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ISS Fender Bender

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the any-landing-you-can-walk-away-from dept.

Space 248

wjsteele writes "Seems that the Space Station has had a minor fender bender. Sounds kind of scary... being in a space craft and hearing metal crunching (like an aluminum can.) Apparently some 'Minor' space debris struck the station around 2:30am this morning, while the astronauts were eating their wheaties." Update: 11/27 16:31 GMT by M : Looks like an experiment may be to blame.

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Uhh (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576750)

So?

Re:Uhh (1)

October_30th (531777) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576764)

"Humans and aliens wrapped in two million, five hundred thousand tons of spinning metal, all alone in the night. It can be a dangerous place..."

Re:Uhh (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576882)

and aliens

You mean there are Europeans up there?

Affirmative action works project (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576931)

Maybe if NASA hadn't turned into yet another government work program set aside for women and minorities, all these screwups wouldn't keep happening.

What if NASA would hire qualified engineers, regardless of their gender or ethnicity? And promoted their managers the same way?

What if NASA's current "engineers" actually did engineering, instead of project management? What if they cut out the extreme dependence on contractors?

Do you think this would let us get back to the 1960s glory days of moon landings and plans for trips to Mars? Or is this just wishful thinking?

Re:Affirmative action works project (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7577064)

Well, getting hit by space junk is not a screwup, unless you count carelessness about deorbiting stuff and not dropping wrenches while suited up and working outside the space station.

Your point is well taken, however, when you consider just how badly the space station is falling apart after just a short time in orbit (relative to it's planned lifetime).

Re:Uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576872)

Really, eh. This is a dumb ass article to post - there is nothing but insipid karma whores that can be posted in relation to this story.

2:30 AM, eh? (5, Funny)

gowen (141411) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576752)

Glad you included that, because times of day -- especially those lacking any sort of timezone information -- are extremely useful when referring to events that take place in space.

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (1)

KDan (90353) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576779)

I was going to say that, but I see someone already said it.

I'll just add that it wasn't 2:30am, it was 5:30am, actually.

Daniel

Anyone know... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576791)

What time zone the ISS runs in?

I'd assume it was the same time zone as the ground control, but AFAIK, ground control for the ISS is split over various sites. I mean, you take a Russian and an American up there and you can be sure someone's gonna be bitchin' about jetlag on the way home...

Re:Anyone know... (4, Informative)

gowen (141411) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576819)

What time zone the ISS runs in?
According to Ed Lu's letters home [38.201.67.77] they work on Greenwich Mean Time.

Re: Why was Greenwich so mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576824)

Because she didn't have time to be nice.

Re:Anyone know... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576891)

I don't reply to Anonymous Cowards

Right...

Re:Anyone know... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576919)


"I don't reply to anonymous cowards"

you just did.

Re:Anyone know... (1)

ComaVN (325750) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576989)

He never lies either, so that works out just fine :P

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576797)

Where did the 2:30 come from anyway? Their is no mention that I can find in the linked article. The only time mentioned is the 8:30 EST. Am I missing somthing? Has he read another artcle that he did not provide a link for?

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (1)

mariox19 (632969) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576807)

I blame the schools. Most graduates can't convert Fahrenheit to Celsius, never mind terrestrial time to star dates.

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576849)

Most graduates can't convert Fahrenheit to Celsius, never mind terrestrial time to star dates.


Convert Fahrenheit to Celsius? Does someone actually use Fahrenheit?

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (3, Insightful)

golan (570588) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576812)

Well, the most logical timezone to apply in space, I believe, would be GMT, kind of standard.
The military people use it when they talk about zulu time, right?, That would be common sense. But, maybe what people at NASA, ESA, or the russian agency think might the other way around!

Would that not be UCT (1)

bWareiWare.co.uk (660144) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576837)

coordinated universal time.

Re:Would that not be UCT (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576883)

UTC == GMT

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576892)

That would also explain why they were eating their wheaties at 2:30 am. 2:30gmt == 7:30 est.

