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The Ten Most Overpaid Jobs In The U.S.

simoniker posted more than 10 years ago | from the it's-a-gas dept.

The Almighty Buck 1130

misbach writes "Here is what the 'compensation experts' have to say are the ten most overpaid jobs [original article at CBS MarketWatch]. 'Almost no one in America would admit to being overpaid, but many of us take home bloated paychecks far beyond what's deserved. 'Fair compensation' is a relative term, yet human-resource consultants and executive headhunters agree some jobs command excessive compensation that can't be explained by labor supply-and-demand imbalances.'"

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Most overpaid job? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436787)

First poster!

Re:Most overpaid job? (2, Funny)

Aardpig (622459) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436870)

First poster!

Huh? First Poster is the most overpaid job? That's news to me, I thought the pay was pretty lousy. Which is a pity, since /. would clearly disintegrate without the terrific work of those unsung heroes, the First Post ACs.

Re:Most overpaid job? (2, Funny)

Dutchmaan (442553) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436897)

I can see the first poster as being most over moderated job.

I don;t know about 9 (3, Insightful)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436788)


I have to think about 9) Pilots for major airlines. If the plane hits inclement weather or other serious issues arise do you really care if the people behind the cockpit doors are making ~250K a year?

Oh and 2) Washed-up pro athletes in long-term contracts? Crap. All major sports athletes are overpaid primadonnas. Paying them millions because they can throw a ball only fuels consumerism. "Did you watch the game on Sunday? Wow!" mindless sheep..

Re:I don;t know about 9 (1)

hng_rval (631871) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436820)

Not to mention that pilots are bathed in a lot more radiation then your average ground-based human.

Compensation for health risks should be considered.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (2, Informative)

3waygeek (58990) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436892)

The Straight Dope [straightdope.com] on in-flight irradiation -- I suppose your definition of "a lot more" is somewhat different than mine.

I think at least part of the problem (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436826)

is that the pilots for the non-major airlines are making so, so much less.

Is this because the pilots for the major airlines are better? Is it because the lives they protect are worth more? No. It's because they have a better union.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (0, Troll)

hobbespatch (699189) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436846)

So what your saying is that Slashdot Moderator wasn't on the list?

Re:I don;t know about 9 (5, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436871)

Athletes is about supply and demand. There are very few people who can supply an acurate, repeatable 50 yeard pass(or whatever) while 3 or 4 300 pound guys moving as fast as an elk bear down on them.
The company that owns the team makes money from that, and the athlete gets a percentage.

pretty simple actually.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (3, Insightful)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436872)

"2) Washed-up pro athletes in long-term contracts? Crap. All major sports athletes are overpaid primadonnas. Paying them millions because they can throw a ball only fuels consumerism. "Did you watch the game on Sunday? Wow!" mindless sheep.."

Actually, this is driven by advertising.
Sports bring in viewers. Star athletes sell stuff people. Advertising corrupts anything it touches. (Just look at professional baseball or pop music for prime examples.)

Re:I don;t know about 9 (1)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436959)


Sports bring in viewers. Star athletes sell stuff people. Advertising corrupts anything it touches.

Which is why I say it fuels consumerism, same thing in as many words. ;) (I cancelled my cable as there is so little useful information on TV these days)

Re:I don;t know about 9 (4, Insightful)

antis0c (133550) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436885)

I agree. A major airline pilot holds the lives of a lot of people in their hands. I wouldn't mind if they got paid twice that as long as they were well trained and happy.

Last thing I want is a depressed pilot worrying about bills when the left engine fails. Last thing I want to enter his mind is "fuck it" when that happens.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (2, Informative)

Fallen Kell (165468) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436967)

Too bad the computer is what does the major work now on any modern jet-liner. You don't even need the pilot to land it anymore... Basically they are there as a backup to the computer system now.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436895)

Yeah, mindless sheep.

Tell me WTF do you do for a hobby? Whack off in the server room?

You know nerds bitch about jocks all through high school, how they think they're so great, so elite.

And then they turn around and say shit like this.

Way to be a grown up and appreciate that everyone enjoys different things.

Mod parent down for being worthless.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436970)

Good call, wish I had some mod points for you.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436915)

It is much, much easier to maintain a server farm than to consistently perform on Sundays in the NFL.

Just an FYI.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7437006)

So? Every day millions of sheep sit on the couch, eat Cheetos and watch the same crap at the same time, the reality show, the latest hot sitcom or jocks throwing balls. They have no free will. "Watch the game, watch the ads, consume." Millions of sheep laughing at the same time as Actor X trips and spills water on Actor Y..
Fuck that, read a good book.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (4, Insightful)

transient (232842) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436973)

Another thing to consider with airline pilots is the huge investment they have to make for initial training. And if you look at salaries for any pilot who isn't working for a major airline, you will begin to understand the sacrifices that have to be made to make it to the majors.

