Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Canadians [Will] Pay Levy on MP3 Players - Updated

CowboyNeal posted more than 10 years ago | from the strange-new-sin-taxes dept.

Music 665

Capt. Canuck writes "According to this Toronto Star story, the Canadian Copyright Board may approve a 20% levy on electronic media tomorrow, including MP3 players and hard drives. With the Canadian Dollar rising and this on the horizon, maybe now is the right time to get that iPod." Update: 12/12 16:33 GMT by M : rcpitt writes "The Canadian Copyright Board has (finally - a year late) issued its ruling on the latest round of blank media levy - the controversial (in the rest of the world as well as Canada) private "tax" on recordable media used to copy music which proceeds go to the music artists in Canada. The ruling by the board and a press release were posted to the Board's web site at 10AM Ottawa (CST) today. The ruling continues the levy amounts from the previous 2 year period (2001-2002) to the end of this period (2003-2004) at the same amounts as previously set but adds new levies on portable (MP3) digital audio recorders of from CDN$2/unit to CDN$25/unit depending on internal storage capacity."

cancel ×

665 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Don't forget... (-1)

SCO$699FeeTroll (695565) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696231)

...to pay your $699 licensing fee you cock-smoking teabaggers.

read this! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696232)

http://apple.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=88928&ci d=7696199

Re:read this! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696268)

How about staying on-topic and ST'ing the FU? Slashdot is not your personal semiotic pigsty.

Re:read this! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696413)

but this is more fun than staying on topic!

Abolish copyright--a solution to the insanity. (4, Interesting)

Thinkit3 (671998) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696240)

Clearly this is insane. It's nothing other than welfare for copyright holders. One way to make things more sane is to abolish copyright. Without copyright, nobody would have a legal right to prevent others from copying music, and thus would have no justification for asking for a tariff on equipment for recording music to. But copyright should be abolished mainly because it is unnatural--cheaper recording media would be just a side effect.

Agree on abolishing copyrights and patents? The poster argoff does as well. You are not alone.

Not a troll - MODS ON CRACK (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696315)

As usual, the moderators seem to be bringing their own baggage to the table.

This is a perfectly-legitimate opinion. It's a howlingly-stupid opinion, but it's still on topic, coherently-stated, and worthy of discussion. Unpopular opinions are not always trolls. Mod it back up, please.

Re:Not a troll - MODS ON CRACK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696347)

Enjoy the fruits of metamoderation, my friend.

It's called groupthink (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696443)

It's what killed Jesus.

No... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696480)

Crucifixion is what killed jesus.

Re:It's called groupthink (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696561)

Groupthink is CAUSED by Jesus.

Re:Abolish copyright--a solution to the insanity. (4, Insightful)

GoofyBoy (44399) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696440)

>Without copyright, nobody would have a legal right to prevent others from copying music, and thus would have no justification for asking for a tariff on equipment for recording music

How does the legal right to prevent others to do something allow them to set up and benefit from a tax?

I honestly fail to see how copyright becomes this thing where we assume that all hard-drives are used to infringe on it.

It's a side effect (1)

Thinkit3 (671998) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696472)

As I said, the removal of that justification is a side effect. The very idea of copyright is insane, so insane laws follow naturally.

Re:Abolish copyright--a solution to the insanity. (2, Interesting)

GNUman (155139) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696475)

Over here in Mexico there's a tax on CD's that goes to Music distributors to compensate for CD piracy.

Music piracy still goes on, you can get any CD for 25 pesos (less than 0.25 USD), while us that still like to buy original CD's have to pay extra so people can get theirs in 0.25 USD.

They wanted to tax computing equipment for the same reason, but it hasn't, AFAIK, gone through legislation.

Re:Abolish copyright--a solution to the insanity. (5, Insightful)

Fancia (710007) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696491)

That's utterly ridiculous. You've jumped to the other end of the argument entirely, ignoring a more rational level in the middle. Abolishing copyright will very likely reduce the amount of quality art available quite drastically; the publishers should be looking to alternate sale methods rather than draconian tariffs and lawsuits. Abolishing copyrights will solve the problem only as much as this will.

Re:Abolish copyright--a solution to the insanity. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696495)

I completely disagree. The problem here is the government: it's using copyright as an excuse to suck money out of a growing market sector. Abolishing copyright would only force the Canadian government to search for something else to exploit.

