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HP Launches New Calculators

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the just-buy-the-cheap-one dept.

Handhelds 384

lar1 writes "It looks like HP is back in the calculator buisness! In a press release dated 2003 October 20, HP states: 'Within the next several weeks, HP will be launching three additional new calculators: two graphing and one scientific. The two yet-to-be-launched graphing calculators, together with the hp 49g+ and the entry-level hp 9g, will provide a complete range of graphing calculators expected to fulfill the needs and budgets of a broad spectrum of calculator users.' The 49g+ boasts features such as: USB and IrDA connectivity, a 75MHz ARM CPU, 2MB of flash, and an SD card slot. That's a lot of calculator!" We mentioned this calculator-on-growth-hormones earlier.

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384 comments

And the thought on everyone's mind is.... (5, Funny)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290958)

...Polish Notation Reverse it is?

Re:And the thought on everyone's mind is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7290999)

Portman, Natalie Reserved?

Re:And the thought on everyone's mind is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291116)

ATFR

SARS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291173)

SARS (coming to your neighbourhood this fall!)

Re:And the thought on everyone's mind is.... (0, Offtopic)

DeadSea (69598) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291211)

ATFR

Did anybody else rearrange that and get "fart"?

Re:And the thought on everyone's mind is.... (2, Insightful)

bmac526 (21433) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291204)

A different way of entering calculations. For example, to calculate 3+2, type:
3(enter)
2
+ (no equals sign)

or for (9+7)*3, type:
9(enter)
7
+
3
*

Takes a little getting use to, but after using it for a while, it becomes natural. I can barely figure out how to use a "regular" calculator now.
BTW, I'm the proud owner of an HP 32SII that hasn't needed a new battery in about 15 years.

Re:And the thought on everyone's mind is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291294)

What kind of idiot would pay $149 for a broken calculator?!!!

Oh, and:
"*** A PC with an internet connection is required. Please purchase separately. "!!!!

Re:And the thought on everyone's mind is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291233)

"While we are committed to the needs of our RPN customers, we also understand that many of our current and future customers are more familiar with the traditional algebraic entry mode. That's why we now offer the choice of multiple entry modes on the HP 49g+ and two other calculators. The HP 17bII+ financial calculator, launched in October, and the HP 12c platinum financial calculator, launched in May, allow for either RPN or algebraic entry modes."

"Fred A. Valdez
General Manager
HP Calculator Division, Personal Systems Group"

Please, Steve. Don't be mad at me! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291302)

Steve! I'm sorry for what I said this morning. Please, come back. I can't live without you!

RPN has ruined me for normal calculators (1)

dannobookem (642117) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291397)

The idea of a stack is so ingrained into me, it takes me a good 30 seconds to remember how to use normal calculators nowadays.

That's a thought on YOUR mind. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291411)

I know what RPN is, and if you don't know what it is, then you're a newbie in the calculator world and don't deserve to use a HP calculator. It's a pain in the butt to here people make fun of RPN because they don't know what it is, and it's even more of a pain trying to defend it against arrogant people like you. There's already a link [hp.com] on the press release that's devoted to describing RPN. This parent does not describe to be ranked as funny.

Lay off, and go to "calculator standard", www.ti.com [ti.com].

Who is it aimed at? (2, Insightful)

soluzar22 (219097) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290962)

Calculators with way too much muscle are cool, and they do tap right into that geeky part of me that drools over lovely gadgets, but on the other hand, seriously, if it can do calculations in hex, that's all I need, and I'd be almost scared to use that one.

I mean, if you break it, it's cost you how much? The last super-beefy calc I owned set me back about UKP 75 and that was a long time ago. Plus, that was a long way away from what we're seeing here. Who are they aiming this at? I personally could never justify the expense of one like this, no matter how useful it may be.



