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Replace Your Music....Again

Hemos posted more than 10 years ago | from the newer-better-faster dept.

Music 538

sethadam1 writes "I was not at all surprised to find that experts are predicting the death of the compact disc in as little as 5 years. This article over at Ananova suggests the next format of music will be little fingernail-sized cards. As cool as these sound, is anyone else worried that sneaky industry folks might try to distribute all new music in DRM'ed WMA files?" Yeah, this description sounds basically like bigger Magic Gate, that wonderful situation where you can pay more than normal to get DRM. Update: 11/13 16:45 GMT by H : As RobertB-DC pointed, this is sort of a dupe - see our previous article.

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LOL PWN3D ON TEH SPOKE (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464474)

Re:LOL PWN3D ON TEH SPOKE (-1, Offtopic)

Dagrush (723402) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464527)

wow, someone whose way too desperate to get the first post.

J00 = WTFPWND BY TEH WILDCAT!!!~`1 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464561)

fp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464489)

fp .. why would they use drm wma? many audiophiles would be pissed at the shitty quality of the audio.

Re:fp (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464646)

exactly. I predict the future is CD/SACD hybrids. When DVD first came out, all the movies were widescreen format. That gave videophiles and other early adopters a reason to update their existing collections and start a new library.


For people that will shell out money, size isn't the issue (Look at laserdiscs). For music, smaller size can even be a problem (people are nostalgic for the large artwork on records).


Of course, I'm biased. Last night I got a set of 15 CD/SACD hybrids, and may get a SACD player in the future :)

No thanks (2, Insightful)

w.p.richardson (218394) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464490)

I'll keep what I have - I can't imagine what the benefit of the "upgrade" would be. I can imagine the significant limitations. Ergo, I stand pat.

Re:No thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464513)

...what??

Benefit of the upgrade (3, Interesting)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464551)

Well, there could be all sort of fun upgrades, depending on how much the cards store. Maybe they could put DVD-like things on there - special features, commentary, 5.1 surround sound. It might actually make buying these things worthwhile.

Re:Benefit of the upgrade (5, Interesting)

metallicagoaltender (187235) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464625)

Considering things of that nature are already available with current technology, shitcanning CDs in favor of these little cards isn't really necessary.

However, if they're willing to sell these things at a reasonable price as the primary medium for music, and end the gouging that exists with CDs, I'd consider it a step forward. If it's just a new medium the industry can overcharge for, then screw it.

Re:No thanks (2, Funny)

Pyro226 (715818) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464555)

Ergo, I stand pat.

Am I the only one thats increased an increase in the use of the word Ergo since the architect scene in the Matrix? Is therefore not good enough anymore?

Re:No thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464557)

Haven't CD's got a build-in self distruct anyway - i mean that after a while (~20 years?) the metals and plastics degrade to such a level that playback becomes impossible?

Re:No thanks (2, Interesting)

gricholson75 (563000) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464622)

That's why you make a new copy every few years.

A MOST SENSUAL VOICE (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464491)

I am Gopher Boy
Pondering Reality
I am Gopher Boy
Will the get the First Posty?

They Won't Get Me! (5, Funny)

Acidic_Diarrhea (641390) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464492)

I've got 10 CD Players and 10 CD Recorders and 10 copies of every CD I own safely stored away in my technology cellar gathering dust. If these bastards try to switch to some DRM nonsense, I'll live safely off my reserves.

yeah (1)

Dagrush (723402) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464493)

worried, yeah, but there are ways around it. and there's no way this will kill mp3s.

Re:yeah (5, Funny)

mike77 (519751) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464515)

sure there is!

Giant EMP'S!

Tell me Mr. Anderson, what good is an mp3 if you have nothing to play it on?

Re:yeah (-1, Offtopic)

Dagrush (723402) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464582)

wow. do you have some karma to burn? good job.

Re:yeah (0, Offtopic)

Dagrush (723402) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464623)

hey, i'm talking seriously, you're talking freakishly, yet your comments get a higher score....

What? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464495)

This article isn't about the death of compact discs, it's about that new storage medium they've discovered that was already reported about. Death of compact disc is just Ananova's bullshit spin on the topic.

Jeez, maybe Hemos should RTFA before posting.

wierd dimensions (5, Insightful)

PhuCknuT (1703) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464497)

Compact discs could be history within five years, superseded by a new generation of fingertip-sized memory tabs with no moving parts.

