:Think these are good? You should see the .au no (1)

wrmrxxx (696969) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170968)

They've got so much going for them that Australia mints notes for a number of other countries in the region. There is a down side to them, though. The plastic doesn't feel as nice as the paper money, and I still think they're a little harder to handle.

simple JPG of new bills. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170827)

For those who don't like PDFs, the bills as .jpg

http://www.danamania.com/temp/us20bill.jpg [danamania.com]

MOD PARENT DOWN (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170946)

These are fake pictures of what US $20 notes were allegedly going to look like from way back in the mid 90s. It's not the real thing folks

New Vending/Change Machines Needed? (1)

notsewmit (655779) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170835)

I imagine this chnage in the currency will require new vending and change machines. I hope places do it a lot faster than the last time around... the school I went to still doesn't have a change machine that can support the most recent $5 bill.

Hardly a drastic cosmetic change (1)

gilesjuk (604902) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170838)

They still look rather dull and boring. Why make all the notes the same colour? it's easier for people with poor eyesight to distinguish between the different notes if they're different colours and sizes.

Who the fuck is Benjamin Franklin? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170840)

Basketballer?

High time (4, Interesting)

david.given (6740) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170841)

At last! Banknotes you don't have to read to work out the denomination of!

I'm British. I'm used to European money, which is all different colours and different sizes, and in a lot of cases is made out of plastic. You probably don't realise just how weird American money looks to us; it's all the same size, it's all the same colour --- even the material feels odd; thin and papery and not very robust. (Rag paper, isn't it?)

When I last visited the US, dealing with American money was a continual surprise. Normally when I visit another country it doesn't take long before I can recognise notes by colour and size, which makes it much easier to handle. With American money, I kept having to peer at it to work out what it was I was about to hand over. I got the impression that they were designed by someone who knew about ergonomics, but wanted no truck with the idea.

Of course, this is mostly just a matter of being used to a different system (I expect that with some practice you get used to looking at the picture rather than the overall design), but I do wonder how blind and partially sighted people manage.

While this isn't a complete solution, at least the high-denomination notes will look different from the low-denomination notes, which will make it much less easy to, e.g., tip someone a hundred dollars instead of one. (Although whether this is considered a benefit depends which side of the transaction you're standing.)

Re:High time (1)

Uncle Joe Steel (714624) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170959)

I tend to look at the number printed on the bill.

Re:High time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170971)

Being British too, the biggest problem I've always had with US notes is the $1. I always feel like I have tumor growing from my thigh when I have to carry around a wallet so stuffed with floppy green $1 notes so thick I could beat a whale to death with it. What a complete waste.

Get $1 and $2 coins in circulation, America!

Re:High time (1)

jea6 (117959) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170979)

Wouldn't a pocketful of $1 coins have more mass that a pocketful of $1 notes? And that jingling, too.

Re:High time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170989)

They've got Dollar coins, IIRC. Just don't use them. Why???

Re:High time (2, Funny)

troc (3606) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170995)

Heh, the US is the only place I have seen a drive-through ATM (cashpoint) which had braille on the digits for all those, erm, blind drivers.

Troc

How does this compare (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170844)

How does this compare with other countries? As an Australian I must say I prefer AUD/NZ style notes but prefer the American coins..

Those security measures have been around since the 80's in Australia by the way.. we welcome your currency to the 80's :)

In an instant... (2, Funny)

webrunner (108849) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170860)

Thousands of peices of clipart rendered obsolete!

Hang on (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170866)


ive been printing fakes all week you insensitive clod

Goodbye, Greenbacks... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170867)

...and Hello Wetbacks!

Well if you insist (1)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170877)

I'll take 5 plates, 10,000, gallons of ink and as much printing paper as you can give me.

Ok all you Conspiracy Theorists... (1, Funny)

weaponx71 (524109) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170900)

Just another trick of the "Iluminintia" to keep you under the boot heel of the fake Federal Reserve. A note is still as worthless as it ever was, amazing that we get charged such a high price for a group of counterfeiters to give us our own money. I wonder what the Dove Report has to say about this one?? LOL (in a whispy, fairy-like voice) "Oh beloved Ascended Master Franken Berry! Please forgive those who make pink $20's! We are mere mortals who love your cereal, but can never find it in stores... only our Target stores!" or something like that...

