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630 comments

How does it go? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490303)

Oh yeah, Frist post, beezachezz!!!!

first goatse.cx (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490304)

first goatse [goatse.cx]

DO NOT CLICK LINK GROSS (-1)

Fecal Troll Matter (445929) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490326)

OMG DO NOT CLICK TAHT LNK PPL!!!!!!!!1111111 MODS PLS REMOEV THIS PSOT THIS GUY IS A TROL

asddf

Re:DO NOT CLICK LINK GROSS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490344)

lol

Re:DO NOT CLICK LINK GROSS (0)

newshooze (714885) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490401)

You must be new here. welcome to slashdot. How's the new AOL account workin' out for ya.

--== CowboyNeal Uses Windows 98 ==--

Re:DO NOT CLICK LINK GROSS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490436)

News flash: his user ID is about half yours. No he is not new here, moron.

Re:DO NOT CLICK LINK GROSS (0)

Dagrush (723402) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490511)

but all his posts have modded -1 plz don't mod me down, my karma's bad enough

Re:DO NOT CLICK LINK GROSS (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490507)

You must be new here. welcome to slashdot. How's the new AOL account workin' out for ya.

someone plz mail me (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490305)

Re:someone plz mail me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490370)

Like anyone would e-mail you, Lisa Simpson. You are unpopular as they come.

FP! (-1, Offtopic)

firebeaker (52242) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490307)

First Post!

YOU FAIL IT. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490330)

4th post.

Re:FP! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490348)

You created this account and waited HOW MANY years to post this stupid message? Was it worth it?

are brazilians sand-niggers? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490312)

as a proud Westerner, I hate sand niggers

we should build consentration camps and gas them all.

Re:are brazilians sand-niggers? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490361)

No, not sand niggers. Brazilians are "original recipe".-in users start at Score: 1). Create an Account!

Microsoft = freedom?? (5, Funny)

Avihson (689950) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490313)

But of course, choice is slavery, war is peace, love is hate.

Just ask Mr Gates at the Ministry of Network Security!

Re:Microsoft = freedom?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490346)

> But of course, choice is slavery, war is peace, love is hate.

I think someone wrote a book on that once.

Re:Microsoft = freedom?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490383)

Just ask Mr Gates at the Ministry of Network Security!

Mr Gates doesn't work at the Ministry of Network Security!
He works at room 101.
As the rat.

Re:Microsoft = freedom?? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490455)

"I've found you can find happiness in slavery."--Reznor

Re:Microsoft = freedom?? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490529)

Because all operating systems are written by programmers, I assume that any operating system is much smarter than me. Thus, any good operating system should try to outsmart me by restricting my options at every turn. Linux, like all versions of Unix, is lousy at restricting my options because at the command line virtually any operation can be performed with ease. (For example, 'rm -rf /win' could 'delete an entire mounted directory, with no popup window warnings whatsoever.)

I'm proud to say that there is no such danger in Windows Server 2003. Windows pop up when I want to make a change, and then more pop up to ask if I'm sure I want the change. Thankfully, Windows Server 2003 looks after my computer's well-being by occasionally switching configuration settings from the way I want them to what the OS programmers think they might probably ought to be. Boy, I'm just impressed with how smart they are. Once I learned to live with whatever the default settings are on any new hardware I install, I can't say the number of hours I have saved.

I use that spare time to reboot my Windows Server 2003 machine multiple times a day. Technical support personnel recommend that I do it regularly-- kind of like brushing my teeth. To help remind me of this necessity, windows pop up to tell me to reboot whenever I make a configuration change. By now my machine is minty fresh, I figure.

There is no such useful rebooting in a Linux system. It is as reliable as the sunrise, with uptimes in weeks, months and years. Virtually no configuration change requires a reboot, to boot. Imagine all that plaque in the computer. Gross!

In XP I am prevented from making dangerous fundamental configuration changes unless I use a special "registry editor". I have found it so useful to have this separate editor that I hope in future versions they go all the way and supply a separate editor for each file on the disk-- in that way windows could pop up at every keystroke to warn me that changing any line in the file I am editing could cause the system to not run properly. If this were only the case, people would finally learn that it is best to just stick with the mouse and they would be freed of the need to constantly move their hands back to the keyboard. (If one stops to think about it, the mouse is a much better device to use than the keyboard. Ever hear of someone getting carpal tunnel syndrome from a mouse? No. It's comfortable and ergonomic. Like Morse code devices. That's how long distance communication started, after all.)