Scientists say each paper-thin device could store more than a gigabyte of information - equivalent to 1,000 high quality images - in one cubic centimetre of space.


So they are fingertip sized, paper thin, and a cubic centimeter? I'm having trouble forming a mental image of this...

Re:wierd dimensions (5, Funny)

cgenman (325138) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464567)

Perhaps they mean the justification is paper thin?

Re:wierd dimensions (1)

-Grover (105474) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464586)

I think they mean that they will be distributed as fingertip sized, and paper thin.

IF they were 1cm^3 it would house 1Gb of info. So, basically, since you're looking at cutting the depth off completley, you'd have instead 1cm^2, which would be significantly less data, if it operates the way I think it's going to.

Re:wierd dimensions (5, Funny)

Threni (635302) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464597)

>So they are fingertip sized, paper thin, and a cubic centimeter? I'm having trouble forming
>a mental image of this...

Hey guys, check out old human-fingers over there!! He doesn't have paper cubes at the end of this fingers! Weirdo!

Re:wierd dimensions (1)

Mantorp (142371) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464652)

cubic sounds cooler than square, has more of a buzzwordy feel

DRM is a *feature* (0, Flamebait)

GaelenBurns (716462) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464499)

Once again, I'll refer to the old "Only Criminals Would Oppose This" arguement. Obviously the smaller size makes it more convenient for the consumer, right? So, it's only a good thing to us *honest* consumers. Only thieves would be phased by restrictions of fair use. I mean, come on.

Re:DRM is a *feature* (3, Insightful)

Threni (635302) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464629)

>Once again, I'll refer to the old "Only Criminals Would Oppose This" arguement.

The one which is wheeled out whenever freedom is being threatened, such as cctv, id cards, drug tests at work etc etc?

Re:DRM is a *feature* (3, Funny)

darkstar949 (697933) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464637)

I disagree, smaller does not always mean better. Yes, a good sized collection of CD's tend to take up some space, but people like to display their CD collection, and it is harder to lose a CD than a small memory stick (I have already lost one)

Re:DRM is a *feature* (3, Insightful)

bladernr (683269) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464661)

Only thieves would be phased by restrictions of fair use.

Yes, I know the spirit of this post, but... Actual consumers cherish "fair use." IMHO, no DRM should interfere with fair use.

I should be able to make as many copies as I feel like on as any devices as I own. That is fair use. If the producers want to prevent infringing uses like Internet swapping, it is their responsibility to do it in such as way as to not interfere with fair use.

I am a solid IP and "rights of the copyright owner" supporter, but I am just as strong a fair use supporter. I will boycott anything that stops my fair use rights.

Already here in Montreal (4, Interesting)

denisbergeron (197036) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464502)

You can buy music in a fingernail card in Toysrus with rhe little reader for 10$ (Can) and you can buy card with two or three song for +/- 5$ (Can)

Music formats... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464504)

will change every decade or so, but no matter what the industry players do, people who love music and wish to share it will triumph. Short of imprisoning people, there is little that anyone can do to prevent sharing of music.

Indy Musicians (5, Interesting)

PurdueGraphicsMan (722107) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464508)

One thing I can't help but wonder is how these changes in the medium we distribute music on will effect the low-budget independant musician. As a musician that's tried to produce albums without the help of a record label I have to wonder if a medium like this could do wonders for bands with no money and big dreams. I know a few years back it was rather expensive just to produce cds in bulk and cds are very inexpensive. But now, if they have these little polymer chips, it should be of almost no cost to the musician. Anyone else follow my thinking?

Re:Indy Musicians (3, Interesting)

valdis (160799) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464649)

A co-worker has a band, and they've released like 8 or 9 albums. Last I asked him, the break-even point for CD's was a press run of only 500 or so. And once you have a good master, a second press run is a lot cheaper.

I think their biggest expense for their last album was studio time, even though they did it in a small local (downtown, in the evenings, upstairs from some store that closed at 5PM) studio.

I doubt it (1)

jcrash (516507) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464509)

The technology "might" be available in five years. But we have technology right now that they could do this with - flash, and by then flash has got to be pretty cheap. Nah, I'd have to say CD's will be here for at least ten more years.