RIAA crossed the border (4, Interesting)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696241)

Dammit, RIAA, you can't just change your name and cross the border... can you...?

The Copyright Board decision comes as the Supreme Court of Canada begins a landmark copyright case that will determine whether Internet service providers must pay a tariff for being a conduit for the rampant downloading of free music.

Hmmm... we should also charge them for the lost business from gaming that they create! Oh, and let's tax them so that the telephone industry gets a cut since so many people are using instant messaging and IRC rather than calling people. Hell, let's just shut them down entirely because they can be a conduit for crime!

Remember, what you choose to spend money on is no longer up to you. :^)

The RIAA is Evil (1)

Doc Squidly (720087) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696333)

The RIAA is and always has been out for one thing, Money.

Absurd (1)

Genghis9 (575560) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696242)

This is ridiculous. The whole intellectual property/copyright thing has swung wayyy too far to one side. We need more people like these guys [customizedclassics.com] around doing this [customizedclassics.com]

Heh. Just the kind of thing that keeps Mickey Mouse up late at night with nightmares...

Customized Hobbit anyone? Under the founders' ideas, the whole Lord of the Rings trilogy would be public domain by now

There are no 'sides' (1)

Thinkit3 (671998) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696343)

There is up and down. Gravity points down, so does the inherent ability to copy information. Laws that try to stop that are wrong, and what comes up must come DOWN.

My wish (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696352)

I wish there was a way for me, as a Christian, as a human being, to sit down with some of you and have a pleasant, civil discussion without bitterness or sarcasm. I don't force people to believe what I believe. I don't mock others with different beliefs. I hope I can find the words to explain myself, as my life goes on. I hope I can help people to see.

JESUS IS DEADER THAN SANTA (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696397)

have lots of fun bowing down to your dead carpenter!

SANTA IS DEADER THAN ELVIS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696451)

must be fun in hell

the easy out (-1)

matto14 (593826) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696250)

simple enough just buy it online or cross the border

Canadian Dollar (5, Interesting)

pollock (453937) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696267)

I think you may be confused about the effect of a rising Canadian dollar. If the dollar continues to go up, importing an iPod should get cheaper.

Re:Canadian Dollar (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696437)

Why bother with an iPod? I have my Linux powered PDA. Serves very well as a music player, and actually has other uses as well. And these days you can pick up an older one is dirt cheap.

Or gauging the Canadian consumer will continue... (4, Informative)

StandardCell (589682) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696559)

The Canadian prices for iPods [apple.com] are $439, $579, and $729 for 10GB, 20GB and 40GB iPods, respectively. You must pay 7% GST on top of anything that you buy.

The US prices for iPods [apple.com] are $299, $399, and $499 for the same above. If you're not in California you only pay shipping and no tax.

At $1.32 Canadian exchange rate, assuming no skimming by your bank, the US prices to Canadians are $395, $527, and $658. Aside from the difference in price, to then bring it across the border you will be charged 7% GST and unknown amounts of excise, brokerage, inspection and other taxes, and they're not small change. I can guarantee you that it will end up costing you more to order it from the US if you're in Canada.

More proof that the Canadian dollar should be at around $1.50 or that prices in Canada should fall. Every Canadian iPod sold makes Apple in Cupertino extra profit at this point, and there's nothing that Canadians can do about it.

Nice Ad! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696271)

Nice advertisement. I didnt know Apple needed all the extra press. So how much do I have to pay to get my product on Slashgay?

Canada (-1, Flamebait)

LittleLebowskiUrbanA (619114) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696282)

Maybe that price hike is going towards their free healthcare....
Seriously, though. People rag on the US for the RIAA? At least we don't have this levy and we're still allowed to own handguns.

Re:Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696366)

yea, and look how well thats working out.....

Re:Canada (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696390)

" Maybe that price hike is going towards their free healthcare...."
Damn, how do you guys do it??? I'm formulating a response, scroll down the page, and BAM there it is! I think my firewall isn't working.
"At least we don't have this levy..."
Not yet. We do have it on some blank media.
"...and we're still allowed to own handguns."
Not in Chicago...

Re:Canada (1)

^_^x (178540) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696429)

I'm in Alberta, and have a Glock 17 and a Desert Eagle... I got my license after the latest gun control increases.

They'd like you to think you can't have guns anymore, but it's merely a nuisance wading through the paperwork.

