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Officials secretly RFID'd at Internet Summit

CmdrTaco posted more than 10 years ago | from the thats-just-creapy dept.

Privacy 216

ewoudenberg writes "A Washington Times article reports that researchers managed to gain entrance to the Internet and technology conference in Switzerland last week only to discover that the summit's badges contained undisclosed RFID chips. The badges were handed out to more than 50 prime ministers, presidents and other high-level officials from 174 countries, including the United States."

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fp? (-1, Offtopic)

brian728s (666853) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716610)

fp?

My wish (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716623)

I wish there was a way for me, as a Christian, as a human being, to sit down with some of you and have a pleasant, civil discussion without bitterness or sarcasm. I don't force people to believe what I believe. I don't mock others with different beliefs. I hope I can find the words to explain myself, as my life goes on. I hope I can help people to see.

Re:My wish (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716735)

You are a fisting cock-sucker.

Burn in hell after you die from the gay plague.

Pig fucker.

Re:My wish (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716814)

Is that you, goatse guy?
You sure sound like him.

Gay plague? Hmmm, you seem like you caught it already

Re:My wish (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716978)

Gay plague

As the Good Book says: "They that live in sin shall die in sin".

Cool. (5, Funny)

torpor (458) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716635)

Politicians should be made to wear RFID's from the day they enter office in service of the public, to the day they leave that office.

"For the people, and of the people" can only be effective if the people keep a track on such people with power ...

Re:Cool. (2, Interesting)

Zebbers (134389) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717048)

umm
what use would the RFID be? it doesnt permit tracking a 'la gps...which would really be the only reason to take a 'politician'.

I despise the political system and politicians too...but that really isnt an insightful comment. A politician has a job, just like you. Should you be bagged and tagged to make sure you arent talking to competitors.

And besides whether we should...like I said, you must not understand RFID cause it would be useless to track people outside of a small, definitive area.

Re:Cool. (3, Insightful)

torpor (458) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717113)

A politician has a job, just like you. Should you be bagged and tagged to make sure you arent talking to competitors.

A politicians job is far more important than mine. It has its risks, it has its responsibilities.

Politicians should be held accountable for every single thing they do while they are on the job. Its the only way to ensure we -the people- don't get screwed ...

Re:Cool. (4, Insightful)

ATMAvatar (648864) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717583)

Many people are closely monitored in the workplace. Why should politicians be any different?

Re:Cool. (1)

telekon (185072) | more than 10 years ago | (#7718054)

like I said, you must not understand RFID cause it would be useless to track people outside of a small, definitive area.

Exactly. And that's why tagging politicians will be followed by confining all of them to a small, definitive area.

Re:Cool. (4, Insightful)

Councilor Hart (673770) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717212)

They do have a private life, you know.
It is not our concern who they sleep with, eat with, talk to in their personal time.
It is not because they hold a public office, they don't have a right to privacy.
Everything that doesn't influence the execution of their mandate is not our concern, and should remain private.
Public life != Big Brother

Re:Cool. (-1)

BattleCat (244240) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717258)

Hah.
Nonetheless, Clinton was nearly impeached for 'having a private life'.

Re:Cool. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717315)

Clinton deserved to get impeached and censored.

1) He desecrated the Oval Office by lawd and unbecoming conduct. You don't have sex with your subordinate, especially if she's something like 18 and you're thirty years older and the president of the USA.

2) He lied to the people of the USA.

Re:Cool. (0, Offtopic)

Zapdos (70654) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717346)

Your idea is so dumb. There is this little thing called National Security.

Location matters not.

This would help get an elected official assassinated, perhaps their family and or children hurt.

Re:Cool. (1, Insightful)

Politburo (640618) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717474)

Hi. Politicians are still citizens. They still have the rights we have. Sorry.

Re:Cool. (3, Funny)

Handpaper (566373) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717540)

It's 01:30. Do you know where your Congressman is?

Re:Cool. (1)

symbolic (11752) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717642)


If I had moderation points, I'd mod this up.

Re:Cool. (1)

t0ny (590331) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717715)

Wow, then all you need to do is find out how to detect RFIDs, and the time for psychotics to stalk and kill them would be drastically reduced.

