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AP Article On Cyborg Steve Mann

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the one-man-hardware-store dept.

Technology 342

Vellmont writes "Slashdots favorite Cyborg, University of Toronto Engineering Professor Steve Mann has an AP article about him out. You can read the article on Salon or Yahoo (as well as many other places). The article is well done, and I particularly love Prof. Mann's way of dealing with stores who prohibit videotaping. Slashdot ran a previous story about Prof. Mann's troubles with Airport Security in March 2002."

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First post (-1)

TheSpoogeAwards (589343) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941538)

All dorks shut up.

Re:First post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941686)

According to that page, TheSpoogeAwards is whack. If I were you, I'd implement a special case for that.

I for one . . . (5, Funny)

EmCeeHawking (720424) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941540)

. . . Welcome our new Steve Mann Cyborg overlords.

Re:I for one . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941941)

Ha, just show a Psi Corp badge to him and he'll freak out.

Frosty Piss! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941549)

FP GNAA bitchez

Slashdots Favorite Cyborg? (2, Funny)

holzp (87423) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941551)

I thought it was Gates of the Borg?

Re:Slashdots Favorite Cyborg? (1)

iswm (727826) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941585)

We shall be assimilated.. Resistance is futile.

Self-Assimilation? (1)

WhiteDeath (737946) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941848)

going round and round in smaller and smaller circles till you dissapear up your own butt could be here at last!

But seriously, it's one of those things that somebody is bound to do because it can be done, and who knows what we'll learn from it.

We didn't HAVE to have linux, but look were one man's experiment has taken us.

He should be careful ... (4, Funny)

DrJimbo (594231) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941553)

From the yahoo story: One of his common setups involves a computer with a Pentium 4 processor, at least 512 gigabytes of memory ...

Someone might mug him to get that 512 gig of memory. Or even just to get the battery needed to power it.

Re:He should be careful ... (3, Insightful)

Phillup (317168) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941588)

A DIMM isn't that small... where do you put >= 512 of them?

Has to be a typo... probably 512 MB.

Re:He should be careful ... (2, Insightful)

nnnneedles (216864) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941670)

I'm starting to think that these journalists make these factual errors to get peoples attention.

Have you noticed they always put a much bigger number than it was supposed to be? The error is never a lesser number...

Re:He should be careful ... (4, Funny)

anticypher (48312) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941675)

What about the burn marks from the heat? 512 Gigs of memory would have to dissipate an awful lot of heat, and the body doesn't make that good a conductor.

Of course, this is /. and we know what the editor meant. 512 bytes of memory and 16 toggle switches :-)

the AC

Re:He should be careful ... (2, Funny)

sgifford (9982) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941707)

If they did, though, he'd have a full record of what the mugger looked like and did, relayed through a wireless network back to another computer.

I saw this guy at USENIX a few years ago, and he was really interesting to listen to.

Benefit of the doubt: RAID (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941764)

I'll give the AP the benefit of the doubt and guess 512 MiB of RAM plus close to 512 GiB of hard drives. AP, Reuters, and other wire services often confuse memory with storage.

Re:Benefit of the doubt: RAID (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941959)

I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and let you renounce your prior fucking retarded claim before I hunt you down, wherever you are, and give you the most powerful atomic wedgie ever, bitch. I'm coming, so lube yup your ass cockfucker.

It's obviously that they mixed up the G and the M mortard.

Re:He should be careful ... (1)

Anonvmous Coward (589068) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941825)

Maybe he's running Redhat?

Ummm (5, Funny)

clifgriffin (676199) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941558)

I'd like to see a bewolf cluster of...hims.

Re:Ummm (5, Funny)

sofakingl (690140) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941721)

It's called the Borg, and you probably don't want to see them (at least not up close).

Re:Ummm (2, Funny)

NanoGator (522640) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941838)

"I'd like to see a bewolf cluster of...hims."

Your wish is my command. [reviewjournal.com]

Eeeegads! (3, Interesting)

BoldAC (735721) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941567)

...so much so that going without the apparatus often leaves him feeling nauseous, unsteady, naked

This is the way I feel too sometimes... if I forget to leave my pager, cell phone, lap-top, sidekick, and laptop behind...

Honestly though, this guy is addicted to information. If you tried to take google away from me, I would feel the same way. Information is addicted... there's no way around it.

AC

Re:Eeeegads! (3, Insightful)

saunabad (664414) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941632)

Honestly though, this guy is addicted to information.

I think this guy is more addicted to publicity than information. I've seen many articles of him, but I still have no idea if he has actually accomplished anything else than just to wear a computer and a camera all the time. No offence to anyone, but what is the point?

Re:Eeeegads! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941706)

I think this guy is more addicted to publicity than information. I've seen many articles of him, but I still have no idea if he has actually accomplished anything else than just to wear a computer and a camera all the time. No offence to anyone, but what is the point?

You don't seem very familiar with the academic world and the gigantic egos (some of them well-deserved) that many professors have.

Publish or Perish.

Re:Eeeegads! (5, Interesting)

Neop2Lemus (683727) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941805)

I agree.

I was at the Toronto Film Festival a few years ago and they'd done a film about him (here) [imdb.com]

We walked out on that film. What made the hour we sat in that theatre more offensive than interesting was that this guy wore his gear around, really had no idea what to do with it, and had a huge ego because he had toys on his head that other people didn't. It wasen't that it was a hobby: cool, but possibly inapplicable to real life, but that he thought he was onto something important and he wasen't. I mean, he'd walk into a WalMart and set up a fuss when they told him no cameras in the store.

Why the university keeps him on I have no idea. If someone can tell me, I'd like to know (seriously, I would like to know).

Re:Eeeegads! (1)

Yorrike (322502) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941711)

...so much so that going without the apparatus often leaves him feeling nauseous, unsteady, naked

That's how I feel when I forget to get dressed in the morning.