Re:Canada (1)

stuart1310 (680476) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696490)

Grrrrrr. It can be so annoying to live in Canada.

Everything happens (4, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696291)

With the Canadian Dollar rising and this on the horizon, maybe now is the right time to get that iPod."

Or you could just get one from a country outside Canada. Say, like one that's big on technology, with small(er) taxes, not too far from Canada and with a currency that's falling through the floorboards ...

Hint: it's not Mexico, Greenland or Russia.

Re:Everything happens (0)

Neop2Lemus (683727) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696336)

OMGosh! Where is it?!?/!!

Tell me-Tell me pls!

Seriouly, you are right. I'll just pick one up next time I'm visiting family in the USofA.

Re:Everything happens (1)

Neop2Lemus (683727) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696377)

I should have also added that its' easy to avoid the tarrif in Canada as well (and not have wasted an entire post).

I mean BestBuy (Sux) and FutureShop(Sux2) aren't the only places to shop. If you go to your local immigrant run computer store, they all charge reasonable prices because they don't pay the tarrifs. At least thats what I've heard...

Re:Everything happens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696365)

and with a currency that's falling through the floorboards
better hurry, will be back above the euro by this time next year

Re:Everything happens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696485)

Here's a clue : last time the US dollar was on par with the Euro, it was roughly in May 2001. It's been falling ever since. And it's going to continue that way as long as the war in Iraq goes on and pinhead Georges remains in power.

Re:Everything happens (4, Funny)

uberdave (526529) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696387)

You mean France [st-pierre-...quelon.com] ?

Re:Everything happens (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696447)

France's currency isn't falling right now (quite the contrary) and France isn't especially big on technology.

Nice try though :-)

Re:Everything happens (1)

tealover (187148) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696537)

France isn't big on technology? Why do you say that? They're a highly industrialized nation that invests heavily in technology. They have some of the largest technology conglomerates in the world.

I'm just curious as to why made that statement.

Why must my government stymy me again and again? (5, Insightful)

Mark_MF-WN (678030) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696293)

First, the blank-tape tax.

Then, the blank-CD tax (20$ for 10 blank CDs? Madness!)

The proposed internet bandwidth tax. Grrr!

Now a hard-drive tax?

I'm going to have to pirate music extra-hard from now on, just to get my money's worth!

Re:Why must my government stymy me again and again (1)

co_fisha (196881) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696338)

Can someone clarify....many stores in canada do not charge the new blank-media tax. why is this?

Re:Why must my government stymy me again and again (4, Funny)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696364)

SIG: More Americans run Kazaa than vote.

Yes, that's because when they download a song from Madonna, the computer they download the song from doesn't recount their download requests and send them a Waylon Jenning track instead.

Re:Why must my government stymy me again and again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696383)

Isn't socialism grand?

Re:Why must my government stymy me again and again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696493)

you are too stupid to be allowed to live.

pls die, thx

Re:Why must my government stymy me again and again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696518)

obviously you mean capitalism

Re:Why must my government stymy me again and again (4, Insightful)

JoeBuck (7947) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696554)

It seems that one fair way to proceed is for the government to levy these taxes and then tell everyone to go nuts, copy everything you want, because it's all paid for. The problem seems to be that the copyright holders want it both ways: to collect the tax money but still have copying be illegal.

Yes but... (4, Interesting)

skajake (613518) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696294)

Now that I have to pay this royalty, am i free to duplicate copyrighted material? Or will I now merely be paying twice for something.

Re:Yes but... (1)

Sir0x0 (732087) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696363)

Yeah, paying music fans are going to be shafted in this sort of a decision. The United States is handling this best, so far, as opposed to England and Canada.

Re:Yes but... (4, Insightful)

Sylver Dragon (445237) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696411)

That's the question that I had. Assuming that this 'tax' is being distributed to the copyright holders, to pay for the music I am assumed to be pirating, shouldn't that pirating now be allowed? Afterall, I have now paid for it. Or is this just going to be another way for the RIAA/MPAA to milk people dry? Now, granted, I am lucky (in this case) that I live in the US, but how long before our congress decides that this is a good idea and impliments it here?
At the moment, I don't download music (I just don't care enough), but if something like this were to go into effect here, I think I would probably start downloading music, just to make up for the cost.
Got to hand it to the people that thought this one up, they may have created a self fullfilling prophesy. Assume everyone pirates music, so charge a tax for it. People either think that its now OK, becuase they are paying for it, or people get pissed about it and start pirating music, just to get their money's worth. Suddenly, everyone is pirating music, and the initial assumption becomes correct.