Re:I don;t know about 9 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436996)

>> Crap. All major sports athletes are overpaid primadonnas. Paying them millions because they can throw a ball only fuels consumerism.

Professional athletes are absolutely some of the most underpaid people in the world. First off, these are the most competative jobs in the world and the spots are very limited. Secondly, the owners of these Pro sports teams, despite their claims of losing money every year, make so much more than their players it is ridiculous.

I'm sure you wouldnt suggest that a computer programmer who works on games, or audio compression formats, or porno codecs are worthless.

@subscribers (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436798)

thanks for slashdotting the site already, you ugly hairy subscribers

Re:@subscribers (1)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436840)


thanks for slashdotting the site already, you ugly hairy subscribers

Most underpaid job? 1) Slashdot editor When a site see a small flurry of referals from /. the admins know they've got ~30 minutes to increase their bandwidth with their providers. It's like an early warning system which so few heed... ;)

Re:@subscribers (5, Funny)

TheOtherAgentM (700696) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436986)

Does anyone else find it amusing that the site that got /.ed is alwayson-network.com and it is down?

And rounding out the bottom 10: (-1)

CmdrTaco (troll) (578383) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436802)

10. The Indian programmer doing the job you were laid off from.

Re:And rounding out the bottom 10: (2, Interesting)

Stephen (20676) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436852)

The Indian programmer doing the job you were laid off from
I thought they were underpaid. Isn't that the point?

Re:And rounding out the bottom 10: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436887)

They get paid?

Re:And rounding out the bottom 10: (1)

twiddlingbits (707452) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436927)

It's all relative. In their economy they might be thought of as overpaid by most of the population. Most folks I talk to think most computer people are overpaid (since it's such an easy job!)

#1 Most Overpaid Jobs (1)

bluethundr (562578) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436803)

I think I know the #1 most

Re:#1 Most Overpaid Jobs (3, Funny)

bluethundr (562578) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436844)

DOH! must...hit...preview!!!

Meant to say, I think I know the #1 most overpaid Jobs... [usatoday.com]

Re:#1 Most Overpaid Jobs (1)

rgoer (521471) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436968)

Interestingly enough, Jobs' salary is only one dollar [forbes.com] .

Re:#1 Most Overpaid Jobs (3, Informative)

aggieben (620937) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436930)

Just in case anyone cares, an FYI:

"It's better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt."-Abraham Lincoln

The attribution is incorrect. This saying came from Proverbs 17:28.

slashdotted (5, Funny)

dtfinch (661405) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436805)

So much for alwayson-network

Re:slashdotted (1)

Phillup (317168) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436863)

Wow... did they pick a bad name, or what!?

There are only 5 posts (as I type this)... I didn't think people read the articles before posting.

Hm... might need to rethink that.

Where is Gates on this list? (2, Insightful)

ChaoticChaos (603248) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436806)

The first clue you're being paid too much is when you start building castles instead of homes. ;-)

It's disingenous to include "CEO's of underperforming companies" when you can't include the man who's in charge of software technology for Microsoft and the whole thing is riddled with security issues. I'd say he's being paid a bit too much with that track record.

Re:Where is Gates on this list? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436835)

Microsoft would not be considered underperforming. Now Enron, WorldCom, Tyco, and ImClone, OTOH.......

Re:Where is Gates on this list? (2, Interesting)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436858)

He makes less than 500,000 per year. I think it is around 250,000 or so. The rest of his wealth comes from investments.

Re:Where is Gates on this list? (5, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436907)

But Microsoft is not an underperforming company. Security issues do not matter, the bottom lines does.
A CEO that manages to put 50 billion dollars away for emergences is a damn good CEO.

Now their product may suck, but the product is not the issue here.

Re:Where is Gates on this list? (1)

realdpk (116490) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436916)

The article is entirely /.'d, so, I can't say if they did, but if they're going to include CEOs, they should specifically mention CEOs of the various Red Cross chapters.

Red Cross donations are regularly pissed away on them. Some are making >$200K for a supposed "charity". What a joke.

You mean Steve Jobs. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436978)

Not his direct salary, but the private jet they bought him and the (unaccounted) stock options. $100s of millions, and they've pretty much brokent even over the last few years, with no significant market growth in anything other than iPods.

Bill's a great discount of a CEO when you consider their profitability and market size. Stevie's raking it in while AAPL investors get pooched.

Re:You mean Steve Jobs. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7437008)

http://www.google.com/search?q=overpaid+ceos+jobs [google.com]

Stevie's #1, and not just in the hearts of Maccies everywhere.

Correction (1)

Cobralisk (666114) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436809)

Almost every year since 2000 has seen the unleashing of a virulent program that uses the net to travel.

This should say almost every day

Re:Correction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436880)

i think you hit Reply to the wrong article.

They missed one. (5, Funny)

Joseph Vigneau (514) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436812)

AlwaysOn Network Web Site Architect/Administrator

Without reading the article (1, Funny)

Bendebecker (633126) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436814)

My guess at number #1 has got to be CEO of a major corp.