What a well thought out idea!

Re:Cool. (1)

torpor (458) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717822)

If you've got the tech to make RFID work, you've got the tech to protect someone from thugs.

Duh.

They Got Him! (4, Funny)

bruthasj (175228) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716637)

With RFID.

Note for the humor-impaired: this is a joke.

Re:They Got Him! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716734)

Well, one can hope that Ossama bin Laden got to this conference too. It might help the CIA to get him too ;o)

Re:They Got Him! (1)

Moth7 (699815) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716835)

As incompetent as the US may be, I doubt that RFIDing him would be their first priority if they found him ;)

Re:They Got Him! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717041)

Incompetent?

Have you read the news about what our 4th Infantry achieved today in Iraq?

Re:They Got Him! (-1, Troll)

BattleCat (244240) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717289)

And what do they achieved ?
I can clearly tell you, however, what your mass media achieved - they have successfully brainwashed an extremely large amount of the world's population.
And sometimes I'm starting to wonder was it brainwashing or brainsurgery ?

DUPE!! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716641)

Re:DUPE!! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716659)

listen you fucking shit skinned coon nigger jungle bunny spear chucker. Shut your chocolate tar baby hide before I whip your ass. go back to niggeria and prance around with all the Schvartza in the bush you fucking moolie nigger. ill fucking brand you toby, and if you try any of that KUNTA KINTA crap ill fucking execute you and feed you to pigs.

Are Dups Bad? (1)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716964)

Dups provide a chance to post additional insights that emerge from the original story. I find that reading all the +5 comments from the first posting of the story provides more food for thought once the dup appears.

Re:Are Dups Bad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717201)

Then just read yesterday's edition!

Another benefit is that usually yesterday's sites that have been slashdotted are back up.

... and you only need to read the Score:5 postings! Sort of the Cliff's Notes version of Slashdot!

One Downside is that when you make a comment, no one else is reading.

FUCK SADDAM, FUCK ISRAEL! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716650)

Both love genocide!

New terrorist spying method (5, Funny)

brian728s (666853) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716653)

Lightbulbs are now being labeled a terrorist device, used to spy on people and documents at places including the pentagon, the whitehouse, and even the United Nations building. Hackers used the light bulbs to send out light, which when intercepted by their illegal hacker tools called "eyes", can identify diplomats, and read classified documents. Americans can rest assured that their safety is being protected by operation "hammerbulb". Democrats are concerned about a lack of hammers to complete the operation, but administration officials assure them that rocks can be used if the shortage proves true.

MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717028)

lmao!

MOD PARENT DOWN (off topic) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717168)

I wasted my time reading that crap? I'll never get those 30 seconds back.

MOD PARENT SIDEWAYS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717376)

Because the other two directions are already taken.

Privacy (4, Funny)

penguinoid (724646) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716654)

They met to discuss privacy matters on the internet (among other things).
I wonder what their policy will be?

Re:Privacy (1)

daminotaur (732705) | more than 10 years ago | (#7718068)

The RFID flap is the most interesting thing to come out of WSIS. And even it's pretty lame. Don't worry about ANY policy coming out of this group. I went to their web site http://www.itu.int/wsis/ the other day and subjected myself to a lot of their streaming video. First off, it was almost all politicians--can you say vacuous platitudes? Boring as hell, and they were all saying the same thing: "Information should be FREE for all the oppressed peoples of the world, kumbaya." If they weren't politicians they were NGO types. Basically a series of three-minute hates against the US as the 800-pound gorilla of the internet--they were polite enough not to mention the US by name usually, but that was the subtext. Bunch of utopian dreamers. Since when has ANYTHING been free? The little problem of IP rights was hardly even mentioned, only by the Iranian president briefly. He used the amusing phrase "Network Order" to describe US hegemony, a play on "New World Order"

Dupe... (-1, Offtopic)

herrvinny (698679) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716658)

DUPE DUPE, do dooooo... [slashdot.org]

Re:Dupe... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716686)

listen you fucking shit skinned coon nigger jungle bunny spear chucker. Shut your chocolate tar baby hide before I whip your ass. go back to niggeria and prance around with all the Schvartza in the bush you fucking moolie nigger. ill fucking brand you toby, and if you try any of that KUNTA KINTA crap ill fucking execute you and feed you to pigs.

duplicate (1, Informative)

hugesmile (587771) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716663)

Wasn't this already discussed? [slashdot.org]

Sorry... (0)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717224)

[lame joke]You're new here, arn't you?[/lame joke]

Mod parent up (0)

GenericAccount (653483) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717344)

Mod parent up...