Re:Yes but... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696445)

Assuming that this 'tax' is being distributed to the copyright holders, to pay for the music I am assumed to be pirating, shouldn't that pirating now be allowed?

It is. Borrow a CD from a friend, or a library, then make a copy it. It's legal to do that in Canada. The only thing that's not allowed is making copies yourself to give to other people -- this, unfortunately, is what file sharing networks come under.

If only there was a file sharing network that 'lent' you files which you could then 'personally copy' once they got to your machine, then you 'returned' the files...

Re:Yes but... (1)

dandelion_wine (625330) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696441)

I've heard this argument/query a lot, but think of it this way -- this is compensation (say they -- I say punishment or disincentive). When you litter and get a $50 fine, it's not you "buying a ticket to litter" though that might be the effect. And if it doesn't thwart would-be litterers, up goes the fine till it becomes a disincentive.

The difference here is that obviously they don't want people to stop purchasing blank media. That would defeat the levy. But paying it doesn't turn an illegal act into a legal one.

Re:Yes but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696483)

So this tax is a punishment? Why should someone be assumed guilty just by purchasing media?

Re:Yes but... (4, Insightful)

Jester99 (23135) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696500)

When you litter and get a $50 fine, it's not you "buying a ticket to litter" though that might be the effect.

Your analogy is flawed though -- the fine/ticket's given to you after you litter.

Different analogy: There's a park that's always getting filled with trash. Finally, the government puts a gate in front of the park, and charges everybody who enters it a $5 "trash fee" because they figure you're going to litter.

Can you litter then?

Re:Yes but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696502)

When you litter and get a $50 fine, it's not you "buying a ticket to litter" though that might be the effect.

This is different. The equivalent would be to charge everybody a "litter-fee" ahead of time. Now everybody -rightly- assumes that litter-removal is already paid for, hence that littering now is ok.

Quite different.... (1)

mindstrm (20013) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696520)

It's more like you had to pay $5 every time you went in the park JUST IN CASE you littered, where yesterday you didn't have to pay.

And yes, it would cause more people to litter.. that's how people think.

So does that make P2P legal in Canada? (5, Interesting)

bmorris (562872) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696297)

You're already "paying" for the media... Maybe the government should just track what files are being downloaded, and distribute the "media tax" proportionately.

mirror (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696303)

That 20-gigabyte MP3 player going under the Christmas tree this season could soon cost 20 per cent more if the Copyright Board approves a proposed levy tomorrow on the sale of digital music devices.

It could also mean new levies on recordable DVDs, removable flash memory and micro hard drives, as well as increased tariff rates on blank cassettes and recordable CDs, assuming a music-industry group called the Canadian Private Copying Collective, or CPCC, gets its way.

Claude Majeau, secretary-general of the Copyright Board, confirmed yesterday that a decision on the controversial levy is to come out Friday morning.

Both the CPCC and a group of electronics manufacturers and retailers aggressively fighting the levy have been arguing their respective views since the Copyright Board began formal hearings on the matter in January.

"It's the kind of decision that's likely to leave everybody unhappy," said Michael Geist, a professor of Internet law at the University of Ottawa and technology counsel for Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP.

"The retailers won't like it because they don't like the levy, period. Consumers won't like it because they won't be paying a fair price for the product. And copyright holders will probably feel they're not getting enough."

The CPCC already collects a levy on blank cassettes, recordable CDs and Sony minidiscs, but in May, 2002, the organization, which collects and redistributes the levy on behalf of the Canadian music industry, proposed that existing tariffs be substantially hiked and expanded to cover M3P players and other digital-memory products that carry music files.

The original purpose of the levy was to compensate artists for the widespread activity of making personal copies of music that an individual already owns.

But the growing popularity of CD burners and free Internet music-swapping services changed the nature and magnitude of "copying." Increasing and expanding the levy is a small yet symbolic attempt at compensating artists and record companies for widespread piracy, the CPCC argues.

"Everybody in the private copying collective is hoping we'll get the levy extended to devices like iPods and other MP3 players with internal memory," said Paul Audley, policy advisor at the CPCC.