We do need something smaller, though.

Fingernail-sized cards? (4, Insightful)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464511)

Does anyone else think that fingernail-sized cards for music is a BAD idea? I have enough problems keeping track of CDs sometimes, these things would be incredible easy to lose.

Of course, the RIAA would love that - "Sorry, you'll have to buy another copy!"

Re:Fingernail-sized cards? -- wait til its smaller (3, Funny)

donutz (195717) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464642)

Does anyone else think that fingernail-sized cards for music is a BAD idea? I have enough problems keeping track of CDs sometimes, these things would be incredible easy to lose.

That's why I'm going to wait until music is distributed on a pill-sized pill. That way, you just swallow it, and the music is absorbed into your brain cells, giving you a permanent copy -- no worries about losing it or it being stolen.

Come to think of it, this should be a cure (or at least a treatment) for when you get a song stuck in your head...you just eat a different song to overwrite it.

And I'm sure the RIAA will be all over this new music format, positively love it: how are you going to share what's in your head? They can't lose!

No way, not that fast (3, Interesting)

scovetta (632629) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464512)

5 years in a very short time on the market as pervasive as the music industry. I still buy videotapes (no, not Betamax), but how long have DVDs been available? Consumer demand will keep CDs rolling until either (a) the quality of this new media is much better, (b) they offer some added value (cheaper?), or (c) CDs are simply no longer produced. I doubt that (c) would happen because the RIAA goes into fits if their revenue drops 10%, how'd they like a 50-60% drop because people don't want to buy chip players (for their homes, cars, walkmans, etc)-- it's too big of a change, too soon. Maybe 10 years...

Re:No way, not that fast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464591)

Why do you doubt (c)? That's what they did to vinyl: they simply stopped making it. That forced people into getting CD players. So stop making CDs and you'll be forced to get a chip player and you'll be pretty much obliged to replace your CDs, too, so the RIAA will see a 50% revenue boost by not making CDs any more.

If you're inclined to argue, remember that this has already happened once before.

Re:No way, not that fast (1)

dbooster (565770) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464632)

I think by death of cd they don't mean totally disappearance of it, just that it will no longer be the dominate medium. Many have said VHS is dead, but as you point out it's still around, even if sales are fading. Music tapes are still around and being sold, too, despite being "killed" by cd's many many years ago.

FP? Or not.... (1)

cwilkins (59481) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464514)

Obviously the slashdotters are not going to embrace some new DRM-based format. But how about the general public? Anyone feel like they've got a handle on the prevailing opinion? I do recall Circuit City's foray into DIVX DVD's (not the codec) which was not well received at all and ultimately failed. One hopes this initiative is for an unencumbered format (yeah, right) and dies the same way.

-cw-

It's their buisness (4, Insightful)

CaptBubba (696284) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464518)

The industry makes their money off of people replacing old formats. Now that pretty much everyone has converted their old collections to CD, that stream of money has pretty much dried up.

It really was only a matter of time before a new format with one or two new features (and a few glaring flaws to be fixed in the next format) would be introduced as the replacement to the compact disc.

Size matters. (1)

Frobozz0 (247160) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464519)

In my case, anything smaller than a CD can easily be lost. Think about how easy it will be to lose a fingernail size music album? Just because we CAN make it smaller, doesn't mean we should. Granted, a little smaller would be nice but that is TOO SMALL.

Other examples I can think of are compact keyboards, playstation controllers, many consumer digital cameras, etc.

Re:Size matters. (1)

DarkDust (239124) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464579)

In my case, anything smaller than a CD can easily be lost. Think about how easy it will be to lose a fingernail size music album? Just because we CAN make it smaller, doesn't mean we should. Granted, a little smaller would be nice but that is TOO SMALL.

ACK. In my opinion the mini-disc is the definitiv lower end. Everything smaller gets blown away when someone sneezes :-) But the RIAA would definetely like to see those mini-media BECAUSE they get lost and you'd have to re-buy your music.

Fingernail sized cards? I doubt it (1)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464520)

No one wants to fiddle around with something that small to hold music... it makes much more sense that we will all have digital players that can download music at wi-fi spots, wherever we are. That way, no fiddling with cards, and if the player has the little cards in it, then it can hold x GB of music, which is plenty until you get to the next wi-fi spot, which will have different songs, etc. :-D

Re:Fingernail sized cards? I doubt it (4, Insightful)

bigman2003 (671309) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464650)

I don't think that the future of music lies in its media format. Those days are gone.