Oh and BTW - First Post ;-)

-- Soluzar

Re:Who is it aimed at? (1)

SuperguyA1 (90398) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291007)

Math geeks (like me) will love this. I've been wanting a calculator for years (since the TI-92 came out) that would do RPN and Symbolic algebra. I doubt the average user will want a calcuator like this, but a whole lot of math/physics/engineering/Chem geeks will be saving their pennies.

Re:Who is it aimed at? (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291137)

It should be a great learning tool. Its algebraic functions show you step-by-step what it's doing.

That is why I'm going to buy it.

Re:Who is it aimed at? (1)

Joney (703717) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291008)

Engineering students, perhaps? I don't think I would have graduated without my HP48. Joan

From the article (2)

pheared (446683) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291017)

Subject suitability

* Engineering
* Surveying
* Math
* Science
* Statistics

Re: No, I know it's a good calc, but (1)

soluzar22 (219097) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291062)


Anyone know how much it's going to cost? I'm not denying the inherent utility of the beast, I've had to have recourse to a beefy calc in my own distant past, but I am wondering who will pay what I suspect to be a high price.



-- Soluzar

Re: No, I know it's a good calc, but (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291179)

At the top of the page: $149.99.

I suspect that unlike PDAs and computers, calculators are considered tools, not toys, so the pricing isn't insanely high when they're first released.

Re: No, I know it's a good calc, but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291281)

I remember when $150 calculators could only add, subtract, multiply, and divide.

Re:Who is it aimed at? (5, Interesting)

daksis (163887) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291029)

I too have fond memories of being jealous over the guy who had every physics formula ever programmed into his TI or HP super computer. But I'm a little curious, with hand held computers with 400mhz processors becoming the norm, will we soon see the death of the "Super Calculator"?

Re:Who is it aimed at? (3, Insightful)

Joney (703717) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291103)

I think it will be up to the schools to decide. I remember in high school if you had a HP with the IR port, they made you put electrical tape over the front to keep you from 'cheating'
but the designation calculator will allow these things to be used on tests where a 'pocket PC' or such will probably be prohibited, even if they do the exact same things, there is paranoia about that sort of thing.
I also remember when the TI9something came out with the QWERTY keyboard on it, my school also prohibited it's use, as it no longer resembled a calculator but in fact a computer.

Ban these calculators in exams (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291239)

This is exactly the reason why I allow only calculators that have basic arithmetic, trigonometric/transcendental functions and one digit memory in my exams.

Bought an expensive, state-of-the-art HP/TI? Too bad you're not allowed to use it. On the other hand, surely you can afford to buy a simple secondary calculator.

Re:Who is it aimed at? (1)

FunkSoulBrother (140893) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291056)

I understand that it probably has more features than anyone would ever need, but if you look at the website its selling for 87 to 105 UK Pounds. Thats not much above the figure of 75 that you quoted paying a long time ago.

Now granted, the price should be way down on the old model thats was good enough for you, but far be it from me to begrudge an up and coming geek who wants to spend his own 80 pounds on a new calculator just like you did while coming up.

Re:Who is it aimed at? (1)

bigberk (547360) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291070)

Who are they aiming this at?
Engineering students, for one. Before I got my first graphic calculator (TI-83) I could have never imagined how much this would simplify problem solving. Looking forward to trying out the HP line.

But (1, Funny)

pheared (446683) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290967)

I love my TI-86. I loved my 82 too.

Re:But (0)

psykocrime (61037) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290998)

I love my TI-86 also, but I'm probably going to buy a HP-49g+ when they hit the store shelves. Just because, ya know, it's the geeky thing to do! :-)

I love my TI-86! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291316)

Did you install a fleshlight in it?!!!

Features (4, Funny)

mopslik (688435) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290974)

The 49g+ boasts features such as: USB and IrDA connectivity, a 75MHz ARM CPU, 2MB of flash, and an SD card slot.

And it adds too!

Broken. (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290981)


Slashdot'd already. Here's the text:
HP (NYSE:HPQ) today announced the hp 49g+ abacus, the flagship of a
new line of powerful abaci to be launched this fall.