Kevin Warwick? (0)

TehHustler (709893) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941572)

I always thought Kevin Warwick, AKA Captain Cyborg, was everyone's favourite cyborg. http://www.kevinwarwick.org.uk/ TheRegister also insult... er i mean do stories on him.

Re:Kevin Warwick? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941667)

They are both frauds of the same magnitude...
odd that they have so much in common.

Internet Link (2, Interesting)

vpscolo (737900) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941574)

One thing that I think most people would benefit from is a link to the net, or prehaps better a secure enclopedia. How many times have you thought "I must look up xys" and then forgot. To just have that information at your fingertips would be excellent. However of course it depends on how deep it all llinks in. The last thing you want is a hacker breaking into your brain and controlling you. An army of zombies? No thankyou Rus

Not a cyborg. (5, Insightful)

praksys (246544) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941575)

He's not a cyborg, unless some of this hardware actually involved surgery or the replacement of biological parts. He's a gargoyle [butler.edu] .

Re:Not a cyborg. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941601)

No, he's a nerd.

I kid! I kid.

No, really. A nerd.

Anonymous Joe

Re:Not a cyborg. (5, Interesting)

Poeir (637508) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941611)

But according to this article [slashdot.org] , linked to in the summary, some of it is implants, so he is a cyborg.

Re:Not a cyborg. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941638)

He has no implants at all, he is not a cyborg, trust me I worked for him.

Re:Not a cyborg. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941813)

This is god. Kill yourself. Trust me.

Re:Not a cyborg. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941816)

trust me I worked for him

So sayeth AC. Note to mods: an AC needs a lot more than an unsubstantiated claim to be informative.

Re:Not a cyborg. (2, Informative)

praksys (246544) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941648)

But according to this article, linked to in the summary, some of it is implants, so he is a cyborg.

According to the slashdot summary maybe, but there was no mention of implants in the orginal NYT article.

You can't get it from the NYT without paying now, so here is the original text:


STEVE MANN, an engineering professor at the University of Toronto, has lived as a cyborg for more than 20 years, wearing a web of wires, computers and electronic sensors that are designed to augment his memory, enhance his vision and keep tabs on his vital signs. Although his wearable computer system sometimes elicited stares, he never encountered any problems going through the security gates at airports.

Last month that changed. Before boarding a Toronto-bound plane at St. John's International Airport in Newfoundland, Dr. Mann says, he went through a three-day ordeal in which he was ultimately strip-searched and injured by security personnel. During the incident, he said, $56,800 worth of his $500,000 equipment was lost or damaged beyond repair, including the eyeglasses that serve as his display screen.

His lawyer in Toronto, Gary Neinstein, sent letters two weeks ago to Air Canada, the airport and the Canadian transportation authority arguing that they acted negligently and seeking reimbursement for the damaged equipment so that Dr. Mann could put his wearable computer back together again.

The difficulties that Dr. Mann faced seem related to the tightening of security in airports since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11. But he had flown from Toronto to St. John's two days earlier without a hitch.

On that day, Feb. 16, he said, he followed the routine he has used on previous flights. He told the security guards in Toronto that he had already notified the airline about his equipment. He showed them documentation, some of it signed by his doctor, that described the wires and glasses, which he wears every waking minute as part of his internationally renowned research on wearable computers.

He also asked for permission not to put his computer through the X-ray machine because the device is more sensitive than a laptop. He said that the guards examined his equipment and allowed him to board the flight.

But when he tried to board his return flight on Feb. 18, his experience was entirely different. This time, he said, he was told to turn his computer on and off and put it on the X-ray machine. He took his case to Neil Campbell, Air Canada's customer service manager at the St. John's airport, and spent the next two days arranging conversations between his university colleagues and the airline.

The security guards continued to require that he turn his machine on and off and put it through the X-ray machine while also tugging on his wires and electrodes, he said. Still not satisfied, the guards took him to a private room for a strip-search in which, he said, the electrodes were torn from his skin, causing bleeding, and several pieces of equipment were strewn about the room.

Once his system was turned off, turned on again, X-rayed and dismantled, Dr. Mann passed the security check. When he was finally allowed to go home, some pieces of equipment were not returned to him, he said, and his glasses were put in the plane's baggage compartment although he warned that cold temperatures there could ruin them.

Without a fully functional system, he said, he found it difficult to navigate normally. He said he fell at least twice in the airport, once passing out after hitting his head on what he described as a pile of fire extinguishers in his way. He boarded the plane in a wheelchair.

"I felt dizzy and disoriented and went downhill from there," he said.

Air Canada said that there was no record that any of Dr. Mann's baggage had been lost and that the Canadian transportation agency, Transport Canada, had required that his belongings be X-rayed. "We don't tell the security firms that there is going to be an exception made," said Nicole Couture-Simard, a spokeswoman for Air Canada. "We don't have that authority."

Transport Canada declined to comment on the case except to say that it was reviewing it.

Considering that even tweezers may be confiscated when a passenger boards a flight these days, the stricter scrutiny that Dr. Mann faced may not seem surprising. But for him, the experience raises the question of how a traveler will fare once wearable computing devices are such fixtures on the body that a person will not be able to part with them.

"We have to make sure we don't go into a police state where travel becomes impossible for certain individuals," Dr. Mann said.

Since losing the use of his vision system and computer memory several weeks ago, he said, he cannot concentrate and is behaving differently. He is now undergoing tests to determine whether his brain has been affected by the sudden detachment from the technology.

Alejandro R. Jahad, director of the University of Toronto's Program in E-Health Innovation, who has worked closely with Dr. Mann, said that scientists now had an opportunity to see what happens when a cyborg is unplugged. "I find this a very fascinating case," he said.

Re:Not a cyborg. (1)

Poeir (637508) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941788)

Also, from reading the comments in the previous story, they're just electrodes. Don't know if that counts or not.

Re:Not a cyborg. (1)

wfberg (24378) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941877)

He's not a cyborg, unless some of this hardware actually involved surgery or the replacement of biological parts.