But Audley said hope and expectation are two different things, adding that the Copyright Board will likely stick with tradition and aim for a compromise.

"It will come down somewhere in the middle," he said. "And that certainly wouldn't reflect what people think (music) rights are worth."

CPCC plans to hold a news conference tomorrow at the Fairmont Royal York to discuss the impact of the decision.

Meanwhile, a group called the Canadian Coalition for Fair Digital Access, or CCFDA, is preparing for the worst. Members include big-name retailers, such as Wal-Mart, CostCo and Staples Business Depot, and high-tech powerhouses such as Intel Corp., Dell Computer Corp., Apple Computer Corp. and Hewlett-Packard Co.

"It's a significant potential hit," said Kevin Evans, vice-president with the Retail Council of Canada and CCFDA co-chair. If the levy does get approved, "we believe it's going to be the (retail) sales clerk that's going to get the full blasting from consumers."

Under the proposed levies, a pack of 50 recordable CDs that have 700 megabytes of capacity will have a 49-cent levy on each disc. Today, that pack costs $29.99, but the levy would impose an additional financial burden of $24.50 if approved.

The general argument against the levy is that it subsidizes the Canadian music industry by treating anyone who buys blank recording media as a potential music pirate, when in fact these same products can be used to store computer files, backup data, software and self-created music and video content.

"What you've got here is a levy that does not sufficiently target its purpose," said Geist.

The retail group, which insists it support the rights of artists and wants to open dialogue toward a better option, argues the levy is too broad and the method of tariff collection and distribution doesn't work.

Members also hold the levy will increase prices on products and tempt consumers to buy in the United States, where a levy does not exist. This punishes Canadian businesses, they argue, and will have an impact on the Canadian economy.

"We've got a levy regime that's way out of date and inefficient," Evans said.

So far, the organization has distributed $11 million back to Canadian artists since it began collecting the levy in 2000. It is expected to issue another $17 million to $18 million between next week and the end of January.

The Copyright Board decision comes as the Supreme Court of Canada begins a landmark copyright case that will determine whether Internet service providers must pay a tariff for being a conduit for the rampant downloading of free music.

That case, being followed by music companies and servie providers around the world, is expected to last six months. By comparison, a homosexual encounter with Rob Malda is expected to last under 45 seconds.

Re:mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696341)

read the post before modding as "informative", dumbass

Re:mirror (1)

Neop2Lemus (683727) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696408)

Big Hint >>>>Troll, mod this crap down.

What does this solve? (2, Interesting)

falxx (456915) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696306)

This is the kind of thing that makes me mad. What does it really solve to do this? The copyright holders will still crave for more money, and they will continue until there's no more money left! And we, the consumers, will never have any profit of such a levy, it won't keep us from getting sued if the copyright holders wants more money, it wont make it easier for us to chose our own device of playing the more and more customized copyprotection...

So I say: Come up with something better, will ya?

Improvement (5, Insightful)

Detritus (11846) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696308)

It looks better than the previous scheme, which charged a fixed amount per megabyte of storage.

Re:Improvement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696410)

free mumia! with the purchase of another mumia of equal or lesser value.

Comment makes no sense (1)

jpmorgan (517966) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696321)

With the Canadian Dollar rising and this on the horizon, maybe now is the right time to get that iPod.

I don't get the Canadian dollar comment. The dollar rising makes imported goods like the iPod cheaper not more expensive.

Re:Comment makes no sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696393)

Ah, fools.

The dollar is rising, making it an ideal time to import. The tariff is looming, making it an ideal time to import.

Once the tariff is in place, it's too late. The dollar isn't going to move 20%, ever.

eric@sandpile.net (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696344)

eric@sandpile.net

Treated like a criminal, act as a criminal (3, Insightful)

Sebby (238625) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696345)

If they're going to treat me as a criminal regardless of what I actually do, then I might as well play into that role.

too powerful (3, Interesting)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696348)

The Copyright Board decision comes as the Supreme Court of Canada begins a landmark copyright case that will determine whether Internet service providers must pay a tariff for being a conduit for the rampant downloading of free music.

I don't know anything about Canadian Law, or Canadian internet/music habits, but I'd guess only a minority of users are downloading (copyrighted) music. I think it's absurd the entire industry could be forced to pay a tariff.