Built for scientists, engineers, mathematicians, surveyors and
students who need portable calculating power, the HP 49g+ abacus
performs all the basic math functions the user knows.
Total workspace includes an unprecedented 80 rows of 10 beads per,
broken into two 40 row columns side by side.

Priced at suggested retail of $99.99, the
abacus also allows for future upgrades via an included
toolkit which allows the user to remove each side bar permitting
access to the bead assembly for easy replacement of worn beads.

"The hp 49g+ is a powerful tool for professional
engineers or college students who prefer the SB (Sliding Bead) entry mode of
calculating ," said Fred Valdez, general manager, abacuss, HP
Personal Systems Group. "We've taken the original hp 49g and made it
streamlined, faster and shellaced to prevent splinters."

Re:Broken. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291021)

> Slashdot'd already.

No, it's not. Karma whore.

Re:Broken. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291047)

No, it's not. Karma whore.
Funny mods don't get you karma, retard.

Check ebay.com (1)

samjam (256347) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291102)

Heh! The old 48GX has been selling for around $150 second hand!

http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dll?query=4 8g x&ht=1&sosortproperty=1&from=R10&BasicSear ch=

Watch out for some cancelled bids anytime now!

Its a top calculator though, with emulators running on freely available ROM imagesfor some time now.

I'm running a 48GX emulator on my SE P800 mobile phone.

Sam

my question (5, Funny)

spammyy (303116) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290982)

who needs that much in a calculator? i mean sounds ok for an entry level pda, but do you need that much? maybe they're trying to capture the calculator gaming world (who's played hick quest on their Ti83)

Re:my question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291073)

>who needs that much in a calculator?

Graduate math and physics majors.

Unfortunately HP sunk the boat, and TI came along with a rescue boat a long time ago.

Re:my question (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291128)

That's not true. The hp48g was one of the most popular engineering calculators ever to grace the face of this earth. The hp49g was nothing but a fancy memory upgrade and new symbolic features that allowed the calculator to be more student-friendly. This new one, the hp49g+ is an extension of that. This is a big deal because hp had announced that they were no longer in the calculator business. Now they're saying here's some new calcs for you that are running on an ARM processor AND have all the goodies you're used to having. Trust me, none of the stuff on this calculator is just eye candy. The machine is pretty badass because it takes the best of the hp49g but gives it to us with hp48gx goodness.

Screen resolution (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290983)

You'd think on a graphing calculator they'd try and put a decent screen resolution in ... more than 130x88 anyway.

I suppose it is because all the software is written for the old screen size, and they don't want to spend time adapting it for a more modern resolution. Shame.

Re:Screen resolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291167)

You'd think on a graphing calculator they'd try and put a decent screen resolution in ... more than 130x88 anyway.

Yes, I want a 42" HD viewing area (with surround sound) to see the intersection of y=x and sin(x).

Re:Screen resolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291259)

You silly boy. Why would you solve that equation graphically?

x = sin(x) is trivial.

Re:Screen resolution (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291474)

Resolution is independant of display size, sheesh.

I was just wondering why they didn't put a 262x160 screen (same physical size, before you get confused) and thus have nicer higher resolution, clearer graphs.

Call me a Luddite. . . (2, Funny)

bplipschitz (265300) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290991)

but I won't be replacing my RPN HP-15C any time soon. I've had it since 1984, and it's still going strong.

Then again, I won't be replacing my slide rules, either. . .

You don't replace the hp 49g+ (1)

pheared (446683) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291067)

...the hp 49g+ replaces you.

Re:You don't replace the hp 49g+ (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291240)

Hi there- just a quick note to let pheared know that he is a retared loser.

Later!

Re:Call me a Luddite. . . (1)

trentfoley (226635) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291149)

I still have and use an original HP41C and a newer HP41CX, synthetic programming and all - one of my first hacks.

I'm glad to hear that HP is back (or still) in the calc biz.