Linux, by contrast, requires no special editor to change configuration files. The fact that there is no "registry" in Linux allows the abomination of using any text editor whatsoever to do the configuration. Can you believe that configuration files are usually stored clear text? Talk about dangerous!

I am also happy to report that I have experienced no truth to the rumor that Windows disks become corrupt after improper shutdowns. Indeed, I have been forced to improperly shutdown the machine innumerable times after it locks up, and I have no apparent problems to report regarding the disk. No such claim can be made for Linux. They say something about lack of data points. Excuses are all I ever seem to hear from the Linux crowd.

By sheer size alone, Windows Server 2003 beats Linux hands down. It is so much bigger, it is _obvious_ that it is better. Why would you want a small OS with the large disks and RAM sizes we have these days? For this reason alone, I heartily recommend Windows as a way to maximize resource utilization. Your CPU and disk will constantly be pegged to the limit, the way god intended. The Linux kernel and drivers accounts for only about 750KB. Why, even the Microsoft Win16 subsystem uses more space than that.

It is no surprise that Windows Server 2003 costs $300 on the retail market and Linux doesn't cost anything. People know what they want, and they want Windows Server 2003. Because Linux is free, that means it's basically worthless. The same goes for all the development tools, remotable GUIs, and applications, which all cost money for Windows (i.e., are worth something) and free for Linux (worthless!).

Installing software is very easy in Windows Server 2003. I usually slip in CDs without even reading instructions or warnings, and just double click on whatever window pops up. There is no need to read anything or touch the keyboard. (Did I mention that I hate that thing?) Well, OK, I have learned the hard way the machine locks up if I don't take the time to close all other applications.

Linux, by contrast, requires typing on the keyboard to get anything to install at all. And you always have to know the NAME of program you want to install. For example, in Slackware, you have to type "pkgtool" to install a program. Linux needs to get with the 21st century!

Windows Server 2003 follows the DOS convention of putting \r\n at the end of every line of a text file. While this is only a mild concern because of the relative rarity of text files on Windows machines these days-- thank god--it helps to differentiate between the text files and the other files. Sadly, Linux makes no distinction between text and other files.

If I legitimately purchase Windows Server 2003, I can call Microsoft customer support to get help with my problems. After a short hold time of an hour or so, they always help me. Ever since I told them that I was dual booting to Linux, they were able to flag my account and now each time I call even the entry level support personnel I am connected to say that Linux is the source of my problems. Everyone seems to agree that Linux is no good. The more I listen, the more I'm impressed with the knowledge of the support staff there.

By contrast, in Linux, all I have is stockpiles of resources and documentation that I would actually have to read in order to understand. Sure, I could obtain Linux support from a commercial organization, but they would probably just tell me I have to use a text editor to fix up my system.

In the end, I have no need for that old computer donkey Unix. I don't need to run big Unix tasks, after all. I refuse to become one of those a bug-eyed computer users, that's for sure. As soon as I can keep Windows Server 2003 from crashing for long enough, I'm going to delete my Linux partition, i.e., the equivalent of moving it to the Recycle Bin, saying that I'm sure, emptying the Recycle Bin, and again saying that I'm sure I want to empty it.

Freedom and choice (-1, Offtopic)

Angry Black Man (533969) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490314)

I'd like some "freedom and choice" with those Brazilian ladies.

Re:Freedom and choice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490510)

If you look at this guy's post history, he is a cut and paste Karma Whore troll.

Re:Freedom and choice (4, Interesting)

Zeinfeld (263942) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490527)

I'd like some "freedom and choice" with those Brazilian ladies.

I am sure that if you went to one of the local 'Thermas' you would find both...

I went to Brazillia and watched the open source debate. I think folk in the US are completely missing the plot. First off the Brazillian govt is dependent on Microsoft in the way the US govt is dependent on Cobol, Windows is their legacy infrastructure.

Secondly the big issue for the country at the moment is the balance of payments. The government is calculating that they can get better prices out of Redmond if they apply pressure.