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576947)

0230GMT = 2130EST. EST is five hours behind GMT/UTC.

I can speak with authority on this one, as I'm British and live in Florida. When I call my family at five in the evening, they're usually about go to bed.

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576966)

EASTERN STANDARD, Y'all! I'm representin' heyah. Now the EST is the best timezone dere iz dogz!

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (1)

InfiniteWisdom (530090) | more than 10 years ago | (#7577108)

the russian agency think might the other way around!

Dude... it isn't the Soviet Russian agency anymore!

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (5, Informative)

jfoust (9271) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576928)

According to the Houston Chronicle [chron.com] , among other sources [spacetoday.net] , the incident took place at 1:59 am CST (0759 GMT) Wednesday.

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (1)

suds (6610) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576936)

Almost all the things in flight (except birds) always refer to GMT!
BTW, When they are in orbit, astro/cosmonauts see a sunset and sunrise every 90 minutes. So I wouldnt be surprised if they are having breakfast at 2.30am GMT.

Re:2:30 AM, eh? (2, Informative)

Jon_MrJR (568060) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576955)

I bet it's UTC, that's the timezone NASA uses on this cute StationLocation website [nasa.gov] ...

False Alarm (3, Funny)

thelizman (304517) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576753)

It was just the aluminum foil on the stations main antenna.

Re:False Alarm (1)

Ripplet (591094) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576816)

It was just the aluminum foil on the stations main antenna.

You mean something took off their tin foil hat? Now they're in trouble!

MOD PARENT DOWN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576980)

God... idiot moderators. They don't 'aluminium foil' in their antenna. The parent is a troll.

Oh boy (4, Funny)

EulerX07 (314098) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576759)

Their insurance are gonna go up now, I hope they had comprehensive...

Space Junk (5, Informative)

Chatmag (646500) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576760)

A 1999 study estimated there are some 4 million pounds of space junk in low-Earth orbit, just one part of a celestial sea of roughly 110,000 objects larger than 1 centimeter -- each big enough to damage a satellite or space-based telescope.

It's no wonder the ISS was hit. All they need is the space equivalent of the "adopt a highway" program, and a lot of plastic bags.

Re:Space Junk (0)

October_30th (531777) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576775)

All they need is the space equivalent of the "adopt a highway" program, and a lot of plastic bags

Or alternatively a chain gang inmates to pick up the trash in orbit...

Re:Space Junk (2, Funny)

Patrik_AKA_RedX (624423) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576835)

Or alternatively a chain gang inmates to pick up the trash in orbit...
An then they say crime doesn't pay. I mean, rob a bank, hide the money, turn yourself in and get a free trip in space! No need for years of hard study and training!

Minor? (4, Insightful)

KingDaveRa (620784) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576761)

Minor? If I was floating about in space in something with walls as thick as a tin can, I would be rather worried by now.

According to This article on BBC News [bbc.co.uk] Michael Foale is no stranger to this: "He was onboard the Mir space station in 1987 when a Progress supply tanker crashed into it - one of the most dangerous incidents to have ever taken place in space."

I'd still be crapping my pants though. There's no jumping off this one.

Re:Minor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576786)

> walls as thick as a tin can

Is that how thick they are? I was always under the impression they were made of sturdier stuff.

Re:Minor? (1)

KingDaveRa (620784) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576828)

I remember seeing something about the walls of a lot of space vehicles being quite thin. I may have dreamed it or something :-/

Re:Minor? (4, Informative)

s20451 (410424) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576946)

Most spacecraft that fly in and out of the Earth's atmosphere have thick skins, to endure the stresses of launch and re-entry. Spacecraft that are solely designed to travel in the vacuum of space tend to be quite thin-skinned to save weight.

For example, the Apollo lunar module had a skin about the thickness of a pop can. Apparently the hatch would bulge outward when the module was pressurized -- I wish I could find a reference for that. There is also a story of a technician on the ground who clicked his pen against a high-pressue LM fuel tank during testing -- the click opened a pin-prick leak that amputated the technician's finger (that story is in "Apollo" by Murray and Cox).