Without a good rpn calc, my sons won't be able to pursue an Engineering degree :)

And finally, there is some good news about HP. I miss Bill and Dave.

xhpcalc (1)

4of12 (97621) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291212)


I've had it since 1984, and it's still going strong.

Mine doesn't work anymore.

I miss it, but get by with my wife's HP-12C.

Some years ago, HP distributed xhpcalc [216.239.57.104], an X windows clients that provided a good facsimile of their programmer/scientific/financial calculator lines with nice buttons, RPN, LCD looking display, etc. [I wish I had a screen dump of it so you could see what it looked like.] This was on HP-UX for PA-RISC machines, like the 700 series. Looks as if it got phased out [slashdot.org] in favor of dtcalc (which I haven't used).

Unfortunately, it seems to have disappeared and I've yet to see anything on freshmeat comparable to xhpcalc.

What they don't say (2, Interesting)

JamesP (688957) | more than 10 years ago | (#7290995)

Is that 49g+ will be running a Saturn Emulator (not Sega Saturn, but the old 4 bit processor form the old ones)

HP your calculators were great, but stop crippling your products... Write another system. Yes, it's expensive, but TI does it right...

But... (1)

fuchsiawonder (574579) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291003)

The important thing is, do the new graphing calculators play Drugwar? *clutches TI-82*

Re:But... (1)

f13nd (555737) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291370)

my 48g+ does, so i assume yeah... or it won't take long for it to play it and TI-83's, 85's and 89's can all do it

Good news for overprivileged children everywhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291048)

Now my son can download two megabytes of his notes onto his calculator for consultation during examinations. Hooray! Finally, he will be able to leapfrog those poor children who "only" have a TI-89.

Frankly, I don't know how kids passed their classes before they had access to programmable calculators.

Re:Good news for overprivileged children everywher (2, Informative)

jasonbowen (683345) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291208)

I know of several schools that don't allow calculators during exams in calc and physics.

Clac vs PDA (5, Interesting)

magarity (164372) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291068)

Just to play devil's advocate: Since PDAs can be had with 75Mhz ARM CPUs and much more memory, what makes this dedicated device better? Given the magins in hardware manufacturing, wouldn't HP be better off writing PDA software to do all of these functions?

Re:Clac vs PDA (5, Insightful)

jonniesmokes (323978) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291168)

You're right that the processor muscle is better on a PDA - but what a good calculator does is provide you with a great interface to do math. Having all the buttons right in front of you really does matter. Once you learn where the buttons are you can fly through calculations. Hunting through menus on a PDA or pecking a fake keyboard with a mouse on a screen isn't nearly as nice.

HP's 15C, 42S, and 48G are great. The neat thing about this new one is that you could probably power a sophisticated robot. You could even do the inverse kinematics on the fly.

Re:Clac vs PDA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291396)

You could even do the inverse kinematics on the fly

Gee, reverse notation, inverse kinematics... these HP calculators just don't do anything in the right order, do they ?

Re:Clac vs PDA (4, Insightful)

Foochar (129133) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291201)

The interface is what makes the difference. I have an HP48GX as well as a Palm Tungsten E. Someone has written a 48SX/48GX/49G emulator that will on the palm. I have it, and it works great. There's nothing like being able to carry the functionality of my calculator with me wherever I go.

That being said, it is not a part and parcel replacement for my calculator. For intense operations the keypad on the real calculator is worlds better than clicking on the screen. The other thing is that the screen size of my calculator is just a little bit smaller than the screen of my palm, and on the palm screen you have to fit both the keypad and the calculator display.

Re:Clac vs PDA (4, Insightful)

FrankDrebin (238464) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291265)

wouldn't HP be better off writing PDA software to do all of these functions?

One problem with convergence of the general-purpose PDA and the calculator is that colleges ban the former from final exams because they can be used to store volumes of notes, even entire textbooks. There really is a market for college students, especially in engineering and sciences, for a good calculator without too much memory and fancy graphics, simply to help perform accurate calculations and nothing more.