Slashdort Needs to RFID Its Postings (0, Redundant)

aheath (628369) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716682)

For those of you who are experiencing the sensation of "deja vu all over again" please see WSIS Physical Security Cracked. [slashdot.org]

Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (3, Redundant)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716688)

I know the Slashdot editors don't read the story submissions, because my earthshattering submissions are never accepted. But do they even read the Slashdot homepage [slashdot.org] ? They might notice duplicate stories [slashdot.org] .

Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (-1, Redundant)

martingunnarsson (590268) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716773)

Damn, you were faster than me! I had the URL copied and everything. Next time I'm gonna beat you.

Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (0, Redundant)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716987)

Don't let redundancy stop you from posting a comment.

perfectly perfect (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717421)

"Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (Score:1, Redundant)"

Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (0, Redundant)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717022)

Don't let "redundancy" stop you from posting a comment.

from the department of redundancy department (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717049)

The Slashcode already extracts URLs from stories into sidebars. Why not a revision that compares those URLs in a submission to those in past submissions? Then editors can see whether a submission is a dup as they go through their incoming queue.

Re:from the department of redundancy department (1)

The Cydonian (603441) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717347)

As you can see from this case itself, your solution wouldn't have caught this dupe. The earlier link was from a press release, while this one's from Washington Times.

Still, /. editors could have acknowledged the earlier story before posting it to the front page.

Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (1)

MooseGuy529 (578473) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717456)

I'll bet it would be possible to use a spam-filter-esque system to compare the text of the articles and the links they point to. By weighting heavily the text of the links and the headings in the linked documents, they could give stories a dup-score and the editors would be shown a list sorted from highest-to-lowest.

Wait... it would have to have a limit on the number of stories it goes back, or else it will compare this one story to every other story in the database! Any ideas?

Bayesian filter for articles? (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717551)

The filter must compare the submission to every article, or the omitted archives might contain dup's. Why not? How about a Bayesian filter? How about a hash of the "salient" details against which a dup would match?

Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (2, Funny)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717803)

I'll bet it would be possible to use a spam-filter-esque system to compare the text of the articles....

I bet it would be possible to check the spelling of the articles posted using a "spell checker". I recall using one in the late 70s on my student Unix system.

Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (2, Informative)

maelstrom (638) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717561)

CmdrTaco hasn't read this site in years.

Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (1)

damien_kane (519267) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717701)

They might notice duplicate stories.

I would think you're new here... but since you've got a low UID, you're just hijacking your faters /. account, right?
All the little slashbots around have to realize, dupes will never disappear.
Taco doesn't want to code a dupe-finder, and the editors just don't care.

Re:Welcome Welcome to to Slashdot Slashdot (1)

Tim C (15259) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717769)

I would think you're new here... but since you've got a low UID

173196 low? That's a joke, right? ;-)

For what (little) it's worth, the problem is getting worse. A few years ago, when I was new here, there was hardly ever a dupe. As the site's grown, though, and I suppose the number of submissions has increased, they've started slipping through more and more often.

I wouldn't say it's a huge problem - after all, just because something's been discussed before doesn't stop us all discussing it again (eg Windows vs Linux, RIAA/MPAA vs the world, etc). I would have thought, though, that it would be fairly easy to search for recently-posted stories based on keywords from the submission under consideration... Maybe they do do that, though, and there're just so many that it'd be almost impossible not to miss one occassionally. After all, even if you only mess up one time in a hundred, as you increase the number of times you do something, you'll increase the number of mistakes you make.