The ISS was specifically designed to withstand impacts from space debris, so I would expect its hull to be a little thicker.

Re:Minor? (1)

October_30th (531777) | more than 10 years ago | (#7577094)

Apparently the hatch would bulge outward when the module was pressurized

Here's one reference: Andrew Chaikin, A Man on the Moon" [amazon.com] , Penguin Books, 1998 (ISBN 0-14-024146-9).

Re:Minor? (1)

rah1420 (234198) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576960)

No, you didn't dream it. Conventional wisdom is to keep a space vehicle wall thin enough to keep oxygen in, and that's pretty much it. The lunar lander had tinfoil walls IIRC.

Thicker walls cause all sorts of problems with secondary emissions when radiation hits them -- to say nothing of the mass penalty to keep it aloft. I'd rather be in a floating tin can that kept the air in and was relatively peaceful than a thick wall that was the equivalent of an operating xray machine.

In a competition between space junk and solar radiation, I'll roll the dice for space junk all the time. Solar radiation is perpetual unless you're in the shadow of the earth. :)

Re:Minor? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576965)

I recall a comment that very often the walls of some of the human habitable compartments of the Apollo spacecraft were as thick as kitchen foil.

Remember, the key issues were strength, airtightness, and weight. The strength had to be enough to keep an atmosphere (or large fraction thereof) of air pressure contained - they were less concerned about something piercing the walls because at the kinds of speeds things were likely to hit, it didn't really matter how thick the walls were.

Re:Minor? (1)

GammaTau (636807) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576845)

According to This article on BBC News [bbc.co.uk] Michael Foale is no stranger to this: "He was onboard the Mir space station in 1987 when a Progress supply tanker crashed into it - one of the most dangerous incidents to have ever taken place in space."

BBC must be wrong. There were certainly no western astronauts onboard the Mir in 1987. I guess they probably mean 1997.

Re:Minor? (2, Funny)

Psiren (6145) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576860)

There's no jumping off this one.

Sure there is. It's just a long way down... ;)

Re:Minor? (5, Informative)

MouseR (3264) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576880)

There's no jumping off this one.

Actually, yes there is.

The ISS has a permanently docked Soyuz capsule for evacuation purposes.

Some details, here [google.com] , also indicate that the incident you mention actually took place in 1997.

NASA also have info on the escape capsule [harcourtschool.com] .

A "brush"? (2, Interesting)

PatrickThomson (712694) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576766)

Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't things as small as paing flecks cause serious damage at the kind of speeds space junk goes at?

I realise the junk might share the same orbit as the space station and have the same relative velocity blah blah, but consider just how slow it'd have to be moving not to rupture the hull.

Re:A "brush"? (1)

mrtroy (640746) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576869)

That was on re-entry. But not to worry, space agencies know about space junk and plan on it not rupturing their hull

Re:A "brush"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576933)


Yes, even paint flecks pack a lot of kinetic energy at high speeds, they should really look at Homer, he's been eating potato chips again.

Re:A "brush"? (3, Informative)

s20451 (410424) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576993)

but don't things as small as paing flecks cause serious damage at the kind of speeds space junk goes at?

I assume you mean "paint flecks", and the answer is that they may cause minor damage. The space shuttle Challenger took a paint fleck hit [raytheon.com] on one of its windows, which left a crater about a quarter inch in diameter. Apparently such minor pitting on the thermal tiles is considered routine in the shuttle program.

Even at orbital speeds, paint flecks don't have enough momentum to worry about. The big worry is the ball-bearing-sized debris, which is essentially impossible to detect, and which could deliver the impact energy of a hand grenade explosion.

Oh, I know what this is... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576771)

Micheal Foale's got one of those sound effect key fobs.