Finally there is a protectionist angle, keeping out big US software companies helps local companies - perhaps.

Of course it's a movement away... (4, Funny)

LordK3nn3th (715352) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490321)

It's a movement away from the freedom and choice of choosing one of Microsoft's fine, fine products!

Re:Of course it's a movement away... (4, Funny)

beacher (82033) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490425)

I think it's an interesting twist that a hacker-genre [slashdot.org] movie [imdb.com] would come to name the first full country to attempt secede from the Microsoft union. I wish them well and hope that they contribute back ;) -B

Theres a typo (1, Funny)

Dr Reducto (665121) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490323)

"Interestingly, Microsoft's representative in Brazil decries this as a movement away from freedom and choice..."

I think the word they were searching for was "Ironically".

Who Cares??!! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490329)

Really...some third world ass-backwards country moves away from Microsoft, and it's three cheers for Brazil??!!

How about cheering when that Country stops it's corruption, and drug cartels, and kidnappings, and desperate poverty?

You geeks really have a warped view of the world!

And they're using OS voting too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490331)

Amadeu says he's even talking to election officials about using open-source software in the country's more than 400,000 electronic voting machines, about 20 percent of which run on a Windows variant.

Well, at least Brazil will have fair elections, unlike some first-world countries I know...

I bet those O/S voting machines give a paper receipt too.

When should a stock holder start to worry (4, Interesting)

Mrs. Grundy (680212) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490332)

We have heard a lot of stories about people, states, and countries moving away from Microsoft. Is this a trend? If you are a manager of a fund heavily invested in MS, or an individual investor, when does this news begin to worry you. In the long run does MS really have a chance when competing against free, well written, well understood software?

Re:When should a stock holder start to worry (2, Funny)

tarquin_fim_bim (649994) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490384)

I have been seriously considering removing Microsoft from my portfolio, SCO seem to be doing rather well at the moment, but I think a lot of clever money has already gone there, over inflating the stock value, so I may hold off for a while, I'm sure Microsoft will come up with some cunning licencing plan to thwart these rogue states.

Re:When should a stock holder start to worry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490466)

"I'm sure Microsoft will come up with some cunning licencing plan to thwart these rogue states."

Didn't the court forbid M$ from creating restrictive licensing plans for distributers a few years ago? I'm *sure* I heard something about that. They were fining distributers who put a different O/S on computers, saying it was against the licensing agreement. At one of the anti-trust trials the judge ruled against allowing that.

So a licensing plan that will force governments to use Microsoft's well-written, bug-free products will land them a hefty fine.

Not that they can't afford it...

Re:When should a stock holder start to worry (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490386)

Yes. MSFT will just make less profit. There current 50-80% profit margin is out of line with other companies of their size.

Re:When should a stock holder start to worry (2, Insightful)

js3 (319268) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490404)

when the stock holder thinks about when to start worrying

Re:When should a stock holder start to worry (2, Insightful)

MoThugz (560556) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490450)

If you are a manager of a fund heavily invested in MS, or an individual investor, when does this news begin to worry you.
If it's not my money, then I'd take the least painful solution as long as it's within budget, be it Microsoft or Open Source. So in a sense, it shouldn't worry you, at least too much.

At least now we'll have viable competition, and IMHO this is almost always a Good Thing(TM).

Re:When should a stock holder start to worry (5, Interesting)

ducomputergeek (595742) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490463)

I work as a tech consultant. My degrees are in German and International business. When I spent a year studying in Germany, the college had 2 SuSE linux labs and one Windows lab on their campus. Most students had dual boot Linux and Windows laptops.

The main reason why Linux was being adopted outside of the United States was because of its cost, even with $2.50 per copy for Windows XP in 3rd world nations, linux decreases in cost per unit the more machines you install it upon.

The other reason was SuSE and Mandrake, both European and not from the United States. Which plays well in the EU. There is a mentality amoung many leaders in France and Germany that want to see the "United States of Europe" superpower and waining themselves from Microsoft could give Europe a leg up in technology as Linux catches on in SE Asia and the 3rd world.

Now with SuSE in the hands of a NA company, I wonder how that will impeed linux adoption. Oh course, IBM would love to see this happen as the premiums would return to hardware, not software.