Slashdotted already? (5, Funny)

edwardd (127355) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436815)

I mean, come on! are we all that afraid that WE'RE overpaid?

Re:Slashdotted already? (5, Funny)

erice (13380) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436961)

I mean, come on! are we all that afraid that WE'RE overpaid?

Not me. I'm unemployed.

hrmm.. (1)

The Other White Boy (626206) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436816)

..i'm just getting a site that wants me to log in, whereas everyone else seems to be reporting a /.ing.. odd.

Site is slashdottted already (-1)

Muda69 (718162) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436819)

Damn, Taco must be pissed that he on the list and is launching his own DOS attack.......

The article (Thanks /.!) (1, Informative)

anaphora (680342) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436827)

This was taken from http://209.157.64.200/focus/f-news/1016490/posts SAN FRANCISCO (CBS.MW) -- Almost no one in America would admit to being overpaid, but many of us take home bloated paychecks far beyond what's deserved. "Fair compensation" is a relative term, yet human-resource consultants and executive headhunters agree some jobs command excessive compensation that can't be explained by labor supply-and-demand imbalances. And while it's easy to argue that chief executives, lawyers and movie stars are overpaid, reality is not that cut and dry. Corporate attorneys earning $500 an hour and plaintiffs lawyers pocketing a third of a class-action or personal-injury settlement certainly don't go hungry. Yet many local prosecutors and public defenders are hard-pressed to pay off law-school loans. Hollywood stars, making $20 million a movie or $10 million per TV-season, qualify for many people's overpaid list. But for every one of those actors and actresses, there are a thousand waiting tables and taking bit movie parts or regional theater roles awaiting a big break that never comes. "A lot of people are overpaid because there are certain things consumers just don't want screwed up," said Bill Coleman, senior vice president of compensation for Salary.com. "You wouldn't want to board a plane flown by a second-rate pilot or hire a cheap wedding photographer to record an event you hope happens once in your lifetime. "With pro athletes, one owner is willing to pay big money for a star player and then all the other players want to keep up with the Joneses," Coleman said. "The art with CEO pay is making sure your CEO is above the median -- and you see where that goes." What follows is a list of the 10 most overpaid jobs in the U.S., in reverse order, drafted with input from compensation experts: 10) Wedding photographers Photographers typically charge $2,000 to $5,000 to shoot a wedding, for what amounts to a one-day assignment plus processing time. Some get $15,000 or more. Yet many mope through the job, bumping guests in their way without apology, with the attitude: "I'm just doing this for the money until Time or National Geographic calls." They must cover equipment and film-development costs. Still, many in major metropolitan areas who shoot two weddings each weekend in the May-to-October marrying season pull in $100,000 for six months' work. Yet let's face it; much of their work is mediocre. Have you ever really been wowed flipping the pages of a wedding album handed you by recent newlyweds? Annie Leibovitz and Richard Avedon they're not, but some charge fees as if they're in the same league. 9) Pilots for major airlines Captains with 12 years of experience earn up to $265 an hour at Delta, United, American and Northwest, which translates to $250,000 a year and more for a job that technology is making almost fully automated. By comparison, senior pilots at low-fare carriers like Southwest and Jet Blue make about 40 percent less. That helps explain why their employers are profitable while several of the majors are teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. The pilot's union is the most powerful in the industry. It commands premium wages as if still in the glory days of long-gone Pan Am and TWA, rather than the cutthroat, deregulated market of under-$200 coast-to-coast roundtrips. Because we entrust our lives to them, consumers accept the excessive sums paid them, when it's airplane mechanics who really hold our fate in their hands. 8) West Coast longshoremen In early 2002, West Coast ports shut down as the longshoremen's union fought to preserve generous health-care benefits that would make most Americans drool. The union didn't demand much in wage hikes for good reason: Its members already were making a boatload of money. Next year, West Coast dockworkers will earn an average of $112,000 for handling cargo, according to the Pacific Maritime Association, their employer. Office clerks who log shipping records into computers will earn $136,000. And unionized foremen who oversee the rank-and-file will pull down an average $177,000. Unlike their East Coast union brethren who compete with non-union ports in the South and Gulf of Mexico, the West Coast stevedores have an ironfisted lock on Pacific ports. Given their rare monopoly, they can disrupt U.S. commerce -- as they did during the FDR years -- and command exorbitant wages, even though their work is more automated and less hazardous than in the days of "On the Waterfront." 7) Airport skycaps Many of the uniformed baggage handlers who check in luggage at curbside pull in more than $100,000 a year -- most of it in cash. On top of their $30,000 to $40,000 salaries, peak earners take in $300 or more a day in tips. Sound implausible? That amounts to a $2 tip from 18 travelers an hour on average. Many tip more than that. While most skycaps are cordial, a good many treat customers with blank indifference, knowing harried travelers don't want to brave counter check-ins, especially in the post 9/11 age. Their work is more mindless than that of a McDonald's counter clerk, who at least has to bag the order correctly. 