DIY (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717912)

I've been reading dup's on Slashdot since 1998, although my current UID dates from later. Help me write a dup-matcher filter for the editors' submissions queue, and we can help do something about it. The Slashcode is OSS, so we can back up our complaints with constructive solutions by patching the code.

We don't need no stinkin badges! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716704)

Badges? We don't need no stinkin badges!

Re:We don't need no stinkin badges! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717291)

This comment is a dupe :)

Hi my name is Cmdr. Fucko (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716718)

My name is Cmdr. Fucko, I post dup stories on Slashbot because being a fucking idiot like myself, I can't bother to check if stories on the same topic have already been submitted and accepted. Now that, that has been said, would anyone like some man-on-man sex?

Re:Hi my name is Cmdr. Fucko (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716745)

Yes, I would enjoy some man-on-man sex, where shall we have it?

-Timothy

Re:Hi my name is Cmdr. Fucko (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716770)

Where should I bring the greased Yoda dolls?

-CowboyNeal

Re:Hi my name is Cmdr. Fucko (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716790)

My small dick is getting so hard I feel it's going to explode.

-Cliff

Re:Hi my name is Cmdr. Fucko (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717011)

Hey, I'd like to take up your offer but I live in TX and it's a long way to Holland, Michigan.

HEY, AMERICA! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716733)

When are you going to go after some other [netfirms.com] nasty dictators [bbc.co.uk] and oppressors then? [hasanpix.com]

Re:HEY, AMERICA! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717977)

Why?
So you Pussies in Europe can Bitch and Moan about our imperialistic goals?

Fuck you,
Clean up your own yard trash, We cleaned out the Big Pig sty.

Good. (4, Insightful)

Space cowboy (13680) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716738)

I hope the media catch hold of it and hype it to hell and beyond. Get some high-flying politico commentators saying how they should have been informed.

Understanding about fire being hot often comes after one has been burnt. Perhaps they'll feel that they shouldn't be "spied on" without their knowledge. Perhaps it might influence decisions they make in future...

Simon.

Re:Good. (3, Insightful)

JohnnyBigodes (609498) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716861)

Good luck.. they (the politicians) will mostly complain about THEIR privacy, citing matters of national security. The people's privacy will always be watched in some way or another due to the need of "a general well-being".

More annoying than "FIRST POST"... (-1, Offtopic)

Terragen (727874) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716740)

... are those people who have to yell "DUPE" and post up a link. (Even after 20 other people already have). Congratulations for noticing - its great observations like that which lead to the capture of Saddam [slashdot.org] .

At least there's only one "FIRST POST".

PROST FRIST!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716772)

FP!

watching you watch me (4, Insightful)

segment (695309) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716741)


Washington Post has their own agendas politically when it comes to reporting. Sure it's pretty shitty to be monitored, but there is nothing stating that any information used was used for anything other than maybe for the sake of having some card manufacturers new card being tested.

Remember intelligence agencies from all over the place keep tabs on each other via other means (ECHELON, HUMINT, OSINT, IMINT, SIGNIT), so I doubt this was anything to be concerned with. Strictly something `chick' to report on. It's far more easier to set up assets to bang (screw/lay/fsck) one of these guys for info, than it would to keep watch of what they do.

User gets in car to go to summit, user's Eazypass or other form of cardpaymentsys tracks what exits he uses via tolls paid. User stops at gasoline station, credit card is used, card information is transmitted. User talks the beltway, cameras capture this. Get the picture? Everyone else sure did. Again other than this being all the rage (RFID's) I doubt it was something major, but surely someone with agendas sees it to be so. When they can produce something absolute that was used with this information, not just 'oh my look at this an RFID story' than I'll worry.

PS... Proof doesn't mean `hey we're the Foobar Newspaper

Re:watching you watch me (2, Informative)

grondu (239962) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716809)

Washington Post has their own agendas politically when it comes to reporting.

The link is to the Washington Times , not the Washington Post.

Re:watching you watch me (1)

segment (695309) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716877)

shit i need to wake up... thanx and doh! but in essence there still isnt anything more than some rfid bs... And I should have known it was the times because of the ugly ass colors they use

TURN YOUR TV ON (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716755)

SAD HAM HAS BEEN ARRESTED!