But, I agree with the parent, the big future is distribution. Of course, that is what everyone is talking about now- creating a new method to download music.

What the music is stored on will be secondary. Some people will put it on a hard-drive, some on Compact Flash, some will burn CD's.

The CD/DVD media is not too bad, but carrying around an entire CD for just one album sucks. More CD players will be able to play MP3/WMA/(insert your favorite codec here).

Who cares what the music will be stored on in retail stores- nobody will be getting their music there in 5 years anyway.

Digital out. (1)

ericspinder (146776) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464521)

Of course they will, but as long as systems have a digital out (or a least speakers) there will be a way to get your "fair use" out of the music you buy.

On another note the technology seems really great, Just think, you could get your AOL "disk" built into a postcard (just pop out the chip), it could save millions for TW.

I wonder how long until you see readers for this technology.

MagicGate (1)

sfbanutt (116292) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464522)

Does anybody actually buy MagicGate memory sticks? My clie nx70 can use them, but I don't see any point to them. As implied in the article, they cost more and do less than a regular memory stick.

DRM killer (1)

musikit (716987) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464525)

just buy records at garage sales. you can get thousands of sounds for just a couple of dollars.

Re:DRM killer (1)

eln (21727) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464634)

Sure, until you want some music that was made in the past 20 years. Hardly anyone records on vinyl anymore, and soon no one at all will.

Just in Case of /. ing (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464529)

CDs 'could be history in five years'

Compact discs could be history within five years, superseded by a new generation of fingertip-sized memory tabs with no moving parts.

Scientists say each paper-thin device could store more than a gigabyte of information - equivalent to 1,000 high quality images - in one cubic centimetre of space.

Experts have developed the technology by melding together organic and inorganic materials in a unique way.

They say it could be used to produce a single-use memory card that permanently stores data and is faster and easier to operate than a CD.

It's claimed that turning the invention into a commercially viable product might take as little as five years.

The card would not involve any moving parts, such as the laser and motor drive required by compact discs. Its secret is the discovery of a previously unknown property of a commonly-used conductive plastic coating.

US scientists at Princeton University, New Jersey, and computer giants Hewlett-Packard combined the polymer with very thin-film, silicon-based electronics.

The device would be like a standard CD-R (CD-recordable) disc in that writing data onto it makes permanent changes and can only be done once. But it would also resemble a computer memory chip, because it would plug directly into an electronic circuit and have no moving parts.

A report in the journal Nature described how the researchers identified a new property of a polymer called PEDOT.

PEDOT, which is clear and conducts electricity, has been used for years as an anti-static coating on photographic film. Researchers looked at ways of using PEDOT to store digital information. In the new memory card, data in the form of ones and zeroes would be represented by polymer pixels.

When information is recorded, higher voltages at certain points in the circuit grid would "blow" the PEDOT fuses at those points. As a result, data is permanently etched into the device. A blown fuse would from then on be read as a zero, while an unblown one that lets current pass through is read as a one.

Story filed: 18:07 Wednesday 12th November 2003

The CD is dead, long live the DVD (1)

heironymouscoward (683461) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464530)

Distribution of music via physical means is already dead, except for niche markets. The corpse is just really large and taking time to rot.

As digital media, the CD will simply be replaced by DVDs of various kinds, same size and shape but 10+ times the capacity.

Oh no! (0)

Meor (711208) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464532)

A DRM format. I won't be able to hook the output up to my computer and be able to save it in another format. Oh wait :(

Yeah right... (2, Insightful)

doctechniqal (516085) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464533)

Old music formats never die, they just become niche markets. Vinyl is still around, and with CD/DVD drives on so many PCs, compact discs aren't really going to go away anytime soon. Moreover, one factor not taken into account is the packaging: what are they going to do, start printing fingernail-sized booklets of the artwork and lyrics that you can only read with an electron microscope?

the next music format? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464534)

What happened to SACD and DVDA .. i thought those were to replace the average Audio CD

Re:DVDA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464644)

I'm sure your mother would rather have four dicks in her holes than a crappy CD.