6) Real estate agents selling high-end homes Anyone who puts in a little effort can pass the test to get a real estate agent's license, which makes the vast sums that luxury-home agents earn stupefying. While most agents hustle tail to earn $60,000 a year, those in affluent areas can pull down $200,000-plus for half the effort, courtesy of the fatter commissions on pricier listings. Luxury home agents live off the economy's fat, yet many put on airs as if they're members of the class whose homes they're selling, and eye underdressed open-house visitors as if they're casing the joint. 5) Motivational speakers and ex-politicians on lecture circuit Whether it's for knighted ex-Mayor Rudy Guiliani or Tom "In Search of Excellence" Peters, corporate trade groups pay astronomical sums to celebrity-types and political has-beens to address their convention audiences. Former President Reagan raised the bar back in 1989 when he took $2 million from Japanese business groups for making two speeches. Bill Clinton earned $9.5 million on 60 speeches last year, though most of those earnings went to charity and to fund his presidential library. The national convention circuit's shame is that it blows trade-group members' money on orators whose speeches often have been warmed over a dozen times. 4) Orthodontists For a 35-hour workweek, orthodontists earn a median $350,000 a year, according to the Journal of Clinical Orthodontics. General dentists, meanwhile, earn about half as much working 39 hours a week on average, in a much dirtier job. The difference in their training isn't like that of a heart surgeon vs. a family-practice doctor. It's a mere two years, and a vastly rewarding investment if you're among the chosen: U.S. dental schools have long been criticized for keeping orthodontists in artificially low supply to keep their income up. This isn't brain surgery: Orthodontists simply manipulate teeth in a growing child's mouth -- and often leave adjustment work to assistants whose handiwork they merely sign off on. What makes their windfall egregious is that they stick parents with most of the inflated bill, since orthodontia insurance benefits cover nowhere near as large a percentage as for general dentistry. 3) CEOs of poorly performing companies Most U.S. chief executives are vastly overpaid, but if their company is rewarding shareholders and employees, producing quality products of good value and being a responsible corporate citizen, it's hard to take issue with their compensation. CEOs at chronically unprofitable companies and those forever lagging industry peers stand as the most grossly overpaid. Most know they should resign -- in shareholders' and employees' interest -- but they survive because corporate boards that oversee them remain stacked with friends and family members. The ultimate excess comes after they're finally forced out, usually by insiders tired of seeing their own stock holdings plummet. These long-time losers draw multimillion-dollar severance packages as a reward for their failed stewardship. 2) Washed-up pro athletes in long-term contracts Pro athletes at the top of their game deserve what they earn for being the best in their business. It's those who sign whopping, long-term contracts after a few strong years, and then find their talents vanish, who reap unconscionable sums of money. NBA player Shawn Kemp, for instance, earned $10 million in a year he averaged a pathetic 6.1 points and 3.8 rebounds a game. Colorado Rockies pitcher Mike Hampton earned $9.5 million -- in the second year of an eight-year, $121 million contract -- and compiled a 7-15 won-loss record with a pitiful earned-run average of 6.15. Thank the players' unions for refusing to negotiate contracts based on performance -- and driving up the cost of tickets to levels unaffordable for a family of four, especially for football and basketball. They point to owners as the culprits, yet golf star Tiger Woods and tennis champ Serena Williams earn their keep based on their performance in each tournament. 1) Mutual-fund managers Everyone on Wall Street makes far too much for the backbreaking work of moving money around, but mutual fund managers are emerging as among the most reprehensible. This isn't kicking 'em when they're down, given the growing fund-industry scandal. They've been long overpaid. Stock-fund managers can easily earn $500,000 to $1 million a year including bonuses -- even though only 3 in 10 beat the market in the last 10 years. Now we discover an untold number enriched themselves and favored clients with illegally timed trades of fund shares. That's a worse betrayal of trust than the corporate scandals of recent years, since they're supposed to be on the little person's side. Put aside what fund managers earn and consider their bosses. Putnam's ex-CEO Lawrence J. Lasser's pay easily outstrips the bloated package that sparked New York Stock Exchange President Dick Grasso's ouster. Lasser's reported take: An average of $21 million in salary and bonus annually in the last five years, and a deferred compensation package estimated to exceed $200 million. If only we were all so fortunate.

Re:The article (Thanks /.!) (5, Informative)

anaphora (680342) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436865)

Once again, with formatting this time :P

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS.MW) -- Almost no one in America would admit to being overpaid, but many of us take home bloated paychecks far beyond what's deserved.

Fair compensation is a relative term, yet human-resource consultants and executive headhunters agree some jobs command excessive compensation that can't be explained by labor supply-and-demand imbalances.

And while it's easy to argue that chief executives, lawyers and movie stars are overpaid, reality is not that cut and dry.

Corporate attorneys earning $500 an hour and plaintiffs lawyers pocketing a third of a class-action or personal-injury settlement certainly don't go hungry. Yet many local prosecutors and public defenders are hard-pressed to pay off law-school loans.