Re:TURN YOUR TV ON (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716955)

Sad Ham?

What the hell is wrong with you? Are you high on crack or something?

Summary (3, Interesting)

FTL (112112) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716763)

To summarise the article, a group of reporters were pissed that they weren't invited to attend the conference. They disected a security card, and found (shock, horror) that it contained features designed to maintain security at said conference. Since this is the only dirt they managed to find, they spin it up into a sky-is-falling end-of-the-world privacy story.

I'd have a lot more respect for activist reporters if they would report the facts without hype. It's not the second coming, it's possibly a minor infraction of the Swiss information laws.

Re:Summary (5, Funny)

Crash Culligan (227354) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717267)

To summarise the article, a group of reporters were pissed that they weren't invited to attend the conference.

That's no surprise. If I recall correctly, the G7 summits are intended to be discussions on global economic policy, to which none of the affected people (pretty much everybody but government officials) are ever invited. (In fact, I don't hear of many economists going to those conferences either; if I'm wrong, please correct.)

As for press not getting in, sure you may loathe muckraker reporting (many people do), but sometimes there's just too much muck to allow to pile up. Do you really want your government to be deciding elements of policy without any input from its constituency? That's becoming the norm, and guerilla reporting may soon be the only way the operation of said government can come to light.

They disected a security card, and found (shock, horror) that it contained features designed to maintain security at said conference. Since this is the only dirt they managed to find, they spin it up into a sky-is-falling end-of-the-world privacy story.

Yeah, I see where the article could sound like sour grapes. But then there's something to be said for the irony of the situation, and I'm glad that someone was in there to highlight it.

  1. Government officials attend privacy and security conference.
  2. Reporters crash privacy and security conference, demonstrating lack of security.
  3. Reporters analyze badges from privacy and not-security conference and find RFID tags, demonstrating lack of privacy.
  4. Article about lack-of-privacy and not-security conference reaches the public.
  5. ???
  6. Privacy!!

I'm not perfectly sure, but I think that next-to-the-last step should be Citizens of the world slap their respective governments upside the head and scream "What were you goobers THINKING??"

At least, that's my take on it...

Re:Summary (4, Insightful)

Ironica (124657) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717881)

a group of reporters were pissed that they weren't invited to attend the conference.

And from the article, there's no indication that they're the same as the group of researchers who snuck in.

They disected a security card, and found (shock, horror) that it contained features designed to maintain security at said conference.

If that's what it was for, how come the security people couldn't tell them that? I'm glad you were able to get more info out of them than the researchers were.

Since this is the only dirt they managed to find, they spin it up into a sky-is-falling end-of-the-world privacy story.

The fact that they faked their way in so easily was the first bit of dirt they dug up. The fact that there were undisclosed monitoring devices in the badges was the next. The final blow was that they couldn't get any info from security about the monitoring, and basically that the conference violated at least three privacy laws in the current jurisdiction.

And that if this is how it goes in Switzerland, how will things go in Tunisia next year?

If you figure it's no biggie, maybe you're right. But then again, if we send a bunch of prime ministers and other politicos to all congregate in a single place, and then we put tags on them so that we know their comings and goings, and who is talking with whom, and then we don't have any apparent plan to purge that info at any point... how easy will it be for every terrorist in the world to strike against their least favorite government at next year's conference? This seems vaguely important to me.

Countermeasures (4, Interesting)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716764)

I wonder if someone is goign to make a killing by selling little RFID chip & reader detectors. Richard Stallman suggested RFID detectors and destroyers [rfidprivacy.org] as a challenge for privacy adocates. Perhaps clothing with conductive/dissapative threads will be the next fashion trend (just don't count on your cellphone ringing if its inside your pocket ;) ).

Re:Countermeasures (2, Funny)

SurgeonGeneral (212572) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716821)

Well how about just some way I can find my keys and television remote control.. That alone would make this technology the best thing since sliced silicon.