It's almost enough to make me glad that in the US, the RIAA has to sue individuals, and haven't (yet) been able to bill ISPs directly.

CD-Rs more expensive too? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696349)

$.49 tarrif per cd? That's nearly 100% of the actual market value! Music doesn't even make up a significant percentage of my use of CD-R media, I'd be pissed if the US imposed such a large tax on it.

My laptop uses the same HD type found in small mp3 players, would it fall under the tax?

So, I assume all this money will be going directly to the artists, who have been so badly hurt by the mp3 downloading craze? Yeah... right.

Re:CD-Rs more expensive too? (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696509)

Music doesn't even make up a significant percentage of my use of CD-R media, I'd be pissed if the US imposed such a large tax on it.

'Music' CD-R media do cost more because they include RIAA fees. Standalone consumer CD burners only work with 'Music' CD-R.

Legalized piracy? (1)

retro128 (318602) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696354)

Can it be argued that if you buy CD's, you've already paid your tax to the music industry that's it's OK to download music?

And what's going to stop people from running over to the States and buying CD's at $0.10/disc?

The best of both worlds (3, Insightful)

Vilim (615798) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696358)

Luckily I live right near the boarder (Thunder Bay Ontario). If I want that ipod I just take a trip to Duluth for the weekend, take my laptop, load it up with mp3's and pretend I had it all along. The strong Canadian doller will make this cheaper than buying it in Canada :D

This was Prescience I Didn't Need (1)

ewhac (5844) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696368)

Sounds like someone read my fictitious news story [vwh.net] and mistook it for a good idea.

*sigh*,
Schwab

Let's pray... (0)

Afbc0m (623144) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696370)

...That this is overturned, elsewise I can see myself doing some cross border runs for storage mediums.

Look on the bright side... (4, Informative)

Geek Boy (15178) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696384)

You're paying for it now, so copy as you like. Don't feel remorse. The government is just making it easy - now Canadians can download music and movies off the Internet instead of wasting time walking to a store. You think the recording industry would dare take you to court and lose when the judge learns that you paid them for it already? That court loss would open the floodgates!

Use this stuff for legitimate reasons only? Go buy in the US. You have a right to do that.

Extremely ignorant story submission (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696389)

I don't have a problem with the proposed levy on mp3 players. What I do have a problem with is the talk of increasing the levy a lot on every blank CD, cassette, or the like. THIS ISN'T JUST ABOUT FUCKING MP3 PLAYERS!

Now what will I do? (2, Funny)

ibullard (312377) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696391)

Oh dear, what will I do now that I can't threaten to move to Canada if Bush gets elected again?!?

Rights (1)

jefu (53450) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696392)

We need to understand, of course, that this is a question of fundamental rights. That is, the recording industry has the right to make as much money as they think they deserve and the artists have the right to sell their work to the recording industry and the consumer has the right, nay! obligation to buy it.

And if the industry isn't getting what it thinks is its due, well, time to tax and spend. Tax the consumer and spend the profits for the benefit of those in the boardrooms.

But I never copied a file.... (1)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696398)

I have never downloaded music, ripped a CD, or recorded copyrighted video. I have used hard disks for my files, bought DVD media for my backups, and bought flash memory for my digital cameras. Why would I have to pay this levy? And can I ask for a rebate if I only use the media for my own copyrighted files?

Remember, Kids (3, Insightful)

illuminata (668963) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696403)

Don't throw tax money at a problem and hope that it will go away. And, don't believe a politician when they say that the tax is going to be used to discourage the use of something. They know very well that the usage rates won't drop much, which means pure profit. You can tax beer, but everybody still likes to get drunk. Most importantly, when you have people who want to tax items that don't directly have to do with the problem in order to make money, it might be a good idea to relocate to another country, because the people in charge of yours might be getting a little bit greedy and a little bit socialist at the same time. That's quite ironic, because isn't socialism supposed to prevent from greed? It seems like that's just being collectively greedy. Anyways, be careful where you move, though, you wouldn't want to move to another country that's just as bad if not worse, right? You could learn a lot from a Libertarian.

Re:Remember, Kids (2, Funny)

illuminata (668963) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696415)

Hey, what'd you do to my formatting, Slashcode?

I said plain text. Plain text dammit!