Hollywood stars, making $20 million a movie or $10 million per TV-season, qualify for many people's overpaid list. But for every one of those actors and actresses, there are a thousand waiting tables and taking bit movie parts or regional theater roles awaiting a big break that never comes.

A lot of people are overpaid because there are certain things consumers just don't want screwed up, said Bill Coleman, senior vice president of compensation for Salary.com. You wouldn't want to board a plane flown by a second-rate pilot or hire a cheap wedding photographer to record an event you hope happens once in your lifetime.

With pro athletes, one owner is willing to pay big money for a star player and then all the other players want to keep up with the Joneses, Coleman said. The art with CEO pay is making sure your CEO is above the median -- and you see where that goes.

What follows is a list of the 10 most overpaid jobs in the U.S., in reverse order, drafted with input from compensation experts:

10) Wedding photographers

Photographers typically charge $2,000 to $5,000 to shoot a wedding, for what amounts to a one-day assignment plus processing time. Some get $15,000 or more. Yet many mope through the job, bumping guests in their way without apology, with the attitude: I'm just doing this for the money until Time or National Geographic calls.

They must cover equipment and film-development costs. Still, many in major metropolitan areas who shoot two weddings each weekend in the May-to-October marrying season pull in $100,000 for six months' work.

Yet let's face it; much of their work is mediocre. Have you ever really been wowed flipping the pages of a wedding album handed you by recent newlyweds? Annie Leibovitz and Richard Avedon they're not, but some charge fees as if they're in the same league.

9) Pilots for major airlines

Captains with 12 years of experience earn up to $265 an hour at Delta, United, American and Northwest, which translates to $250,000 a year and more for a job that technology is making almost fully automated.

By comparison, senior pilots at low-fare carriers like Southwest and Jet Blue make about 40 percent less. That helps explain why their employers are profitable while several of the majors are teetering on the brink of bankruptcy.

The pilot's union is the most powerful in the industry. It commands premium wages as if still in the glory days of long-gone Pan Am and TWA, rather than the cutthroat, deregulated market of under-$200 coast-to-coast roundtrips. Because we entrust our lives to them, consumers accept the excessive sums paid them, when it's airplane mechanics who really hold our fate in their hands.

8) West Coast longshoremen

In early 2002, West Coast ports shut down as the longshoremen's union fought to preserve generous health-care benefits that would make most Americans drool. The union didn't demand much in wage hikes for good reason: Its members already were making a boatload of money.

Next year, West Coast dockworkers will earn an average of $112,000 for handling cargo, according to the Pacific Maritime Association, their employer. Office clerks who log shipping records into computers will earn $136,000. And unionized foremen who oversee the rank-and-file will pull down an average $177,000.

Unlike their East Coast union brethren who compete with non-union ports in the South and Gulf of Mexico, the West Coast stevedores have an ironfisted lock on Pacific ports. Given their rare monopoly, they can disrupt U.S. commerce -- as they did during the FDR years -- and command exorbitant wages, even though their work is more automated and less hazardous than in the days of On the Waterfront.

7) Airport skycaps

Many of the uniformed baggage handlers who check in luggage at curbside pull in more than $100,000 a year -- most of it in cash.

On top of their $30,000 to $40,000 salaries, peak earners take in $300 or more a day in tips. Sound implausible? That amounts to a $2 tip from 18 travelers an hour on average. Many tip more than that.

While most skycaps are cordial, a good many treat customers with blank indifference, knowing harried travelers don't want to brave counter check-ins, especially in the post 9/11 age. Their work is more mindless than that of a McDonald's counter clerk, who at least has to bag the order correctly.

6) Real estate agents selling high-end homes

Anyone who puts in a little effort can pass the test to get a real estate agent's license, which makes the vast sums that luxury-home agents earn stupefying.

While most agents hustle tail to earn $60,000 a year, those in affluent areas can pull down $200,000-plus for half the effort, courtesy of the fatter commissions on pricier listings.

Luxury home agents live off the economy's fat, yet many put on airs as if they're members of the class whose homes they're selling, and eye underdressed open-house visitors as if they're casing the joint.

5) Motivational speakers and ex-politicians on lecture circuit

Whether it's for knighted ex-Mayor Rudy Guiliani or Tom In Search of Excellence Peters, corporate trade groups pay astronomical sums to celebrity-types and political has-beens to address their convention audiences.

Former President Reagan raised the bar back in 1989 when he took $2 million from Japanese business groups for making two speeches. Bill Clinton earned $9.5 million on 60 speeches last year, though most of those earnings went to charity and to fund his presidential library.

The national convention circuit's shame is that it blows trade-group members' money on orators whose speeches often have been warmed over a dozen times.

4) Orthodontists

For a 35-hour workweek, orthodontists earn a median $350,000 a year, according to the Journal of Clinical Orthodontics. General dentists, meanwhile, earn about half as much working 39 hours a week on average, in a much dirtier job.