Still not enough resolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291076)

"131 x 80 pixels"

No thanks. My TI-85 had 128 x 64 resolution ten years ago. Why would a calculator need crap like an SD slot when all you want is a high quality graph? Besides, I don't want to take the time to learn the HP equivalent of TI-Basic.

Is this even relevant? (1)

Asprin (545477) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291077)


As the proud owner of an HP28S from my undergrad days, I have to say that if I were going into school now, I'd just get a basic Palm for $80 and be done with it. Not only is it a standard platform with many games, utilites and useful apps, but several nifty programmable RPN graphing and solving calculator programs are available for free. You can probably even get an HP28 or HP15 emulator for it.

About the only advantage I still see with the HP Calc is the keyboard. That, and I'm certain the palm would be banned from exams because of the potential for cheating, but so would the HP, no? I mean, 2MB will store a ton of cheat sheets! I packed a boatload of notes into the 32K of my 28S back in '89!

Your post beat mine by 1 second....Same topic too. (1)

zymano (581466) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291258)

I agree with everything you said.

Compusa was offering a COLOR Viewsonic PDA for $ 99 last week but I didn't buy it.

The keyboard is the sticking point .

HP doesn't get it yet. Word is Convergence. (2, Insightful)

zymano (581466) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291083)

I saw a $ 99 Pda at Compusa last week. By viewsonice
with rebates.

Now, I know they can't handle all the functions of the top of the line graphing calculator but they might if you have an emulator or other software.

The graphing calculator is dying out and being replaced by SUPERIOR technology. HP is not embracing the future by not coming out with a hybrid
pda/graphing calculator.

Re:HP doesn't get it yet. Word is Convergence. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291164)

Easy: grab a PDA, put Linux and X11 on it, and run Matlab or Mathematica! Aren't general purpose computers cool?

Re:HP doesn't get it yet. Word is Convergence. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291165)

If the $99 pda could somehow run Mathmatica and gnuplot and had a perl interpreter and a decent keyboard, I could probably make it work, but I don't think it would be as efficient at the same tasks. I also think there are a lot of people who need a calculator for basic math but don't even understand what most of the features on a scientific calc actually do. If your calculator solves triple integrals but you aren't past multivariable calculus yourself, it probably looks like a useless feature.

It's pretty hard to make a general purpose computer fit the space that requires a good scientific calculator. I don't think a pda is going to do it either.

Updated ROM from the 49G (2, Informative)

Cochonou (576531) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291095)

From the previous articles about the 49G+, it looks like the calculator is to run an updated 49G ROM (with the ARM9 will emulating the Saturn CPU from the 49G).

Now, I wonder if HP is going to make the updated ROM and its subsequent revisions available for 49G owners... that would indeed be very kind of them, but they might also want to increase their sales figures by making 49G zealots switch to the 49G+.

Great devices, for the computer as well (4, Interesting)

Zergwyn (514693) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291112)

I am very excited by this news. I swear by my 48gx, which has the most useful calculatlor I have ever used. RPN input is very fast, the stack is very useful, and it was really ahead of its time with features. However, it can be a bit pokey at times, making certain features less useful. However, it is also very good on the computer. In mid-2000, HP actually made the laudable move of releasing the HP48 ROM images to the public, so various emulators that work exactly like the real thing can be found for various platforms. For OS X, I would suggest using x48, which is even featured [apple.com] on Apple's website! You can find the original page here [archive.org]. Worth checking out. Also, HP48gx enthusiasts should check out metakernal, which, while it requires you to have an add-on memory card, can make the 48gx a lot more usable. It rewrites a lot of the core functions in assembly, making them far faster, as well as adding new features. It is also free now (minus the cost of the required card, obviously).

Fibble gone missing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291125)

Find the ocular fwibble before midnight!

Add another item to the convergence pool (3, Insightful)

DeepDarkSky (111382) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291133)

Pretty soon, a little handheld gadget will be all of these:
- PDA
- Cell Phone
- Digital Camera
- Video player
- portable mass storage
- MP3 Player
- advanced graphing calculator ...there're so many, what have I missed?