I kinda like thinking I'm a cyborg because of my contact lenses. And watch and mobile phone attached to me..

Is he - (2, Interesting)

ir0b0t (727703) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941576)

- linked to the net through his gear? I couldn't tell from the story.

Re:Is he - (1)

Cska Sofia (705257) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941776)

Depending on where he's going, Mann carries a few different wireless transmitters so he can connect to whatever kind of network -- Wi-Fi, cellular, old-fashioned radio -- happens to be available.

I wonder (2, Funny)

segment (695309) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941858)

... If I run a wireless sniffer... can I snoop on his thoughts? ;O

YOUR HELP NEEDED! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941578)

I am Mr. Darl McBride, the CEO of SCO corporation.

I am in charge of this firm which is fast sinking due to the fact no one will pay my Linux toll. The litigation sector has a peculiar nature in my country as it concerns financial transactions; anything is possible for you to stay afloat with the enormous compensation therein to the right scummy lawyers.

Unfortunatly, my own lawyers have failed me and so I need to get what little money the company has left out of the corporate accounts before the company tanks and the shareholders try to take what is left. I have $37 million I was recently given by Microsoft who is trying to prop up my attempt to destroy linux. I fear they will want it back if things fail and I feel it is time to get out before the end.

Taking into cognizance the foregoing, I am in a position to make all necessary arrangement to portray you as my "lawyer" so that I can pretend to have payed all the money to a real lawyer should Microsoft or the sharewolders come looking for it. I only ask that you help me set up an account to funnel the money into. I will let you keep half of this $37 million for yourself. That will leave us both with more than enough money to flee to Brazil and live it up for the rest of our lives should the true nature of this scheme come to light.

Call me so that we can discuss further at 1-800-726-8649.

Thank you!

Darl McBride

Can't be bothered to read the article? (4, Insightful)

Realistic_Dragon (655151) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941583)

Video quote:

"Then he tells the employees that "HIS manager" makes him film public places for HIS security -- how does he know, he tells them, that the fire exits aren't chained shut? -- and that they'll have to talk to HIS manager."

Of course if he does that in a cinema he will be arrested and sent to a state pen where he will become even more attached (ouch) to his wearable computer thanks to the resident cybernetic surgeon, Joe 'Two Teeth' Bob.

Re:Can't be bothered to read the article? (2)

mondoterrifico (317567) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941980)

No since he lives in Canada. But since you didn't read the article you wouldn't know this... and I forget why it is pressing that i tell you this.
Hopefully we in Canada can become some sort of pirate nation. AYe matey. but i digress.

computers as mental extensions and I"P". (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941590)

ya see, this is why us hackers (in the original "total freedom of information" sense) taking the long view are so totally opposed to intellectual "property".

When the computer is so tightly integrated with your mind that it's effectively become a part of you, intellectual "property" law enforcement amounts to thought crime enforcement. And DRM is mind control. Just plain evil.

The right to know should be a basic human right. The right to say should be a basic human right. And if human is expanded to man-machine, that should apply to our computers too.

So, WAKE UP. Fight for your right to know. Do NOT hand people power to "own" YOUR copy of some information just because it's like THEIR copy. THEIR copy is NOT DIMINISHED by your having a copy.

It's NOT WRONG to copy information, any information. Let no person, natural or legal, tell you it is.

Re:computers as mental extensions and I"P". (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941700)

Nice troll. Or are you really that stupid?

Yeah, yeah. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941592)

I think we all know the REAL reason this guy is becoming a cyborg. I think this is all I need to say: GO GO GADGET PENIS!

More Advanced Than I Thought! (2, Funny)

jheinen (82399) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941594)

"One of his common setups involves a computer with a Pentium 4 processor, at least 512 gigabytes of memory and a specialized operating system based on Linux"

Wow. Where can I get a box like that that fits under my sweater?

Re:More Advanced Than I Thought! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941796)

Users advanced several theories about that typo in replies to this comment [slashdot.org] . Hint 1: Fill a vest with iPods.

Yahoo's editor is on loan from /. (1)

Realistic_Dragon (655151) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941602)

"One of his common setups involves a computer with a Pentium 4 processor, at least 512 gigabytes of memory and..."

512 gig of memory eh? It's not likley to even have that much disk space.

Mind you, fitting enough power to run that puppy into a wearable PC isn't exactly a minor engineering challenge, it must still be pretty heavy.

Re:Yahoo's editor is on loan from /. (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941804)

It's not likley to even have that much disk space.

How big is the drive in a 40 GB iPod audio player? How big would 13 of those drives be?

Article text (-1, Redundant)

kiwipeso (467618) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941606)

Professor Lives Life As a Cyborg

By BRIAN BERGSTEIN, AP Technology Writer

TORONTO - When you first meet Steve Mann, it seems as if you've interrupted him appraising diamonds or doing some sort of specialized welding. Because the first thing you notice is the plastic frame that comes around his right ear and holds a lens over his right eye.

But quickly you see that there's more to his contraption: A tiny video camera is affixed to the plastic eyepiece. Multicolored wires wrap around the back of Mann's head. Red and white lights blink under his sweater.

Mann greets you, warmly at first, though he soon gets distracted by something on the tiny computer monitor wedged over his eye.

In fact, being with Mann sometimes feels like the ultimate, in-your-face version of having a dinner companion who talks on a cell phone.

But don't be put off by it.

Someday you, too, might be a cyborg.

___

Mann, a 41-year-old engineering professor at the University of Toronto, spends hours every day viewing the world through that little monitor in front of his eye -- so much so that going without the apparatus often leaves him feeling nauseous, unsteady, naked.

While the small video camera gives him a recordable, real-time view of what's in front of him, the tiny screen is filled with messages or programming code fed by a computer and wireless transmitters that Mann straps to his body. He calls the experience "mediating reality" -- sort of like having icons from your computer screen transposed onto your regular vision.