The difference in their training isn't like that of a heart surgeon vs. a family-practice doctor. It's a mere two years, and a vastly rewarding investment if you're among the chosen: U.S. dental schools have long been criticized for keeping orthodontists in artificially low supply to keep their income up.

This isn't brain surgery: Orthodontists simply manipulate teeth in a growing child's mouth -- and often leave adjustment work to assistants whose handiwork they merely sign off on. What makes their windfall egregious is that they stick parents with most of the inflated bill, since orthodontia insurance benefits cover nowhere near as large a percentage as for general dentistry.

3) CEOs of poorly performing companies

Most U.S. chief executives are vastly overpaid, but if their company is rewarding shareholders and employees, producing quality products of good value and being a responsible corporate citizen, it's hard to take issue with their compensation.

CEOs at chronically unprofitable companies and those forever lagging industry peers stand as the most grossly overpaid. Most know they should resign -- in shareholders' and employees' interest -- but they survive because corporate boards that oversee them remain stacked with friends and family members.

The ultimate excess comes after they're finally forced out, usually by insiders tired of seeing their own stock holdings plummet. These long-time losers draw multimillion-dollar severance packages as a reward for their failed stewardship.

2) Washed-up pro athletes in long-term contracts

Pro athletes at the top of their game deserve what they earn for being the best in their business. It's those who sign whopping, long-term contracts after a few strong years, and then find their talents vanish, who reap unconscionable sums of money.

NBA player Shawn Kemp, for instance, earned $10 million in a year he averaged a pathetic 6.1 points and 3.8 rebounds a game. Colorado Rockies pitcher Mike Hampton earned $9.5 million -- in the second year of an eight-year, $121 million contract -- and compiled a 7-15 won-loss record with a pitiful earned-run average of 6.15.

Thank the players' unions for refusing to negotiate contracts based on performance -- and driving up the cost of tickets to levels unaffordable for a family of four, especially for football and basketball. They point to owners as the culprits, yet golf star Tiger Woods and tennis champ Serena Williams earn their keep based on their performance in each tournament.

1) Mutual-fund managers

Everyone on Wall Street makes far too much for the backbreaking work of moving money around, but mutual fund managers are emerging as among the most reprehensible.

This isn't kicking 'em when they're down, given the growing fund-industry scandal. They've been long overpaid. Stock-fund managers can easily earn $500,000 to $1 million a year including bonuses -- even though only 3 in 10 beat the market in the last 10 years.

Now we discover an untold number enriched themselves and favored clients with illegally timed trades of fund shares. That's a worse betrayal of trust than the corporate scandals of recent years, since they're supposed to be on the little person's side.

Put aside what fund managers earn and consider their bosses. Putnam's ex-CEO Lawrence J. Lasser's pay easily outstrips the bloated package that sparked New York Stock Exchange President Dick Grasso's ouster. Lasser's reported take: An average of $21 million in salary and bonus annually in the last five years, and a deferred compensation package estimated to exceed $200 million.

If only we were all so fortunate.

Re:The article (Thanks /.!) (2, Funny)

Gherald (682277) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436957)

> Once again, with formatting this time :P

Karma whoring at its best ;-)

Re:The article (Thanks /.!) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436925)

Next year, West Coast dockworkers will earn an average of $112,000 for eating CmdrTaco's asshole

Nice try, troll!

Re:The article (Thanks /.!) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436966)

Heythanksthatsawesomeilovestuffthatrunsonandonwith outanybreaks!

It's slashdotted now but... (-1, Redundant)

BigGar' (411008) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436829)

where does Slashdot news editor fall in the list?

I nomiate: Slashdot editors! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436831)

Paying those ass-clowns *anything* is overpaying.

Ooops, /.ed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436842)

alwayson.com is not....anymore.

Always on.. (-1, Redundant)

DraKKon (7117) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436847)

Heh.. alwayson-network it is not...

Fastest Slashdotting Ever? (nt) (0, Redundant)

Nutsquasher (543657) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436848)

(nt)

Dare I say it? (1)

weeboo0104 (644849) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436851)

Most overpaid job #11 - Slashdot Editor

wow, that was fast (1)

CAIMLAS (41445) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436860)

hopefully one of the first three people to view the site thought to mirror the content for the rest of us here...

1 Minute to Slashdot Effect (1)

joeware (672849) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436861)

It appears that only 1 minute after this story was posted to the masses, the site hosting the article has already been downed due to the Slashdot effect. You darn wankers, you are like a virus that brings down unprepared sites on the web. I want to read the article, could the rest of you please stop for a few minutes? Thank you very much.

/.ed (1)

r_glen (679664) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436864)

Oh well, it's much more fun to speculate.

Kind of an ironic name for a website... (2, Funny)

ahem (174666) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436866)

...given the current slashdotting.

http://www.alwayson-network.com/comments.php?id= 14 77_0_7_0_C

Heaven Forbid (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436867)

Heaven forbid that we just list the 10 things on slashdot... guess that would be asking too much.