The levy won't affect me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696407)

Canadian music industry, proposed that existing tariffs be substantially hiked and expanded to cover M3P players

I guess that means I can still buy a MP3 player levy-free. ;)

you're forgetting a very important fact.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696409)

this is a story about Canada..

noboby cares about Canada..

thus the story is deemed pointless and absolutely useless..

move on..

Re:you're forgetting a very important fact.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696442)

if you only knew how much oil, power generation and fresh water is up there, not to mention good looking girls!

Re:you're forgetting a very important fact.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696464)

HEH!

Come to Norway. It's Canada * 1000 :-)

Re:you're forgetting a very important fact.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696510)

Actually I do.

ABSO-FUCKING-LUTELY NONE!

Now fuck right off you stupid nigger.

Barter system anyone? (4, Funny)

Billy the Mountain (225541) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696417)

Psst, Trade ya these prescription drugs for your MP3 players? How about it eh?

BTM

My copyright (3, Insightful)

future assassin (639396) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696428)

Does this mean that everytime I take a picture with my Canon D30 camera I will see a cut of the 20% lavy. I mean it is my copyrighted work on the CF card.

If you going to get punished for a crime (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7696432)

if your goign to get punished for a crime you might aswell do the crime

soo i think shur they should levey the tax so then i can pirate every thing i want and sleep well cause i know im still paying for it

that is how they want every one to think right? cause i know that whats goign to happen

Canada + Apple (-1)

GaylordFucker (465080) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696435)

are about as interesting as the turds i shat out a few hours ago

there were bits of corn, the fecal matter was very soft (must have been the veggies), a light brownish color, a semi-rancid smell, but overall it was a good shit..

How to destroy an industry..101 (3, Interesting)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696456)

Even hard drives? Sheesh... At this rate they will tax the computer industry into oblivion..

Enough is enough with these thugs in Canada (4, Informative)

StandardCell (589682) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696459)

Why does one group get to have its way with all digital media without respect for other groups? Why is it that musicians and songwriters deserve to impose a "guilty until proven innocent" handout? If they get that much, then what will happen when other groups ask for them? What about film producers and movie studios? What about software companies? What about print publishers? If you take all of these groups into consideration, given what is already charged, the average CD blank will end up with a $4 per blank tax.

Great. The deal is then that I will get all of my software, music and books from warez newsgroups, filesharing networks and wherever else I can.

Does this make any sense whatsoever? Because if these groups think they can tax all this blank media, they will utterly destroy retail sales of both original media and blanks and the incentive of the consumer to engage in purchases thereof. This will end up hurting the artists represented by the collective. They will also drive blank media into the underground where trucks haul this stuff into black markets. Who loses in this scheme? Everyone but the people who supposedly get these taxes.

I consult for a living in the video editing and commercial production field, and now I have to tell my clients to make an emergency purchase tomorrow of spindles of DVD-Rs, CD-Rs and any other media and stockpile them because of this ridiculous tax. My clients don't deal in pirated material, and often we have to license music, images and footage from the creators anyway. They will never be able to apply for the proceeds from these taxes because they'll never qualify.

Enough is enough. E-mail Claude Majeau at majeau.claude@cb-cda.gc.ca and let him know what you think of him and his band of thugs. Find the MP for your riding [parl.gc.ca] and tell them that the Canadian Copyright Board needs to be stopped before they destroy retail sales in Canada and end up fueling mass piracy and the black market for the sake of artists who should be paid based on the merits of their music, not because they have been somehow directly robbed.

Re:Enough is enough with these thugs in Canada (5, Interesting)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696507)

As a musician and songwriter, I see this sort of thing as a barrier to entry, not a benefit.

If the cost of recording media goes up, it makes it more expensive to record, and makes it much more costly to distribute one's music for free. If it costs me $4 to make a demo to give away, then it's costing almost as much to make music to give away for free, as it would cost to buy some music produced by a corporation!

This isn't about piracy, it's about controlling whose art gets distributed. Stalin had different methods, but it's the same goal.

Legislation (2, Interesting)

windside (112784) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696469)

Frankly, I think this is another example of intelligent Canadian legislation. The tariffs on CDR media and (potentially) MP3 players may not be palatable to consumers, but they keep the dogs of the music industry at bay. Meanwhile, South of the border there is a dearth of similar legislation. What happens? The heads of the RIAA are weeping and gnashing their teeth, launching lawsuits against pre-pubescent downloaders.