I think Linux will be catching on internationally in the next couple years on desktops big time. It probably will be longer in the United States.

Well written? Well understood? (3, Insightful)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490474)

In the long run does MS really have a chance when competing against free, well written, well understood software?

I love Linux and free software as much as the next slashdot reader....and I'm not trying to troll...but there's a lot of free software which is neither well written nor well understood, particularly the latter...even by people like me who have been using linux for years personally and professionally. Case and point would be the linux kernel, which has dozens of options which for years have had no help, no corresponding HOWTO, and names that remind you of PlotHoleFillTech from Star Trek.

Brasil's own Conectivia Linux (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490334)

Right there in the same league with Red Hat and Suse is Brasil's own home grown Linux, Conectiva [conectiva.com.br]. Not as well known in North America, yet it is perhaps the most popular Linux in the Southern Hemisphere of the Americas.

Re:Brasil's own Conectivia Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490522)

We also have Kurumin, based on Knoppix, and it rocks!

(Curumim == boy in Tupi-Guarani, a native language)

(*) I'm just a satisfied user. Link not included because I don't know if the server can handle /.

Freedom of choice (1, Redundant)

wed128 (722152) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490337)

somehow by CHOOSING to move away from microsoft, they are moving away from freedom of choice? that is the biggest piece of FUD i've ever heard!

My Experience with Linux (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490347)

I work as a consultant for several fortune 500 companies, and I think
I can shed a little light on the climate of the open source community
at the moment. I believe that part of the reason that open source
based startups are failing left and right is not an issue of marketing
as it's commonly believed but more of an issue of the underlying
technology.

I know that that's a strong statement to make, but I have evidence to
back it up! At one of the major corps(5000+ employees) that I consult
for, we wanted to integrate the shareware version of Linux into our
server pool. The allure of not having to pay any restrictive licensing
fees was too great to ignore. I reccomended the installation of
several boxes running the new 2.4.9 kernel, and my hopes were high
that it would perform up to snuff with the Windows 2k boxes which
were(and still are!) doing an AMAZING job at their respective tasks of
serving HTTP requests, DNS, and fileserving.

I consider myself to be very technically inclined having programmed in
VB for the last 8 years doing kernel level programming. I don't
believe in C programming because contrary to popular belief, VB can go
just as low level as C and the newest VB compiler generates code
that's every bit as fast. I took it upon myself to configure the
system from scratch and even used an optimised version of gcc 3.1 to
increase the execution speed of the binaries. I integrated the 3
machines I had configured into the server pool, and I'd have to say
the results were less than impressive... We all know that linux isn't
even close to being ready for the desktop, but I had heard that it was
supposed to perform decently as a "server" based operating system. The
3 machines all went into swap immediately, and it was obvious that
they weren't going to be able to handle the load in this "enterprise"
environment. After running for less than 24 hours, 2 of them had
experienced kernel panics caused by Bind and Apache crashing! Granted,
Apache is a volunteer based project written by weekend hackers in
their spare time while Microsft's IIS has an actual professional full
fledged development team devoted to it. Not to mention the fact that
the Linux kernel itself lacks any support for any type of journaled
filesystem, memory protection, SMP support, etc, but I thought that
since Linux is based on such "old" technology that it would run with
some level of stability. After several days of this type of behaviour,
we decided to reinstall windows 2k on the boxes to make sure it wasn't
a hardware problem that was causing things to go wrong. The machines
instantly shaped up and were seamlessly reintegrated into the server
pool with just one Win2K machine doing more work than all 3 of the
Linux boxes.

Needless to say, I won't be reccomending Linux/FSF to anymore of my
clients. I'm dissappointed that they won't be able to leverege the
free cost of Linux to their advantage, but in this case I suppose the
old adage stands true that, "you get what you pay for." I would have
also liked to have access to the source code of the applications that
we're running on our mission critical systems; however, from the looks
of it, the Microsoft "shared source" program seems to offer all of the
same freedoms as the GPL.

As things stand now, I can understand using Linux in academia to
compile simple "Hello World" style programs and learn C programming,
but I'm afraid that for anything more than a hobby OS, Windows
98/NT/2K are your only choices.

thank you.