Mann manipulates the computer through a handheld key device he invented, though he has experimented with putting electrodes on his skin and trying to control the cursor with brain waves.

If it sounds a bit creepy, consider this: Mann became a cyborg so he could be more human.

To be sure, that runs contrary to the sci-fi movie treatment of cyborgs (short for "cybernetic organisms") as electronic beasts, like in the "Terminator" movies. It also seems to violate a pastoral sense of what it means to be human: governed by spirit, reason and instinct, not infused with wires and silicon.

But Mann has sensitive and perceptive motives for his electronic immersion, which began 25 years ago. He believes that wearing computers and cameras will give people more power to maintain their privacy and individuality.

For one thing, Mann touts the power of wearable computers to filter out advertising and other elements of daily experience he finds objectionable.

And in a world of ever-increasing surveillance cameras for security, and strong database-mining software for government intelligence and corporate marketing, Mann believes regular people ought to have cameras and powerful computers on them, too. It's all about leveling the power dynamic.

"People feel they're masters of their own destiny when everything they need is right there with them," he says.

A cyborg could, say, take pictures of hostile police officers during a political demonstration and instantly post them on the Web -- to spur others to join in the protest, perhaps, or to simply provide alternative documentation of the scene. Mann calls such postings "glogs" -- short for "cyborg blogs" ("blogs," of course, is itself shorthand for "Web logs").

In more everyday language, Mann advocates "using a bit of the machine against itself."

For example, Mann has created performance art by shooting video in stores that prohibit it, using handheld cameras more noticeable than the "EyeTap" ocular computing system he normally wears. When employees tell him filming is not allowed, Mann points to the stores' own surveillance cameras behind darkened domes in the ceiling.

Then he tells the employees that "HIS manager" makes him film public places for HIS security -- how does he know, he tells them, that the fire exits aren't chained shut? -- and that they'll have to talk to HIS manager.

His behavior in such showdowns generally provokes hostility, confusion or resigned shrugs.

But don't try telling Mann that the complaining employees are just doing their jobs, and that his real beef is with executives who make store policy. Mann believes everyone should fight The System, those powerful institutions lurking behind the one-way mirrors.

"Clerks should be confronted with their clerk-iness," Mann says one afternoon in the Deconism Gallery, an electronic-art studio he runs near Toronto's Chinatown.

That comment is pure Steve Mann -- onto something, but pedantic about it.

"Cyberman," a 2001 Canadian documentary about his work, includes footage of Mann telling the director and producer which scenes they ought to use and which ones to cut, a conversation he surreptitiously filmed through the EyeTap.

Yet Mann's cyborg experience is much more than a political statement or geek showboating.

In his 2000 book "Cyborg: Digital Destiny and Human Possibility in the Age of the Wearable Computer," Mann wrote about the surreal beauty he experienced in programming the computer in his vision to alter colors, or alert him to objects behind him.

"The wearable computer allows me to explore my humanity, alter my consciousness, shift my perspectives so that I can choose -- any given time -- to see the world in very different, often quite liberating ways," he wrote in "Cyborg."

For example, Mann and his graduate students have developed software that can transform billboards or other rectangular shapes in the physical world -- when viewed through the lens of a wearable computer -- into virtual boxes for reading e-mail and other messages.

Mann envisions future generations walking down the street and seeing virtual, personalized messages on bus stops and building walls. A friend could log onto your glog to see where you were, then fire off a quick e-mail that only you would see on the park bench: "Turn around -- you went two blocks too far."

Of course, there are more prosaic possibilities. Mann's graduate student James Fung once was wearing an EyeTap while sitting around a campfire with friends and used its wireless Internet connection to find a ghost story to tell.

"It was a nice example of myself and the computer working together," Fung says. "You could imagine that if it were completely concealed in glasses ... people would naturally think that I was able to recall the stories myself."

Mann builds his "WearComps" and "EyeTaps" himself, with input from his wife, Betty, who has worn the gear, too, for nearly 15 years.

He has shrunk it dramatically over time. His first wearable system had to be carried in a heavy backpack, then it morphed into a terrible-looking beast that featured a helmet topped with rabbit-ear TV aerials. Eventually Mann developed a system that could be hidden behind sunglasses, and now uses the one-side-of-the-face wraparound.

It can plug into a variety of computers and devices. One of his common setups involves a computer with a Pentium 4 processor, at least 512 gigabytes of memory and a specialized operating system based on Linux (news - web sites).

Depending on where he's going, Mann carries a few different wireless transmitters so he can connect to whatever kind of network -- Wi-Fi, cellular, old-fashioned radio -- happens to be available.

The system lets him check e-mail while out and about, for example, though Mann sets it to reject attachments that could clog the works. While lecturing to his classes, he can read his notes on the little monitor.

All this began in Mann's childhood in Hamilton, Ontario, where he was a tinkering misfit who would doodle circuitry designs in class.

He wired the family home to eavesdrop on his parents' conversations and invented a sonar raccoon detector for the backyard. He and his brother, Richard, now a computer science professor at Canada's University of Waterloo, put up sensors that would detect when a parent was coming upstairs, so the boys could pretend to be sleeping by the time their bedroom door opened.

As a teenager, Mann worked in a television repair shop and became fascinated by the mini-TVs that served as viewfinders in consumer camcorders. He decided to link that technology with computing, and by the late 1970s, he began experimenting with wearable computers.

He wore one to a high school dance.

___

Steve Mann is not alone in dreaming of enhancing human capabilities with computer intelligence.

Some futurists consider it inevitable. Inventor Ray Kurzweil predicts a human-computer mind meld this century that will usher "The Age of Spiritual Machines."

Gazing into that same ethereal future, professor Kevin Warwick of Britain's University of Reading had circuitry implanted inside his arm for three months last year.