What about HR people? (4, Funny)

tangledweb (134818) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436868)

Is it too late to nominate human resource consultant to the list?

Re:What about HR people? (1)

EinarH (583836) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436994)

Gimmme a break! And don't be so bitter.

They do the important job of outsourcing to India!

and the top two most over paid jobs are (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436878)

#1 web administrator of www.alwayson-network.com

#2 slashdot reader who spend all day reloading /.

Always on? (1)

carlcmc (322350) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436881)

http://www.alwayson-network.com/comments.php?id=14 77_0_7_0_C

Problem Report
There was a communication problem.

Message ID
TCP_ERROR

Problem Description
The system was unable to communicate with the server.

Possible Problem Cause

The Web server may be down.
The Web server may be too busy.
The Web server may be experiencing other problems, preventing it from responding to clients.
The communication path may be experiencing problems.

Possible Solution
Try connecting to this server later.

Uh huh - Always on...

A ./ record (1)

Perl-Pusher (555592) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436882)

The site was down before the first post hit ./! That's got to be some kind of record.

text in case of /.ing (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436890)

Database connection failed. Please check your config settings.
Database connection failed. Please check your config settings.
Database connection failed. Please check your config settings.
Database connection failed. Please check your config settings.
Database connection failed. Please check your config settings.
Invalid page request.
Database connection failed. Please check your config settings.
Database connection failed. Please check your config settings.
Database connection failed. Please check your config settings.

Notice: Undefined variable: set in /home/aonet/public_html/aopm/lib/banner.fns.php on line 98

they forgot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436894)

/. story poster...

Slashdotted after one (1) comment. (1)

randyest (589159) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436899)

Guess that server couldn't even handle the subscribers. Is that a record?

Well, until some karma whore or AC posts the article text, I'll have to make my own list of overpaid jobs. Ready?

  1. Actor/actress
  2. Politician
  3. Sport player
  4. Hardware reviewer (in any case where $pay > 0)
  5. Supermodel dressing room attendant
Anyone else have more? ;)

Another Article @ CBS (3, Informative)

jaaron (551839) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436900)

This article seems slashdotted, but there's a similar (same?) article on the CBS site: Ten most overpaid jobs in the U.S. [marketwatch.com] .

Also, check a search on Google News [google.com]

Well... alwayson is currently off.... (0, Redundant)

Fallen Kell (165468) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436904)

Arrg.. They be slashdotted there mattey.

Even though its not "talk like a pirate day", it still beats talking like a landlubber.

...and the 11th most overpaid job is (0, Redundant)

inhalent (88094) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436905)

WebAdmin for alwayson-network.com!

Of course (0)

NotoriousBob (700016) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436906)

This answers the most import question of all; Why don't /.ers read articles? Well, you need to be able to reach it to read it.

Slashdotted! (0)

avkillick (698274) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436910)

Looks like the always-on network just became the always-off network

law of supply and demand. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436912)

No such thing as "overpaid". If someone is
willing to pay it and some body's willing to
supply it. It's a fair price.

Number 11 on the list... (1)

cyclist1200 (513080) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436917)

...Compensation Expert.

The guy keeping their website up (0, Redundant)

cyber_rigger (527103) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436921)

Might be over paid. :^)

Public Program Managment. (5, Insightful)

Brigadier (12956) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436926)



I work for an architecture firm that handles airport noise mitigation projects. and I'ved worked with several municipalities with regards to differnt programs accross the country. The majority of these programs are federally funded. I recently saw a job opening for a program director assistant type position paying over 80k a year. For someone not knowing the real requirments of the Job it may sound intence but the job is so easy and so useless. It blows my mind to see how over paid public servants are in the US it is crazy. Not only that but how many uneccessary jobs are created in adminitrative positions. Another area is State education systems and the amount of money paid to administrative professionals when teachers are in short supply and classrooms are under equipped.

mirror (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436928)

http://209.157.64.200/focus/f-news/1016490/posts

The list, for those curious... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436931)

10) Wedding photographers
9) Pilots for major airlines
8) West Coast longshoremen
7) Airport skycaps
6) Real estate agents selling high-end homes
5) Motivational speakers and ex-politicians on lecture circuit
4) Orthodontists
3) CEOs of poorly performing companies
2) Washed-up pro athletes in long-term contracts
1) Mutual-fund managers

Slashdotters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436932)

Whatever job *you* have-
*You*, who are reading this and responding.
You are overpaid. You spend your day reading Slashdot. Get back to work.

Slashdot copy editor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436935)


You know the one responsible for editing, spelling, grammar, and checking for dups...

Well, i'm not on the list... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436936)

though it should would be great if i was.

i'm making less then $12/hr as a (linux) systems administrator and web programmer (cold fusion)

anyone willing to pay me $30k/yr(plus some benifits) for doing one or the other can get me eaily.