Instead of the usual Grenade Launcher, Bazooka, Machine Gun noises, the new space version comes with 'crunching metal tin', 'airlock hiss' and 'oops, we lost a solar panel' noises...

Nice one Michael!

ISS Gender Bender (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576773)

Bite my shiny metal space station !

In Soviet Russia.... (-1, Troll)

stemcell (636823) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576776)

Mir space station crashes into you.

2:30 AM, eh? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576781)

Doing what, pray tell? Eating their Wheaties or sucking each others dicks...? Hmmmmm?

30,000 km/s can do a lot of damage (5, Informative)

asciimonster (305672) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576782)

I recall an insident with a space shuttle a few years ago. A flick of paint hit a window and left a fist-sized star in that window. That's the danger of space 30,000 km/s isn't a big deal in space, but having a collision at that speed is quite an impact.

So anyone who still think the movie Armageddon is based on scientific facts. (Remember the body being flung againt the windscreen and it didn't even have a scratch?) Think again...

Re:30,000 km/s can do a lot of damage (2, Insightful)

Seahawk (70898) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576834)

Except that the body in Armageddon didnt move with 30000 km/h compared to the shuttle, as it had fallen out of a spaceship with the same speed and direction of the first craft

Re:30,000 km/s can do a lot of damage (1)

asciimonster (305672) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576889)

Except that the body in Armageddon didnt move with 30000 km/h compared to the shuttle, as it had fallen out of a spaceship with the same speed and direction of the first craft

Ok. Bad example. But in the film there were some basketball-sized stones flying around...

Wait a minute... That body could never have hit the second shuttle in the first place. It has the same speed as the first shuttle, and since there is no atmosphere to slow him down, it should float alongside it.

Re:30,000 km/s can do a lot of damage (2, Insightful)

Stween (322349) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576912)

"That body could never have hit the second shuttle in the first place. It has the same speed as the first shuttle, and since there is no atmosphere to slow him down, it should float alongside it."

If memory serves from the movie, there was an awful lot of stuff floating around on the approach to the asteroid that could have slowed the body down quicker than a shuttle. A couple of strikes from those basketball-sized stones you mention could easily have kicked the body back a little.

That said, there's little point trying to analyse a movie that's clearly not intended to be scientifically accurate.

Re:30,000 km/s can do a lot of damage (1, Offtopic)

cybergrue (696844) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576877)

So anyone who still think the movie Armageddon is based on scientific facts.
Your kidding right. Armageddon is possibly the worst SF movie in recient years in respect for the correct protrayal of science. Normally I go to see big budget SF movies and privatly chuckle everytime a scientific law gets broken. Most movies I rate in "minutes between screwups", however in Armageddon, it was how many screwup were there per second. My favourate one is when they doc with Mir, start it rotating to create artificial gravity, and then walk up the docking tubes. :-[ If they got this wrong, then don't expect the Hollywood producers to be able to calculate the damage from a two body collision correctly.

Re:30,000 km/s can do a lot of damage (2, Insightful)

myom (642275) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576904)

Anything hitting the space station at that speed (1/10 the speed of light) would cause enormous damage. Did you mean 30 000km/h?

Re:30,000 km/s can do a lot of damage (2, Insightful)

dAzED1 (33635) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576948)

that you could see. with detail, the body coming pretty much meant that the relative speed differential wasn't 30,000km/s. Or even 30,000km/h. Or even 300km/h. Ever seen a car drive towards you at 300km/h? Even without flalling arms, even with sharp, slick edges, its more blurry than that body was.

Just because something is in space doesn't mean that its relative speed to you is instantly 1/10 the speed of light - you realize that you're just one zero away, right? Additionally, just because you're in space and you hit something, doesn't mean your relative speed was all that high. I mean, if your relative speed is 1m/h different, and you're only 1m away...well, in 1h, you'll hit it.

Has no one heard of relativity here?

Re:30,000 km/s can do a lot of damage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7577092)

Uh, the speed of light is 300,000km/s not km/h. 30,000km/h is 1/600th the speed of light.