What about the back? (1)

Jhonny (705236) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170908)

Is it just me? Or does it look like someone splaterd malted butter all over the back of the bill? I understand we need to be secure, but couldent we do it a bit more subtly? People are eventually going to learn how to print their own 20s just like that, and anyway, they can still use the old ones they can print of.

The next step (1)

boogy nightmare (207669) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170911)

would be to alter the sizes so the blind can tell them apart, just about every country in the world has different sized bank notes for this reason, why not the US....

Re:The next step (1)

radja (58949) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170962)

there's some countries that use 'raised' inks. probably not accurate enough for real braille, but a set of symbols (dots, a few mm across and similar sized bars) would be enough to keep different bills apart.

Stop making our currency so irregular (2, Insightful)

91degrees (207121) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170925)

It's a nuisance having all the notes different colours. They become less uniform. It's bad enough that they have different pictures on them. Can't they all be the same except for the value? Only the laziest of people and those stupid Canucks can't be bothered to read the number.

What's even more annoying is that small change comes in different sizes. Not only that, but the sizes are illogical. I mean come on! 5c is bigger than 10c! We need to make themn all the same size and all the same colour to remove this confusion.

Did anyone ask teh retailers? (2, Insightful)

amichalo (132545) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170930)

The issue I see with this form of anti-piracy copy protection is that the methods to detect fraud take too long.

When I worked in retail where a typical purchase was about $35, we saw Twenties all day long. The only thing we did was make sure it was put in the drawer facing the same way so the manager wouldn't get upset when he did the count that night.

For $50 or $100 we had a yellow pen that you ran on the bill and the ink would be brown for a good bill, black if it was not.

THAT'S IT - there was no using a microscope to read Jackson's lips as he spoke the word "Republic".

Bottom line is, unless retailers perceive there is a problem to their bottom line because the banks won't accept their cash deposits full of bad cash, the best solution is for the mint to print fewer bills and assume a certain percentage of fraudulent bills are in circulation.

It woudl save the treasury money on ink and cotton paper!

Unloved $1 Coins Keep Expensive George Around (3, Interesting)

4of12 (97621) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170931)


All the big portrait remakes of U.S. currency neglected the one dollar bill.

From what I understand, paper money costs more to maintain relative to coin over a period of years. Wear and tear means reprinting and replacement over a shorter life cycle for paper currency.

There's been 2 or 3 attempts to get US to use one dollar coins, and the vending machine manufacturers and the casinos would welcome the move, but people keep wanting to use those $1 bills over the Ike dollars, the Susan B. dollars and I'm not sure what else.

What's weird is that coins up to $20 denomination were used in the 19th century. And that was when $20 represented something like 2/3 of a month's wages for many people.

Re:Unloved $1 Coins Keep Expensive George Around (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7170957)

If they would just put George Washington's image on the coin instead of some politically correct Indian or Negro image, then I might adopt the coin.

How this happened (3, Funny)

Eslyjah (245320) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170932)

It looks like Queer Eye [bravotv.com] visited the US Treasury.

A waste of time.... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170936)

The US mint anf Govt is being really stinking stupid.

Let's make new hard to copy bills...

oh but the old stuff is still perfectly fine...

so all counterfitters need to do is continue what they have done forever? as the new bills mean nothing to them as the old bills are still useable and therefore the counterfits are still useable.

pure stupidity... have the banks pull them out of circulation and announce a death date for the bills. I.E. 60 days after the introduction of the new bill the old bills will be worthless. you can trade them in at a bank after that. (and the bank inspectes them carefully)

anything else is a waste of time and effort.

Cash who cares? (1)

nuggz (69912) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170956)

I only occasionally use cash now.
Most of the time I use my credit card, faster, easier, less to carry, no lost change, no pockets of change, no rolling of change.
I get a nice clean statement telling me what I have purchased.

I just use cash for the few places that don't take Credit cards.

What they really need to do is... (1)

hackhound (599190) | more than 10 years ago | (#7170974)

replace the $1 and $5 bills with coins. Harder to counterfit, and much longer lasting. I just visited Canada, and they do not use bills for anything less than $5. They have a dollar coin with a picture of a loon (type of duck) which they call a loonie. They also have a two-dollar coin which looks like a euro that they call a toonie. Who says Canadians don't have a sense of humour.
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