Finger-nail sized? (1)

lintux (125434) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464537)

Hmm. It happens from time to time that I lose a CD and find it back under my bed orso, months later.

Now what about a fingernail-sized thingy? I'd probably accidentally suck it up into the vacuum cleaner... Yeah, very nice. Smaller than a MD or 200M CD shouldn't be necessary IMHO.

I just know I'm gonna lose one of these (1)

kidgenius (704962) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464538)

I know I've lost cd's before by either beign misplaced, whatever. But now, I'm going to have these little paper-thin devices the size of my thumbnail floating around? Yeah right, I'd lose those before I got a chance to walk out of the store.

Obvious (1)

pvt_medic (715692) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464539)

Well I think it is quite obvious that the CD is slowly being phased out. But a memory stick is nothing new. And the fact that this would be a permanent storage is the wrong direction. They need to create reusable technology.

Oh and of course downloading music you want is the new fad that will replace CDs. iMusic, Napster, etc are the wave of the future.

Hey RIAA (1)

KingKire64 (321470) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464540)

"Do you here that. It's the sound of inevitibility, it's the sound of your death."

Agent.Smith

Player inclusive (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464541)

I could imagine that those cards could play the stored music by themselves, to make it impossible to reach the digital data

Shortsighted (4, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464542)

The Ananova article focuses solely on the implications for music storage. That will, no doubt, be a major application, but the important part of the story is: permanent, reliable storage with a data density of 1 GB/cm^3, for God's sake! This seems to me like a major breakthrough that will have implications far beyond whether we can or can't rip an MP3 of the latest disposable pop star of the week's manufactured hit single.

they sound small... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464543)

finally i can put my music with my coin collection... in the couch.

Five years is bull, read the article (4, Insightful)

tuffy (10202) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464545)

The researchers claim: "turning the invention into a commercially viable product might take as little as five years". Would that turn out to be true and this device takes off, it'll still take a few years to push CDs out of the marketplace. Though I'm certain the RIAA would love to sell you your music colllection all over again, that task would likely take years more to complete.

SACD (1)

citizenkeith (720680) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464547)

I find SACD much better than files or memory tabs. Multichannel mixes and high resolution stereo mixes are something to be excited about. Surely music execs are taking a long hard look at the movie industry's success with DVD.

Whatever (1)

Quasar1999 (520073) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464550)

It was a big conspiracy when CD's hit the market, now it's a big consipiracy that something else will replace them... Yes, if you want to, you can replace all your existing music with whatever this new medium ends up being... but you don't have to. CD's are digital, and unlike the Tapes they replaced will last in the same quality as they day you purchased them... no need to replace your entire music collection... that's just FUD...

cubic? (1)

SparklesMalone (623241) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464552)

"each paper-thin device could store more than a gigabyte ... in one cubic centimetre of space.

How is something paper-thin a cubic centimeter?

Sounds good but (2, Insightful)

JamesD_UK (721413) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464554)

I'm always loosing CD's how am I going to sort through a collection of thumbnail sized pieces of plastic, I just know I'd loose everything! Did anyone else notice in the article that the "paper thin" devices can store 1GB in a cubic centimeter? I'm pretty sure something paper thing with a volume of 1cc is more than thumbnail sized. I assume that these 'thumbnails' aren't supposed to hold 1GB?

Re:Sounds good but (1)

radja (58949) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464609)

and that's beside the fact that a decent case around this this can't really hold a legible playlist written on it..

Didn't we just read about this? (1)

djhankb (254226) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464556)

I swear i just heard about this...

ah yes, here is the link. [slashdot.org]

Great idea though..

-Henry

"[Jews] are the root of evil" (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464563)

Greek Jewish leaders denounce remarks by "Zorba" composer Theodorakis

ATHENS (AFP) - Greek Jewish leaders came down on one of the country's best-loved composers, Mikis Theodorakis of "Zorba the Greek" fame, for calling Jews the "root of evil", and reproached government ministers for failing to react.

Theodorakis "repeated in the 21st century opinions from the darkest Middle Ages and slogans used by Nazi Germany, fanning both inside and outside the country the winds of intolerance and racism," the Central Jewish Council of Greece charged in a statement.

The composer was flanked by Culture Minister Evangelos Venizelos and Education Minister Petros Efthymiou when he made the comments at a November 4 reception for the publication of his autobiography, an event covered massively by the Greek media.