In one aspect of the experiment, Warwick moved his hand, and the implant relayed signals through the Internet to move a robotic hand. The gestures weren't coordinated, but Warwick said the test showed the feasibility of plugging electronic devices into the nervous system. Now Warwick hopes to lay the groundwork for a brain implant that could aid people with disabilities or augment existing abilities.

Mann believes a cyborg future is inevitable. Eventually, he says, everyone will want to be more tightly linked with computers, to enhance our memory and connections to other people.

And in that case, Mann contends that wearing the machine will be optimal. "My computer's twisted up like a pretzel around me, instead of me all hunched over a box," he says with pride.

Mann realizes that for mass appeal, wearable computing will have to be small -- perhaps incorporated into contact lenses. That will take a big manufacturer, and indeed, Mann has advised Xybernaut Corp., a Virginia-based company that makes wearable computers -- including one that fits over one eye -- for field technicians, the military and the disabled.

But that incarnation of wearable computing, says Mann, is too specialized, too limited. "What's needed is the equivalent of the personal computer, which was designed for no purpose in particular, and so it started a revolution," he says.

But professor, could there really ever be widespread demand for your kind of device? Getting cues from a tiny machine or communicating through it is one thing, but when do you think John Q. Public would let a computer "mediate reality"?

Mann lets that question wash over him.

"Any prediction can turn out to be a combination of codswallop, kerfluffle and flapdoodle," he says while wearing the EyeTap at a Toronto pizza joint. "A lot of people try to predict the future, and I guess one question is, why should I listen to them?"

http://www.eyetap.org

Re:Article text (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941652)

yea, b/c you know yahoo is going to get slashdotted.

fucking karma whores.

and stupid fucking mods.

nauseous side effects? (5, Interesting)

t0qer (230538) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941613)

Mann, a 41-year-old engineering professor at the University of Toronto, spends hours every day viewing the world through that little monitor in front of his eye -- so much so that going without the apparatus often leaves him feeling nauseous, unsteady, naked.

I think it's called anxiety. I get it alot when i'm away from my computer, I don't have that clickly click click of the keyboard (it's bordering on OCD now)

I would also think the nauseous side effects he's experiencing when he takes his headgear off might be what I suffer from too. I think my eyes are used to focusing on my CRT a foot away from my eyes since i'm in front of the PC so much. Also my cochlea in my ear is used to my head not moving so much. When I go outside I get the double whammy of viewing objects that are not in my average focus, and i'm moving around.

Re:nauseous side effects? (3, Interesting)

KrispyKringle (672903) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941873)

That doesn't make much sense. By that logic, people who spend a lot of time reading books would have the same issues.

I would guess his issue is actually that he's become used to focusing his eyes on a screen in front of him when moving around. Ordinarily, feeling motion when not seeing it causes nausia (such as when sitting in a bus or train where there is no visible motion but your inner-ear can feel the motion. This is because (I remember hearing on the Discovery Channel or somesuch) that situation--feeling but not seeing motion--is a symptom of some poisons and your body has evolved to heave up the toxins.

Anyway, in his case, he has become used to seeing something always in front of his eyes which is not moving, even when walking about. Perhaps the rapid motion of the world around him, when he isn't wearing his glasses, makes him nauseous? Then again, you'd think you'd see this with people who wear glasses, too, when they remove them (I just got a prescription for farsightedness--guess I'm getting old--so I'll be able to tell you shortly).

Either that or he's just a kook.

Re:nauseous side effects? (3, Insightful)

t0qer (230538) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941952)

By that logic, people who spend a lot of time reading books would have the same issues.

Book reading isn't nearly as monotonous to your body as sitting in front of a CRT though. A book you can change its viewing distance by extending your hands, the light is reflected off the pages wheras a CRT the light is being emitted from the screen itself.

Books can be read in front of a nice warm fire on a cozy couch. They can be taken to your bathroom for a good read during a nice long sit down.

CRT's have refresh rates. Maybe high refresh rates have an undocumented side effect (we all know low refresh rates leads to headaches) Books refresh in realtime, at the maximum rate our eyes can see the text.

A book is waaaay more relaxing to your body than the computer is.

Transition Sickness (see my post below...) (1)

farrellj (563) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941940)

Scroll down and to see it on the main page for the article...or search for "farrellj"

liberal use of the word (4, Insightful)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941637)

Cyborg? He's not a cybernetic organism, he's guy who lugs around gear.

He's no more a cyborg than a guy covered in mud is a golem.

Re:liberal use of the word (1)

puckmaster87 (740068) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941752)

You're right, he isn't a Cyborg. They really shouldn't be calling him that as it technically isn't politically correct.
He's no more a cyborg than a guy covered in mud is a golem.
Well, that's just strange.

Re:liberal use of the word (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941863)

He's no more a cyborg than a guy covered in mud is a golem.
Well, that's just strange.

Darned right! Everyone knows you need a little scroll with words on it in your mouth!

Re:liberal use of the word (1)

mrmud (219198) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941958)

From dictionary.com:

cyborg
A human who has certain physiological processes aided or controlled by mechanical or electronic devices.

Yep, he seems to fit that definition to me.

You were right about the golem though, if that's any consolation

golem
In Jewish folklore, an artificially created human supernaturally endowed with life.

Odd (0)

Quasar1999 (520073) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941642)

With the way things are going in hollywood, you'd think that (a) someone from paramount would fly up from LA to TO, and slap him with an copyright infringment lawsuit... He's trying to be Borg!

Re:Odd (1)

kmckinlay (139593) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941811)

Except he predates the Startrek Borg by several years. From the article:

But Mann has sensitive and perceptive motives for his electronic immersion, which began 25 years ago

...I wonder if he might be interested in sueing Paramount?

Re:Odd (1)

MacBorg (740087) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941889)

There is the BorgLab/mithril group at MIT...

A bit confused about our usage of the term cyborg (1)

fishexe (168879) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941643)

Uh... since when is someone who wears computer a cyobrg? I was expecting to read about a guy's numerous electronic implants, but...what the hell? Use of computers, whether worn or not, does not qualify one as a "cybernetic organism." Having them as an integrated component of one's being does.