Re:Countermeasures (1)

Ironica (124657) | more than 10 years ago | (#7718002)

Well how about just some way I can find my keys and television remote control.. That alone would make this technology the best thing since sliced silicon.

Here you go. [sharperimage.com]

Privacy issue, or planning aid? (2, Interesting)

xplenumx (703804) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716848)

I would think that the information provided by the RFID tags would be invaluable - not in terms of violating privacy but for the planning of future conferences. I'd gladly wear RFID chips in my conference badge if it lead to improved trafficking for future conferences. One doesn't attend conferences for the privacy.

Re:Privacy issue, or planning aid? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717128)

I'd gladly wear RFID chips in my conference badge if it lead to improved trafficking for future conferences.

Yeah, but "trafficking" in what?

Re:Privacy issue, or planning aid? (3, Insightful)

Dashing Leech (688077) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717155)

One doesn't attend conferences for the privacy.

So, if you spent 2 hours in the bathroom with bad diarrhea, you'd have no problem telling them if they asked you why you were in there for so long and why you missed a few sessions? Is that it, every minute of your day there is open for anyone's scrutiny? (That is, anyone with access to an RFID tracker.)

Re:Privacy issue, or planning aid? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717311)

Well i'd rather tell them i had a bad case of Diarrhoea then tell them that I was doing the wife of (insert name of desired country) in it.

Re:Privacy issue, or planning aid? (1)

Viceice (462967) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717422)

Well i'd rather tell them i had a bad case of Diarrhoea then tell them that I was doing the wife of the president/prime minister of (insert name of desired country) in it.

Hmm, just maybe... (0, Redundant)

11223 (201561) | more than 10 years ago | (#7716859)

Perhaps if they RFID-tagged Slashdot submissions, they could detect dups at a distance, before they were posted.

RFID Ads (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7716868)

The real irony is that the article ends with two advertisements for RFID products.

Creapy? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7717025)

Creepy. It's just CREEPY. I am not sure Creapy is even a word. Jeez.

Creapy? (1)

dstillz (704959) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717029)

From the that's-just-crappy dept, with an apostrophe.

Washington Times (1)

LittleDan (669174) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717064)

We should take this with a grain of salt; this is the Washington Times we're dealing with. They have a history of making up news stories. I wouldn't trust them.

oh no! we know now... (2, Funny)

Zed2K (313037) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717382)

That someone hit the bathroom at 12:30pm and then again at 3:30pm. They also exited the room for a smoke break after their bathroom break. Oh and don't forget the super secret buying of a Snickers bar at 3:35pm.

WTF, Over... (5, Insightful)

Sylver Dragon (445237) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717412)

Maybe its just me, but this seems like a whole lot of noise over nothing. Those badges were probably security badges. You know, the kind many of us corporate workers wear every day to work. If you are one of those workers who have to swipe your ID badge in front of a little box that goes beep, and an LED turns green, and the door opens, the you are carrying an RFID tag (possibly even a smart card, but this is not as common). This is no big deal, its simply a way to control access. Technically, it provides some employee tracking, but its also very useful for security.
Heck, even parking garages are using these for employees now. My girlfriend has a little card (HID Prox card), which she uses at work to get into and out of the parking complex for work. Myself, I work at a company that builds physical security systems, so I work with these things every day. And, I find, that most of the privacy concerns are way overblown. Though, I still don't like the idea of carrying one on me, I am a bit of a privacy nut afterall.
If anything, this article sounds like a bunch of reporters got pissed, because they weren't allowed into a closed door conference, and broke the rules to get an access badge, and then reported on the evil RFID tag in the card, despite this being a very common thing, especially in places where security is an issue.

Hipocrisy? (2, Insightful)

InfiniteWisdom (530090) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717516)

RFID concerns are overblown, except when the tags are on YOU.

Re:Hipocrisy? (3, Insightful)

Sylver Dragon (445237) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717699)

No, RFID concers are overblown. I just happen to be one of the people that believes in erring on the side of caution. Truth is, those little suckers take some good sized equipment to read from any worthwhile distance, so carrying my work ID badge on me at all times (I just keep it in my wallet) really isn't a cause for concern. What bothers me, is the idea of any government of corporation trying to hide these things on me, so that they can track me when the technology advances far enough for the readers to be small and have good range.
Also, note that I did say privacy nut, which usually implies being irrational. Which many of my fears about privacy are, but I'll hang onto them, just in case one of them is right.