Re:My Experience with Linux (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490372)

sounds like fud to me...

*someone who has seen what happens when freebsd is swapped with win2k*

Re:My Experience with Linux (1)

ergo98 (9391) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490433)

It's an astoundingly obvious troll, which makes it all the more hilarious seeing the serious replies that it's getting.

Re:My Experience with Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490403)

the sentenence structure and your grammer is amazingly similar to those letters i get from Nigera...

Re:My Experience with Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490407)

You just pass your MCSE?

"I consider myself to be very technically inclined having programmed in
VB for the last 8 years doing kernel level programming."

I shall bow before you expertise. Your comment about C clearly shows that you never bothered to get out of you VB mindset. I have programmed many distrubted programs that need to run quick and efficiently, and C is always the best choice short of assembly.

Re:My Experience with Linux (1)

Steve Ballmer's Fat (641246) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490413)

I believe that part of the reason that open source based startups are failing left and right is not an issue of marketing as it's commonly believed but more of an issue of the underlying technology.
....I'm afraid that for anything more than a hobby OS, Windows 98/NT/2K are your only choices.
Thanks Bill. That was, ummm... interesting!
Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr. Bill Gates!! *applause*

Re:My Experience with Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490414)

with all do respect to your wonderful VB skills, which i also use. I do not think that you corrrectly setup your boxes correctly. i can asure you as i have seen linux in an enterprise enviornment. they will run for years without rebooting and without crashes.

Re:My Experience with Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490422)

I reccomended the installation of

several boxes running the new 2.4.9 kernel, and my hopes were high
that it would perform up to snuff with the Windows 2k boxes which
were(and still are!) doing an AMAZING job at their respective tasks of
serving HTTP requests, DNS, and fileserving.


2.4.9 new? according to the chart on my wall, that came out in q3 of 2001. Not exactly new by any standards considering the speed at which linux kernel development moves.

I consider myself to be very technically inclined having programmed in

VB for the last 8 years doing kernel level programming. I don't
believe in C programming because contrary to popular belief, VB can go
just as low level as C and the newest VB compiler generates code
that's every bit as fast.


-1 Flamebait

YHBT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490442)

please don't feed them.

Re:My Experience with Linux (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490423)

Give me a break. Visual Basic programmer for 8 years is trying to set up a Linux system and it doesn't work? Surprise surprise. I would have thought this post was submitted by Bill Gates, except he's probably smart enough to know that Universities do more with Unix style systems than compile "Hello World" programs. Almost all the serious research going on in the world is done on Unix style systems. C'mon. Get a grip. VB, please.

Re:My Experience with Linux (4, Informative)

seb249 (603325) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490438)

Hi there,

Just had a read through your post and thought wow you seem to have been burnt by a bad experience.

Where i work we use a combination of win2k, WinNT, Linux and Unix boxes. In my experience by far the least troublesome are the linux boxes, our databae server has only just recently had to be rebooted (depressing it was up for 460 days) and that was one really abused box ( developers testing on it as well)

Could you give us an indiction of the load and purpose of the box ? Perhaps we can assist you in sorting out what the issue was.

Tis a shame you had a bad experience, but i think you will find that if you would like to track down what happened or why people would be happy to help.

Regards

Seb

sorry in advance...=) (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490349)

i, for one, welcome our new brazilian overlords...

Choice (1)

rf0 (159958) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490352)

Everything is about choice. Microsoft saying that this is a move away from freedom and choice is rubbish. If *they* want to use Microsoft then they will. For somethings MS is the best answer such as playing games and for the general populs. It brings some sort of standard to the industry.

However if Brazil feel that other OS are better for the jobs they want then they can go for it. The point is no-one is being forced to use anything so MS just see the $$'s slipping away than anything else

Rus

Re:Choice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490391)

"It brings some sort of standard to the industry."

Standards? Microsoft takes real standards and extends them to become non standard, so people are locked in!

As well as.... (3, Interesting)

BWJones (18351) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490353)

Citing economic as well as social reasons

We should probably add security reasons, employment reasons, resource reasons, government infrastructure reasons, political reasons, etc....etc...etc...