He is the first volunteer (2, Funny)

earthforce_1 (454968) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941660)

for Borg assimilation.

Get some PRIORITIES (-1)

Joseph Goebbels (524047) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941677)



The worst terrorist attack in recorded history occurred not even 59 years ago, and you people are discussing an AP Article On Cyborg Steve Mann???? My *god*, people, GET SOME PRIORITIES!

The bodies of 250,000+ dead people couldn't give a good god damn about the advent of fusion power, your childish Lego models, your nerf toys and lack of a "fun" workplace, your Everquest/Diablo/D&D addiction, or any of the other ways you are "getting on with your life".

Remember Dresden!

He's a techno-roadie ! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941681)

He's no cyborg - he's just lugging gear around looking for a gig !

What does this have to do with online stuff? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941682)

Seriously, every little law placed on some gadget is now screamed here as being some "online" oppression.

Real world vs. fanboy fantasies (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941690)

I am what most people would consider a highly trained technical professional. Unlike most people who spout off at this site, I have the certificates to prove this, and furthermore they're issued by the biggest software company in existence.

I know how to tell facts from marketing fluff. Now, here are the facts as they're found by SEVERAL INDEPENDENT RESEARCH INSTITUTES:

Expenses for file-server workloads under Windows, compared to LinuxOS:
  • Staffing expenses were 33.5% better.
  • Training costs were 32.3% better.


They compared Microsofts IIS to the Linux 7.0 webserver. For Windows, the cost was only:
  • $40.25 per megabit of throughput per second.
  • $1.79 per peak request per second.


Application development and support costs for Windows compared to an opensores solution like J2EE:
  • 28.2% less for large enterprises.
  • 25.0% less for medium organizations.


A full Windows installation, compared to installing Linux, on an Enterprise Server boxen:
  • Is nearly three hours faster.
  • Requires 77% fewer steps.


Compared to the best known opensores webserver "Red Hat", Microsoft IIS:
  • Has 276% better peak performance for static transactions.
  • Has 63% better peak performance for dynamic content.


These are hard numbers and 100% FACTS! There are several more where these came from.

Who do you think we professionals trust more?
Reliable companies with tried and tested products, or that bedroom coder Thorwalds who publicly admits that he is in fact A HACKER???

--
Copyright (c) 2004 Mike Bouma, MCSE, MCDST, MS Office Specialist

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover
Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU
Free Documentation License".

I want to be there when he goes through security! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941691)

After his last experience with airport security guards, he's likely to be sent to Guantanamo Bay if he claims to be a cyborg instead of a computer geek.

Although if, as he claims, he can't be separated from the electronics, he can go through the X-ray machine with them :)

P4, 512GB, Linux (0, Redundant)

aardwolf204 (630780) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941730)

From the Yahoo Story:

It can plug into a variety of computers and devices. One of his common setups involves a computer with a Pentium 4 processor, at least 512 gigabytes of memory and a specialized operating system based on Linux

When did P4s go 64bit?

MODS: fourth TLP about the same typo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941815)

time to kick in (-1, Redundant)?

Hmmmm.... (1)

Quixote (154172) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941735)

and by the late 1970s, he began experimenting with wearable computers.

He wore one to a high school dance.

Must've been quite the ladies' man...

Re:Hmmmm.... (1)

Cska Sofia (705257) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941806)

I'm sure he only did it to crack some corny "Hey baby, check out the size of my hard drive"-style pick up line.

Re:Hmmmm.... (1)

putaro (235078) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941903)

In the late '70's if you had a hard drive going around with you, you would have had it on a not-so-small cart....with a not-so-small extension trailing behind.

Wearables @ a dance (1)

MacBorg (740087) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941901)

This is just so appealing... I am dreding the prom... this would raise a few eyebrows (how does it work with a tux)

Re:Hmmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941926)

Ladies have no taste.

I'd be all over a cyborg chick ;)

I'm sorry, you can't tape in here! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941745)

[Steve Mann visualizes: Possible Response - Yes/No / Or what? / You'll have to talk to my manager / Fuck you, asshole / Fuck you.]

Steve Mann: You'll have to talk to my manager.

Not too good for his health... (5, Interesting)

Cska Sofia (705257) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941753)

Since the device only covers one eye, it would surely lead to asymmetrical vision problems. Rather quickly, I'd imagine, given how close the image is.

Re:Not too good for his health... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941765)

Why do you assume that "asymmetrical vision" is a "problem"?

Getting the documentaries? (1)

sgifford (9982) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941755)

I saw parts of one of Mann's documentaries at USENIX in New Orleans a few years ago (1999?), and it was extremely entertaining. Since then, I've been trying to find a place where I can get my hands on a copy. Does anybody know a place that sells these, or a place where I can download them?

Re:Getting the documentaries? (2, Informative)

kmckinlay (139593) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941954)

I don't know where to get the documentaries, but the CBC web site has a biography on him at http://www.cbc.ca/cyberman/ [www.cbc.ca] . Including a couple of interesting videos on Steve and his wife.

Hardware (1)

Quixote (154172) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941775)

Yaknow, I'd like to experiment with some of this wearable stuff. In particular, taking video (and audio) unobtrusively as I walk around. However, I don't have the wife's permission^W^W^W means to spend 1000s of bucks on such a gig.

Are there any cheap A/V "pen" cameras with a wide lens, that output to USB? I'd like to just record for now; having an over-the-eye small lcd display can come later..

Just hit delete? (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941829)

I wonder how he feels about spam? It's bad enough normally, but he'll get "you've got mail!" for pen1s-x-tend0rs as he's walking along the sidewalk or talking to someone. (Sure, he could toggle off notification. Do you think he's the type to have anything less than maximum verbosity?)

And I guess we'll eventually need laws against driving and Instant Messaging at the same time.