MicroMetoriets (1)

rf0 (159958) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576784)

Least it wasn't a micro meteroite which would of just punctured the ISS and caused massive decompression. Of course floating around where the only way down is 100 mile fall isn't an overally comforting idea

Rus

Re:MicroMetoriets (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576914)

Except...

a) the stations is designed to withstand mictometeor hits.

b) there is a capsule parked there permanantly for escape

c) in the event of a puncture, they can move to either the capsule or just out of the effected compartment, and seal off that area. decompression isn't very fast through a 1cm hole.

Re:MicroMetoriets (3, Informative)

0123456 (636235) | more than 10 years ago | (#7577021)

I believe that even the shuttle is able to cope with a hole in the hull close to an inch across long enough to do an emergency re-entry (of course if it's in the wrong part of the hull it's Columbia time again). So an ISS crew shouldn't have too big a problem with small meteorites, even if they had to seal off one module... the idea that all your air will leak out in seconds through a small hole is pure Hollywood.

Doesnt seem right to me (3, Interesting)

hookedup (630460) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576787)


The spokesman, who spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity, said by telephone that the space forces had detected an object along the station's orbit. They determined that the object was very small and would pose no danger to the craft.

Shouldnt they at the very least notify the crew to inform them of the junk nearby? And possibly practice a drill for this sort of thing.

Seems to me they lucked out this time, if that had been a bigger piece of junk which would cause major damage, and had ground control had seen it and not said anything, we would have plenty of different headlines this morning.

Fender Bender ? (4, Insightful)

mbone (558574) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576792)

This is one of the weirdest things I have heard of -
- Both astronauts heard it
- By this point they should be pretty familar with the noises the station makes - for example, the thermal expansion / contraction as you go through the terminator.
- It did not sound like an explosion (typical velocities of space debris impacts is 5 kilometers per second or so - and meteorites impact at even higher velocities), so it probably wasn't a piece of random junk.
- They got out the mobile camera and couldn't see anything damaged.

So what was it ? Let's hope it wasn't some valve or other part failing, but I suspect we will hear more of this.

Re:Fender Bender ? (1)

October_30th (531777) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576808)

The scientific explanation is simple: gremlins.

I know what it is (1)

a!b!c! (137622) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576842)

Its is a printout of the code SCO needs to win its case, turned into an intersplanetary spitball.

Re:Fender Bender ? (2, Funny)

AllUsernamesAreGone (688381) | more than 10 years ago | (#7577115)

Obviously it has to be aliens doing knock-and-run.

Moving orbit (1)

rf0 (159958) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576795)

"In case a piece of debris is big enough to threaten damage, the spacecraft are directed to a safer orbit."

Am I the only worried by this in that if there is a bit of junk they have to move. Surely if we keep polluting space then there eventually won't be another orbit.

If there was a bit of junk on the freeway it would be picked up and moved and in space we just avoid it

Rus

Re:Moving orbit (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576829)

Rusty, I told you before, and I'll tell you again. Stop cocksucking spamming your worthless domain site, mmkay?

Sound in space? (1)

instanto (513362) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576801)

I did'nt think sound travelled in space.

Anyway; The ISS and the MIR stations - according to reports sound awfully like the space station in Armageddon (the movie - not the biblical doomsday).

"Russian Equipment, American Equipment.. its all made in Taiwan!"

Re:Sound in space? (4, Informative)

Stween (322349) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576853)

"I did'nt think sound travelled in space."

That's true. The sound didn't travel through space, the sound travelled through the body of the space station and the air contained within it, not the vacuum of space.

Re:Sound in space? (1)

Patrik_AKA_RedX (624423) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576865)

I did'nt think sound travelled in space.
Almost right. It doesn't travel through space (mostly vacuum), but it does travel through space stations (various materials which conduct sound vibrations).