Although, that said. There is a place for proprietary software and many Microsoft products would meet this need. The problem is that Microsoft spent years being just good enough and out-competing the better alternative in many cases (MacOS) and now it is turning around to bite them in the butt, because Linux based solutions are now in many cases.....good enough.

Of course OS X is still the best solution for most users that I have yet seen, but in the short term, Brazil could likely use their existing CPU hardware infrastructure for Linux as opposed to purchasing new hardware from Apple. Long term costs could most likely be lower with a gradual phasing in of OS X in combination with OSS solutions running on Linux and the use of existing infrastructure on Windows however as a healthy computing ecosystem is diverse.

everything is about money (1)

js3 (319268) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490366)

moving away from something you can't afford isn't all that revolutionary.

Re:As well as.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490390)

Of course OS X is still the best solution for most users that I have yet seen

OSX doesn't really offer anything that Linux doesn't. It may be more suitable for the home user, but in the corperate environment Linux is probably better suited than OSX will ever be.

Re:As well as.... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490428)

We should probably add security reasons, employment reasons, resource reasons, government infrastructure reasons, political reasons, etc....etc...etc...

Although, that said. There is a place for proprietary software...
Yes there is: /dev/null. A proprietary solution is by definition inferior to a Free solution. Given the Freedom to improve the software, security problems can be fixed, employment created, resources used most efficiently, government infrastructure relied upon, and so on.
Of course OS X is still the best solution for most users that I have yet seen...
OS X is "more free" than Windows (there are degrees of freedom), but not by much. If the number of coders working on Windows-based solutions were all working on GNU/Linux instead, there is no way a team of Apple coders could keep up with the entire world. The only reason Apple jumped forward is by leveraging their UNIX compatibility.

Re:As well as.... (3, Insightful)

intermodal (534361) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490439)

those are social reasons. The employment reasons, resourcre reasons, political reasons etc. are based primarily on replacing foreign software providers with local support and software firms, to keep Brazilian money in Brazil. Piping their funds to Cupertino does not put money back into the Brazilian economy.

Fuck you (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490360)

Fuck you

excellent! (1)

c4ffeine (705293) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490363)

With any luck, this will allow them to save large amounts of money, possibly fueling a tech boom. Well, probably not that much, but it will definitely benefit them. Other nations will notice this, and with any luck push similar initiatives. THis is our lucky bereak!

Away from choice? (0, Redundant)

doormat (63648) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490365)

Why dont they just say "Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain." If this isnt corporate spin BS I dont know what is...

Re:Away from choice? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490418)

It isn't entirely "spin". If you read this account [penguinhosting.com] about corporate life in bolshevik [sp?] russia, you can see how supposed 'choice' (you can use the states' stores, or the free markets') can change to no choice (you can use the states' stores, or you can get a bullet to the head as an traitor to the state.)

And if (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490376)

the Brazilians can program as well as they play football (soccer)....

Like a divorce... (0)

Mainframer (530235) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490378)

As in a divorcing couple, the market divorce from Microsoft promises to be painful for one of the two partys. We all have a hunch as to who the pain striken party will be by this long overdue separation...

Only if Mexico followed Brazil brave footsteps... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490379)

But our president is a wimp, and the USA is TOO close.... It will ashame you the strenght Microsoft has in my country... Big money can go a long distance in a corrupt county like mine, and without brave politicians we are doomed.

Linux Laptops from Brazil? (1)

incom (570967) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490388)

Are there any credible laptop manufacturers in Brazil that might offer a laptop without the MS tax?

Duh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490389)

Everyone warez Microsoft products anyway, I know no small business in Brazil who actually paid for their Microsoft Office or Windows

Attitude... (5, Insightful)

Mullen (14656) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490397)

"If this was a rich country, it wouldn't matter and we could buy Microsoft products, but we're a developing country and Linux is just a lot more accessible, so we're heading toward a Linux generation."

It is this attitude that probably got them in to the problems they are in now and it is the attitude that got California in the problems it has now. When the State is flush with cash, you still have to find ways to save money. Just because the State has money, it does not mean it should spend it. It should return it to the people who gave it really belongs to, the Tax Payers.
Run Linux, save money, lower taxes. Sounds like a good combination to me.