"Sticking feathers up your butt... (2, Insightful)

slashdaughter (309904) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941832)


"Sticking feathers up your butt does not make you a chicken."
- Tyler Durden

.

Re:"Sticking feathers up your butt... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941922)

Except for the fact that, unlike chickens, cyborgs don't exist. Thus, there are no metaphorical feathers to stick up one's ass.

Still, it'll be quite amusing when someone like Mann is admitted to an ER for second degree burns after his bionic penile attachment short circuits.

I'm all for entertainment at another's expense.

Re:"Sticking feathers up your butt... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941963)

Surgically grafting them to your butt makes you a chicken-man.

Borgie Borg (4, Funny)

NanoGator (522640) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941847)

When asked how many brothers and sisters he has, his response was "I am third of five."

Everyone should have at least three. (4, Insightful)

An Onerous Coward (222037) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941859)

The eventual coolness of wearable computers shouldn't be underestimated. Sure, it will start out with bleeding edgers being able to fire off posts to Slashdot using nothing but an elaborate series of eye movements. Early adopters tend to look silly to the rest of us. No shame in that.

But start combining technologies like mesh networks, cryptographic authentication schemes, GPS, and the like, and imagine where they're going. How cool would it be to walk down any street in the country, and be able to call up the name, location, and menu of every Chinese restaurant within seven blocks? Or pinpoint all the "single and looking" girls at a rock concert who don't identify themselves as cat lovers.

Imagine walking through a dark parking lot. If someone tries to attack you, one press of a button could notify the police and everyone within a two mile radius of your location.

In a lot of ways, this means giving up a certain amount of privacy. For example, the distress signal from the last paragraph isn't going to work if anyone, anywhere can hit the panic button anonymously. That's where the cryptographic authentication comes in. There needs to be a way to verify the originator and trustworthiness of a given piece of information, whether it be, "Yes, officer, I'm authorized to drive a motor vehicle," or "Chin Wan's has great stir fry." The infrastructure doesn't exist yet, and it doubtless will never be perfect, but someday it will be at least as trustworthy as asking to see someone's ID.

Some information will be automatically broadcasted, whether the user likes it or not (wanted for armed robbery). Some of it will be available to cashiers and law enforcement (too young to buy beer). Some of it will be voluntarily made available to the world (likes long walks, sunsets, and jiu-jitsu).

It's going to be fun to watch these technologies come together. Possibly in a train-wreck fashion.

Re:Everyone should have at least three. (1)

ydrol (626558) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941957)

The eventual coolness of wearable computers shouldn't be underestimated. Sure, it will start out with bleeding edgers being able to fire off posts to Slashdot using nothing but an elaborate series of eye movements. Early adopters tend to look silly to the rest of us. No shame in that

Reaction to mobile phone technology may be an interesting indicator. Here In the UK, people started using those headset/speaker phone thingys a couple of years ago. They often looked like "mentally challenged" people muttering loudly to themselves until you heard them bellow "I'm on the train .. see you at 7". Now a few people have the blue-tooth thingys that look like little Galaxian Ships balancing delicately on the ear...

They look mad to me too, but then again I'm not really "into" mobile technology. And if I were a different hue, would visible blush uncontrollably when mine rings on the train because I forgot to turn it off. [whispers] "I'm on the train, Call you later" [Switch Off]

Wrong Steve (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941907)

I think Steve Austin is more popular than this newcomer. Probably more expensive to taxpayers as well.

computers as mental extensions and I"P". (-1, Redundant)

sanctimonius hypocrt (235536) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941911)

ya see, this is why us hackers (in the original "total freedom of information" sense) taking the long view are so totally opposed to intellectual "property".

When the computer is so tightly integrated with your mind that it's effectively become a part of you, intellectual "property" law enforcement amounts to thought crime enforcement. And DRM is mind control. Just plain evil.

The right to know should be a basic human right. The right to say should be a basic human right. And if human is expanded to man-machine, that should apply to our computers too.

So, WAKE UP. Fight for your right to know. Do NOT hand people power to "own" YOUR copy of some information just because it's like THEIR copy. THEIR copy is NOT DIMINISHED by your having a copy.

It's NOT WRONG to copy information, any information. Let no person, natural or legal, tell you it is.

DUPE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941965)

How many times are you going to post the same thing [slashdot.org] over and over?

Re:computers as mental extensions and I"P". (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941995)

you are an idiot. DRM is not "mind control". shut up and get a job.

Sensory overlays with V chip (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941918)

Of course they'll only be used for good things [plif.com] right?

Why not use a PDA? (4, Interesting)

KrispyKringle (672903) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941929)

According to this [eyetap.org] , the current design uses a PC104 100MHz 486 board with all sorts of hacked-up components (4 lithium batteries at like $600 alone). But plenty of PDA's are available at 400MHz or better with decent power consumption, etc.

Seems to me that that'd be a better place to start. Rewire the LCD output to go to his glasses-screen, find CF modules for things like the video cam, GPS, WiFi, and what-have-you, and you're good. The only big issue I see is the storage space, which, with an IBM microdrive, is probably limited to 5GB or so.

He suffers from "transition sickness" (5, Interesting)

farrellj (563) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941931)

When he gets sick from not viewing the world through his video camera, he is suffering a form the same thing people who spend a lot of time in Virtual Reality do...their brains adapt to the slight lag caused by the electronics, and I theorize that they do so quickly because video is a much "hotter" medium...that is, it is like a firehose for the real visual field that the eye is used to. When that lag is eliminated, by taking the display off, it takes a while to adapt back to the visually cooler natural environment...and until it adapts, your inner ear and your visual perceptions are out of sync, and that can cause nausia. ...based upon observations from being the techie at a Virtual Reality Gameing place for 6 months.

ttyl
Farrell

Re:He suffers from "transition sickness" (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941988)

You don't need electronics for that. People have tried this with inverting prism glasses. After a while, the brain adjusts to them and perceives things normally. But it's not a lot of fun if you suddenly yank them off after adjusting and try to walk around.