Re:WTF, Over... (1)

Ironica (124657) | more than 10 years ago | (#7718052)

If anything, this article sounds like a bunch of reporters got pissed, because they weren't allowed into a closed door conference, and broke the rules to get an access badge

The original press release reported on /. (here [slashdot.org] ) didn't mention that group of reporters at all, and this article doesn't actually discuss any link between the researchers and the reporters. I get the impression that the Washington Times thought the discussion of the pirate radio broadcast gave the story a little more color for those who find RFID boring.

Besides, would you feel just as fine about your security card at work if it flashed your personal details on a screen that can be read from 10 feet away, along with a queue of the last several people who walked in via that entrance? Is it enough for your boss to know that you just got back from lunch late, or should he know that you were at lunch with the same group of drinking buddies you always go with too?

Self-Defense (5, Insightful)

Quantum-Sci (732727) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717510)

For those who doubt the concerns about RFID, it's about who controls your own information: you... or others.

We will get no regulation of the uses RFID is put to, while the Party is in power, and so it's up to us to sort this out.

Be advised that cellphone mfgrs are now adding technology that PUSHes ads to you. Will you be able to turn it off? Doubtful; if all the carriers do it, there's no place else to go.

And of course CDMA has always had geo-location... they promise it's only used to catch indicted criminals, but that claim is very doubtful, given some recent events.

Delegates at a conference could be identified as they approach their car. Obscuring codes don't matter; a sample could be taken at any time prior, at great distance with a parabolic dish. Soldiers could be accurately geo-located by the enemy.

Did you know that all GM cars since 1999 have black boxes in them, which are NOT being used to help you understand what happened 5 seconds before an accident, but to INDICT you for that accident, and expose you to civil litigation as well. Your inanimate *car* has become a prosecution witness against you, even though your own wife isn't supposed to be forced to testify against you.

This is the difference between the old way, and the neo-way, of managing the citizens. The deeper question is, why is our society becoming more and more adversarial, so fast? How do Nordic countries and Canada, get away with cooperation, rather than ever strengthening offense and defense, every day? They don't worry about NOT being something, like we Americans do. Double-plus ungood.

You say that when out in public, you have no expectation of privacy? True, but RFID expands that 'public' from your immediate surroundings (which you are aware of, and choose to inhabit), to the known universe, and for all time. If in 10 years it is considered treasonous to question RFID, some of us will be screwed, now, won't we? We all go places we'd like to keep private sometimes, now, don't we? Care to give that up, for no good reason other than FEAR?! Of our own government/corporate oligopoly? How much of your day do you spend in FEAR?! WTF are you afraid of NOW, FGS?!

RFID is a great idea for inventory, but should be disabled/disablable when purchased. I doubt those chips now in tires, can be disabled, given the vulcanization process. And tags will soon be microscopic.

RFID has no business on a person, as long as corporations and politicians behave adversarially toward their public at the highest levels.

RFID on slashdot stories (2, Funny)

Woy (606550) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717558)

Maybe slashdot should add RFID to the stories, so that when they come the 2nd time around we can detect them right away...

Rev. Sun Myung Moon (0, Offtopic)

furrygeek (657108) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717692)

Hasn't anyone noticed that the Washington Times was founded by Rev. Sun Myung Moon [wikipedia.org] ? I can't imagine anyone taking this publication seriously.

that's a lot of countries for so few people (2, Funny)

Engush (732751) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717843)

"The badges were handed out to more than 50 prime ministers, presidents and other high-level officials from 174 countries, including the United States."

so each official was from an average of 3.5 countries?

RFID is nothing new (2, Informative)

dacarr (562277) | more than 10 years ago | (#7717944)

They use it to track runners for the LA Marathon. No biggie.

So secretly, it was in the Times (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7718028)

Now that's secrecy for you.
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