Attitude indeed (0, Interesting)

Mike Hawk (687615) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490435)

Or, alternately, one could read that as linux is the OS for poor people.

The bus is the transportation of choice for poor people. Ramen is the food of choice for poor people. Taco Bell is the restaurant of choice for poor people. Welfare is the lifestyle of choice for poor people.

Where does that put linux?

Re:Attitude... (1)

sheldon (2322) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490514)

Run Linux, save money, lower taxes. Sounds like a good combination to me.

Absolutely, but if you want to save money that means government shouldn't hire developers to work on Linux and artificially support a market.

However... (1)

tshak (173364) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490526)

One could also render this attitude as, "we would benefit and enjoy the higher end solution, but we just can't afford that right now so we'll make do with this lower cost alternative."

I'm not making any claim about whether or not Linux is a good choice regardless of the purchase price, it just sounds like they care less about Free Software (as in speech) and more about getting a free lunch.

There's mulitple ways to render Brazil's attitude. Our speculations may be valid, but we shouldn't jump to and conclusions about those speculations.

is this a threat to linux security? (4, Interesting)

sbma44 (694130) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490398)

In recent years Brazil has become [iht.com] the home to a lot of crackers (I believe there was a slashdot article on this recently as well). Presumably moving the government's preferred software solutions will also influence Brazil's populace, through compatibility requirements and civil workers becoming familiar with OSS, then taking that knowledge home.

If Brazil remains a locus of "grayhat" activity, could this mean more resources will be put toward finding Linux exploits? Certainly on the whole Linux is more secure than Microsoft's offerings, but I imagine most would agree that its small userbase has played a part in limiting the number of exploits uncovered.

Re:is this a threat to linux security? (4, Insightful)

inerte (452992) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490472)

Yes, it will mean that brazilians will be more able to find holes on Open Source and Linux solutions.

Also, it means that they will be able not only to find them, but also to fix them.

Do brazilians 'hack' a lot? Sure, they do. Bu not because the tech is there, the same reason why people don't commit murder because there's a kitchen knife there.

There are good and bad sides of these observations. Why did you pick up the bad? Brazilians would know how to crack, and also how to fix it.

Wonderful News (3, Interesting)

slevin (67815) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490405)

This is such wonderful news I can barely stand it. I've spent the whole weekend in a slump because it recently hit me that Microsoft has flat out killed all progress in browser technologies for the mainstream consumer. Their admission to make no more changes to IE until the next revision of the OS is terribly sad. For a brief shining moment one could dream of a world of human beings working together and exchanging ideas. But for the most part, the internet has been reduced to an alternate way to watch CNN.

Individial centric social structures (such as capitalism) work well in many ways, but they are very vulnerable through brainwashing of individuals (advertising) and the abuse of the commons(spam). Governments are the forces of socialism which keep things in check. I'm giddy at seeing this actually happening.(Even though I am deeply sad that my own dear Home of the Brave dropped the ball on this in a fearfully troubling manner.) I pray to any higher power that will answer me that this sort of thing will continue until it is safe and productive to have a good idea again.

context people (5, Insightful)

jdkane (588293) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490408)

Slashdot story posting says
Interestingly, Microsoft's representative in Brazil decries this as a movement away from freedom and choice..."

The context in the actual story is:
Although Amadeu insists the government has no plans to mandate open-source software use, Microsoft is worried and is lobbying to prevent the policy from becoming law.
"We still think free choice is best for companies, the individuals and the government," said Luiz Moncau, Microsoft's marketing director in Brazil. "There is the risk of creating a technology island in Brazil supported by law."

Understanding the full context, I believe it's a bad thing to exclude one party and not the other, whether it's Microsoft of Linux being excluded. Yes, it sounds like good reasoning that the government would go with Linux and Open-Source because of the cheper prices. However at the same time they should not exclude other types of non-open-source software. Other than for reasons of anti-competitiveness I don't see a good reason to not allow other types of software to be used.

Re:context people (4, Insightful)

oGMo (379) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490478)

However at the same time they should not exclude other types of non-open-source software.

There is very good reason to exclude non-open-source software, all of which have been discussed and experienced repeatedly. As it's been said, this exclusion does not exclude any company, Microsoft or otherwise. Microsoft is free to compete in the open source arena just like everyone else.