You can bet something like this will not be allowed during test taking, that's for sure.

Re:Add another item to the convergence pool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291231)

Yeah, kids'll have to start using their brains to do long division again...

Re:Add another item to the convergence pool (1)

AragornSonOfArathorn (454526) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291422)

Pretty soon, a little handheld gadget will be all of these:
- PDA
- Cell Phone
- Digital Camera
- Video player
- portable mass storage
- MP3 Player
- advanced graphing calculator ...there're so many, what have I missed?


And a built-in hotplate to keep your mug of coffee warm.

Are They.... (2, Funny)

Anonym1ty (534715) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291155)

  • Do the new calculators also take pictures?
  • Do the also make phone calls?
  • Can I use it as a rolledex?
  • Can I send e-mail from it?
  • Can I IM people on it?
  • Can I stream live video from it?
  • Can I fax graphs from it?
  • Can I look up a webpage on it?
  • Can I listen to MP3's On it?
  • Can I watch Videos on it?
  • TV?

If it doesn't do ALL of this I am not impressed ---But that's just me

This is getting ridiculous... (2)

WIAKywbfatw (307557) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291199)

It's way past the stage that these pocket calculators are calculators in the classical sense - these beasts are practically PCs.

When I sat my first recognised exams in mathematics (way back in the late 80s), the HP calculator I had then was programmable, and it was child's play to write programmes that solved quadratic equations, etc. Other kids in my class had models that had graphical displays that would give visual representations of equations, calculate integrals, etc.

And while most of us then where honest, because we knew our subject material, the potential for cheating (using a calculator to come up with an answer instead of working it out with your brain) was enormous.

Fast forward to today. I bet a fair few of these calculators-on-steroids will get bought by students that have no idea how to solve the problems set for them but are quite happy to just plug in a few numbers and have the calculator pop out the answers for them.

That's great if you want generations of kids who can use a programme someone else has written for them, not so great if you hope to teach those kids more complex maths, physics, engineering, etc later on.

My nephew is about to start the same exams I took 15+ years ago. There are no restrictions or checks on what calculators can be taken into any exam. How ridiculous is that?

Re:This is getting ridiculous... (1)

Sage Gaspar (688563) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291291)

Not ridiculous at all, because the majority of the things you can do on calculators are donkey work. Taking derivatives, taking straightforward integrals, solving simple differential equations, plotting directional fields, etc, is not high-level math. When the calculator can do proofs for you, then come back and talk to me.

High-level problems are things for which there are no algorithms, and solutions aren't a simple matter of calculation. The skills you need are logic, the ability to translate symbols into meaning, and a fair amount of intuition. Those are the things they should be testing you on.

It makes it much easier to be able to do these things without using a calculator, and I find myself almost never pulling out my TI-89 (great investment, hehe; I was young and stupid), but it makes more sense to see if students actually understand the kernel of the idea rather than memorizing tables. It's the same exact reasoning that says we shouldn't be memorizing log tables.

Re:This is getting ridiculous... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291309)

When I had to pass my entry exam (civil engineering) we needed to determine the value of n for a quite complicated trigonometrical equation in x.

I programmed my TI58 with the equation, iterating over some values of x and n. 15 seconds later I had n = 4, and I started rewriting the equation from the bottom up. POC.

Re:This is getting ridiculous... (1)

Joney (703717) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291436)

Sometimes our professors would give equations or systems where the calculator would give a totally absurd result or it would give two 'possible' solutions, even though one of them was impossible in the system.
the people that did the work by hand had more meaningful answers, square root of something over something, while a calculator answer would be a totally berserk decimal. the teacher would often criticize those turning in papers with such answers, asking, oh can you show the whole class how you got that answer? and the whole time the student never realized how neatly the equation came out when done without the calculator.

but worse still, try turning in one of two possible answers the calculator gave you and it be the wrong one and getting 0 points for your effort.
I didn't take algebra in college but I imagine the simiple solution there is to ban calculators outright or those of greater than scientific capacity.

but in engineering I found that our teachers handled the calculators just fine.
Ex: by wanting a number to only three decimal places, but when the calculator figured it out, it rounded differently than you or I would so the class turned in slightly different answers depending on their reliance on the calculator.