Film footage showed neither minister reacted when Theodorakis said Greeks and Jews "are two peoples without kin, but they had fanaticism and self-knowledge and managed to prevail."

"Today, we can say that these little people are the root of evil," said Theodorakis, 78, a committed leftist and political activist who was jailed under the fascist junta that held power in Greece in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Government spokesman Christos Protopapas sought Wednesday to distance the government from his comments, which despite the number of journalists present were only repeated in one small right-wing daily.

"The government does not share and is not in agreement with the opinion expressed by Mr. Theodorakis," the spokesman said, but added that "despite the disagreement" the composer "is still held in high regard" by the government for his works

Why not ? (1)

ThomasFlip (669988) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464565)

Why not just create CD players with proprietary audio-out jacks that aren't compatible with computers. Also ban companies from creating newmusicformatCD-rom drives which support the new CD format. If users can't put music on their computers, wouldn't this eliminate the problem of music piracy substantially ?

Ah, retailing... (1)

Sumbody (686160) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464568)


Scientists say each paper-thin device could store more than a gigabyte of information - equivalent to 1,000 high quality images - in one cubic centimetre of space.

The packaging, however, will be the size of an average storm door.

Uhh, don't throw away those CDs. (1)

Liselle (684663) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464569)

I'm not worried yet. It's difficult to get folks to embrace potentially limiting technology without changing the medium (see VCR vs. DVD). Besides, unlike cassette tapes, where quality is an issue, my CDs are more or less as good as the day that I bought them. There is no reason for me to buy music I already own on a DRM-enabled chip, only new stuff (and best of luck trying to sell them without selling CDs too), so that will slow adoption considerably.

It's not time for doom-and-gloom yet. Thumbs down on the unecessary commentary in the summary. On top of that, I consider Ananova to be dodgy in general, I've seen too much sensationalistic (is that a word?) stuff from them before.

Yep, about as dead as Cassette tapes... (1)

wtrmute (721783) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464570)

... Oh, wait, people still use those. So I guess the CDs will be here for a while yet.

A thought (1)

iplayfast (166447) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464572)

As the size of the copy medium shrinks, it becomes smaller then the neurons that we use to hold it. Shouldn't there be some sort of limit as to the size of something that is copyable? After all we are copying the music to our neurons aren't we :)

Fingernail sized cards? (1)

theparanoidcynic (705438) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464574)

I don't want my music on fingernail sized cards. I'd so lose those damn things. As for DRM, that's a real possibility. Though, in all of our experience, how long does music industry DRM usually last against the internet. ;)

NO MOVING PARTS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464576)

They seam to reiterate the fact that this has no moving parts many times... what a breakthrough

Quality increase (1)

dimer0 (461593) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464578)

No matter what, they'll need to ensure the quality is leaps and bounds better than current CDs - or else no way in hell people will switch.

SACD or whatever 5.1 format you like recorded on a DVD should definitely be the next thing. I can't wait until new automobiles are sold with a THX-certified 5.1 speaker system installed at the factory.. Ahhh

Form factor won't work (5, Interesting)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464580)

Yes, we all know this article is a dupe [slashdot.org] , but Ananova slanted the data to look at CDs in particular.

The problem with replacing CDs with this technology is the form factor:

Scientists say each paper-thin device could store more than a gigabyte of information - equivalent to 1,000 high quality images - in one cubic centimetre of space.

I have enough trouble finding my CDs in the car without having to worry about them blowing away in a stiff breeze. If size were the issue, CD Singles would be released on half-size discs... in fact, many pop albums don't seem to have more than 30 minutes of music anyway.

The best way to incorporate this technology in a consumer-oriented music distribution would be to enclose it in a larger plastic enclosure with an interface to the player. Something like this [geocities.com] , perhaps?

All I can say is ... (1)

bryanp (160522) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464583)

Not this little black duck.

Other uses? (1)

darkstar949 (697933) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464584)

The idea sounds like a good one, but not just to replace audio CD's, plus for audio CD's you also have the small problem of how do you keep track of (for some people easily) 50+ "fingertip-sized memory tabs" ~ I know I have been known to lose full size CD's imagine how easy it would be to lose these. However, seeing as how they say that it can store 1Gb of data I can foresee it coming into use in digital camras, and perhaps for software distribution.