Re:Well, i'm not on the list... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436985)

I've got a $100 script doing the job you're doing.

Article Mirrored (5, Funny)

TrekCycling (468080) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436938)

Here's the list.

#1 - Professional Athletes
#2 - CEO
#3 - CTO
#4 - CIO
#5 - Chairman of the board
#6 - Generic Executives
#7 - CEO
#8 - CEO
#9 - Guys at think tanks that produce articles like this
#10 - CEO

Alwayson-network.com (1, Redundant)

lucky_duck (553295) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436942)

is down...'nuff said.

Talk about the pot and the freakin' kettle (5, Funny)

Glamdrlng (654792) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436944)

...yet human-resource consultants and executive headhunters agree some jobs command excessive compensation that can't be explained by labor supply-and-demand imbalances.

You gotta be fscking kidding. Did the HR consultants and executive headhunters point out that their own astronomical salaries can't be explained by anyone? Anyone that is, except for other HR consultants and executive headhunters...

Ironic (3, Funny)

thomas.galvin (551471) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436945)

alwayson-network.com is a wonderfully ironic name for a webserver that just got slashdotted...

Sour grapes (1)

bperkins (12056) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436949)

It would have been a more enjoyable article if it wasn't for the shrill sound of an axe grinding in my ears the whole time I was reading it.

Seriously, since when is it new that there a cushy, overpaid jobs out there? For many, you need to get lucky or know someone to get them, for others, you need to undergo a long training program followed by many years of totem pole climbing.

They're just jealous (1)

Blackknight (25168) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436953)

People will pay whatever they think you're worth. Athletes get such high salaries because they bring in so much money for the owners.

If they didn't have high salaries then they'd up like music artists, where the labels get rich and the artists gets ripped off.

In California... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7436962)

...it's the grocery store employees, at least that's what the Von's CEO wants everyone to beleive.

Suggestion... (2, Funny)

GreggBert (89663) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436964)

I would have thought that "Microsoft O/S Security Assurance Specialist" would have made the list. No ?

Google Cache of the Story (5, Informative)

sparkhead (589134) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436976)

Google cache [216.239.41.104]

PO'ed photographers speak out. (3, Insightful)

TheMysteriousFuture (707972) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436984)

Got this from a photography forum [pro4um.com]

Quote


There was some recent NEGATIVE PRESS about us as Professional Photographers being over paid.

IF you would like to FLOOD this guys email box expressing your feelings, please go here:

http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/mai...3BF2A%7D

Here is an a small amount of what he said about us professional photographers:
--------------
What follows is a list of the 10 most overpaid jobs in the U.S., in reverse order, drafted with input from compensation experts:

10) Wedding photographers

Photographers typically charge $2,000 to $5,000 to shoot a wedding, for what amounts to a one-day assignment plus processing time. Some get $15,000 or more. Yet many mope through the job, bumping guests in their way without apology, with the attitude: "I'm just doing this for the money until Time or National Geographic calls."

They must cover equipment and film-development costs. Still, many in major metropolitan areas who shoot two weddings each weekend in the May-to-October marrying season pull in $100,000 for six months' work.

Yet let's face it; much of their work is mediocre. Have you ever really been wowed flipping the pages of a wedding album handed you by recent newlyweds? Annie Leibovitz and Richard Avedon they're not, but some charge fees as if they're in the same league.

--------------
Come on gang...this guy can't get by saying this about us....let's send him a message!!!!!!

End quote

Interesting that he doesn't even consider that SOME (not all) photographers just MIGHT actually be over paid.

THE most overpaid?? (1)

EvilStein (414640) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436990)

'Fair compensation' is a relative term, yet human-resource consultants and executive headhunters agree some jobs command excessive compensation that can't be explained by labor supply-and-demand imbalances.'"

These "human resouirce consultants" and "headhunters" are the overpaid morons!

pay reflects risk analysis (3, Insightful)

Speare (84249) | more than 10 years ago | (#7436992)

The bit about the wedding photographer sounds like he had some grudge against his (or his daughter's) photographer. Whine whine whine.

If you hire a bargain-basement photographer's assistant, you might get stunning Annie-Liebowicz-level artwork. But the chances are that you'll get fifty images that are ill-timed, ill-posed, ill-conceived, ill-focused or ill-processed. You pay the money to someone who will get the best possible angle on the critical moments that the wedding couple will want to remember for the rest of their lives. Sometimes that requires a nudge to move Aunt Marge out of the way. It's not an occasion you're going to want to repeat if the photographer got it all wrong.

The same goes for an airline pilot... think about all the training you're depending on. Sure, it's "routine" to fly from coast to coast, but emergencies happen and it's the pilot's experience and training that you're paying for. It's a little late to complain that you didn't get your money's worth, once you've landed safe and sound after a boring flight.

Alternate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7437000)

FreePublic.com has a copy as well check here: http://209.157.64.200/focus/f-news/1016490/posts [209.157.64.200]
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