Re:This is getting ridiculous... (4, Insightful)

Cochonou (576531) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291486)

I'd tend to disagree with you, even in the field of complex math teaching.

There is no denying that the CAS of these calculators is very powerful, and often can't be challenged for solving equations or calculating triple integrals. But at best, these kinds of tools can help you working faster and more efficiently, but not do the work for you.
In physics, the calculator (or Maple, Mathematica, Matlab..) can solve your equations saving your time - and some of your nights - but cannot put into equations your problem which is the real deal.
In mathematics, the calculator might be capable of determining the kernels and images of linear applications as an example, but comes short for solving anything that requires to find a proper demonstration. So it won't get you very far.

At last, it could be argued that because of the huge amount of memory modern calculators feature, student are becoming lazy and shove all the formulas into their calcs instead of learning them. Yes, it might be a shame. However, it is sometimes said that the important is not to know all the information by heart, but to know where you will be able to find it.

HP Bring back the 16C !!! (1)

caldwet (237198) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291200)

HP bring back the Computer Scienbtists 16C !

http://www.hpmuseum.org/hp16.htm

It only sells on ebay for between $150 - $300 USD.

Probably would cost about $5 bucks to make.

HP: Where's the updated 16c? (2)

billnapier (33763) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291209)

Screw all those nice graphics and algebraic equation solvers, what I want is an HP 16c" [hpmuseum.org]. They're on e-bay for $140 or so, which is a little expenseive for a at least 14 year old calculator. HP, bring back an improved 16c!

Comparison (1)

wizarddc (105860) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291308)

Does anyone know how these compare to the standard TI calculators? i.e. which is the most similar to the TI82, 83, 86, 89? Us math majors need to know!

reckanize! (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291332)

HP-11C 4EVA! ;)

Seriously, I'd never heard of the 16c until now - sounds interesting. Time to eBay! My 11c is still working _fine_, though.

Plastic ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291344)

It that plastic I see as a case ? Then the ingeneer at HP must have missed the point or been overruled by suits... What really is great in a good old metal HP 48 GX is its "lightsaber" side : it's strong, versatile, compact, elegant... the noble weapon of a more civilised time.

The only thing that reminds me of a lightsaber in the new one is that it talks like Yoda.

HP releases new calculator (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291377)

Formely know as the DEC Alpha line.

internet connection? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291379)


*** A PC with an internet connection is required. Please purchase separately.


whats all that about?

What, no coloured displays? (1)

dragonfly_blue (101697) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291406)

There are certain types of plots that would benefit greatly from having a colour display, such as fractal image generators, fuild dynamics plots, and even topographic-style mapping algorithms.

I guess I just don't understand why HP/Compaq PocketPC's have been shipping with gorgeous transreflective displays for years, why they haven't shipped a high-end calculator for the real math geeks.

I suppose they think all of us just carry around a laptop with Mathematica instead.

How long till Linux port? (2, Funny)

TokyoBoy (217214) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291420)

Hm....2MB flash, SD card slot, ARM CPU...looks like a Linux port is a no-brainer.

Any bets on how long till Linux's first boot on an HP49g+?

Floating point (1)

LordDartan (8373) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291435)

If I remember correctly, the ARM processors don't have a floating point unit on them, so is it really going to be any faster than my old 48gx?

Holy Cow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291449)

Can you imagine a Beowulf cluster of these?

Girl selling her calculator (1)

netglen (253539) | more than 10 years ago | (#7291450)

Last month I saw a girl in college trying to sell her $80 graphing calculator for $5. She was broke and wanted to some money for lunch. Sheesh.

Whoopty..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7291456)

fuckin....

doo....
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