Mediaplay (1)

onyxruby (118189) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464585)

This would be just like media play. A DRM enriched small piece of technology that will be held back by the DRM. What's different about this that makes it worth buying over the established based of hundreds of millions of CD players? Nothing at all, short of the recording industry refusing to put music out on round shiny objects that were once called CD's, it's just not gonna happen. Tech history is full of superior technology that never took off because it was either too expensive, or DRM'd. It's simply not enough to have superior technology, a superior user experience is also required.

Bugger the DRM... (1)

pwagland (472537) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464590)

With finger nail sized cards, these things are going to be lost so quickly that it won't matter!

*sigh*

I know, I know... I'm a luddite...

Hard Drives (1)

mekkab (133181) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464593)

In the future (actually, our present day!) people won't have to "change" plastic things to switch songs- they'll just hit the next button.

And iTunes (or whatever FSF alternative is better...) will show them that they have 29 days worth of music on their current playlist. And when they want to take their music to their friends house they can simply take a harddrive- be it an external USB 2.0, or just a regular old internal IDE...

I have a portable MP3 player with Smart Media cards- they are small, they look cool, I get neat-o stares on planes. But you know what? Its a PAIN IN THE *SS to switch those stupid cards in and out.

The future is convenience. Hard drives are convenient. Your silly attempt to deny this and bring about a new "media" is comical and quaint.

It's a plot! (1)

Rinikusu (28164) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464595)

Dude, with this new technology you can lose your music in your change jar, couch, laundry, through the cracks in your floorboards, etc.. Just imagine trying to change "fingernails" while driving on the road (as if CD's weren't a pain in the ass as it is.. :) ). I think the industry would LOVE this new format as they're banking on selling the same albums over and over to people who misplace their stuff regularly (guilty I am).

Mini discs? (1)

ArmenTanzarian (210418) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464599)

Don't we hear this stuff every 5 years? Yeah CD's blow, but market inertia is such that things don't catch on and replace older tech unless its:

A. Ridiculously better
B. Required to maintain status quo
C. Held up by an extremely vocal niche market
D. Much cheaper
E. All of the above (most effective)

There're millions of examples of this happening. I've heard great things about mini-discs, but it just didn't explode (at least in America). So saying something will revolutionize, replace, blow away something else in 5 years is like saying Dancing Elmo will be more popular than Tickle Me Elmo and Beanie Babies combined. Who knows?

- D

Cassette Tapes Rule (4, Funny)

fleener (140714) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464602)

This news comes as fresh amusement because I am on the verge of converting my CD collection to cassette tape. Cassettes are cheaper media, devoid of DRM, and my car came with a cassette player by default.

I don't dislike CDs, but every CD player I've owned has eventually broken, while my portable cassette players from the '80s are still rollin'.

I'm pretty darn sure that whatever The Corporation decides will be The Next Best Thing, I will still be able to dub it to tape.

Re:Cassette Tapes Rule (1)

Potor (658520) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464638)

I agree to a limited extent; my walkmans do break, but not my excellent stereo component deck. I love Maxell XLII 90s.

That's Awe-some! (2, Insightful)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464617)

The future of music is cookie-cutter boy bands and oversexed boobie-girls on little cards.

Don't we already have this? They're called Hit-Clips by Tiger and they look like they suck.

I don't see how the *new, Improved version* for adults is going to be any better.

I think the future of music is that artists will actually come to your house and play, as that is the only way the record company execs will be able to get their kids solid-gold braces.

Launching way OT, remeber that promotion that Master Card was running where they show the record industry intern make his way up the ladder to exec, where he has a fur coat, a private helicopter, and a stripper on each arm? Priceless.

Maybe they should be using.... (1)

PurdueGraphicsMan (722107) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464624)

these things for software distribution. If they start using this chip as a replacement for CD and DVD ROM and no one can afford a "paper-thin chip burner" how will we copy and redistribute software? Of course, this assumes that the machines that make these chips are expensive and wouldn't fit into a typical home office.

It will only happen if.... (1)

jjh37997 (456473) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464626)

This will only happen if the new media offers the consumer a clear advantage over CDs.

CDs replaced LPs because they offered numerous advantages over vinyl, smaller size, greater music clarity, etc...etc.... If whatever comes down the pipe does not offer more benifits it won't be adopted.