Cool Idea, Not cool person (3, Interesting)

Sargerion (712886) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941973)

While I admit the whole cyborg thing is cool, with constant information and survailance, I have to say this guy is just a bit paranoid. Especially if he lives in Canada. I mean, sure things aren't always fair between companies and consumers, the people and the government, but he has some fairly absurd ideas. I read the article, and there was a part stating:

Then he tells the employees that "HIS manager" makes him film public places for HIS security -- how does he know, he tells them, that the fire exits aren't chained shut? -- and that they'll have to talk to HIS manager.

His behavior in such showdowns generally provokes hostility, confusion or resigned shrugs

Well, of course it does, because that's ridiculous...

But don't try telling Mann that the complaining employees are just doing their jobs, and that his real beef is with executives who make store policy. Mann believes everyone should fight The System, those powerful institutions lurking behind the one-way mirrors.

Oh please, the execs of huge corporations are only human, too. Are you saying that corporations are some kind of sentient beings, having no trace of the true human limbs that support them? Lurking behind one-way mirrors... puu-leese. Sure, corporations are greedy, most don't give a crap about their customers, and they have their own little worlds, but there's humans behind those corporations, not idiot machine-humans like you. In the end, you're probably just as greedy and stupid as the execs are. I can see it now: "All humans who do not conform the cyborg initiative will be assimilated by force. Buy Powerade"

Not everyone can afford your life style, Mr. Mann, some people have to make an honest living, and can't go around being ridiculous the whole day. Some people aren't going to "fight The System" because they have a family to support and lives to lead. This Professor just needs to get a freakin' life, seriously. I think this is just a case of a guy with absurd ideas having the means to realize his equally bizzare notions that everyone should be walking around like a f**king cyborg in order to be more human.

A cyborg could, say, take pictures of hostile police officers during a political demonstration and instantly post them on the Web -- to spur others to join in the protest, perhaps, or to simply provide alternative documentation of the scene. Mann calls such postings "glogs" -- short for "cyborg blogs"

Shut the hell up. Wow. "Glogs"? Who the hell do you think you are? The logical progression of human evolution may indeed be through machine integration, but not right now. Just stop it, you pri*k. You know why they have cameras in stores? So if some punk comes in and robs it, they'll have evidence against them. And why don't they allow cameras in stores? Well, I'm not too sure about that one, but why the hell would you want to video tape in a store anyway? I'm sure the exits are chained up, you paranoid piece of crap. And we have police to keep order, not to beat down innocent citizens. Although that may happen in other countries, you live in CANADA!! Canada you idiot! Probably one of the most passive counties in the world! And if there was a demonstration where people got hurt, there's a good chance they deserved it for being stupid radicals with too much time on their hands, like you (but I'm not against demonstrations. There are entirly legitimate demonstrations to be had, such as one against the Iraq war).

"Clerks should be confronted with their clerk-iness," Mann says one afternoon in the Deconism Gallery, an electronic-art studio he runs near Toronto's Chinatown"

WHAT!?! What the hell are you talking about!? What is wrong with you!? Clerk-iness?! You mean their honest day's work to support themselves? Oh, oh, sorry, sorry. Wouldn't want to spoil your perfect world with laggarts who have to support themselves. Far be it from them to ask you for a bit of respect for a freakin' job, at least they're trying. You, on the other hand, were probably just teased in school because you were equally ridiculous back then, and grew up a spiteful little bastard child, and now you're going to take it out on the world by making eveyone cyborgs and getting rid of gas station clerks.

Mann's graduate student James Fung once was wearing an EyeTap while sitting around a campfire with friends and used its wireless Internet connection to find a ghost story to tell.

Tuition and Canadian tax dollars at work... glad to see it...

All this began in Mann's childhood in Hamilton, Ontario, where he was a tinkering misfit who would doodle circuitry designs in class.

Hey man, I've drawn all kinds of designs school too, and I must be the biggest computer loser in my city, but I wasn't some fool-headed misfit set out to undermine the government.

He wired the family home to eavesdrop on his parents' conversations and invented a sonar raccoon detector for the backyard. He and his brother, Richard, now a computer science professor at Canada's University of Waterloo, put up sensors that would detect when a parent was coming upstairs, so the boys could pretend to be sleeping by the time their bedroom door opened.

As a teenager, Mann worked in a television repair shop and became fascinated by the mini-TVs that served as viewfinders in consumer camcorders. He decided to link that technology with computing, and by the late 1970s, he began experimenting with wearable computers.

He wore one to a high school dance.

I have the utmost respect for my fellow hardware tinker-ers, but that's a bit much.

"Any prediction can turn out to be a combination of codswallop, kerfluffle and flapdoodle," he says while wearing the EyeTap at a Toronto pizza joint. "A lot of people try to predict the future, and I guess one question is, why should I listen to them?"

Good point. Why the hell should we listen to YOU, jack ass? Look, this is a really interesting article about computer-human integration and all, but it's like writing a music history article with the prime focus being an interview with Michael Jackson. He might have had something to do with history of music, but he isn't exactly the ideal musician. Perhaps I'm overracting, but this guy's complete lack of sense just blew my mind. Surely they could have found someone else, cause this guy doesn't deserve to be within 100 miles of a public speaking platform. I think, although I apologize if I don't, I speak for the rest of the hard working 9 to 5 people of the US and Canada when I say, "Yeah, neat idea. Now shut the hell up, Mr. Steve Mann."

First Post! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7941974)

w000t

what happens if a cyborg eats too much granola? (1)

cudaboy_71 (620256) | more than 10 years ago | (#7941992)

A cyborg could, say, take pictures of hostile police officers during a political demonstration and instantly post them on the Web -- to spur others to join in the protest, perhaps, or to simply provide alternative documentation of the scene.
oh jesus, are the borg all liberals?
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