Technology Island (1)

Bob9113 (14996) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490430)

"We still think free choice is best for companies, the individuals and the government," said Luiz Moncau, Microsoft's marketing director in Brazil. "There is the risk of creating a technology island in Brazil supported by law."

So, wait, in the first part of that quote, he says free choice is good. In the second part he says Microsoft's monopoly and refusal to interoperate make free choice painful. So after running that through the bullshit-o-tron we get: "Free choice is good as long as you choose Microsoft."

Good and bad... (-1, Flamebait)

Fux the Penguin (724045) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490434)

I keep seeing stories on slashdot about foreign countries either moving away from MS towards open-source, or being coerced/bribed by MS to stay in their camp. So, what do you think stories like this mean for the U.S. economy?

On the one hand, it's great for Brazil, and the the Brazilian IT market. In general, it takes more highly trained (and more expensive) IT workers to manage a Linux infrastructure. However, that's money they could be sending into the U.S. in terms of software licenses, which would then trickle down to the rest of us.

Don't get me wrong...I love Linux, and I use it for many home-grown applications. However, in this time of economic uncertainty, I'd rather see money flowing into the U.S., even if it winds up with MS.

Re:Good and bad... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490456)

Well, there are circa 300 million US residents, and circa 6 billion people on earth. You can bet your bottom dollar than a bunch of the 5.7 billion who don't live in your nation wouldn't be willing to legitimise a monopoly in order to keep US programmers employed.

That might sound harsh, but it's true.

Re:Good and bad... (5, Insightful)

cranos (592602) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490461)

So MS bad if screwing over local companies/organisations but MS good if screwing over foriegn companies/organisations? Sorry buddy but you can't have it both ways.

Its called a global economy, something the US has been pushing hard over the last couple of decades. Mind you the US version of the global economy seems to think that everyone else should play by the rules except the US.

Re:Good and bad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490464)

fvck that noise, i rather see Linux take over, than have servers all over the world running windoze & iis falling over like a row of dominos by the millions because some bored blackhat or script kiddie decided to release his latest project in to the wild

Re:Good and bad... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490473)

"I'd rather see money flowing into the U.S., even if it winds up with MS."

After running that through the bullshit-o-tron, we get:

"I'd rather see money flowing out of Brazil."

You bigotted idiot.

freedom (0)

Dagrush (723402) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490452)

who cares about Microsoft's "freedom" care about source code freedom and source code free-ness ...at least this can't be modded lower than my other posts...

Brazilian ladies Love Linux ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490490)

New Marketing Plan for the Penguins:

Brazilian ladies Love Linux !

All the Beauty AND the Brains...

A McDonalds, somewhere in Rio, 2004 (5, Funny)

morelife (213920) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490495)

"Deseja batata com isso?"

(you want fries with that?)

--Luiz Moncau, Director of Marketing, Microsoft Brazil, 4 months from now.

Well, of course governments are doing this (5, Interesting)

cemkaner (55453) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490505)

We keep reading about the yet-another-government that said "oh, dear, Microsoft is sooooo expensive, we should use Linux instead."

And then there's an item in the Wall Street Journal about someone from Microsoft striking a deal with the country's government. They get big discounts, free software, maybe some gifts for the schools, maybe even some investments or jobs.

So if you were running a poor country, why WOULDN'T you threaten to give Microsoft products the boot? It's a negotiation!

Zero Hunger (1, Offtopic)

jpatokal (96361) | more than 10 years ago | (#7490521)

...and before the ObTrolls start yelling about Third World governments putting money into newfangled computers instead of feeding their own people, don't worry, Brazil's working on that too [fomezero.gov.br]. (In case you don't read Portuguese, here [ryerson.ca]'s an article about the 'Hunger Zero' program in English.

Cheers,
-j.

I'm getting sick of these stories (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7490528)

Is there any way to turn off stories of this variety? I get tired of reading on an almost daily basis that:

Someone in a high up place somewhere mentioned something about Linux or open source

Some government has decided to think about using Linux and open source in the future

Microsoft's practices are being frowned upon somewhere by somebody. ... ad nauseum.

Stories like these need a new category so I can ignore them.
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