Re:Sound in space? (2, Informative)

snipingkills (250057) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576871)

Sound doesn't travel in a vacuum due to a lack of matter to vibrate through. If something impacted the hull the sound waves would be transmitted through the hull and through the atmosphere inside the space station.

Re:Sound in space? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576991)

Minor spelling flame, I mention this because it comes up a lot:

The "'" in didnt needs to abbreviate the "o" not the space. You never need to indicate an abbreviation for a space with an "'".

So the first line should have read:

I didn't think sound travelled in space.
Apologies in advance for any spelling errors in this message, Sod's law says there are some...

WTF? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576809)

The trolls told me Michael got fired. And here I thought we were finally rid of that fucking prick.

A simplier explanation (5, Informative)

doktorstop (725614) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576810)

The Russian Space Agency has just issued a simplier explanation. They've been trying to figure out what happened and came out with a different idea. No debris have hit the station. The sound was internal, coming from something that jammed a fan in the internal air ventilation system. This also has been confirmed by specialists from RosAviaKosmos (the company that built IIS =) Sorry, folks, the Mars attack theory will have to wait till next time =)

Re:A simplier explanation (0)

agentforsythe (696066) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576868)

IIS? *runs and hides*

Re:A simplier explanation (1)

InfiniteWisdom (530090) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576942)

RosAviaKosmos (the company that built IIS =)

Wasn't Microsoft the company that built IIS?

Planetes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576815)

Sounds like they need to do like in the anime Planetes, where the main characters are space garbagemen, and have to clear out debris.

The future equivalent of the UN pays bounties for clearing out certain debris, so each space corporation has a small department responsible for picking up the trash, and that department is not very well looked upon... It could become reality one day!

Re:PLANETES (-1)

Captain Goatse (715400) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576844)

Yes! PLANETES rocks!

By the way, do you know any place you can download illegally translated(unofficial translations are indeed 'illegal', enough to provoke a 100% win lawsuit) copyright-infringing scans of the award winning manga?

Perhaps... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576826)

Perhaps this could lead to a situation ala Mission Critical

FLOATING space junk? (2, Insightful)

localroger (258128) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576856)

Space junk does not "float," it zips along at seven miles per second. Any piece of space junk big enough to see would have completely destroyed at least one module of the ISS. Even if the space junk was in "almost" the same orbit as ISS (say, detached from the ISS itself previously) it would be going fast enough to do a hell of a lot of damage.

I don't have any idea what could have caused this, but it wasn't something randomly floating around that just bumped the station. What disturbs me more than the accident itself is that professionals who should know better are floating this idea that it might be like a shopping cart hitting your car. It makes no sense at all.

Re:FLOATING space junk? (2, Insightful)

andrewscraig (319163) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576890)

But you have to think relative. Relative to the speed of the space station, a piece of space junk "almost" in the same orbit as ISS is going "almost" the same speed as the ISS (unless one is being propelled by something). That's why it can just rub against the station without actually causing any damage.

You knew it was coming! (4, Funny)

Txiasaeia (581598) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576861)

Did anybody else read the title and think "Bite my shiny metal space station ass?"

Re:You knew it was coming! (1)

Patrik_AKA_RedX (624423) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576879)

Yes:
ISS Gender Bender (Score:0)

by Anonymous Coward on 27-11-03 14:49
But that was without the ass.

Some serious analysis required (2, Funny)

heironymouscoward (683461) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576873)

The scene... a silently rusting space station, somewhere in near Earth orbit.

"Honey,..."

"Yeah?"

"... I think I crashed the space station"

"WHAT?!!"

"Look, it wasn't my fault. Some space junk came out without stopping and I ran right into it!"

"Honey, baby, how often have I told you, DON'T DRIVE MY SPACE STATION. Sorry, I got a little emotional there."

"We're insured, aren't we?"

"Not over international territory. Right now we're about over Afghanistan. No coverage."

"I'm so sorry, I'll make it right..."

"OK, suit up, we're going out"

"No, I meant I'll bake some cookies"

"OK, get me a beer while you're at it."