Be like Gilligan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464627)

Be like Gilligan

With technology changing as fast as (or even faster) than I can earn it... I may as well live on a island without a single luxury. Gilligan seemed happy enough, Why not?

programming *is* an art.. (0, Offtopic)

SlashDread (38969) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464633)

"When information is recorded, higher voltages at certain points in the circuit grid would "blow" the PEDOT fuses at those points. As a result, data is permanently etched into the device. A blown fuse would from then on be read as a zero, while an unblown one that lets current pass through is read as a one."

Like a sculpturing, the trick is to carefully -remove- unneeded bits. The program, like the sculpture, is already there waiting to get unraveled.

"/Dread"

Replace? WHY? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7464654)

CD quality is good enough for me and the money I am willing to spend on playback equipment. What would this new format offer, other than physical size savings? Size is not enough reason for me to want to replace my CDs (and mp3 and ogg rips).

Size? You must be kidding... (2, Funny)

nosfucious (157958) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464655)

1cm cubed? Huh, i'll probably miss it and stuff it in my morning, not very awake, coffee.

I thought credit card size and form was about right. Then my memory jogged and I recalled my days at my previous job. How many PCMCIA cards were lost by "accident" by thoughtless management PHBs?

(I reckon I know that more than a few early expensive ones ended up at Crown Casino via Cash Converters).

Yeah, and I'd better be able to get the music off this thing and put it back my Nex-II. AND I want to back this up or gaurenteed low cost ($1 ~ $2 max) should it be faulty/or I already own the CD.

Won't happen. (1)

MisterFancypants (615129) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464657)

For music media, the size of a Gamecube disc is pretty ideal, if you ask me. Anything smaller would just be a pain in the ass. Even if you didn't lose the things, how are you going to store them? In a giant pile? Have fun finding the album you're dying to hear in that situation.. And while smaller-than-CD would be ideal, it wouldn't be ideal enough for most people to go through the trouble of another format switch. Sorry, record companies, but CD quality audio is more than enough for 98% of the people in the world... and CD size isn't really an issue (and if it is, mp3 players can easily take care of it without requiring a wholesale format change). You're going to have to find some other way to make money than with a forced format change, this time.

I think the music industry will lose a ton of money on this if they really push it. Either give us the convinience of owning the songs in a digital format we can shuttle to any type of device we'd like or stay with CDs. I don't see consumers, even the mainstream consumers, going for anything else right now.

Replace? I don't think so... (1)

pridefinger (549632) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464658)

Why would I replace the music I already have in digital form? I guess there will be audiophiles that do it, but for me CDs and the music I already have ripped are more than sufficient.

-Pride

Sigs are for people with imagination

The real future (1)

Apreche (239272) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464659)

The real future of music is this. At home everybody will have multiple gigagbytes, even terabytes of storage. Hard disks are cheap now, and will become so much cheaper in the future. Everyone will have a huge collection of mp3s and divxs and the like. Everyone will carry around wirelessly networked devices that will play audio and video in some way. All the data will be sent from your file server at home to you in real time. And if you try to play a song you don't have, then a transparent p2p network layer will automatically seek out and retrieve it for you.

One step more than this is somebody somewhere make a database of all mp3s and videos, if that's possible. Then everybody will just get everything from that database and it's mirrors. Thus eliminating the personal file server. Or maybe it will work together with smaller file servers, so you only have to store the things you listen to often and the things you have acquired recently. The rest can be streamed and such.

There will be a wireless information network similar to MITs oxygen. All physical data storage formats will be lost to us. No more discs chips or flash. The network will be so fast and will be everywhere that it just wont matter.

One day in the semi-distant future this will be true.

cover art! (2, Funny)

feed_those_kitties (606289) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464672)

Look at this 'album' cover! It's a DOT!!

Sometimes, smaller isn't better...

Why? (4, Insightful)

fizban (58094) | more than 10 years ago | (#7464673)

Why waste money on more expensive solid state distribution methods when we already have a cheaper solution working today?

There's absolutely no need to sell new fingernail sized cards that replace CDs, when they can just distribute over the internet. If anyone needs to carry around their music, then they can just buy memory cards and move their music around on those.

And on another point, if they start selling fingernail sized cards, are they still going to package them in CD size boxes and waste more space than they have to?
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