Although I'm not terribly fond of either option, I'd much rather pay a bit of a premium if the alternative is getting lubed up and penetrated by American-style "Justice".

That said, I might be wrong. I know the RIAA suits have pressed charges on non-American downloaders. Can anyone confirm whether (or not) any Canadians have been taken to task?

Anyways, it's no big deal because I've already got my iPod :)

I should become a Canadian artist... (5, Funny)

Wraithlyn (133796) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696470)

"So far, the organization has distributed $11 million back to Canadian artists"

Wow.. so that's like about what, 2.75 mil per Canadian artist then? ;)

*ducks and covers*

Sick and Tired (2, Insightful)

Freddy6667 (731203) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696476)

This is nothing less than extortion. When ever some "special interest" group complains about some imagined disparity, our government responds by promptly caving in to whatever they want. If this trend continues Canada will be a third world country in no time. If there are any politicians out there reading this, grow a set and tell these "special interest" groups to get a life, get a job, and earn money. Starving artists, if your "art" was any good, you wouldn't be starving. To all Canadian's lets download every piece of music out there, we're being forced to pay for it anyway

MP3 player levy loophole (5, Interesting)

russotto (537200) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696479)

If this is the same levy as before, it only applies to _blank_ media. That is, media without any sounds on it. So the iPod in Canada could just come with a copy of "Steve Jobs Sings" prerecorded, and no levy.

not an isolated case, but still angers (5, Insightful)

dandelion_wine (625330) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696527)

Ok - not like this is a lone cry in the wilderness, but this just sickens me.

This does happen elsewhere. We pay for increased insurance rates when other people have more accidents. The prices in our stores go up when other people shoplift. The difference? The government doesn't raise the prices on tangentially connected items in order to compensate.

I'm not screwin around here. Several years ago I bought a hand-held dictaphone that used normal-sized cassette tapes. Sure, it's bulkier, but had a huge advantage -- those mini-tapes were mondo-expensive. I'd buy ten cheapo no-name standard cassette tapes (all I'd need for a lecture, etc) and I'd be set. Enter the levy -- doubling the price or more of the cheap tapes. May as well get pricey ones if I'm gonna get charged a flat fee per tape. And out goes the entire purpose of buying that particular model. Punished for an entirely erroneous assumption. And let's remember: mixed-tapes were legal, too. Mass production and use (as some DJ's would do) was a concern for the powers that be, but fair-use was still fair-use. Now we get slammed whether we break the law or no.

Is this a democracy or not? Who got to have a say on this issue?

The levy (probably) legalizes the copying of music (4, Interesting)

chathamhouse (302679) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696533)

The interesting thing about these levies is that the money spent by the consumer doesn't necessarily vanish into thin air.

While this has yet to be tested in courts, what consumers get in exchange for the levy is permission to make copies of music for personal purposes. In other words, it legalises the _download_ of MP3s for which you don't own the cd or other media. This is, after all, what the levy is compensating artists for.

However, it does not legalize the _distribution_ of copyrighted works. Hence you're in the clear if you only download, but not make anything available from P2P networks. An interesting compromise.

Canada has not yet signed the WIPO treaties which would be breached by the compromise reached by the copyright board. Naturally, copyright holders argue that this is a mis-interpretation of the law, and that we should be both paying the levy AND barred from copying for personal purposes.

Compare the Canadian Copyright Act to the Australian Copyright Act, and you find that the consumer comes out far ahead in the Great White (as in snow, not culture) North. In Australia, making a backup copy of music that you've purchased is a technical (but again untested) breach of the Copyright Act.

In the end, I'll take a $25-$200 once-off levy over not having permission to copy CD's that I've purchased, or being subjected to the DMCA, or being subjected to the WIPO treaties any day. As an added bonus, artists who have limited distribution of their works (i.e. the Little Guys) see some of this cash. This helps the economy a lot more than slowing down the sales of portable music devices.

Now downloaders are guiltless... (1)

puppetman (131489) | more than 10 years ago | (#7696566)

Musicians in Canada are getting compensated by blank media and MP3-player sales as well as by albumn sales.

If the consumer is paying the artist via this levy, does that mean sharing music via a P2P network is now legal for Canadians, so long as they intend to transfer that music to either an MP3 player or some form of media on which the levy has been applied?

That might be an interesting challenge in the Canadian Courts.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>