I'll thank you (4, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576884)

Not to refer to my secret orbiting battle station from which I intend to launch my bid for world domination as 'debris'

For the space newbies (4, Funny)

suds (6610) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576925)

Space junk, half the size of the little finger nail has hit the International Space Station (of size approximately 20 VW beetles) today morning at 2.30am precisely. The junk was moving at a 1000 times the speed of a jumbo jet, and if hit head on could create a crater 0.0034 times the size of Philadelphia.

Al Quaida !!! (0, Flamebait)

escallywag (715579) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576938)

Must have been space debris intentionally put on a collision course with the ISS by terrorists !!!

Why didn't they just... (5, Funny)

riggwelter (84180) | more than 10 years ago | (#7576945)

...raise shields?!

Later on that day... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7576997)

...they discover that a six pack of beer has been stowed away in the bathroom. And one can is missing...

Just another dreamer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7577018)

We have to get serious about space debris. We can't do it half-heartedly, we can't use half-measures and we must learn from anime.

Filmmaker David Cronenberg Arrested In Space (5, Funny)

Saint Aardvark (159009) | more than 10 years ago | (#7577020)

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION -- Canadian filmmaker David Cronenberg was arrested today over 700 miles above the Earth's surface when he was found filming scenes for a sequel to his controversial film, Crash, a movie about sexual attraction to car crashes.

Cronenberg, who had not obtained permission to film from the American or Russian space agencies, was found outside the International Space Station by astronauts after they were awoken by what sounded like "a car being crashed". Upon investigation, the astronauts found Cronenberg discussing the result of a take with actor Elias Koteas and giving direction for the next.

"I can't believe he did this," said cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri from the space station. "This is not a movie studio."

The arrest comes only six months after Cronenberg announced that he was entering the X-Prize Contest, which promises an award of $10,000,000 US to the first privately-owned reusable spacecraft. Outside of a few die-hard fans of the director's work, no one had taken Cronenberg's entrace seriously.

"This really fucks things up for me," said John Carmack, the odds-on favourite in the contest. "If he posts bail and gets back up in space, then he wins the prize. I never knew he was this far ahead."

Cronenberg is being held in a washroom on the International Space Station pending a routine Soyuz supply flight. Sources at NASA say that it's possible he could be formally booked and bail set within as little as six days, giving him plenty of time to fulfill the X-Prize conditions.

Open-source programmer Richard Stallman could not be reached for comment, but sources close to the computing guru said he had been collaborating with Cronenberg for some time. "He was one of the paramedics in the first Crash," said a friend. "I think Cronenberg's making him a meteorite or something in this one."

Re:Filmmaker David Cronenberg Arrested In Space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7577060)

that is so not funny

I told them i would do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7577040)


they should of paid me (places pinkie on lips) the one meeelion dollars

If we stop polluting space... (0)

Brutulf (725176) | more than 10 years ago | (#7577075)

Wont all the "space junk" fall down to earth eventually?

KW (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7577086)

Russia: Space station was not struck

MOSCOW, Nov. 27 (UPI) -- Russian space officials denied Thursday the International Space Station had been struck by a foreign object, Gateway2Russia.com reported.

U.S. astronaut Michael Foale told NASA's Mission Control Wednesday a brief, metallic crunching noise he heard sounded as if something had hit the orbiting station.

Foale and Russian crewmate Alexander Kaleri were finishing breakfast when they heard the noise from the rear of the station's Russian module housing sleeping quarters, a kitchen and toilet.

"A noise was heard, similar to the sound of a tin being crushed. It lasted about one second," Sergei Gorbunov, spokesman for Russia's space authority Rosaviakosmos, told NTV television.

"Using external cameras the crew checked the paneling of the segment -- no damage was found," Gorbunov said. "The noise was most likely linked to some kind of device inside the station."

Interfax news agency quoted a Rosaviakosmos spokesman as saying that the noise may have come from a ventilator as has happened previously.
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